How To Plumb A Single Tank Septic? (Correct answer)

  • Find where you want to go into the building relative to where you want to place the septic tank. Excavate to at least 2 feet deep and drill a hole through the wall, or go deeper and go under the footing, whichever is desired, or necessary. Plan for the flow to go downhill from here, as this is exactly what a gravity fed system is all about.

How does a single chamber septic tank work?

Septic tanks work by allowing waste to separate into three layers: solids, effluent and scum (see illustration above). The solids settle to the bottom, where microorganisms decompose them. The scum, composed of waste that’s lighter than water, floats on top.

How do you tap into an existing septic tank?

Use a 4-inch pipe to connect the two septic tanks. Place this pipe into the inlet hole of your new septic tank before you lower it into the ground. After you’ve lowered your new septic tank, insert the other end of the pipe into your old septic tank’s outlet hole.

What size pipe goes into septic tank?

Four-inch pipe is standard, and it should extend far enough under the house to connect with the main soil stack, which is a 3-inch pipe that extends vertically past the main bathroom and through the roof.

How far should a septic tank be from a house?

Most importantly, a septic tank must be at least seven metres from a house, defined as a ‘habitable property’. Septic tanks are built underground and release wastewater slowly into the surrounding environment. For this reason, they must be a set distance away from a home.

Can a septic tank have only one lid?

Septic tanks should have one lid per compartment. Most tanks have (2) compartments. So, most residential tanks should have (2) lids about 5′ away from each other.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

Does shower water go into septic tank?

From your house to the tank: Most, but not all, septic systems operate via gravity to the septic tank. Each time a toilet is flushed, water is turned on or you take a shower, the water and waste flows via gravity through the plumbing system in your house and ends up in the septic tank.

What is the smallest septic tank available?

If you’re looking to install a septic system, the smallest tank size you’re likely to find is 750-gallon, which will accommodate one to two bedrooms. You can also opt for a 1,000-gallon system, which will handle two to four bedrooms.

What size septic tank do I need for a tiny house?

Tiny homes typically require a 500 to 1,000-gallon septic tank. Though, it’s not always possible to implement a tank of this size. In some states, for example, the minimum tank size is 1,000 gallons. There may be exceptions to this rule if your home is on wheels.

What happens if septic tank is too small?

An adequately sized septic system may only need pumping every two to five years on average. If the septic tank is too small or the drain field is in danger of overloading, homeowners may consider pumping the tank once or twice per year until they can renovate and enlarge the system.

How deep should a septic tank be buried?

In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter. If you do not find the lid by probing, shallow excavation with a shovel along the tank’s perimeter should reveal the lid.

How to Install a Septic System

Documentation Download Documentation Download Documentation In rural regions of the nation where waste water treatment is not accessible, private on-site wastewater treatment systems (POWTS), also known as septic systems, are utilized largely to treat waste water. Gravity fed/conventional systems are divided into two broad categories: 1. gravity fed/conventional systems and 2. alternative (pump) systems, which include aerobic treatment units (ATUs.) In most cases, electric pumps are used in alternative systems.

However, in many health jurisdictions across the United States, it is still feasible for an individual property owner with heavy equipment operation skills to utilize a backhoe to establish a septic system on their land.

Steps

  1. Read More About ItRead More About It In rural regions of the nation where waste water treatment is not accessible, private on-site wastewater treatment systems (POWTS), also known as septic systems, are utilized largely to treat wastewater. Gravity fed/conventional systems are divided into two broad categories: 1. gravity fed/conventional systems and 2. alternative (pump) systems, which include aerobic treatment units and other components (ATUs.) Electric pumps are commonly used in alternative systems. Because of the possible harm to the environment posed by contamination of the watershed, this project is advised for a professional with relevant experience. However, in many health jurisdictions around the United States, it is still possible for an individual property owner with heavy equipment operation skills to build a septic system with a backhoe.
  • The following are some of the conclusions from the site survey that have an impact on the design:
  • Available space
  • Terrain
  • Intended purpose and projected water demand depending on the size of the residence or building that the system will serve
  • Location of the well and/or nearby wells
  • And other factors.
  • The following are examples of soil test findings that have an impact on the design:
  • The soil type and layering (sand, clay, rock, and where it is placed in relation to depth)
  • The soil’s ability to drain and filter wastewater
  • And the soil’s ability to drain and filter wastewater
  1. The kind and layering of the soil (sand, clay, rock, and where it is placed in relation to depth)
  2. The soil’s ability to drain and filter wastewater
  3. And the soil’s capacity to drain and filter wastewater are all important considerations.

Please keep in mind that the following procedure assumes that the system is being installed for the first time and not as a replacement.

  1. 1 Assemble the equipment and tools that will be used throughout the dig. You will require the following items:
  • Backhoe, laser transit, and grade pole are all included. A 4″ Sch. 40 PVC pipe (and fittings, if necessary)
  • A 4″ ASTM D2729 perforated pipe
  • A 4″ASTM D3034 pipe and fittings
  • A 4″ Sch. 40 vent cap and test cap
  • PVC primer and adhesive
  • A 4″ Sch. 40 vent cap and test cap The following tools will be required: Saw (either hand saw or cordless reciprocating saw)
  • Hammer drill and bits (for drilling through walls if necessary)
  • The following items are required: hydraulic cement (to seal surrounding pipe if pipe is going through wall)
  • Shovel
  • Stone measuring an inch and a half and cleaned (amount varies depending on system size)
  • Tape measurements (both ordinary and at least a 100-foot-long tape)
  • Septic fabric (cut to 3′ length or less from a roll)
  • Septic tank and risers (concrete or plastic if allowed)
  • Riser sealant such as Con-Seal (for concrete) or silicone caulk (for plastic)
  • A septic filter (such as a Zoeller 170 or similar) if one is necessary
  • A distribution box (either concrete or plastic, if more than two laterals are being run)
  • And a septic tank.
  • 2 Find where you want to get into the building relative to where you want to install the septic tank. Make an excavation at least 2 feet deep and drill a hole through the wall, or go deeper and drill a hole beneath the footing, depending on your preference or the need. Because this is precisely what a gravity-fed system is designed to accomplish, expect the flow to continue to flow downhill from here. When transferring waste from the tank to the drain field, it does not employ any mechanical methods other than gravity.
  • 2 Determine the location of the entrance to the building in relation to the location of the septic tank. To drill a hole through the wall, excavate to a depth of at least 2 feet, or go deeper and dig beneath the footing, whichever is more desirable or essential Because this is precisely what a gravity-fed system is designed to accomplish, anticipate the flow to continue to flow downhill from here. In order to discharge the waste from the tank to the drain field, no mechanical mechanism other than gravity is employed.
  • Make sure you use a test cap on the end that will be entering the building. It is recommended that if you are going through a wall, you seal the area around the hole with hydraulic cement both inside and outside
  • Do not run too much pitch out to the tank. If there is an excessive amount, the water will run away quicker than the sediments, resulting in the solids remaining in the pipe. Additionally, depending on the depth of your drain field and how close it will be to the tank’s outflow, there may not be enough pitch to get to the drain field.
  • 3 Dig a hole large enough to accommodate the installation of the concrete aerobic tank below ground. Make use of the laser transit to “shoot” the top of the pipe that leads out to the tank with the laser. The distance between the top of the intake and the bottom of the tank is measured in feet and inches. To the number you fired off the top of the pipe, add this (go up on the grade pole) + 1 1/2″ to get the total. The depth of the grade pole has now been adjusted to the desired depth. Using this, continue to drill the hole to the desired depth
  • 3 Dig a hole large enough to accommodate the installation of the concrete aerobic tank below ground level. To “shot” the top of the pipe that leads to the tank, use the laser transit. The distance between the top of the intake and the bottom of the tank is measured in feet and meters. To the number you fired off the top of the pipe, add this (go up on the grade pole) + 1 1/2″ to get the final result. It is now necessary to adjust the depth of the grade pole. Using this, continue to drill the hole to the necessary depth
  • .
  1. 4Use “inch-and-a-half cleaned drain rock” from a neighboring gravel dump to surround the pipe, which is required in most areas. This is necessary in order to keep the pipe stable. For further information on the size of embedment and gravel required, check with your local health department. Five-inch perforated pipe in a gravity drain field does not have a slope from one end to another and has capped ends
  2. Once you have received a green sticker from the health inspector, you must cover the pipe and tank. All places, subject to the restrictions of the local health authority, will be required to cover the drain rock with a specific filter fabric, newspaper, four inches of straw, or untreated construction paper before backfilling. Advertisement
  1. A pump chamber after the septic tank should be installed The pump chamber, also known as a pressure tank or dosing tank, is where the electric pump is housed, which is responsible for transporting wastewater from one location to another and finally into the drain field for final disposal.
  • Set up the pump chamber in the same manner as you would a septic tank. The effluent pump and floats are housed in the pump chamber, and they are responsible for pumping the effluent out to the drain field at predetermined or scheduled intervals. This is a hermetically sealed system. To ensure that the electrical installation complies with state standards, it is frequently necessary to hire a qualified electrician. It is important to remember that in places with high groundwater, the pump chamber or additional ATUs may remain essentially empty for long periods of time, and that these tanks may need to be safeguarded from floating by the installation of additional weight or other protective features.
  1. The pump chamber should be set up similarly to how the septic tank should be set up: The effluent pump and floats are housed in the pump chamber, and they are responsible for pumping the effluent out to the drain field at predetermined or predetermined time intervals. A sealed system is used in this application. If you want to comply with state requirements, a certified electrician will almost always be required to complete the electrical installation. Because groundwater levels can be quite high in some regions, it is important to be aware that the pump chamber or additional ATUs may be mainly empty for long periods of time, and that these tanks may need to be secured from floating with additional weight or other protective features.

Create a new question

  • Question I had a tank put, but it isn’t level with the ground. What will be the ramifications of this, and should it be leveled? It is necessary to keep the tank level. It is difficult to predict what it will have an impact on because we do not know which direction it is off level. Question Is it necessary to be concerned about tree roots growing into the drainage area when using a gravity flow kind of tank? Whether or whether you have lateral lines is dependent on the kind of trees that are growing close or above them. Tree species that tend to extend roots into the lateral lines and obstruct them are known as ramifications. Due to the fact that they are buried deep in the ground and surrounded by a pocket of gravel that allows waste water to drain out, they are rarely affected by grass, weeds, and shrubs. Question What is the maximum depth that a pipe may be lowered into the leech bed? The majority of systems require 12 volts “in the form of rock The perforated pipe should be suspended in the top area of the rock
  • It should not be touching the rock. Question Maintaining a lush green grass on or above your pitch is it safe, or is it a good practice? According to what I’ve heard, brown or dead grass is preferred so that your field can breathe more easily. It is necessary for your field to take a breath. The presence of green grass across your field indicates that it is functioning well. With lush grass covering your field, it will be able to breathe. There should be no planting of woody shrubs or trees over the leach field. Question What is the recommended distance between the septic tank and the house/boundary? A minimum of fifty feet is required. States have different laws, but this is the most common distance
  • Nonetheless, other states have stricter laws. Question What is the average amount of soil that goes into a residential leach field? It is dependent on how chilly it becomes. There are no less than 12 in the northern United States “in the leach field’s surface
  • Question Is it possible to build a septic system during the cold months? What you should do will depend on whether or not you reside in a place where the ground freezes. Question What amount of water should I put in the tank to get it going? None. A typical tank holds 1,000 gallons and will fill up quite quickly if used on a regular basis. When liquid effluent is discharged to the drain field, the goal is to catch and pre-treat particles that have accumulated. It is possible that a pump system will require water to prime the pump. Question There is a misalignment between my septic field’s underground line and the pipe on the tank. Is it OK to utilize a 90-degree elbow on my septic tank? As long as you have decent downhill flow, you should be fine. Instead of using a 90, I would use two 45s. Question If I’m installing a septic system, when should I contact an inspector? Immediately following system installation but before earth is used to cover the system in place Always check with the inspector ahead of time to verify that they can satisfy your inspection needs
See also:  Gurgling In Pipes When Flushing Toilet Septic Tank? (Best solution)

More information on the replies Inquire about something There are 200 characters remaining. Include your email address so that you may be notified when this question has been resolved. SubmitAdvertisement

  • The use of aerobic bacterial additions (which are available at most DIY stores) to maintain a healthy and well functioning system, as suggested by producers on a periodic basis, is contentious. The septic tank is an anaerobic (wet) environment in which the majority of yeasts and other additions will have little or no effect on the sewage being processed. When it comes to installing septic tanks, some old school installers believe that placing an additive, a shovel of muck, or even a dead cat in an empty tank will “start” the process. What naturally enters the tank serves as the only thing that is necessary. The aerobic (wet or dry) component of the system consists of hundreds of square feet of drain field, where additives will do little help even if they make it all the way to the end of the system. The use of chemicals in septic systems has not been the subject of an independent research that has been published in a respectable scientific publication anywhere in the world, including this nation. This will mostly certainly be confirmed by your local health department. Each phase of the building process will almost certainly include an examination by a health inspector before the work can be completed or covered up. On pressurized lines, the use of a sand embedment is recommended in order to reduce the amount of damage caused by moving soil that has a high concentration of clay. When pumps are turned on and off, pressurized lines might move as well. Four inches (10.2 cm) of sand bedding on all four sides of the lines will prevent sharp pebbles from the ground or backfill from wearing holes in the pipe over time
  • And

Thank you for submitting a suggestion for consideration! Advertisement

  • Keep the perforated pipe for the leech field in a vertical position while installing it to avoid having the holes in the pipe turn downward. It is necessary to lay the perforated drain field pipe ASTM 2729 dead level, so that the printed line on the pipe is facing up. The perforations on both sides of the pipe are on both sides of the pipe. All of the sections of perforated pipe are cemented together, and the ends of each leach line are capped to complete the installation. So, when waste water enters the pipe, it will fill the pipe to the height of the perforations and overflow from ALL of the holes, utilising the whole leach field as a means of treatment. In certain health authorities, you can utilize waste water to water grass or decorative plants, trees, vegetable gardens, and fruit trees if you place the perforated pipe on a slope. However, the water must first be cleaned by the system (tertiary treatment includes disinfection) in order to prevent pathogens (germs) from the septic system from being discharged into the environment throughout the process. Make sure to check with your local health authority to verify if the practice known as “reuse” is permitted in your community.

Advertisement

Things You’ll Need

  • The following tools are required: backhoe tractor, trencher, shovel, contractor’s laser level and rod, or a surveyor’s transit. Septic tanks
  • PVC pipe with perforations
  • Material for embedding
  • PVC adhesive, PVC fittings, and a septic tank outlet filter are all included. Hand saw
  • Course file
  • Sandpaper If necessary, effluent pumps and floats are installed. If an alternate system is used, a control panel is installed.

About This Article

The writers of this page have together authored a page that has been read 499,778 times.

Did this article help you?

Mr. Fix-It-Up-For-The-Family You may save a lot of money if you understand how a sewage treatment system works—and what can go wrong—so that you can handle your own septic system maintenance.

How does a septic tank work?

Pumping the tank on a regular basis eliminates sludge and scum, which helps to keep a septic system in good working order. It is possible for a well-designed and well built septic system to last for decades, or it might collapse in a matter of years. It is entirely up to you as long as you can answer the question of how do septic tanks function. Healthy septic systems are very inexpensive to maintain, but digging up and replacing a septic system that has completely collapsed may easily cost tens of thousands in labor and material costs.

It’s critical to understand how a septic tank works in order to maintain one.

Let’s take a look below ground and observe what happens in a properly operating septic system, shall we?

Understand that a septic system is a cafeteria for bacteria

Bacteria are responsible for the proper operation of a septic system. They decompose garbage, resulting in water that is clean enough to safely trickle down into the earth’s surface. The entire system is set up to keep bacteria healthy and busy at all times. Some of them reside in the tank, but the majority of them are found in the drain field. 1. The septic tank is the final destination for all waste. 2. The majority of the tank is filled with watery waste, referred to as “effluent.” Anaerobic bacteria begin to break down the organic matter in the effluent as soon as it enters the system.

  1. A layer of sludge settles to the bottom of the container.
  2. 4.
  3. Scum is mostly constituted of fats, greases, and oils, among other substances.
  4. Grease and oils float to the surface of the water.
  5. (5) A filter stops the majority of particles from reaching the exit pipe.
  6. The effluent is discharged into the drain field.
  7. Effluent is allowed to leak into the surrounding gravel because of holes in the drain septic field pipe.

When gravel is used to surround pipes, water can run into the soil and oxygen can reach germs. The garbage is completely decomposed by aerobic bacteria found in gravel and dirt. 9. Potable water seeps into the groundwater and aquifer system from the surface.

Septic Tank Clean Out: Don’t abuse the system

Septic systems that have been correctly planned and constructed require just occasional ‘pumping’ to remove the sludge and scum that has built up inside the tank. However, if you don’t understand how a septic tank works, you may unintentionally hurt or even destroy the system.

  • Drains are used to dispose of waste that decomposes slowly (or not at all). Cigarette butts, diapers, and coffee grounds are all known to cause issues. Garbage disposers, if utilized excessively, can introduce an excessive amount of solid waste into the system. Lint from synthetic fibers is emitted from washing machine lint traps. This substance is not degraded by bacteria in the tank and drain septic field. Bacteria are killed by chemicals found in the home, such as disinfecting cleansers and antibacterial soaps. The majority of systems are capable of withstanding limited usage of these goods, but the less you use them, the better. When a large amount of wastewater is produced in a short period of time, the tank is flushed away too quickly. When there is too much sludge, bacteria’s capacity to break down waste is reduced. Sludge can also overflow into the drain field if there is too much of it. Sludge or scum obstructs the flow of water via a pipe. It is possible for tree and shrub roots to obstruct and cause harm to a drain field. Compacted soil and gravel prevent wastewater from seeping into the ground and deprive germs of oxygen. Most of the time, this is caused by vehicles driving or parking on the drain field.

Get your tank pumped…

Your tank must be emptied on a regular basis by a professional. Pumping eliminates the accumulation of sludge and scum that has accumulated in the tank, which has caused the bacterial action to be slowed. If you have a large tank, it may be necessary to pump it once a year; but, depending on the size of your tank and the quantity of waste you send through the system, you may go two or three years between pumpings. Inquire with your inspector about an approximate guideline for how frequently your tank should be pumped.

…but don’t hire a pumper until you need it

Inspections and pumping should be performed on a regular basis. However, if you’re not afraid of getting your hands dirty, you may verify the sludge level yourself with a gadget known as The Sludge Judge. It ranges in price from $100 to $125 and is commonly accessible on the internet. Once you’ve verified that your tank is one-third full with sludge, you should contact a professional to come out and pump it out completely.

Install an effluent filter in your septic system

Garbage from your home accumulates into three distinct strata. The septic filter is responsible for preventing blockage of the drain field pipes.

Septic tank filter close-up

The septic tank filter is responsible for capturing suspended particles that may otherwise block the drain field pipes. Obtain an effluent filter for your tank from your contractor and place it on the outflow pipe of your tank. (It will most likely cost between $50 and $100, plus labor.) This device, which helps to prevent sediments from entering the drain field, will need to be cleaned out on a regular basis by a contractor to maintain its effectiveness.

Solution for a clogged septic system

If your septic system becomes clogged and you find yourself having to clean the filter on a regular basis, you might be tempted to simply remove the filter altogether. Hold on to it. Solids, wastewater, and scum are separated into three levels in septic tanks, which allows them to function properly (see illustration above). Solids sink to the bottom of the container, where microbes breakdown them. The scum, which is made up of trash that is lighter than water, rises to the surface. In the drainage field, the middle layer of effluent leaves the tank and goes through an underground network of perforated pipes to the drainage field.

  1. Keep the effluent filter in place since it is required by your state’s health law.
  2. Waste particles might flow through the filter and clog the perforated pipes if the filter is not used.
  3. Your filter, on the other hand, should not require cleaning every six months.
  4. A good chance is high that you’re flushing filter-clogging things down the toilet, such as grease, fat, or food scraps.
  5. A garbage disposal will not be able to break down food particles sufficiently to allow them to flow through the septic tank filtration system.
  6. Plastic items, disposable diapers, paper towels, nonbiodegradable goods, and tobacco products will clog the system if they are flushed through it.

For additional information on what should and should not be flushed down the toilet, contact your local health authority. More information on removing lint from your laundry may be found here.

Get an inspection

Following a comprehensive first check performed by an expert, regular inspections will cost less than $100 each inspection for the next year. Your professional will be able to inform you how often you should get your system inspected as well as how a septic tank functions. As straightforward as a septic system appears, determining its overall condition necessitates the services of a professional. There are a plethora of contractors who would gladly pump the sludge out of your tank, but many, in my experience, are unable to explain how a septic system works or how it should be maintained.

A certification scheme for septic contractors has been established in certain states; check with your state’s Secretary of State’s office to see whether yours is one of them.

Also, a qualified inspector will be able to tell you whether or not your tank is large enough to accommodate your household’s needs, as well as the maximum amount of water that can be passed through it in a single day.

As you learn more about how a septic tank works, your professional should be able to tell you whether or not your system will benefit from this treatment.

Alternatives to a new drain field

If an examination or a sewage backup indicate that your drain field is in need of replacement, the only option is to replace it completely. As a result, it’s important to talk with a contractor about other possibilities before proceeding with the project.

  • If an examination or a sewage backup indicate that your drain field is in need of replacement, the only option is to replace it completely. A contractor should be consulted about alternative possibilities because the costs might be quite expensive.

Protect your drain septic field from lint

When this device is in place, it inhibits lint from entering the system, especially synthetic fibers that bacteria are unable to digest. One of these filters, which I’ve designed and termed theSeptic Protector, was invented by me. An additional filter is included in the price of around $150 plus delivery. Learn more about how to filter out laundry lint in this article.

Don’t overload the septic system

This device prevents lint from entering the system, particularly synthetic fibers, which bacteria are unable to digest and hence cause infection. Septic Protector is the name I gave to one of these filters that I designed myself. An additional filter is included in the price of roughly $150 plus delivery. See this article for further information on how to filter out lint from your clothes.

See also:  What The Best Way To Clean The Trailer Septic Tank? (Solution)

Meet the Expert

Septic systems, according to Jim vonMeier, are the solution to America’s water deficit because they supply cleaned water to depleted aquifers, according to vonMeier. He travels the country lobbying for septic systems, giving lectures, and giving testimony. For septic system inquiries, as well as information on the operation of the septic tank, contact him by email.

Septic Tank Installation and Pricing

To process and dispose of waste, a septic system has an underground septic tank constructed of plastic, concrete, fiberglass, or other material that is located beneath the earth. Designed to provide a customized wastewater treatment solution for business and residential locations, this system may be installed anywhere. Although it is possible to construct a septic tank on your own, we recommend that you hire a professional to do it owing to the amount of skill and specific equipment required.

In this post, we’ll go over the several types of septic systems that are accessible to homeowners, as well as the procedure and costs associated with installing one.

Who Needs a Septic Tank?

For the most part, in densely populated areas of the nation, a home’s plumbing system is directly connected to the municipal sewer system. Because municipal sewer lines are not readily available in more rural regions, sewage must be treated in a septic tank. If you’re moving into a newly constructed house or onto land that doesn’t already have a septic tank, you’ll be responsible for putting in a septic system on your own.

How to Prepare for Your Septic Tank Installation

Here are a few pointers to keep in mind to make sure your septic tank installation goes as smoothly as possible.

Receive Multiple Estimates

Receiving quotations from licensed septic tank installers and reading reviews about each firm using trustworthy, third-party customer evaluations should be done before any excavation or signing of any paperwork is done. Examine your options for a contractor and make sure they have the appropriate insurance and license, as well as the ability to include critical preparations such as excavation and drain field testing in their quotation.

Test the Soil and Obtain a Permit

For septic systems to function properly, permeable soil surrounding the tank must absorb and naturally handle liquid waste, ensuring that it does not pollute runoff water or seep into the groundwater. The drain or leach field is the name given to this region. Before establishing a septic tank, you are required by law to do a percolation test, sometimes known as a “perc” test. This test indicates that the soil fits the specifications established by the city and the local health agency. In most cases, suitable levels of permeable materials, such as sand or gravel, are necessary in a soil’s composition.

Note: If you wish to install a septic tank on your property, you must first ensure that the ground passes the percolation test.

Plan for Excavation

Excavation of the vast quantity of land required for a septic tank necessitates the use of heavy machinery. If you are presently residing on the property, be careful to account for landscaping fees to repair any damage that may have occurred during the excavation process. Plan the excavation for your new home at a period when it will have the least influence on the construction process if you are constructing a new home. Typically, this occurs before to the paving of roads and walkways, but after the basic structure of the home has been constructed and erected.

The Cost of Installing a Septic Tank

There are a few installation charges and additional expenditures connected with constructing a new septic system, ranging from a percolation test to emptying the septic tank and everything in between.

Percolation Test

A percolation test can range in price from $250 to $1,000, depending on the area of the property and the soil characteristics that are being tested.

Ordinarily, specialists will only excavate a small number of holes in the intended leach field region; however, if a land study is required to identify where to excavate, the cost of your test may rise.

Building Permit Application

A permit will be required if you want to install a septic tank on your property. State-by-state variations in permit prices exist, however they are normally priced around $200 and must be renewed every few years on average.

Excavation and Installation

When you have passed a percolation test and obtained a building permit, your septic tank is ready to be professionally placed. The cost of a new septic system is determined by the size of your home, the kind of system you choose, and the material used in your septic tank. The following is a list of the many treatment methods and storage tanks that are now available, as well as the normal pricing associated with each.

Types of Septic Tank Systems

When you have passed a percolation test and obtained a building permit, your septic tank is ready to be professionally constructed. It depends on the size of your home, the type of system you choose, and the material of your septic tank that you want to install. A list of the numerous treatment methods and tanks that are now available, as well as the normal pricing associated with each, is provided below.

Types of Septic Tanks

  • Concrete septic tanks are long-lasting and rust-proof, but they are difficult to repair if they are damaged. It is possible that concrete tanks will cost up to $2,000 depending on their size. Plastic —While plastic tanks are cost-effective, they are also susceptible to damage. They are around $1,200 in price. Fiberglass —While fiberglass septic tanks are more durable than their plastic counterparts, they are susceptible to shifting or displacement if the water table rises to an excessive level. Depending on the model, these tanks may cost up to $2,000

More information may be found at: Septic Warranty Coverage and Costs.

Using Your Septic Tank

It is important to maintain the area around your new septic tank’s drain field and to frequently check your tank using the lids included with it. Never use a trash disposal in conjunction with your septic tank since it might cause the system to clog. Additionally, avoid driving over the land where your septic tank is located or putting heavy gear on top of your septic tank or drain field to prevent damage. Most of the time, after five years of septic system use, you’ll need to arrange a cleaning and pumping of the system.

Send an email to our Reviews Team [email protected] if you have any comments or questions regarding this post.

A QUICK GUIDE TO SEPTIC TANK TROUBLES

Septic tanks are excellent options for disposing of waste generated by a household. However, in order for your septic system to function properly, it must be maintained on a regular basis. Having your septic system pumped may be all that’s needed if your system has been performing well for a few years but is no longer performing correctly for any reason. Septic tank pumping is part of the normal septic-system maintenance process. Using a septic-pumping service, sludge is removed from your septic tank, allowing waste material to flow and be treated effectively once again.

YOU CAN SEE, HEAR, AND SMELL SEPTIC TROUBLE

When you are standing close to your leach field, which is the vast area where your septic tank is buried, you will be able to tell whether there is a problem with your septic tank. Septic-treated waste from your septic tank trickles onto the leach field, where it is spread into the surrounding soil. If the area around your drain field seems to be significantly greener than the rest of your yard, you may be experiencing septic tank troubles. Whenever the soil in and around the septic tank becomes mushy, pooled, or muddy, stay away from the area and contact your plumber immediately.

The gurgling sound indicates that there is a problem with your drainage system.

Homes with sluggish or non-functioning septic systems will begin to smell like rotten eggs or sewage gas as a result of the scent. When the tank, inlets, or outlets are broken or blocked, a foul stench may begin to emanate from the area surrounding the underground tank on the outside.

YOU MAY HAVE A PROBLEM SEPTIC TANK

Your family takes a lot of showers, does a lot of laundry, and runs many dishwasher loads every day, is this the case? It’s possible that your septic tank isn’t big enough for your wastewater capacity. Although the Louisiana Department of Health authorizes 500-gallon, single-chamber septic tanks for smaller residences, the department advises that double-chamber or successive single-chamber tanks be installed wherever practical. If your leach field is capable of supporting the additional tank flow, you may be able to increase the amount of waste your septic system can handle.

Tanks can also be shifted, resulting in them not being level or not working in the proper direction.

Ideally, air should fill up the top 15 percent of the septic tank’s entire inner height, while the bottom liquid should not reach over 85 percent of the tank’s total inner height.

Sluggish septic system performance can eventually result in backup into your home’s internal water supply lines and plumbing fixtures.

YOU NEED PATIENCE WITH SEPTIC FLOODING

If your septic tank has been flooded as a result of storm-related flooding, you must wait for the water to drain before proceeding with any work surrounding your leach field. A soft leach field will not provide enough protection for buried septic equipment. It is possible that pumping a flood-submerged tank will break the pipe connections, resulting in the tank popping out of the earth. Reduce your family’s water use until your septic system is back up and running, and then plug the septic system.

It is against the law to throw waste water into any creek, stream, or other waterway.

In many circumstances, removing roots, blockages, and debris from your septic lines will be sufficient to rehabilitate your septic system after floods.

7 Steps to a New Plastic Septic System

Plastic septic tanks are only one important component of a home’s wastewater management system. There are several other components as well. When you are preparing for your plastic septic tank installation, it is critical to recognize and remember that there are several critical steps to take when installing a new septic system, and if you do not complete each of them carefully, you may be faced with some very expensive consequences down the road.

Step 1: Design Your System

The first step is to take your time and properly design your complete system. There is some critical information that you will need to investigate and get in order to complete this task. You will require a site survey to assist you in determining the borders of your land so that your septic system can be installed in accordance with local restrictions about how near to your neighbor’s property wastewater may be discharged underground.

The following are the most crucial pieces of information to look for during the site survey:

  • In addition to the quantity of space available, the land’s topography should be considered as well as the purpose and estimated usage of water based on the size of your home, so you know how much water your septic system will have to treat on a regular basis the position of any wells on your property or on the properties of your neighbors

In addition, you will need to conduct a percolation test on the soils in the region where your plastic septic tank installation will take place. Performing this test is critical because it will determine whether or not the ground is suitable for a plastic septic tank, as well as what type of structural precautions you will need to take to ensure that the plastic septic tank does not fracture or crack under the pressure exerted by the surrounding ground. The following parameters will be measured by the soil test:

  • The kind of soil and the composition of the soil (sand, clay, rock, etc.)
  • Layering (in which different soil types are found at different depths)
  • The capacity of the earth to drain and filter effluent

Once you have completed these tests, you will have the information necessary to build a septic system that is appropriate for your home.

Step 2: Seek Permits

The second stage in the installation process is to submit your plans and applications to your local government in order to obtain the permissions and approvals that are necessary. In order to gain clearance for these designs, you must ensure that they are in compliance with all applicable plumbing and construction requirements. It is possible that you may be punished and compelled to remove your equipment if you do not obtain these critical permissions.

Step 3: Gather Equipment

Bring together all of the items that will be needed for your plastic septic tank installation. The following is a list of the equipment and parts that you will require:

  • Backhoe – this is by far the most effective method of digging the holes that will be required to install your septic system in the earth. In order to conduct some more accurate digging in the holes you dig with your backhoe, you’ll need a shovel. In order to assure exact measurements for digging, a laser transit surveying equipment is used. A grade pole is a surveying equipment that is used to accurately measure the depth of a hole while digging. (1) – 4′′ Sch. 40 PVC pipe – this is the input pipe from your house, and it may also require fittings
  • And (2) – 4′′ Sch. 40 PVC pipe – this is the output pipe from your home, and it may also require fittings
  • (1) – 4′′ perforated pipe in accordance with ASTM D2729 – output pipe for dispersing effluent into draining field
  • (1) – 4′′ASTM D3034 pipe with suitable fittings
  • (2) – 4′′ASTM D3034 pipe with appropriate fittings
  • – 4′′ Sch. 40 vent caps and test caps – to disperse gas buildup resulting from the degradation of waste in the septic tank
  • – 4′′ Sch. 40 test caps – to ensure that the tank is functioning properly. To join PVC pipes together, PVC primer and PVC adhesive are used. Cutting PVC pipe to the required length requires the use of a manual hand saw or an electric hand saw. The usage of a hammer drill and bits is required if you need to drill through the wall of your house in order to install the septic system. If you drill a hole through a PVC pipe, you may use hydraulic cement to seal the gap between the pipe and the wall of your home. The stone should be 1 12 inches in thickness and should be put below your septic system to guarantee proper drainage. Small and big tape measures – you will need at least 100 feet of tape, therefore it may be beneficial to have both a small and a large tape measure on hand
  • Septic fabric — You will need roughly 3 feet of fabric cut from a roll. Plastic septic tank and risers – check with your local rules to ensure that plastic septic tanks are permitted. Silicone caulk is used to seal the risers of the stairwell. If a septic filter is necessary, it should be installed. Check out the plumbing codes in your area. Distribution box made of plastic – this is utilized when running a system with many laterals to the draining field.
See also:  How To Kill Tree Roots In Mainline To Septic Tank? (Solved)

Step 4: Install Intake Pipe

Choose one of the sides of your home or structure from which you want the septic tank to take in waste water for treatment. It is necessary to dig down at least 2 feet and either make a hole in the wall or dig further into the footing of the home or structure at that location. If you have a gravity-fed system, you should design the flow such that it flows downhill, rather than uphill, because gravity-fed systems do not require mechanical techniques to transport waste from a tank to a drain field.

  • Install the 4 inch Sch.
  • It has to be level at the wall and slope down about 1/8 inch per foot toward the plastic septic tank, according to the manufacturer’s specifications.
  • In the event that you swap pipes, make certain that you utilize the proper adaptor while connecting it to the plastic septic tank.
  • If you decide to drill a hole in the wall, you must use hydraulic cement to seal the area around the hole, both on the inside of the building and on the outside as well as the inside.

If the pitch is excessively steep, the wastewater will flow too quickly through the system, causing the particles to become caught in the pipe. It is also possible that you will have insufficient space left to adequately drain the effluent into the draining field.

Step 5: Install Plastic Septic Tank

Excavate a huge hole deep enough to accommodate your plastic septic tank below the surface of the ground. Make use of your laser transit to identify the top of the intake pipe and measure the distance between the top of the intake pipe and the bottom of the tank with your tape measure. In order to get the depth you want, double that amount by 1 12 inches and add it to the measurement taken from your laser transit to your grade pole. Continue digging until you reach the desired depth. Afterwards, you must dig out your draining field (also known as a leach field) in accordance with the parameters of your survey results as well as any applicable local restrictions.

Step 6: Install Draining Field

Generally, a 12 inch coating of washed drain rock will be required surrounding the pipe in order to keep it stable while it is transporting stuff. According to your local health criteria, the size of the gravel and the depth of this layer will be determined. If you are placing perforated pipe in a gravity septic system drain field, keep in mind that the pipe has no slope on either end and is capped on both ends.

Step 7: Inspection and Filling In

Following the permission of your local health inspector, it is time to cover everything with dirt and finish the job. To cover your cleaned drain rock before covering it with soil, you will most likely need a specific cloth that functions as a filter, untreated construction paper, or four inches of straw to cover the drainage region.

Bonus for Pump Plastic Septic Tank Installations:

If you have a pumped plastic septic tank installation, there will only be a few variations in the process you will go through. Before you can connect your plastic septic tank to your draining field, you must first construct a pump chamber in your home. The pump chamber is constructed in a manner similar to that of the septic tank, but the electrical aspects of the pump will necessitate the services of a certified electrician to ensure that you are in compliance with state standards. Those who live in areas with a lot of groundwater may find that their pump chamber is mostly empty most of the time, and others may find that they need to add more weight to the floatation mechanism that switches the pump on and off.

Not until you have obtained your permits and asked for assistance from local septic specialists at the first indication of problems, not after you have put everything together, filled it in, and discovered evidence of sewage leakage when you first turn on the water, should you begin digging.

If any part of this instruction seemed unfamiliar to you, there’s no shame in asking for clarification! Early involvement with the specialists will save you a great deal of time, money, and the frustration of having to repair a septic system that was badly constructed.

What Homeowners Should Know about Septic Tanks

If you own a house with a septic tank or are considering purchasing a home with a septic tank, it is critical that you understand how this system operates on your property. What the benefits and drawbacks of having a septic tank are, where you could find one in South Florida, and what buyers should know about septic tanks before acquiring a house that has one are all covered in this article.

What Is a Septic Tank?

A septic tank is a waterproof container that is buried beneath your home or business property. The purpose of this tank, which is often constructed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, is to collect and store wastewater and garbage generated by your home. Everything that goes down a drain ends up in your septic tank, from your kitchen sink to your showers and toilets to your garbage disposal. When wastewater enters the septic tank, solids separate and settle to the bottom, forming sludge, while oil and grease separate and float to the top, forming scum.

Even the wastewater is discharged into the drain field, where it is cleansed by the soil before reaching the groundwater table and becoming drinkable.

What Are the Pros and Cons of a Septic Tank?

Septic tank systems have a number of advantages and disadvantages that should be addressed before acquiring a house with a septic tank system or connecting a home to the municipal sewage system. The following are some of the advantages of a septic tank system:

  • It is useful in regions where access to a sewer is either too expensive or unattainable. Installing and maintaining it is rather inexpensive. Water bills were reduced, and sewage fees were abolished.

The following are some of the disadvantages of a septic tank system:

  • It is not possible to flush anything into the toilet tank that cannot be organically decomposed (such as hair, dental floss, grease, fat, diaper wipes, paper towels, and so on). It is not permitted to clean with bleach or other strong chemicals. Expenses associated with pumping every 2-5 years

Do All Homes Have Septic Tanks?

Septic tanks are installed in around 20% of residences in the United States. A septic tank is most typically seen in rural locations when there is a big amount of property separating neighbors from one another. However, in south Florida, they may be found in practically every city, which is a welcome relief. It is not possible to determine where to seek for them because there are no established restrictions, although they are generally located in lower-income regions where individuals do not want to spend the additional costs associated with having a public sewer system.

What Should Prospective Homeowners Know about Septic Tanks before Buying?

In the event that you’re considering purchasing a property that is equipped with a septic tank system, there are a few things you should know:

  • It is necessary to have a septic system examination performed before a title may be transferred. Remember that septic tanks can live up to 40 years or longer, so check the tank’s age before buying
  • It is possible that you may need to replace your system at some time during your homeownership, which can cost upwards of $7,000 for a traditional system. Alternatives may be more expensive. Investigate whether or not the septic tank system has ever failed or required repairs in the past. Septic tanks are frequently hidden behind concrete and are not properly maintained. Leaving a septic tank unattended for an extended period of time will result in irreversible damage to the drain field
  • In this instance, the only option is to dig up the entire yard (about 2000 SF depending on the number of bedrooms) and replace the tank. This is an extremely expensive project

Want to Learn More? Contact Our Team.

If you have any questions concerning septic tank systems, sewer systems, or any of the various methods through which your house handles wastewater, please don’t hesitate to contact our staff at Watermen Plumbing. For further information, please contact us online or by phone at (954) 800-6364 right now.

Preparing Your Property for Septic Tank Installation

Installation of a septic tank is a major undertaking, but it is one that is absolutely essential for many families in the United States. In our time at Septic Connection, we have erected a significant number of septic tanks on our own property. Our customers frequently inquire about how to prepare their land for the installation of septic tanks. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions. As you will see, implementing some of the actions outlined below will help you prevent delays and difficulties in your travel plans.

  1. In addition to years of experience and high-quality labor, we provide competitive pricing.
  2. Remove the old septic system from the property.
  3. It goes without saying that the first stage is the removal of the existing system, which includes the septic tank, pipes, and other components.
  4. Obtain the Necessary Permits Regulations governing septic systems differ from state to state and even from municipality to municipality.
  5. Fortunately, the knowledgeable personnel at Septic Connection can assist you with this issue.
  6. Drain fields filter and purify wastewater by using the soil in the surrounding area.
  7. Knowing the state of the soil in advance gives you plenty of time to make any required improvements.

Debris, furniture, and other things should be removed from the area to make it more accessible for service professionals.

In addition, the machinery that will be used will be rather noisy.

Make sure you have enough of drinking water on hand.

Make sure you have plenty of drinking water on hand to use for drinking, washing, and cooking.

Make plans for the toilets and showers.

It may be necessary to hire a portable toilet for use on the site.

What You Should Know About Septic System Maintenance When it comes to learning about what you need to do to keep your septic system in perfect functioning order, there is never a bad time to start.

Be familiar with the concept of septic pumping and when you should schedule yours.

Make an appointment with a professional. If you have any additional questions or concerns, you should contact Septic Connection to speak with a knowledgeable specialist about them. We are more than delighted to assist you.

3 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT SEPTIC TANK BAFFLES

By Admin on November 12, 2020 Your efforts to live as environmentally conscious as possible, as a responsible homeowner, are likely already underway, with practices such as recycling, composting, and purchasing energy-efficient equipment among your list of accomplishments. As a septic tank owner, you want to be sure that anything you put into your tank and septic field is causing the least amount of ground contamination as is reasonably practicable. Fortunately, there are a number of modest improvements you can do immediately to make your septic system even more ecologically friendly than it already is.

Have your septic tank inspected and pumped on a regular basis.

A bigger septic tank with only a couple of people living in your house, for example, will not require pumping as frequently as a smaller septic tank or as a septic tank that must manage the waste products of multiple family members will require.

When in doubt about how often to pump your septic tank, consult with a professional for advice.

In addition to locating and repairing any damage, a professional can ensure that the septic field is in good working order and that your septic tank is functional, large enough to handle your family’s waste, and not causing any unwanted pollution in nearby ground water.

Avoid flushing non-biodegradable items down the toilet or down the toilet.

Items that are not biodegradable are unable to properly decompose in the septic tank and might cause the system to get clogged.

In addition to causing issues in your house, septic system backups can damage ground water in the area surrounding your septic field.

Towels made of paper Products for feminine hygiene Grease or fats are used in cooking.

grinds from a cup of coffee Even if you have a trash disposal, the food scraps that you flush down the drain and bring into your septic system may cause unanticipated harm to your plumbing system.

Food scraps can enhance the amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus in the wastewater, which can disturb the natural bacterial balance of the septic tank, among other things.

Water conservation should be practiced.

Exceedingly large amounts of water use will interfere with the normal flow of wastewater from your home into your septic tank.

Limiting the amount of time you spend in the shower and turning off the faucet while brushing your teeth, as well as purchasing a smaller dishwasher and washing machine that use less water, are all simple strategies to reduce water use in your home.

The following are some basic steps you can take to make your septic system more ecologically friendly: save water, maintain your septic system and tank, and recycle wastewater. To get answers to any of your septic tank-related issues, get in touch with the experts at Upstate Septic Tank, LLC.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *