What Not To Put In A Septic Tank Residential?

Do not put cigarette butts, paper towels, sanitary tampons, condoms, disposable diapers, anything plastic or similar non-biodegradables into a septic tank system. Avoid washing food scraps, coffee grinds, and other food items down the drain.

When should you not have a septic system pumped?

  • When the Septic System is Flooded by a Storm or Area Flooding, Don’t Pump It Out If you property has been flooded by rising water such as from a storm, hurricane, or a river overflow, pumping out a septic tank when ground waters are still flooding the area of the septic tank can lead to some unexpected problems:

What should you avoid with a septic tank?

You should not put these items into your commode:

  • Cat litter.
  • Coffee grounds.
  • Cigarette butts.
  • Dental floss.
  • Disposable diapers.
  • Earplugs.
  • Sanitary napkins or tampons.

What will ruin a septic system?

Any paper products like tissues, paper towels, tampons, or sanitary products, even some heavier toilet paper, will clog your system if you flush enough of it. Wet wipes are another product that you should never flush into a septic system.

What happens to poop in a septic tank?

The inlet pipe collects the water waste in the septic tank, long enough that the solid and liquid waste is separated from each other. Inside the tank bacteria from the wastewater breaks down the solid waste. These bacteria decompose the solid waste rapidly allowing the liquids to separate and drain away more easily.

Can I use bleach if I have a septic tank?

You might consider bleach to be a great cleaner to use for your septic system. Unfortunately, that mindset is a dangerous one to have because it’s usually recommended to avoid using bleach in your septic system. The chemicals within bleach can kill the bacteria that your septic tank relies on.

Is Dawn dish soap safe for septic systems?

One of the best know is commercials for Dawn dish soap. The ability for the cleaner to disperse oil and grease is better for cleaning, as it helps to break it up. The reason these are bad for septic systems is because if you use too much they can leach out into the environment without being properly treated.

What is the most common cause of septic system failure?

Most septic systems fail because of inappropriate design or poor maintenance. Some soil-based systems (those with a drain field) are installed at sites with inadequate or inappropriate soils, excessive slopes, or high ground water tables.

Can you pour milk down the drain if you have a septic tank?

If not the trash. A man who has a septic tank service told us to buy a gallon of whole milk and let it go bad a few days and flush it into the septic tank to feed the bacteria. He said to do this about once a month.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

Does Pee stay in the septic tank?

The urine is diverted to a small holding tank, usually located in a basement, while feces still get flushed into a septic tank. Others use small portable urinals to collect urine, Nace says. Moreover, the average person uses more than 3,000 gallons of clean water every year just to remove urine from toilets.

Can I take a shower if my septic tank is full?

Only the water would get out into the leach field in a proper system unless you run too much water too fast. The thing to do is to run your shower water outside into it’s own drain area, but it may not be allowed where you are. Used to be called gray water system.

Is Lysol toilet bowl cleaner safe for septic systems?

It’s safe for plumbing and septic tanks, and cleans and disinfects both above and below the water line. Angled Spout for Hard-to-Reach Areas – This bottle is easy to use in urinals and toilets of all sizes. Allow cleaner to sit for at least 10 minutes then brush the entire bowl or urinal and flush.

Is vinegar harmful to septic tanks?

Will baking soda hurt a septic system? Baking soda and other common household solutions such as vinegar are not harmful to your septic system. Harsh chemicals such as bleach and ammonia can disrupt the good bacteria in your septic tank and should not be used as part of a septic treatment.

How can I increase bacteria in my septic tank naturally?

Homemade Septic Tank Treatment The ingredients required for this natural solution are the following: Water, Sugar, Cornmeal, and Dry Yeast. To concoct this mixture, first start by boiling roughly a half gallon of water. Add in 2 cups of sugar. The sugar will act as the first food your bacteria will eat!

Perspective

Do you have any questions about how septic systems work? During the whole time I lived in Cincinnati, I never gave it a second thought. All of the residences I resided in were linked to a municipal sewer system. I attached a sewage connection to nearly every house I constructed throughout my construction career. Only a few of the houses I constructed required their own septic systems. One particular house, on the other hand, stands out in my memory. The land was insufficiently large to sustain a standard leach field setup.

An engine with a propeller mounted on a shaft that extended down into the septic tank was there.

This engine would spin for 10 minutes per hour, similar to how a kitchen blender would function.

Visiting a medium- or large-scale sewage treatment plant will reveal exactly what I’m talking about.

  1. A excellent method of getting rid of all of the potentially dangerous substances that may be found in wastewater is to introduce oxygen into it.
  2. Wastewater travels via a 4-inch pipe that links to a big precast concrete tank when you flush your toilet or when water drains from a tub, shower, vanity, or kitchen sink, among other things.
  3. Septic designers calculate the size of the system depending on the amount of waste that is expected to be generated in the home on a daily basis.
  4. Within the tank, some tanks have different walls and baffles than others.
  5. As they make their way inside the tank, these creatures are meant to crash into this wall.
  6. Make certain that your tank is fitted properly so that the drain line enters the tank with the drain pipe pointing exactly at this little wall.
  7. The bacteria in the tank begins to work immediately to break down the waste.

For every gallon of water that enters the septic tank, a gallon of water exits the tank in the same manner.

It flows from the tank to the leach field, or it is pushed up a slope to get there.

The pipes are often put on a thick layer of washed sand to provide a stable foundation.

Plenty of oxygen may be found in the sand, which also contains a large number of microorganisms.

It’s a straightforward method that has stood the test of time.

Several years ago, when living in Cincinnati, I used to flush everything and everything down my drainpipes.

That was a poor attitude, and local sewer plant workers wished that more people shared their concern for the environment.

grease from kitchen pots and pans had been emulsified by me, and it had most likely solidified farther down the sewage line.

The only things that should be flushed down the toilet are waste from your body and toilet tissue.

Never flush flushable wipes down the toilet or into a septic tank or public sewer system.

Visit theAsktheBuilder.com website and view my flushable wipes demonstration video!) If you plan to construct in a rural region where a septic tank will be required, consider installing a utility sink in the laundry room or garage that drains straight outside of the building.

As a result, many inspectors allow this gray water to flow onto the ground away from your property since they don’t want you to put paint, grease, or other unidentified substances into your septic tank.

The need to pump your sewage tank at least once every three years cannot be overstated.

The expense of replacing a leach field might run into the hundreds of dollars.

You can understand why doing so is quite beneficial. It costs less than $100 on average each year, on average. Subscribe to Tim’s free newsletter and tune in to his latest podcasts to stay up to date. Visit the website: AsktheBuilder.com.

How to Care for Your Septic System

Septic system maintenance is neither difficult or expensive, and it does not have to be done frequently. The maintenance of a vehicle is comprised of four major components:

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order. Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract.

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Everything that goes down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet, ground up in the trash disposal, or poured down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system, which is where it belongs. What you flush down the toilet has an impact on how effectively your septic system functions.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system.

A simple rule of thumb is to never flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Cooking grease or oil
  • Wipes that are not flushable, such as baby wipes or other wet wipes
  • Photographic solutions
  • Feminine hygiene items Condoms
  • Medical supplies such as dental floss and disposable diapers, cigarette butts and coffee grounds, cat litter and paper towels, pharmaceuticals, and household chemicals such as gasoline and oil, insecticides, antifreeze, and paint or paint thinners
See also:  How To Unblock A Toilet With Septic Tank? (Solution)

Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed! Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed. Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.

Household Products That Will Ruin Your Septic Tank!

Many people who have septic tanks are unaware of what they may and cannot flush down their toilets or down their sinks. It may come as a surprise to find just how delicate septic tanks are, and how many common household goods can cause harm to and/or block your septic tank if you don’t know what you’re doing. By keeping these things out from your drains, you can maintain your septic tank in good shape and avoid costly septic repairs down the road. Chemical Cleaners are a type of cleaning agent that uses chemicals to remove dirt and grime.

  1. You may disturb the bacteria cycle in your septic tank by pouring anti-bacterial cleansers like bleach down your drains and down your toilets.
  2. Additives Several septic tank additives make the promise that they will enhance the amount of bacteria in your septic system.
  3. The Environmental Protection Agency and the American Ground Water Trust, on the other hand, warn that chemical additions may cause more harm than good to your tank.
  4. Using Bath Oils Oil floats to the top of your septic tank, where it congeals and hardens to produce a layer of scum on the surface.
  5. It has the ability to withstand bacterial activity and embed in the solid waste layer.
  6. Grease from the kitchen Grease of any kind contributes to the buildup of scum in your septic tank.
  7. Unless otherwise instructed, you should avoid dumping oil down your sinks.

In addition, dryer papers might jam the entrance baffle.

Over time, the clay will clog your pipes and cause your septic tank to fail completely.

Products Made of Latex The majority of latex-based products are not biodegradable.

If the outlet tee is missing, the latex may clog the drain field on its way out of your septic tank, causing it to back up and choke the tank.

Paints and oils are two types of media.

In order to maintain your soil and groundwater free of diseases, you must have this bacterium on hand.

Prescription medications and chemotherapy medications Even after passing through a patient’s digestive system, powerful medications may still retain active ingredients that are harmful to them.

If possible, avoid allowing drug-contaminated faeces to enter your home’s septic tank.

Some prescription medications have the potential to be harmful to the environment.

Chemicals for Automatic Toilet Cleaning Systems Automatic toilet cleaners release an excessive amount of anti-bacterial chemicals into your septic tank, causing it to overflow.

Instead, choose toilet cleansers that are suitable for septic systems.

Even minute amounts of string, on the other hand, can clog and ruin pump impellers.

In a period of time, it will encircle a pump and cause harm to your septic tank’s mechanical components.

Your tank is only capable of holding a specific amount of domestic water; it cannot accommodate big volumes of water from a pool or roof drain.

Don’t use your sinks or toilets as garbage cans; this is against the law.

Put your trash in the garbage to prevent having to pay extra in pump-out fees.

Young children, on the other hand, may be unable to comprehend how toilets function.

Rather than degrading, the clothing are likely to block your septic tank.

Butts for Cigarettes Cigarette filters have the potential to choke the tank.

For a comprehensive list of potentially dangerous goods, consult your septic tank owner’s handbook or consult with a specialist.

If possible, avoid flushing non-biodegradable goods down the toilet or down the drain. You will save money on costly repairs and you will extend the life of your tank by taking these precautions.

Septic System Do’s and Don’ts – Septic Tank and Septic System Services, Repairs, Installations in New Jersey

Skip to the main content MenuClose Take note of these suggestions on what to do and what not to do if you have a septic system for waste management at your residence or place of business. A decent rule of thumb is: if you haven’t eaten it, wouldn’t eat it, or couldn’t eat it, don’t put anything in the septic system.

Septic System Do’s

  • Spread out your laundry usage over the course of the week rather than doing many loads on one day. However, while it may be handy to dedicate a whole day to laundry, doing so would place a significant strain on your septic system. Consider connecting your laundry trash to a separate waste disposal system to save money (dry well or seepage pit). While it is not generally essential, it will minimize the pressure on the regular system and allow a mediocre system to survive. Laundry loads should be spaced out and only complete loads should be washed. In order to complete one load of laundry, 47 gallons of water are required. It makes a significant difference to your septic tank if you just do one load every day rather than seven loads on Saturday. In addition, front-loading washers consume less water than top-loading washers
  • Liquid laundry detergent should be used. Clay is used as a ‘carrier’ in powdered laundry detergents to transport the detergent. This clay can expedite the building of sediments in the septic tank and perhaps fill the disposal area
  • Reduce the number of home cleaners (bleach, strong cleansers, and similar harmful compounds)
  • And reduce the amount of fertilizer and pesticides used. Home sewage treatment systems are not adversely affected by the presence of detergents, food waste, laundry waste, and other household chemicals in reasonable proportions. Don’t forget to keep a permanent record of where the most important sections of your septic system are situated in case you need to do future maintenance (such as septic pumping service or field repairs)
  • Schedule septic pumping service on a regular basis. Every two to three years, or if the total depth of sludge and scum surpasses one-third of the liquid level of the tank, the contents of the septic tank should be drained out. It is possible that the sediments will be transferred into the absorption field, or leach field as it is more frequently known, if the tank does not receive regular cleaning. A rapid blockage ensues, which is followed by a premature failure, and eventually the leach field must be replaced. In comparison to rebuilding your leach field, pumping your septic tank is less costly. Instead of using the inspection ports located above the inlet and exit baffles, insist on having your septic tank cleaned through the manhole in the center of the top of your septic tank. Don’t forget to keep track of your septic pumping service and septic system maintenance. When at all feasible, conserve water by using water-saving gadgets. Reduced flush toilets and shower heads are readily available on the market. Install water fixtures that consume little water. Showerheads (2.5 gallons per minute), toilets (1.6 gallons), dishwashers (5.3 gallons), and washing machines are all examples of high-volume water users (14 gallons). A family of four may save 20,000 gallons of water per year by putting fixtures such as these in their home. Inspect any pumps, siphons, or other moving elements in your system on a regular basis
  • And Trees with substantial root systems that are developing near the leach field should be removed or prevented from growing there. Planting trees around your leach field is not recommended. Branches and roots from trees in close proximity to the absorption lines may clog the system. Check your interceptor drain on a regular basis to verify that it is free of obstructions
  • And Run water routinely down drains that are rarely used, such as sinks, tubs, showers, and other similar fixtures, to prevent harmful gases from building up and producing aromas within
  • All drainage from the roof, cellar, and footings, as well as surface water, must be excluded from the drainage system. It is permissible to discharge drainage water directly to the ground surface without treatment. Check to see that it is draining away from your sewage treatment facility. There should be no drainage of roof downspouts into the leach field. When water softeners are used, the backwash contains salt, which might harm your leach field. In order to protect your well and precious plants, you should discharge this waste into a separate system or to the ground surface. Make sure that swimming pools (above-ground or in-ground) are kept away from the leach field.

Septic System Don’ts

  • Garbage disposals should be avoided. In addition to increasing the accumulation of solids in the septic tank, garbage grinders also increase solids entering the leach fields and pits, which are both detrimental to the environment. Their downsides exceed the convenience they give, and they are thus not suggested for houses that have their own sewage treatment systems in place. If septic tanks are utilized, the capacity of the tank should be raised, or the discharge should be routed via a separate tank first, known as a garbage tank. The system should discharge into the septic tank or into a separate leaching system rather than straight into the current leaching system once it has been installed. For those who have a garbage disposal, make sure to pump it more frequently– or, better yet, compost your kitchen wastes altogether. Disposals result in the accumulation of fats, particularly from meat and bones, as well as insoluble vegetable particles. Here are a few items (this is not an exhaustive list) that should never be dumped into a septic tank or leach field:
  • Cigarette butts, disposable diapers, sanitary napkins, tampons, handi-wipes, pop-off toilet wand scrubbers, garbage, condoms, hair, bandages, and so forth
  • Ragstrings, coffee grounds, paper towels, anti-bacterial soaps – biodegradable soaps only
  • No “biocompatible soaps”
  • Ragstrings, coffee grounds, paper towels Dead fish or small animals
  • Rubber, plastic, or metallic things
  • Hard toilet paper – soft toilet paper is preferable for the tank.
  • Excessive use of chlorine and chemicals should be avoided – (1 part chlorine to 5 parts water makes an effective bacteria cleaning spray)
  • Allowing water conditioning backwashes or outflow from water softeners, purifiers, sanitizers, or conditioners is not recommended. Dehumidifiers and air conditioners release moisture
  • Discharges from hot pools and jacuzzis Water from leaking devices, such as toilets that are difficult to detect. Make a habit of color testing the toilet on a regular basis to look for septic system issues. Keep dirt and inert materials to a minimum. Clothes, fruits, and vegetables that have been soiled should be dusted off before washing. Even diluted, do not dispose of chemicals from x-ray equipment since they will condense and harm the subsurface environment, which is against the law. Avoid using hair conditioners that include heavy oils – if you do, please let us know so that we may make adjustments to compensate with more or alternative bacteria (or avoid using them totally if they are not biodegradable). Keep grease from the kitchen OUT of the septic system. It is difficult to break down and might cause a blockage in your drain field. In order to dissolve these oils, there are currently no known solvents that are safe for use in groundwater. Chemical additions for septic tanks are not advised. Household systems cannot function properly if additives are used. In addition, excessive use of these chemicals may cause the waste from your toilet to be released into your septic tank, causing your system to fail prematurely. It is possible that some additives will damage your groundwater. In order for your septic system to function properly, no extra additives are required. Many of those that market their services as “solid waste removal” really deliver on their promises. During the solids removal process, the solids are transported to a disposal field. When the solids reach the disposal area, they shut up the space and cause the system to malfunction. Furthermore, although it is not harmful, it is not required to “seed” a new system with yeast or other organisms. Even routinely disposed of human waste includes enough bacteria to populate the septic tank, and other microorganisms are already in the soil and stones of the disposal region
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What NOT to Put in Your Septic Tank

When septic systems are operated in the manner intended, they perform optimally. It’s easy to fall into the trap of believing that everything you flush down the toilet or wash down the drain will just disappear. When your home is connected to a sewage system, you may be pretty certain that your water waste is at the very least transported away from your home. The contents of your toilet bowl either remain on your property or in your septic tank until you have it removed from the system.

Being kind to your septic tank pays dividends

Your septic tank is a biological system that decomposes organic waste, primarily human waste, in a controlled environment. The use of this method for disposing of other organic (and inorganic) waste products is not recommended. There are a few items that you should never put into your septic tank in order to avoid this situation. Food. Food should not be flushed down the toilet, and if at all possible, avoid using a garbage disposal. Grease and oil contribute to the formation of the scum layer on the surface of the tank, but they have no effect on the biological activity occurring there.

  1. Consider starting a compost pile for food waste that is derived from plants.
  2. Facial tissues, sanitary napkins and tampons, disposable diapers, baby wipes, paper towels, cigarette butts, kitty litter and other waste from the toilet should be disposed of in the garbage.
  3. If you didn’t create it and it isn’t toilet paper, you should avoid flushing it altogether.
  4. Drain cleaners are quite damaging to your plumbing system, as well as to your septic system as well.
  5. Drain cleansers should not be used!
  6. Cleaners for the home.
  7. Bacteria-killing products such as bleach, toilet bowl cleansers, and home cleaners are also available.
  8. The use of household cleansers, which do not discriminate between harmful and healthy bacteria, should be minimized to the greatest extent feasible.
  9. Paint, varnish, paint thinner, antifreeze, expired prescription prescriptions, antibacterial soap, pesticides, gasoline, kerosene, oil, or anything else of a similar kind should not be flushed down the bathroom sink.
  10. These chemicals will kill the microorganisms in your septic tank, and worse than that, they will damage the groundwater in the surrounding area, which includes your well.

For information about hazardous household waste disposal locations in your area, contact your local county offices. In order to arrange service or drain cleaning, please call Clear Drain Cleaning at (330) 343-7146 for any and all of your drainage and drain maintenance requirements.

Septic Tank Cleaning Fort Collins: Never Put These Items Down the Drain If You Have a Septic Tank

A septic tank is something that most people are familiar with, and they are generally aware that they should get it cleaned every three to five years at the absolute least. But did you know that even if you get your tank serviced on a regular basis, there are things you might be doing that could be causing significant damage to your system and shortening the life of your tank? At Lion Home Service, we understand a thing or two about septic systems, and we also understand that it is sometimes what you don’t flush down the drain that may help to extend the life of your system and prevent a potentially hazardous sewage backup in your home or business.

Follow the instructions below, and if you have any questions or need help, please contact Lion Home Service in Fort Collins.

How Does a Septic Tank Work?

In your house, if you perform an action that requires the flushing of a toilet or the washing of the garage floor, the water that is generated must be disposed of in some manner. Depending on whether you have a septic system or not, the water will either travel into pipes that will transport it away from your house and over to a central water treatment facility, or it will go directly to your septic tank. This container retains your wastewater and allows any particles to sink to the bottom of the container.

Caring For Your Septic Tank

After all, everything you flush down the toilet goes into a holding tank that is ultimately emptied, so you might ask why it matters so much what you flush down the toilet. There are two important considerations to bear in mind. First and foremost, whatever you flush down the toilet must be biodegradable, which means it must easily decompose in your tank. Items such as flushable wipes, cotton swabs, and even paper towels can not entirely decompose in a septic system, which might result in a major backup.

For the second time, you should never flush or wash anything down the drain that might potentially harm the beneficial bacteria in your septic system or contaminate groundwater.

Also, keep in mind that once the wastewater in your septic tank reaches a particular level, it will begin to run into your drainage system. If your wastewater contains harmful chemicals, there is a strong possibility that it will leak into the groundwater and contaminate it.

List of Items To Never Put Down the Drain

With the two most essential kinds of goods that might affect your septic system now defined, let us offer two lists of common home products that should never be flushed down the toilet or down the sink. Read them carefully and then distribute them to the rest of your family so that everyone is aware of what is and is not acceptable to flush down the toilet.

Hazardous Materials

  • Paint, gasoline, motor oil, weedkiller, solvents such as paint thinner, bleach, insecticide, herbicide, drain cleaner, and medications (particularly antibiotics) are all prohibited.

Non-Biodegradable Items

  • Toilet paper
  • Disinfectant wipes, paper towels, tissues, dental floss, cigarettes butts, coffee grinds, cat litter, condoms, feminine hygiene items, cotton swabs, and so on.

Despite the fact that this is not an exhaustive list, it should provide you with a general notion of the kind of items you should avoid flushing down the toilet. Cleansing products and even toilet paper that has been classified as safe for septic systems should be substituted instead. However, while knowing how to correctly care for your septic system may appear to be a burden, it will save you and the environment from any pollution concerns, and it will no doubt keep your septic system functioning smoothly for many years to come.

Signs Your Septic Tank Is Full

In the event that it has been several years since you last had your septic tank cleaned, or if you aren’t sure whether or not it has ever been done, it is critical that you arrange an appointment as soon as possible. There are times when tanks will fill up; nevertheless, you’ll want to get it emptied out before it becomes an issue. But what if you already have a nagging feeling that something is wrong? The following are some clear symptoms that your septic tank may be overflowing with waste:

Pooling Water

In the event that you discover significant pools of water near your septic system’s drain field, it might be a sign that your tank is overflowing and that the wastewater isn’t being allowed to naturally evaporate.

Odors Coming From Drains

In the event that you notice an irritating odor every time you take a shower or turn on a faucet, it is possible that your tank is full and sewage is beginning to back up in the pipes, resulting in the odor being produced.

Slow Drains

If the water isn’t draining as rapidly as it used to, it might be an indication that your septic tank is overflowing and needs to be cleaned.

Sewage Backup

When a tank is completely filled, sewage will begin to overflow or back up into the pipes. If the situation is severe enough, sewage can even back up into your home’s drains, which is not only distasteful, but it also poses a substantial health danger to you and your family members.

Particularly Green Grass Around Your Drainfield

Sometimes you may detect pools of water around your drain field, but other times you may only notice that the grass around it is exceptionally lush and green. This is frequently another indication that your septic system is about to overflow.

Contact Lion Home Service For Septic Tank Cleaning

Do not allow your septic system to reach the point where it is overflowing with waste. Septic tank cleaning should be performed on a regular basis by Lion Home Service in Fort Collins. We are a family-owned and run business that serves the whole Northern Colorado region, including Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Windsor, and Fort Collins, among other cities. Call today to receive your no-obligation quote. We look forward to being of service to you!

The 3 Worst Things To Put In Your Septic System

Posted at 6:01 a.m. on September 15, 2016 by Nothing is more hazardous to your septic system than throwing stuff down the toilet that don’t belong there in the first place. Certain goods are unquestionably worse than others. Putting the incorrect object down a drain or flushing it down the toilet might result in a costly and time-consuming repair job down the road. Eventually, it will back up your pipes, resulting in blockages and eroding the tank to the point where you will need a professional to come in and pump it out for you.

If the problem continues for an extended period of time, you might wind up paying thousands of dollars for a new septic tank! The following are the three worst things you can put in your septic system to avoid this from occurring to you:

  1. Grease. Your mother always warned you not to flush grease down the toilet, and she was absolutely correct! Grease will not break down in the same way that water and garbage will, and you will end up with a clogged drain that will allow nothing to pass through. Blockages in the septic system can cause the septic system to back up, which can cause major damage to your septic system. Pour your grease into a container and set it aside to harden before throwing it away. As a precaution, wipe down your pans with a paper towel to ensure that no grease goes down the drain
  2. Anything else other than trash and toilet paper should not go down the toilet drain. You’d be shocked at the variety of items that people flush down the toilet. A good rule of thumb is to remember that a toilet is not a garbage can! Always use caution while flushing anything down the toilet, including cat litter and coffee grounds, sanitary napkins and tampons, diapers and baby wipes, and cigarette butts, among other things. In the event that it does not adequately break down, you will have a major blockage and back-ups. The consequences of doing so will be far worse than you may anticipate for your septic system. Chemicals that are potentially hazardous. Heavy chemicals such as bleach, motor oil, dangerous chemicals (including those used to kill rodents and pests) and other toxic substances should never be used in your septic tank. If you flush them down the toilet, you will be eliminating all of the beneficial bacteria that aid in the breakdown of waste and the proper operation of your system. Additionally, you will be poisoning your soil, which is a health threat for everyone! Make sure to properly dispose of toxic chemicals and to use ecologically friendly cleaning solutions for your sinks and bathrooms.

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Despite the fact that there are several alternative ways to dispose of trash within the home, some people just opt to use their toilet or garbage disposal for materials that do not belong in these pieces of equipment – which may put their septic system at risk. There are certain things that a toilet is supposed to handle and rid of, such as body waste, particular paper products, and the occasional spider that gets tangled in toilet paper, but there are other items that people flush that can cause far more harm than good.

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You might believe that “if it flushes, it’s alright,” but this isn’t always the case, even when it comes to goods that are advertised as safe to flush as a form of disposal.

What is a septic system?

As previously stated, a septic system installed within a home serves as a waste disposal system, processing and eliminating wastewater generated within the residence. For those who have an anaerobic or aerobic septic system in their house, this implies that they are not reliant on the city or town’s sewage system to transport and treat their waste water. As with all other systems and components of the home, a septic tank system is composed of several moving parts and features, all of which must be properly maintained in order to perform at peak performance.

The most reliable approach to determine whether or not your septic system is completely operational is to hire the services of a septic tank inspector, who can (and will) supply you with a thorough septic tank inspection report following each visit to your property.

The more you understand about your system and how it should operate, the less likely it is that you will suffer difficulties such as braking, clogging, or backups into your house.

While there are a variety of items that might create problems when they are flushed down the toilet or placed through the trash disposal, some of the most prevalent are items that people do not think twice about flushing or putting through the garbage disposal.

Here’s a list of the top five things you should avoid introducing into your home’s septic system:

  • Coffee grounds: While coffee grounds are not flushed, they frequently make their way into a garbage disposal and, ultimately, into the septic tank. Because of their texture, bacteria have a tough time breaking them down, which can put your septic system in risk over time as they accumulate. One excellent comparison is to think of these grounds as if they were gravel, despite the fact that they are far smaller. In the long run, the number of coffee grounds that do not decompose will contribute to an increase in the amount of solids (or sludge) present in the system, which might cause it to malfunction. Strong disinfectants, such as bleach: Because a properly functioning septic system relies on beneficial bacteria to break down waste, introducing these sorts of chemicals into the system in excessive quantities can be detrimental to the system. The weekly cleanings and the introduction of these chemicals into the toilet bowl insert in tiny amounts per flush are both perfectly acceptable practices
  • Nevertheless, the use of excessive amounts is not encouraged. A decrease in the quantity of bacteria present in the holding and treatment tanks, which is a “living system,” might lead to an increase in the amount of solid waste accumulating in the system, which may necessitate more regular visits from a septic services specialist. Contrary to popular belief, condoms, disposable diapers, flushable wipes, and tampons are not as safe to flush as you may assume. Due to the fact that rubber does not degrade within the system, flushing condoms may put a septic system at risk of failure. Although the materials that are used to manufacture disposable diapers and tampons are termed biodegradable, this does not imply that they are beneficial to the general health of the system. However, while they will ultimately fail within the system, it may take a long time for them to do so, resulting in these objects remaining in the system for extended periods of time and causing further problems. Is it one of these other problems? These huge things have the potential to block pipes or become caught around the motor of a septic system, leading it to fail. A septic motor is a high-priced device that will normally cost upwards of $600 to repair or replace. Is taking this chance worth it? Grease and oil derived from the cooking process: Despite the fact that it may appear simple to simply drop these items down the drain while cleaning pots and pans, they may cause more harm than good. Although some oil and grease can unavoidably enter a septic system, an excessive amount of this will undoubtedly cause difficulties over time, especially in older homes with older septic systems. What is the explanation behind this? Over time, these materials have a tendency to harden and solidify, making it more difficult to break them down. The particles may also become attached to the sides of the pipes and walls of the septic tank, as well as to the moving mechanisms within it, causing backups, blockages, and overflow – or even a breakdown of the aerator or any other affected sections. Medications: Additionally, drugs have the potential to kill the bacteria that must be present in a septic system when they are flushed, and in some cases, they do so. This does not just apply to unused tablets
  • Liquid drugs should never be flushed down the toilet too. Many of these prescriptions contain high amounts of antibiotics, and when these pills are flushed down the toilet, the chemicals in these medications will disrupt the delicate balance that must exist in the tank. Another item to take into consideration? If there is a problem with your septic tank – such as an undiscovered leak – these chemicals will be released into the environment as well, and this is harmful.

There are methods for disposing of all of these things that are not limited to the sink or toilet, and homeowners should consider taking advantage of these possibilities. Even if it means that garbage bags will fill up fast or that an empty jar will be required to collect grease, making these decisions will save you time, concern, and most likely a significant amount of money in the long run. Septic system maintenance is neither difficult nor prohibitively costly as long as you follow the instructions of septic service specialists.

For those who have not complied with suggestions and may have introduced items such as these into their system?

Don’t be scared to ask about the many septic system treatment alternatives accessible to folks who need to reintroduce healthy bacteria into their systems while also eliminating some of the known concerns.

WHAT HAPPENS IF YOU DON’T PUMP YOUR SEPTIC TANK?

The disposal of all of these things may be accomplished outside of the sink or toilet, and homeowners should consider taking use of these choices when possible. Even if it means that garbage bags will fill up fast or that an empty jar will be required to collect grease, making these decisions will save you time, concern, and most certainly a significant amount of money in the long term. It is not difficult or expensive to maintain a completely operating septic system as long as you follow the suggestions of septic service pros; nevertheless, the instant you depart from the plan, this may change.

Various alternatives are available.

You may reach out to Aeration Septic at (330)791-3226 to talk with a professional and book an in-home consultation if you’d like additional information on how to properly maintain your home’s septic system.

What size of septic tank do I need?

There are choices for disposing of all of these things that are not limited to the sink or toilet, and homeowners should consider taking advantage of them. Even if it means that garbage bags will fill up fast or that you will need an empty jar to collect grease, making these decisions will save you time, concern, and most likely a significant amount of money in the long run. It is neither difficult or expensive to keep a septic system completely operational as long as you follow the suggestions of septic service pros; nevertheless, the instant you depart from the plan, this may change.

There are alternatives.

For more information on how to properly maintain your home’s septic system, contact Aeration Septic at (330)791-3226 to talk with a knowledgeable representative and book an in-home consultation with an expert.

septic tanks for new home construction

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size. Of course, all of this is dependent on the number of people who live in the house as well as the amount of water and waste that will be disposed of through the plumbing system.

For the most accurate assessment of your septic tank needs, you should speak with an experienced and trustworthy sewer business representative.

planning your drainfield

Here are some helpful hints for deciding where to locate your drainfield when you’re designing it.

  • Vehicles should not be allowed on or around the drainfield. Planting trees or anything else with deep roots along the bed of the drain field is not recommended. The roots jam the pipes on a regular basis. Downspouts and sump pumps should not be discharged into the septic system. Do not tamper with or change natural drainage features without first researching and evaluating the consequences of your actions on the drainage field. Do not construct extensions on top of the drain field or cover it with concrete, asphalt, or other materials. Create easy access to your septic tank cover by placing it near the entrance. Easy maintenance and inspection are made possible as a result. To aid with evaporation and erosion prevention, plant grass in the area.

a home addition may mean a new septic tank

Do not make any big additions or renovations to your house or company until you have had the size of your septic system assessed. If you want to build a house addition that is more than 10% of your total floor space, increases the number of rooms, or necessitates the installation of new plumbing, you will almost certainly need to expand your septic tank.

  • For a home addition that will result in increased use of your septic system, your local health department will require a letter from you that has been signed and authorized by a representative of your local health department confirming that your new septic system is capable of accommodating the increase in wastewater. It is not recommended that you replace your septic system without the assistance of a certified and competent contractor.

how to maintain your new septic system

Septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services are provided by Norway Septic Inc., a service-oriented company devoted to delivering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to households and business owners throughout the Michiana area. “We take great delight in finishing the task that others have left unfinished.” “They pump, we clean!” says our company’s motto. Septic systems are something we are familiar with from our 40 years of expertise, and we propose the following:

  • Make use of the services of a qualified specialist to develop a maintenance strategy. Make an appointment for an annual examination of your septic system. Utilize the services of an effluent filter to limit the amount of particles that exit the tank, so extending the life of your septic system. Waste items should be disposed of properly, and energy-efficient appliances should be used. Make sure you get your septic system professionally cleaned every 2 to 3 years, or more frequently if necessary, by an experienced and qualified expert
  • If you have any reason to believe that there is an issue with your system, contact a professional. It is far preferable to catch anything early than than pay the price later. Maintain a record of all septic system repairs, inspections, and other activities

common septic questions

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions by our septic customers.

How do I determine the size of my septic tank?

If you have a rectangular tank, multiply the inner height by the length to get the overall height of the tank. In order to find out how many gallons your septic tank contains, divide the number by.1337.1337

How many bedrooms does a 500-gallon septic tank support?

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size.

How deep in the ground is a septic tank?

Your septic system is normally buried between four inches and four feet underground, depending on the climate.

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