What Kind Of Pump Is Best To Pump A Septic Tank? (Solution)

Septic Tank Grinder Pump Use a Grinder pump. These septic tank pumps are used to grind and move black water or sewage from place to place, grinding the solids to enable everything to fit through standard piping (usually 2” diameter). Typically, the grinder pump is installed right in a septic tank.

  • Effluent pumps are the best fit for handling the transfer of grey sewage liquid from the septic tank to the drain field. Their name alone speaks volumes of the function they perform. Effluent pumps are only able to handle solids measuring about 3/4” and nothing more.

What kind of pump can I use to pump out my septic tank?

Effluent pumps are typically used to pump grey-water from a septic tank to a leach field. For raw sewage, a sewage pump or grinder pump is recommended to prevent clogging from handling solids larger than 3/4″ in width.

Can I use a grinder pump to a septic tank?

Septic grinder pumps should not be paired with septic tank systems because the slurry is so finely ground that it won’t separate from the liquid once inside the septic tank. This means that it won’t get sent on to the secondary system, which can destroy your underground leach field.

How do I know what size septic pump I need?

Calculating head Here, you simply measure the vertical distance (in feet) from the top of the pump in the pump chamber to the discharge point — the elevation of the discharge laterals. The second component is the friction loss in the supply pipe and laterals.

Can I use a sump pump in my septic tank?

A: No. If you have a septic system, under no circumstances should the sump be pumped into the basement floor drain. Adding to the flow with a sump pump can damage the septic system. Even if you are connected to a public sanitary system, the sump should not be pumped into a floor drain.

Do all septic tanks have pumps?

Septic Systems Rely on Gravity, Most of the Time For that to work, a pump is needed, or sometimes two pumps. If the tank is higher than the house, a grinder pump that liquefies solids will be placed in a pit in the home’s basement or crawlspace.

How do I remove sludge from my septic tank?

How to Reduce Sludge in a Septic Tank Without Pumping

  1. Install an aeration system with diffused air in your septic tank.
  2. Break up any compacted sludge.
  3. Add a bio-activator or microbe blend.
  4. Maintain the aeration system.
  5. Add additional Microbes as required.

How do you tell if your septic tank is full?

How to tell your septic tank is full and needs emptying

  1. Pooling water.
  2. Slow drains.
  3. Odours.
  4. An overly healthy lawn.
  5. Sewer backup.
  6. Gurgling Pipes.
  7. Trouble Flushing.

How do I keep my septic system healthy?

Do’s and Don’ts when maintaining your septic system

  1. Regularly inspect and maintain your septic system.
  2. Pump your septic tank as needed.
  3. Keep your septic tank lids closed and secured.
  4. Be water-wise.
  5. Direct water from land and roof drains away from the drainfield.
  6. Landscape with love.
  7. Keep septic tank lids easily accessible.

What is difference between sewage pump and grinder pump?

Grinder pumps are a subtype of sewage pumps. Generally speaking, sewage pumps that are not grinder pumps can move sewage solids up to two inches in diameter that are easy to break down or dissolve. However, a general sewage pump that is not a grinder pump is usually less expensive and draws less power.

What is an effluent pump used for?

Effluent pumps are used to pump grey-sewage liquid from a septic tank to a leach field. Unlike sewage pumps which handle larger solids, these pumps typically handle solids only up to 3/4″.

What is the difference between a sump pump and a sewage pump?

Sump pumps and sewage pumps are often thought of as the same thing. They are not. Sump pumps handle excess water; sewage pumps handle sewage. They do look alike, and both are used in home basements.

How high will a sewage pump pump?

Sewage Grinder pumps normally have a 1-1/4” discharge and range from 2 HP and up. They will pump low volumes of sewage (30 Gallons Per Minute or less), but can push it over longer distances (thousands of feet) and can handle head pressures of up to 130 feet.

How do you size an effluent pump?

For commercial or industrial systems, the average solids size is 2 ½” or larger. Flow and total dynamic head (TDH) are integral in selecting a pump. Your water flow requirements, measured in GPM, are based on the number of people using the system, peak usage times and the number of water fixtures (e.g. toilet, sink).

The Best Sewage Pumps of 2022

If you purchase a product after clicking on one of our affiliate links, BobVila.com and its partners may get a commission. Image courtesy of depositphotos.com Septic systems are used to handle waste in homes that are not connected to municipal sewage systems. It is necessary to utilize an efficient wastewater pump in order to transport wastewater from a residence to the wastewater treatment system. To the contrary of effluent pumps and sump pumps, which only move water, sewage pumps are capable of transporting wastewater with particles up to 2 inches in diameter.

They are made of a sturdy cast-iron construction that can withstand the corrosive environment of a wastewater treatment basin.

This article will go into great detail on what characteristics are critical to consider when searching for a sewage pump, as well as examining some of the best models currently available on the market.

  1. The Zoeller 267-0001 M267 Waste-Mate Sewage Pump is the best overall choice. Liberty Pumps LE51A LE50-Series Sewage Pump is the runner-up in this race. THE BEST VALUE FOR MONEY CAN BE FOUND: Superior Pump 93501 Cast Iron Sewage Pump with 1/2 horsepower

Image courtesy of Amazon.com

What to Consider When Choosing the Best Sewage Pump

Image courtesy of Amazon.com.

Material

Sewage pumps spend the most of their life immersed in wastewater, therefore they must be extremely sturdy in order to last. In order to accommodate this, the majority of sewage pumps are constructed of cast iron or thermoplastic. However, while cast-iron pumps cost more than thermoplastic pumps, they are stronger and more robust and will therefore last longer than thermoplastic pumps, which are less expensive but will fail much sooner than an iron pump. Because of the solid waste that travels through it, the impeller, which is the portion of the pump that pushes the water, must be strong and long-lasting.

Other features of certain sewage pumps include the ability to quickly replace out individual components that are likely to wear out before the engine does.

Size and Weight

When purchasing a sewage pump, it is critical to evaluate the pump’s overall size in order to decide if it will fit correctly into a wastewater basin or septic pit. The majority of sewage pumps are around 16 inches tall and 11 inches broad. The weight of these models varies depending on how they are constructed. Premium pumps, which are constructed of heavy-duty cast iron housings, may weigh up to 45 pounds, whilst those that are constructed of cast iron and plastic can weigh as little as 20 pounds.

It is also critical to take into account the size of the pump’s input and output ports. To handle solid waste up to 2 inches in diameter, residential sewage pumps must have an input and output of at least 2 inches in both directions. Anything smaller than this will quickly become clogged.

Horsepower

In order to establish whether or not a sewage pump will fit correctly into a wastewater basin or septic pit, it’s vital to examine the size of the pump when buying. Septic pumps are typically sixteen inches tall and eleven inches broad. According on their construction, the weight of various types might vary. Premium pumps, which are constructed of cast-iron housings for durability, may weigh up to 45 pounds, whereas those made of cast-iron and plastic can weigh as little as 20 pounds. The size of the pump’s input and output must also be taken into account.

Anything smaller than this will quickly jam the system.

GPH

The amount of wastewater that a sewage pump can transport in an hour is measured in gallons per hour (GPH). Some firms also use gallons per minute as a unit of measurement (GPM). The GPH or GPM of a sewage pump is determined by the horsepower of the pump as well as the elevation between the pump and the main sewage line or septic system to which the pump is pushing waste. Most sewage pumps may display their GPH in conjunction with an elevation, which is generally referred to as “head” measurement.

This indicates that if the height difference between the pump and the sewage line is 5 feet, the pump will be able to transport 4,000 gallons of water per minute.

The horsepower of a pump’s motor, as well as the design of the pump, affect how much GPH it can generate.

Features

The majority of sewage pumps are equipped with safety measures, and the majority of them are equipped with thermal overload protection. This function automatically shuts off the sewage pump when a particular temperature is reached in order to prevent the motor from overheating and being damaged. This function is required in order to prevent the pump from overheating if it becomes blocked. Getting rid of a blockage is significantly less difficult and expensive than replacing a pump that has a burned-out motor.

Our Top Picks

The models listed below include strong motors, long-lasting cast-iron construction, and high flow rates, which distinguish them as some of the best models available on the marketplace. Any of the pumps listed below would be suitable for use as a sewage-pump solution in a residence. Image courtesy of Amazon.com This model, from one of the industry’s most venerable brands, may be an investment, but its long-lasting construction and high-performance engine make it well worth it. The cast-iron structure of this pump instills trust in the user by providing a heavy-duty feel right out of the package.

At a height of 5 feet, a 12-horsepower engine can pump waste at a rate of 128 gallons per minute, and it can pump trash up to a maximum height of 21.5 feet if the situation calls for it.

According to the level of the water in the tank, the float switch automatically turns the pump on and off.

This type also incorporates an automated shutdown feature in the event that the pump becomes inoperative, so preventing harm. Approximately 11 inches long, 13.6 inches wide, and 16 inches high, the Zoeller 267-0001 measures in at 16 inches. Pros

  • Completely submersible due to its cast-iron structure. It has a maximum flow rate of 128 gallons per minute. Pump with non-clogging impeller designed for solid items Features such as automatic shut-off and a float switch

Image courtesy of Amazon.com This model from Liberty is one of the more powerful versions on the market, with to its solid cast-iron structure and strong motor, which pumps 160 gallons per minute to a height of 5 feet. Its 12-horsepower motor pumps to a height of 5 feet. Using a float switch, the pump is activated when the water level is between 12 and 16 inches above the bottom of the basin and turned off when the level drops below 6 inches from the bottom of the basin. The pump’s impeller and discharge can handle solids up to 2 inches in diameter, and its impeller and discharge are capable of handling larger solids.

Rust and corrosion are prevented from forming on the pump housing due to the powder coat finish applied to it.

Pros

  • Housing is made of heavy cast iron with a powder coat finish. 160 gallons per minute pumping capacity Solids up to 2 inches in diameter can be passed via a semi-open impeller. A maximum height of 25 feet is allowed.

Image courtesy of Amazon.com This sewage pump is a good choice because of its long-lasting structure and high production. This 12-horsepower pump can move a decent 4,800 gallons per hour at even height, and it has a maximum vertical height of 25 feet, which is outstanding for its size. And, while it may not have the same flow rate as higher-end pumps, the quality of build on this model makes it stand out from the crowd. A black coating protects the housing from rust and corrosion, and the housing is constructed of cast iron for long-lasting durability and reliability.

This pump, which can handle solids up to 2 inches in diameter, measures 9.75 inches in length, 16.75 inches in height, and 9 inches in width, which is about typical in size.

  • Cast-iron structure that is resistant to rust and corrosion
  • Impeller made of cast aluminum
  • It grinds bigger items. a tank that moves 4,800 gallons per hour A maximum height of 25 feet is allowed.

Our Verdict

TheZoellermodel is our top option for the finest sewage pump because of its cast-iron structure, submersible capabilities, and capacity to transport more than 128 gallons per minute, among other characteristics. Pumping water to a height of 21.5 feet and accepting tiny particles with its non-clogging impeller, this pump is simple to use and hassle-free to maintain. The Superior Pump, on the other hand, has the same cast-iron structure as the Superior Pump option, but it is significantly less expensive.

However, keep in mind that the 4,800 gallon per hour output means that less water is carried than with a typical pump.

How We Chose the Best Sewage Pumps

TheZoellermodel is our top option for the finest sewage pump because of its cast-iron structure, submersible capabilities, and capacity to transport more than 128 gallons per minute, among other factors. Pumping water to a height of 21.5 feet and accepting tiny particles with its non-clogging impeller, this pump is simple to use and requires no maintenance. The Superior Pump, on the other hand, is made of the same cast-iron material as the other options, but it is significantly less expensive than the other two options.

Having a cast aluminum impeller has the benefit of being able to grind items and transport them up to a maximum height of 25 feet. Note that the 4,800 gallon per hour output means that less water will be carried than with a typical pump.

FAQs

Learn how sewage pumps vary from effluent pumps, as well as how to determine what size sewage pump you require by continuing reading this article.

Q. What is the difference between an effluent pump and a sewage pump?

If the gray water has minimum particulates less than 12 inches in diameter, an effluent pump or sump pump can pump it out; on the other hand, a sewage pump can pump out black water that contains human waste up to 2 inches in diameter.

Q. What size sewage pump do I need?

If the gray water has minimum particulates less than 12 inches in diameter, an effluent pump or sump pump can pump it out; on the other hand, a sewage pump can pump out black water containing human waste up to 2 inches in diameter.

Q. How long do sewage pumps last?

An effluent pump or sump pump can pump gray water with little particulates less than 12 inches in diameter, but a sewage pump may pump away black water that contains human waste up to 2 inches in diameter.

How To Choose The Correct Submersible Pump

It is possible for a submersible pump’s size, form, and capabilities to differ significantly depending on the application. In this post, I will examine the distinctions between the many various models of submersible pumps that we provide, in order to assist you in determining which pump is most suited to your needs. Despite the fact that we have a broad assortment, our submersible pumps may be divided into four general categories: high head effluent, sump/ effluent, sewage ejector, and sewage grinder.

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Effluent submersible pumps, often known as sump pumps, are meant to move relatively clean water, typically from behind an aerobic system or a septic tank.

I will go into great depth about each of these categories farther down on this page.

3 THINGS YOU MUST KNOW IN ORDER TO CHOOSE THE CORRECT PUMP

Small differences in size and shape can result in significant differences in performance and capabilities between submersible pumps and their counterparts. The distinctions between our many various models of submersible pumps will be discussed in this article to assist you in determining which pump is best suited to your application. However, even though we have a big range, our submersible pumps may be divided into four categories: High Head Effluent, Sump/Effluent, Sewage Ejector, and Sewage Grinder (to name a few).

Submersible pumps for sump and effluent are meant to pump reasonably clean water, often from behind an aerobic system or septic tank.

Following that, I’ll go into much greater depth on each of these categories.

HEAD PRESSURE EXPLAINED

In its most basic form, head pressure refers to the amount of force that the pump must resist in order to successfully push the water to its goal. This value is calculated by multiplying the vertical lift (static head) by the length of the pipe run and the flow rate of the pump and dividing the result by three. Together, these two values represent what we term Total Dynamic Head (TDH) (TDH). Using just the vertical lift and the run distance, our professionals will be able to determine the TDH required for your application if you do not already know it.

In most cases, if the numbers are near, it is highly advised that you go with the next bigger unit size up instead.

HIGH HEAD EFFLUENT SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS

Effluent submersible pumps, also known as turbine pumps or deep water well pumps, are high-pressure submersible pumps that use high-head effluent to move water. Septic system irrigation systems, like as spray irrigation and drip irrigation, are among the most common applications for these pumps. Due to the fact that these pumps are only meant to handle pure water or treated wastewater, they are typically only seen in conjunction with an Aerobic Treatment System. Most of the High Head Effluent Pumps that are utilized in the Aerobic Septic System industry are of a similar design and construction.

Pumps in this category are available from Septic Solutions in two distinct configurations.

FRANKLIN ELECTRIC LITTLE GIANT

The Franklin Electric Little Giant High Head Effluent pump is a mid-suction machine that is designed to handle high head sewage. This indicates that the water will be drawn into the unit by the pump from the middle of the unit. As a rule of thumb, this is the optimal design for an aerobic system since it enables any solid material that makes its way into the pump tank to settle to the bottom of the tank and avoids debris from clogging up the intake screen of the pump, which might cause the pump to fail prematurely.

The 20 GPM variant, however, is the one that is most frequently utilized.

STA-RITE DOMINATOR

It is a bottom suction device that is used with the Sta-Rite Dominator High Head Effluent pump. This implies that the water will be drawn into the pump from the bottom of the unit. In the construction of an aerobic system, some systems employ bottom suction units that are elevated from the tank’s bottom by means of a PVC pipe spacer, despite the fact that this is a more dangerous configuration. It is likely that the Sta-Rite Dominator will be your best option if this is the type of set up you are looking to replace.

SUMP/EFFLUENT SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS

Our sump and effluent pumps are intended to manage wastewater containing just a small amount of particles or pure water, respectively. Almost all of our effluent pumps are equipped with a 1-1/2″ NPT discharge, with some of the larger units having a 2″ discharge as well. These pumps are capable of handling materials as tiny as 3/4 inch in size. A septic tank or an aerobic system is often used to pump waste water to a drain field, secondary treatment system, or surface discharging point using one of these devices.

All of the manufacturers whose products we sell deliver extremely high-quality, low-maintenance devices.

The higher the horse power rating of a unit, the greater the head pressure and volume of water it is capable of dealing with.

SEWAGE EJECTOR PUMPS

We have built our sump and effluent pumps to handle wastewater that has just a small amount of particulates or that contains only pure water. Almost all of our effluent pumps are equipped with a 1-1/2″ NPT discharge, and some of the larger units are even equipped with a 2″ discharge. Larger particles up to 3/4″ in size may be handled by these pumps. A septic tank or an aerobic system is often used to pump waste water to a drain field, secondary treatment system, or surface discharging point; however, other applications exist.

Almost all of the manufacturers whose products we sell produce devices of exceptional quality that require little maintenance.

The higher the horse power rating of a unit, the greater the head pressure and volume of water it is capable of coping with.

SEWAGE GRINDER PUMPS

Sewage Grinder pumps, like Sewage Ejector pumps, are likewise built to handle raw sewage pumping duties, but they do it in a more gentle manner. Pumps for sewage grinders, on the other hand, are significantly more powerful. These pumps are capable of grinding sewage into a slurry and pumping it under extremely high pressure to its intended destination, among other things. There are a handful of applications in which these pumps are typically employed. The first method is to pump sewage from a house into a common sewer main system.

  1. All of our Grinder Pumps are 2 horsepower devices with discharges that are 1-1/4 inch NPT.
  2. Each model is available in two configurations: one with internal capacitors and another without internal capacitors (see below).
  3. These do not require the use of a control panel to function.
  4. Important Reminder: 2.0 horsepower grinder pumps must only be utilized in situations where they will be subjected to a minimum of 30 feet of head pressure before they can be considered safe.
  5. When pumping into a common sewage main or when you have less than 30 feet of head, you should use a Sewage Ejector pump rather than a Sewage Grinder pump, as explained above.
  6. In order to obtain the various versions of the pumps that are featured on the Internet, we must first obtain approval from the manufacturer.

If you are unable to locate a pump on our website that is suitable for your use, please contact us so that we can assess whether or not we have anything that will work for you.

What Sewage Pump is Best For Your Septic Tank? – Septic Maxx

In the same way as Sewage Ejector pumps are built for raw sewage pumping duties, Sewage Grinder pumps are likewise designed to handle raw sewage pumping jobs. But sewage grinders are far more powerful than standard pumps. (See figure.) Pumps like this may grind up waste and push it at extremely high pressure to its destination, a process known as slurry grinding. In most cases, these pumps are employed in a handful of different applications. To begin, a resident must pump waste from his or her home into a common sewage main.

  1. Unless otherwise specified, all of our grinder pumps are 2 horsepower models with 1-1/4 inch NPT discharges unless otherwise specified.
  2. Depending on the model, it is available in two variations: one with inbuilt capacitors and one without.
  3. Operation is not facilitated by the use of a control panel.
  4. Important Reminder: 2.0 horsepower grinder pumps must only be utilized in situations where they will be subjected to a minimum of 30 feet of head pressure before they will be considered safe.
  5. When pumping into a common sewage main or when you have less than 30 feet of head, you should use a Sewage Ejector pump rather than a Sewage Grinder pump, for example.
  6. In order to obtain the various versions of the pumps that are mentioned on the website, we must first obtain approval from the appropriate authority.

Grinder Pumps

Waste from water-using appliances in the house, such as showers, toilets, and sinks, is channeled via your home plumbing system and into the grinder pump tank for disposal. There is a limit to the amount of wastewater that may be stored in the tank. The presence of a grinder pump in your system indicates that the tank has reached its maximum capacity. When the trash reaches this level, the pump kicks in and grinds the waste into smaller bits before transferring it to your septic tank for disposal.

Keep in mind, however, that a grinder pump, like a garbage disposal, is designed to handle just human waste and toilet paper, not anything else.

Submersible Pumps

Submersible pumps are particularly useful for homes with basements, that are on a split level, or that are located in a low-lying portion of the country. These pumps are automated and drain water fast, preventing floods from occurring. It is important to have a high-quality submersible pump if you have a high-pressure sewer system in your home. A pump of this type consumes less energy and operates more silently than other pump alternatives.

Submersible pumps are typically installed in a sump pit, which is a shallow hole where water collects. A sump pit is a hole in the earth that is used to collect rainwater and other liquids. It is the location in your septic system where pumps can be put.

Effluent Pumps

Effluent pumps are well-known for their dependability and long-term durability. Effluent pumps are similar to the other alternatives in that they are capable of pumping sewage waste solids as well as liquid waste. Effluent pumps, on the other hand, are not capable of handling the same amount of water as other sewage pumps. Typically, these pumps are designed to handle solids with a diameter of 3 inches or smaller. “Greywater” is the term used to describe the wastewater that is drained by an effluent pump since it is neither clean water nor sewage water.

If you want to keep your sewage pumps in good working order, you should choose Septic Maxx Premium Products, which provide necessary maintenance for a healthy septic system.

To talk with one of our septic system specialists, please contact us online or call us at 800-397-2384.

What is a Septic Tank Pump

Pump for septic tanks In the context of septic tanks, this term refers to a submersible water pump that is positioned either in the last chamber of the tank or in a separate pump sump after the tank. A septic tank pump is a tiny electrical water pump that may be submerged in wastewater and is used to pump out sewage. The pump will be activated and deactivated by a float switch when the chamber fills with water. When the pump is turned on, a little impeller in the pump rotates, which causes the water to be forced upward via the pipes to which the pump is attached.

Why Do You Need a Septic Tank Pump

When it comes to pumping effluent from a septic tank or sewage treatment plant to a higher level, a septic tank pump comes in handy. This may be important if you have either a raised percolation area or a soakaway in your yard. It may also be required in situations when the ultimate sewage disposal destination is positioned upslope from the septic tank outlet, making it impossible for wastewater to flow to the final effluent disposal point by gravity.

Installing a Septic Tank Pump in a Septic Tank

Pumps for septic tanks can either be put directly into an existing septic tank or at a pump station that is connected to the septic tank. The pump should not be installed directly in your septic tank, unless your tank is a single chamber septic tank. In the case of single chamber septic tanks, installing a septic tank pump will result in the pumping out of particles that have accumulated. Solids can accumulate in a soakaway or percolation area, causing it to get clogged. If you have a two- or three-chamber septic tank, you may put a submersible septic tank pump in the final chamber of the tank to help with drainage.

It is possible that the pump will become clogged with tiny particulates if this step is not taken.

Installing a Septic Tank Pump in a Separate Pump Sump

Pumping septic tank effluent is best accomplished by the installation of a septic tank pump in a separate chamber or the purchase of a pre-assembled pump station.

A packaged pump station will typically include a pump that has been preinstalled into a chamber that has been outfitted with the requisite gate valves and non-return valves.

Septic Tank Filters

It is preferable to place septic tank filters, also known as bristle filters or effluent filters, in front of a pump station if at all possible. These filters are a very easy and effective solution to protect your pump from being damaged by foreign objects. The effluent filter captures and retains any tiny particulates that are present in the wastewater as it runs into the pump chamber. If possible, this filter should be fitted in a 110mm/4″ T piece under a manhole so that it may be readily removed and washed once or twice each year.

Septic Tank Pump Alarms and Controls

A septic tank pump alarm should always be installed in conjunction with the installation of a septic tank pump. These are typically comprised of a float switch that is hooked into a miniature alarm panel. If the pump fails, the water level in the pump chamber rises since no water is being pushed away from the pump chamber. The rising water level activates the float switch, which in turn triggers an alert and the flashing of a beacon to warn of the impending danger. In addition, alarms with a GSM dial-out feature are offered.

Septic Tank Pump Costs

Septic tank pumps for residential use are not very pricey items. Normally, they cost £150/€175 per person. The cost of installing the pump may be the same as if you hired a professional septic tank repair firm to do the work for you. Pumps with greater capacity may be necessary when pumping a big commercial septic system, when pumping over a long distance, or when pumping from an elevated position.

Sizes And Types Of Septic Pumps

It is possible for a submersible pump’s size, form, and capabilities to differ significantly depending on the application. To assist you in determining which type of submersible pump is best for your septic system, we will explore the distinctions between the many various models of submersible pumps. It is possible to classify submersible pumps into four main categories:

High Head Effluent

High head effluent pumps are typically used in conjunction with an aerobic system to discharge to either a spray system or a drip system.

Sump/Effluent

Submersible sump/effluent pumps are meant to pump reasonably clean water, often from behind an aerobic system or a septic tank, into a holding tank.

Sewage Ejector and Sewage Grinder

Neither of these pumps is capable of pumping raw sewage. We will go into great depth about each of these categories farther down on this page.

Questions You Need To Ask To Choose The Correct Pump

You should ask yourself the following questions before making a choice on which type of pump would perform best for your particular situation: -Can you tell me about the application? -What is the major function of the pump? -What type of material will the pump be tasked with transporting is unknown. What am I pumping? Is it clean water or sewage? -What type of head pressure will the pump have to contend with when it is operating? -95 percent of all homes using a spray or drip irrigation system should not require a high head pump with a flow rate greater than 20 GPM.

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The majority of dwellings require a pump with a flow rate of 10-20 GPM (gallons permutes).

Pumps with a flow rate of 20 GPM are more commonly seen in residential settings since they are more cost-effective than their 10 GPM counterparts. While 10 GPM pumps offer greater head pressure than 5 GPM pumps, this feature is both superfluous and more expensive in the long run.

Head Pressure Explained

Head Pressure is just the amount of force that the pump needs exert to elevate the pipe vertically (static head), multiplied by the size of the pipe.

High Head Effluent Submersible Pumps

These high-pressure submersible pumps, also known as turbine pumps or deep-water well pumps, are used to pump effluent from sewage treatment plants. Septic system irrigation systems, like as spray irrigation and drip irrigation, are among the most common applications for these pumps. Due to the fact that these pumps are only meant to handle pure water or treated wastewater, they are typically only seen in conjunction with an Aerobic Treatment System. The high head effluent pumps that are utilized across the Aerobic Septic System business are all of a similar design and construction.

In this area, there are two types of pumps to choose from: bottom suction pumps and mid suction pumps.

This will prevent you from installing a brand-new pump in a tank that hasn’t been cleaned in five years.

Mid Suction Pumps

These pumps, such as the Franklin Electric/E-series and the Sta-Rite step 20 high head effluent pump, are mid-suction designs. This implies that the water will be drawn into the unit by the pump in the middle of the unit. In general, this is the optimum design for an aerobic system since it allows any solid material that makes its way to the pump tank to settle to the bottom of the tank, which is beneficial for the system’s efficiency. Consequently, there is less chance of material clogging up the pump’s intake screen, which would eventually cause the pump to fail prematurely.

Sta-Rite STEP 20

Mid-suction pumps include the Franklin Electric/E-series and the Sta-Rite step 20 high head effluent pump. This implies that the water will be drawn into the unit by the pump at its core. In general, this is the optimum design for an aerobic system since it allows any solid material that makes its way to the pump tank to settle to the bottom of the tank, which is beneficial for the system’s performance. Consequently, the pump’s intake screen is not clogged with debris, which would eventually cause the pump to fail prematurely.

Franklin Electric/Schaefer E-Series/FPS

Franklin Electric pumps will necessitate the use of a higher-rated float switch than the Sta-Rite step 20 because they use more current. It is advised that you use a Sie-Pump master float with Franklin mid-suction pumps. Franklin pumps of all varieties (including the Little Giant, Schaefer, and FPS versions) are the same pump. The only thing that distinguishes them is the name on the sticker. The engine and the pump are the same thing on the other end. Known for its motors, Franklin Electric used to manufacture all of the pump motors for Sta-Rite and a variety of other manufacturers before going out of business.

  1. Some Franklin pumps have been in operation for more than 15 years, according to the manufacturer.
  2. For any other pump, you may use a conventional mercury float with a rating of 13 amps, which will provide you with years and years of trouble-free operation.
  3. When the pump is running, the float will fail and become caught in the “on” position, causing the pump to run continuously.
  4. It will, however, switch back on after it has returned to normal operating temperature.

The pump is capable of doing this for around 21 days before entirely failing. You’ll notice that this is happening if your sprinkler heads are not fully extending and are only barely squirting water out of the ground.

Sta-Rite Dominator

The STa-Rite Dominator High Head Effluent pump is a bottom-suction machine that pumps high-head effluent. This implies that the water at the bottom of the unit will be drawn in by the pump. They are mostly used in cisterns and in situations where the water pressure to the home has to be increased. They have gained popularity since they are less expensive than mid suction pumps, which they replace. Aerobic septic systems that employ bottom suction units should be lifted off of the tank’s bottom using PVC pipe to prevent the accumulation of sludge.

It is likely that the Sta-Rite Dominator will be your best option if this is the type of set up you are looking to replace.

Sump/Effluent Submersible Pumps

Sump and effluent pumps are intended to handle wastewater that contains just a small amount of particles or is clear in color. The majority of our effluent pumps have a 1 1/2 NPT discharge, and some of the larger units even have a 2″ discharge on the larger units. These pumps are capable of handling materials as tiny as 3/4 inch in size. These devices are often used to pump wastewater from a septic tank or an aerobic system to a drain field, secondary treatment system, or surface distribution point, among other applications.

Each of these brands manufactures extremely high-quality machines that require little maintenance.

The higher the horsepower rating of a unit, the greater the head pressure and volume of water it is capable of dealing with.

It may be more cost-effective to invest in a higher-quality pump that will last four times as long as a lower-quality pump.

Sewage Ejector Pumps

In order to treat wastewater with little particulates or pure water, sump and effluent pumps are utilized. The majority of our effluent pumps have a 1 1/2 NPT discharge, with some of the larger units having a 2″ discharge as well. It is possible to use these pumps to handle smaller particles up to a 3/4-inch diameter. In most cases, these machines are utilized to pump waste water from a septic tank or aerobic system onto a drain field, secondary treatment system, or surface distribution point.

These brands are known for producing high-quality systems that require little maintenance.

The higher the horsepower rating of a unit, the greater the head pressure and volume of water it is capable of coping with.

If you go to a store like Home Depot or Lower, you can get less priced pumps, but they’re generally constructed of lower-quality materials, like as plastic. A higher-quality pump that will last four times as long as a lower-quality pump might be more cost-effective.

Sewage Grinder Pumps

Sewage grinder pumps, like Sewage Ejector pumps, are likewise built to handle raw sewage pumping duties, and are similar in design. Sewage grinder pumps, on the other hand, are significantly more powerful. These pumps are capable of grinding sewage into a slurry and pumping it under extremely high pressure to its intended destination, among other things. These pumps are commonly used in a handful of different applications. The first method is to pump sewage from a house into a common sewer main system.

  • All of our grinder pumps are 2 horsepower machines with discharges that are 1-1/4″ NPT.
  • It is possible to purchase each model in two variations: one with internal capacitors and one without internal capacitors.
  • These do not require the use of a control panel to function.
  • The majority of manufacturers provide two different models: one with a large volume lower head and another with a low volume high head.
  • Once again, the model you pick is largely determined by your responses to the questions given above.
  • If they are not needed to pump against a minimum of this much back pressure, the motor will begin to rotate at an exceedingly rapid rate, causing it to burn out quite quickly.
  • With this information in hand, you are now prepared to proceed with the challenge of acquiring a new submersible pump for your application.

Differences Between Sewage Pumps and Grinder Pumps

Despite the fact that they seem identical, sewage and grinder pumps work in a completely distinct way to dispose of raw sewage. You may learn more about the differences between them by reading on. Do not hesitate to contact your local qualified plumber if you feel that your sewage ejector pump or septic grinder pump may be malfunctioning or have been damaged.

Sewage Ejector Pumps

Sewage and grinder pumps are not the same thing, despite the fact that they both dispose of raw sewage.

Find out more about how they vary in the sections below. Do not hesitate to contact your local qualified plumber if you feel that your sewage ejector pump or septic grinder pump is malfunctioning.

Septic Grinder Pumps

System with a high pressure and minimal volume, such as septic grinder pumps. They are therefore more suitable for transporting small quantities of raw sewage over greater distances than sewage injector pumps. If you require sewage to be transported to your pressured sewer main, a septic grinder pump will assist you in accomplishing this goal. The septic grinder pump is equipped with blades that are used to grind raw sewage into a slurry before it is released into the environment. It is then transferred to a pressurized sewer main where it is disposed of.

This implies that it will not be sent to the secondary system, which might result in the destruction of your subsurface leach field if it does.

Which Pump Should I Use?

When determining which sewage pump is appropriate for your home’s sewage pumping needs, it’s crucial to consider the amount of sewage you need to pump, the destination of the sewage, and the distance the sewage has to travel to reach its destination. In the event that you must pump sewage to a pressured sewer main, we propose that you install a grinder pump. Pumping to an aseptic tank or a gravity flow sewer main is far more efficient than pumping directly to the sewer main using a standard pump.

The trade-off is that grinder pumps are only capable of pumping small amounts of waste water.

The finest advice you can get when choosing a new sewage pump system for your house comes from a professional sewage pump plumber.

Our certified Rockford plumbers are available at (616) 901-1149 if you have any questions or concerns about our sewage or grinder pump services.

Septic Tank Pump: When You Need One & When to Call a Pro

Considering the volume of sewage you need to pump, the destination where the sewage will be sent, and the distance it must travel to get there are all essential considerations when determining which pump is right for your home’s sewage pumping needs. If you have to pump sewage to a pressured sewer main, we propose that you install a grinder pump. Pumping to an aseptic tank or a gravity flow sewer main is far more efficient than pumping directly to the drain field. Septic grinder pumps are also capable of pumping ground sewage across distances of thousands of feet, which is far longer than the range of sewage ejector pumps.

Sewage ejector pumps, on the other hand, are capable of transporting large quantities of raw sewage (up to 200 gallons per minute) across short distances (less than 750 feet) with minimal effort.

What type of pump is most appropriate for your family needs will be determined by a certified plumber.

Our certified Rockford plumbers are available at (616) 901-1149 if you have any questions or need assistance with our sewage or grinder pump services. Grand Valley Plumbing takes great pleasure in assisting homeowners in maintaining the functionality of their home’s plumbing systems.

Septic Tank Sump Pump

Sump pumps, also known as de-watering pumps, are often used in extremely wet areas to remove excess water from basements and foundations as a result of major weather events. This is a pump that is used primarily for insurance purposes, to ensure that buildings preserve structural integrity even in extremely wet situations. Sump pumps are occasionally used in septic systems, however they are utilized seldom since there are better options available if a pump is required.

Septic Tank Grinder Pump

Have you ever wondered how the process of pumping septic uphill is accomplished? Use a Grinder pump to get the job done. These septic tank pumps are used to crush and transfer black water orsewagefrom place to place, grinding the particles to enable everything to fit into normal pipe (typically 2” diameter). In most cases, the grinder pump is positioned directly in the aseptic tank itself. Septic tank grinder pumps are required in this situation because black water is being sent uphill to a septic tank, municipal sewer system, or wastewater pumping center via the sewage pumping center.

Sewage Tank Effluent Pump

They are solely designed to carry cleared effluent from a septic chamber (not a tank) to a drain field and are not intended to be used in conjunction with a tank. You should use caution if you are pumping cleared effluent from a septic pumping chamber (meaning a separate holding place downstream from the main septic tank). The removal of this pump from the tank, which contains solids and scum, is vital due to the fact that it is incapable of breaking down solids. Before installing a septic tank pump in your system, ALWAYS consult with a professional septic tank service provider first to ensure that the pump is appropriate for your system.

Whether you have concerns regarding your septic system, the possibility of requiring a pump, or the expenses associated with installing a pump for yourseptic system, we will be happy to answer them.

As always, if you have questions about your septic tank system or needservice, please give us a call at(260)-982-7111.

A septic tank’s waste and sewage are evacuated from it and discharged into a drain field, either by gravity or with the assistance of a septic system lift pump. In most cases, a septic pump is not required if the waste can flow at a rate of at least two feet per second through the system using gravity alone. Pumps are typically required for septic tanks that are located lower than the drain field and for which gravity is unable to transport and/or force the effluent out of the tank due to its location.

Know If Your System Uses A Septic Effluent Pump Or Septic Grinder Pump

Knowing what sort of pump your septic system is equipped with is critical to the overall operation of the system. A septic effluent pump is a device that transfers waste from a septic tank to a drain field. A septic grinder pump is responsible for the grinding and movement of human waste and toilet paper. Septic tank businesses in Gainesville, FL such as Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service can help if you’re not sure what sort of pump the system is using or where it’s located in the system.

Our professionals will identify the pump and check the septic system in order to notify you of the procedures that need to be taken in order to keep all components in proper operating order.

How Septic Pumps Work

A septic pump is a sort of submersible pump that is installed in either the last chamber of the septic tank or in a separate chamber outside the main tank of the system. As waste builds up in the chamber, it activates a float switch, which then activates the septic pump. After that, waste is forced up the outflow pipe and into the drain field by an impeller. Installing a septic tank pump alarm is an excellent strategy to avoid having to clean out your septic tank on a regular basis. One of our professionals will connect the float switch to an alarm panel, which will sound if the pump fails for any reason during the installation.

This alarm will ring and notify you if there is a sewage backup in your home.

See also:  What Is Involved In Septic Tank Cleaning?

Maintenance For A Septic Pump

The upkeep of a septic pump goes hand in hand with the upkeep of a septic system in its whole. Never drain or flush any of the following common home objects to avoid the need for emergency septic service and to ensure the pump’s long-term functionality:

  • Baby wipes
  • Cat litter
  • Fats, oils, and/or grease produced by or utilized in the preparation of meals
  • Dental floss
  • Personal hygiene products
  • And Q-tips or other cotton swabs are all recommended.

In addition, avoid using the garbage disposal because this can cause the septic tank to fill up more rapidly and force water into the tank, among other things. If there is an excessive amount of water entering the septic system, it can cause sediments to enter the septic pump, resulting in a probable blockage in either the pump or the drain field. If or when this occurs, contact Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service for prompt and dependable septic tank repairs.

Common Septic Pump Issues

In addition, avoid using the garbage disposal because this might cause the septic tank to fill up more rapidly and force water into the tank as a result. Excess water entering the septic system can lead to the accumulation of sediments in the pump, which can lead to a potential blockage in either the pump or the drain field. When or if this occurs, contact Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service for prompt and dependable septic tank repair services.

Noise Or No Noise

There are occasions when it is possible to hear the septic pump operating within the chamber itself. Do not hesitate to contact us for septic service if it appears that the pump is having difficulty or is failing to transport waste effectively.

Leaking Into The Septic Tank

The septic pump is equipped with a check valve, which provides a pressure gradient in order to keep the waste flowing through the pump and into the drainage system. Whenever the valve wears down or breaks, waste is forced back into the septic tank, causing the tank to overflow and back up into the pipes.

Faulty Float

An internal check valve in the septic pump helps to maintain a pressure gradient, which keeps the wastewater flowing through it and into a drain field. A malfunctioning or broken valve allows waste to flow back into the septic tank, causing the tank to back up into the pipes.

Burnt Out Motor

If the motor within the septic pump burns out or fails, the pump will be unable to transfer waste, even if the energy is still being supplied to the device, since the waste would be trapped.

In most cases, replacing the pump will address the problem.

Installing A New Septic Pump Or System

Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service will replace your septic tank if it is essential, and they will also install a new pump. Everything begins with an application, which is needed by the Florida Department of Health. We will always assist you in filling out the application and applying for any permissions that may be required. Our professionals will be pleased to walk you through the procedure and answer any questions you may have along the way.

Septic Tank Service

Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service can solve any septic issue, regardless of whether your sewage system currently has a pump or if you’re interested whether installing a pump will increase the system’s overall efficiency. When performing septic tank repairs in Gainesville, our specialists take into consideration the demands of the family or company. Call Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service immediately to make an appointment for septic service!

The Top Reasons to Pump Your Septic Tank and How to Do It

Published at 04:30 p.m. tank septic HinSeptic Tank There are no comments.

contact us The Septic System

One out of every five houses in the United States has or plans to build an individual septic system, whether it be a septic tank or the more ancient and less widely utilized cesspool method of disposal. Septic systems have a life expectancy of between 25 and 30 years, depending on the kind of system. As with any other important component of homeownership, it is a good idea to have a basic understanding of how it works and how to properly maintain it before you purchase a house. Ideally, you’d know how to recognize when something is wrong, what to do when something is wrong, and how to stop anything like that from happening in the first place if it does happen.

Understanding Your Septic System

In general, personal septic systems perform wastewater treatment as well as or better than most city municipal systems, and in certain cases, even better than some of these systems. Often utilized in rural and widely distant suburban regions as more cost-effective alternatives to city sewer lines, they are becoming increasingly popular. There are several things that a homeowner may and should do to ensure that their system is in good working order. Unfortunately, many people fail to carry out these necessary duties on a regular basis.

  • As the old phrase goes, “out of sight, out of mind,” so it is with money.
  • They are also expensive to maintain.
  • It should not be debatable when it comes to responsible homeownership that you use a certified septic contractor.
  • Rescue CesspoolDrain are on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

What Is the Difference Between Septic Systems?

Septic systems are designed to provide the basic function of waste water treatment. Household wastewater is often composed of the following chemicals in large quantities:

  • Dishwashers, garbage disposals, sinks, toilet flushes, and washing machines are all examples of home appliances.

Anything that drains from the house is classified as domestic wastewater, and it eventually filters into the home’s sewage treatment system to be treated.

Septic Tank

Septic tanks, on the other hand, are the more popular and up-to-date choice. They are placed in about one out of every four households in the United States. When using a septic tank, wastewater is sent to a drain field, where it is subjected to a filtering process. Among the most important components of a sewage treatment system is the septic tank. Its primary function is to break down a proportion of the particles in wastewater, remove a portion of the sediments, and store the remaining materials.

The storage of any solid substance, on the other hand, is the reason why the septic tank must be pumped on a regular basis.

Cesspool

Cesspools are only utilized in a few isolated rural communities. They are regarded out of date and are even prohibited in certain areas since they are seen to be a danger to the public’s health. A cesspool is a pit that is walled with concrete or rock and that has an outflow pipe that connects it to another pit on occasion. Cesspools do not provide waste filtering in the same way as septic tanks do. As a result, the surrounding land and groundwater get contaminated in the long run. If you live in an older, presumably rural property that once had a cesspool for a septic system, you will almost surely be required to adhere to particular cleaning and pumping frequency restrictions to keep your system in good working order.

How a Septic Tank Works

The septic tank is a location where all wastewater is separated into three levels, which are afterwards disposed of. Those that flow to a drain field are separated by a layer of liquid, a layer of lighter particles called scum, and a layer of heavier solids called sludge, which settles at the bottom of the tank. Anaerobic bacteria that dwell in the septic tank then break down all of the particles into less-complex organic substances, which are then excreted. Although your sewage is ” digested” by a healthy microbial environment, you have a well-functioning septic system, and a sufficient drain field, the layers of sludge and scum in your tank will accumulate over time despite your efforts.

It doesn’t take long until the layers begin to build up to the point where bacteria are no longer able to keep up and floating particles begin to reach the drain field.

Because of this, the scum layer and sludge layer must be removed from the system on a regular basis.

Why People Avoid Caring for Their Septic Systems

Unfortunately, despite the fact that it is an extremely necessary task, there are a variety of reasons why individuals neglect or avoid caring for their septic systems.

Common Reasons People Neglect Their Cesspools and Septic Tanks

One of the most common reasons for people to overlook their septic pumping is due to a lack of knowledge. They just do not realize that they are required to do so or do not know how to do so. The fact that people assume it will be gross or difficult, or a mix of the two, is another reason they oppose it. Despite the fact that some tanks have a large access cap on the inlet end, many others have no evident way to get inside them. In general, the more recent the tank, the less difficult the task.

You may get advice from a reputablecesspool pumping contractor in Long Island about the restrictions that apply in your region, as well as book an appointment for an assessment of your problem.

Common Septic System Myths

In many cases, customers are discouraged from getting their septic tanks serviced because of misconceptions that they have about septic contractors.

  • The fact that the drains and toilets are operational indicates that the septic system is not in need of maintenance. In actuality, no one has ever been trapped in a septic tank. Septic systems that are more than a decade old are equally as effective as new ones. Release of wastewater into anything other than a licensed septic system (such as a ditch, for example) is an acceptable alternative if the system is not functioning properly
  • Nevertheless,

Actually, effective septic pumping ensures that the drains and toilets continue to function. New systems outperform their predecessors in terms of efficiency. It is against the law to release wastewater into the environment, yet individuals do sometimes fall into a septic tank while attempting to pump it manually. Given the fact that septic tank pumping is a potentially dangerous operation that involves pumping the septic system, it is clearly one that should be left to the experts.

What Happens if You Don’t Pump Your Septic Tank?

Actually, effective septic pumping ensures that the drains and toilets continue to function properly and efficiently. System performance is vastly improved as compared to older systems. It is against the law to discharge wastewater into the environment, yet individuals do occasionally fall into a septic tank while attempting to pump it out themselves on occasion. Given the fact that septic tank pumping is a potentially dangerous operation that involves pumping the septic system, it is clearly one that should be left to the pros.

Sewage Backup

In reality, regular septic pumping ensures that the drains and toilets are operational. New systems are far more efficient than older systems. It is against the law to discharge wastewater into the environment, yet individuals do sometimes fall into a septic tank while attempting to pump it manually. Because septic tank pumping is a potentially risky job that involves pumping the septic system, it is absolutely one that should be left to the experts.

Public Health

When enzymes are no longer effective, the sediments from the unpumped system may flow into the drain field, which is an undesirable outcome. As a result, particles from food waste grinders (garbage disposals), solid human waste, and even potentially dangerous prescription prescriptions that were flushed into the sewer system can infiltrate the ground water supply. Unfortunately, many homeowners are unaware of the most effective pumping frequency for their particular house septic tank system.

How Often Should You Clean the Septic Tank?

Despite the fact that some people clean their septic tanks on a regular basis, an evaluation by a certified expert is the most reliable approach to identify when it is time to have the sewage pumped out. When the base of the floating scum layer is within six inches of the outlet pipe and the top of the sludge layer is within twelve inches of the outlet pipe, they will generally recommend that you service your system. While the Environmental Protection Agency suggests that you pump your septic tank every three to five years, the frequency with which you should do so depends on a variety of factors.

Septic System Care Based on Use

In order to properly manage your tank, you should begin by being conscientious about how much water you consume. The following are examples of what I mean:

  • Other than human waste and toilet paper, you may flush whatever you choose. Leaving the faucets open
  • The practice of pouring food or oil down drains
  • Overuse of dishwashers and washing machines
  • Frequent use of dishwashers and washing machines

The bottom line is that, the more water your home consumes, the more frequently your septic tank will need to be pumped.

Garbage Disposal

Food waste grinders and garbage disposals speed up the process of filling the septic tank, as opposed to just throwing solids in the trash or composting them, which slows the process.

In fact, garbage disposals have been shown to increase the quantity of waste in your tank by up to 50%. As a result, the recommended pumping frequency has been increased from every 3 – 5 years to every 1 – 2 years.

Tank Size

It is true that all septic systems require maintenance on a regular basis. Because of the usual needs for space between the sludge and scum layers, a larger tank will be able to operate for longer periods of time between pumpings when compared to a smaller tank in most cases. The number of people that live in the house also has an impact on how frequently it should be pumped, as more people equals more wastewater.

How to Pump Your Septic Tank

If you have a septic treatment system, a trained sewage contractor would most likely measure the layers of scum and sludge that have built up over time. In a standard septic system, enzymes are responsible for no more than 40 percent of the wastewater treatment processes. The majority of the time, after the solids account for around 25 to 35 percent of the total tank volume, they will propose pumping. In preparation for pumping your septic tank, the contractor will conduct a comprehensive check of the pipelines to search for leaks or degradation.

Mistakes to Avoid When Pumping Your Septic Tank

Just like with any technical activity, there are several things that should be avoided while trying to maintain your septic system in the most efficient manner possible.

  • Pumping too seldom results in early drain field failure and the need for possibly expensive repairs. Pumping too frequently is a waste of time and resources. The act of pumping the septic tank in an attempt to “repair” a malfunctioning drainfield Pumping the septic tank without first having a septic system checkup performed
  • And

Performing pumping operations without conducting an inspection might result in issues being misdiagnosed or left undiagnosed, which can lead to more expensive problems in the future.

So, How Often Should You Pump Your Septic Tank?

The quick answer is that it is dependent on the situation. In situations when using a waste disposal will almost surely limit the time available, having a big tank size may be advantageous. For a large family, a more frequent pumping schedule will be required in comparison to a single person’s home. One of the only ways to get an accurate assessment of the condition is by having an experienced, local sewer contractor do a full examination and then analyze the situation from there. Schedule service with our knowledgeable staff by contacting us or calling: 631-239-6800.

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