What Products Will Damage My Septic Tank? (Solution found)

Household Products That Will Ruin Your Septic Tank!

  • Chemical Cleaners. Septic systems use bacteria to eliminate pathogens in waste.
  • Additives. Several septic tank additives claim to increase bacteria in your septic system.
  • Bath Oils.
  • Kitchen Grease.
  • Dryer Sheets.
  • Kitty Litter.
  • Latex Products.
  • Paints and Oils.

Can household products damage your septic tank?

  • It might surprise you to learn just how fragile septic tanks are and how many everyday household products can damage and/or clog your septic tank. Keep your septic tank in good condition and avoid costly septic repairs by keeping these products away from your drains. Septic systems use bacteria to eliminate pathogens in waste.

What products are bad for septic systems?

But to make it even clearer, here are the top ten household products to avoid when you have a septic tank.

  • Fabric softeners.
  • Latex products.
  • Medicines.
  • Antibacterial soap.
  • Cosmetics.
  • Drain cleaners.
  • Bleach.
  • Dishwasher and laundry detergent.

How do you ruin a septic tank?

9 Ways You’re Destroying Your Septic Tank

  1. Flushing Paper Products.
  2. Pouring Grease Down the Drain.
  3. Using Too Much Drain Cleaner.
  4. Introducing Additives to Your System.
  5. Flushing Cat Litter.
  6. Neglecting to Pump Your Tank Regularly.
  7. Planting Trees and Shrubs on Your Drain Field.
  8. Washer Lint Overload.

What chemical kills septic tank?

Caustic soda or lye at high levels in a septic tank risks killing the bacteria needed to break down sewage pathogens both in the tank itself and also in the soil into which the septic tank effluent is discharged.

What to put in septic tank to break down solids?

Yeast helps actively breaks down waste solids when added to your septic system. Flush ½ cup of dry baking yeast down the toilet, the first time. Add ¼ cup of instant yeast every 4 months, after the initial addition.

How do you dissolve sludge in a septic tank?

How to Reduce Sludge in a Septic Tank Without Pumping

  1. Install an aeration system with diffused air in your septic tank.
  2. Break up any compacted sludge.
  3. Add a bio-activator or microbe blend.
  4. Maintain the aeration system.
  5. Add additional Microbes as required.

Should you put additives in your septic tank?

There is little scientific data to suggest that you should add bacteria or enzymes to your septic system. The United States Environmental Protection Agency reported that biological additives do not appear to improve the performance of healthy septic tanks.

Can you repair the top of a septic tank?

If it is not rusted, you can replace the rusted top with a heavy-duty plastic or concrete lid. Concrete septic tank covers are heavy but strong and durable. Plastic covers offer faster access to the septic tank and are much easier to install.

Can you repair a cracked septic tank?

Cracks in septic tanks don’t always need to be repaired. If they are tiny and nothing leaks in or out, they might be left alone. If cracks in the tank allow leaking but are not too large, the contractor may fill them with concrete filler.

What is the best thing to put in your septic tank?

Biological Additives. Biological additives, like bacteria and extracellular enzymes, are the only acceptable septic tank treatment for promoting a healthy, natural bacterial ecosystem, maintaining an effective drain field, and protecting the health of the local groundwater.

Can you use bleach with a septic system?

Flushing bleach down your drains will kill all of the bacteria in your septic tank —even the good ones. They may have a corrosive effect on parts of your septic system, however. Additionally, they might also damage the natural balance of bacteria and other substances that live in your septic system.

Is baking soda and vinegar safe for septic systems?

Will baking soda hurt a septic system? Baking soda and other common household solutions such as vinegar are not harmful to your septic system. Harsh chemicals such as bleach and ammonia can disrupt the good bacteria in your septic tank and should not be used as part of a septic treatment.

What eats sludge in septic tank?

One example of a homemade remedy is to flush ¼-½ a cup of instant yeast down your toilet. The yeast eats away at the sludge and helps loosen it, breaking it down so that wastewater can get through.

What dissolves poop in septic tank?

You’ll need a pot of hot water, a cup of baking soda and a cup of vinegar. Pour the baking soda into your toilet bowl. Then add the vinegar a little bit at a time to avoid overflow. The mixture should start fizzing and bubbling immediately.

How long does it take for poop to break down in a septic tank?

The bacteria take 2-4 hours to germinate and then begin to break down solid waste. If the temperature and conditions are favorable, then the bacteria will multiply to the maximum level that the environment will allow in about 2-4 days.

Top 10 products to avoid using when you have a septic tank

Throughout Metro Atlanta and the neighboring areas, The Original Plumber offers plumbing services to both residential and business customers. We are able to identify the problem quickly and begin making repairs the same day it is discovered. You can count on us to be here for you seven days a week! When you have a septic tank on your property, you must make sure that it is pumped out at regular intervals to keep it operating properly. Make a phone call to your plumber to receive the finest advise on how to keep your system in good working order.

Septic tank maintenance plans are available; please inquire.

Fabric softeners

Fabric softeners are a terrible choice for septic system owners because of the way they operate on a fundamental level of operation. They accomplish this by introducing slimy chemicals into clothing in order to soften the textiles. These slimy molecules are referred to as quats (quaternary ammonium compounds), and they have been shown to be effective against bacteria. Also included in the formulation is an acid-base mixture that is intended to regulate pH levels while washing in order to increase absorption.

Fabric softeners become poisonous to bacteria as a result of the presence of all of these substances, and you should avoid using them.

Latex products

Latex materials are typically non-biodegradable, and as a result, they should be avoided while flushing the toilet. This implies that latex products will not be digested by the bacteria and will only be eliminated at the time of the next pumping session. In certain instances, the latex may even make its way into the drain field, causing the system to become clogged and ineffective. According to popular belief, latex condoms are only constructed from the material of rubber. Truth be told, certain synthetic components are also added to make them stronger and thinner, although this is not well known.

Medicines

Medicines are goods that should not be flushed down the toilet if you have a septic system in your home. Never succumb to the temptation of dumping leftover medications down the toilet. Pharmaceutical goods have the potential to disrupt the bacterial equilibrium in a septic tank, resulting in septic tank failure. The compounds included in medications are also capable of leaking through the drain field and harming the groundwater. This is actually a pretty typical occurrence in today’s society.

Instead of flushing your medications down the toilet, take use of accessible take-back disposal services.

Antibacterial soap

Even from the name, it is clear that antibacterial soap is a product that has been particularly created to fight bacteria. If you pour this sort of soap down your drain, it will accomplish exactly what it says on the label – it will destroy the beneficial bacteria in your septic system.

To avoid this, simply wash your hands with regular soap. Natural disinfectants such as lime juice can also be used in place of antibacterial soaps to keep your home clean.

Cosmetics

Heavy metals such as zinc, chromium, silver, cadmium, and even titanium are included in the majority of cosmetic items. The septic tank becomes contaminated with some of these metals when you wash these cosmetics off in the sink. The fact that these metals are not biodegradable means that they will ultimately exit the septic tank in their original condition and wind up poisoning groundwater sources. Cosmetics, as a result, are among the most crucial goods to avoid while using a septic system.

Drain cleaners

Pipe corrosion is a result of the use of drain cleaners, which not only destroy germs in the septic system, but they also erode the pipes themselves. Therefore, drain cleaners should be avoided at all costs, especially in the case of people who do not utilize a septic system. To be on the safe side, utilize a degreaser that is both enzymatic and bacterial in nature. For anyone interested, Bio-Soli is now offering a really decent one. It comes in the form of a liquid and is extremely effective.

Bleach

Bleach is extremely poisonous to bacteria and should be avoided or used sparingly in any situation. When it comes to washing clothing, using bleach in modest amounts is OK; but, if you use too much bleach, the bleach may destroy the beneficial bacteria in the septic tank. Furthermore, bleach will leave the septic tank in its original form, resulting in contamination of the groundwater supply system.

Dishwasher and laundry detergent

In most cases, phosphates and surfactants are included in laundry and dishwashing detergents, and these substances can readily enter the drain field. Apart from causing harm to the beneficial bacteria, these phosphates and surfactants have the potential to leach out of the septic tank in a hazardous form, poisoning the surrounding groundwater supply. Always use detergents that are devoid of phosphates to prevent getting into this situation.

Crushed food

Laundry and dishwashing detergents include phosphates and surfactants, both of which are easily absorbed into the drain field by water. Besides destroying the beneficial bacteria in the septic tank, these phosphates and surfactants can also leak out of the septic tank in a poisonous form, polluting the groundwater under the surface. Always choose phosphate-free detergents to prevent getting into this situation.

Fats, Oils, and Greases (FOG)

In the event that you pour FOG down your sink, you will draw all types of issues. In the first instance, the FOG will cool down and become trapped on the edges of the pipes. In the meanwhile, the collected fog will continue to trap debris, which might eventually result in clogged pipes. Second, bacteria are not easily able to break down fats, oils, and greases, as previously stated. FOG will just float to the surface of the septic tank and contribute to the formation of the scum layer. As the FOG continues to build up, the septic tank will begin to fill up much more quickly than usual.

Conclusion

Being aware of the items to avoid using in your house can assist you in extending the life of your septic system as well as avoiding avoidable failures in the future. The ten products to avoid that we discussed above are some of the most commonly harmful products on the market, but the list only scratches the surface of the problem. The number of products that you could be using that are running your septic system without your knowledge is virtually limitless.

That’s why we put together a comprehensive eBook that includes a list of 30 products that you should avoid if you have a septic system. Please click on this link to download your free copy of the booklet, and then begin your road to a healthy and long-lasting septic system right now.

Septic Safe Products and the Ones to Avoid

Being aware of the items to avoid using in your house can assist you in extending the life of your septic system as well as preventing avoidable breakdowns in the future. The 10 goods to avoid that we discussed above are some of the most prevalent and toxic products on the market, but the list just scrapes the surface of the dangers that these products may cause. Other goods that you may be utilizing that are interfering with your septic system’s operation are not always obvious. We created a detailed eBook that includes a list of 30 things to avoid if you have a septic system, which you can get for free here.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE “SEPTIC SAFE”?

If you were born and reared in a city, it’s likely that you have little awareness about septic tanks and systems. Septic systems are an alternate drainage solution for rural households that do not have access to centralized sewage infrastructure. To answer all of your questions, Septic Systems are a type of drainage system. They transport waste and water from a residence to a specialized septic tank, where microorganisms are used to separate waste from the surrounding water. This type of tank makes use of perforated pipes that discharge the water into a piece of soil known as a drainage field.

As a closed-loop system, septic systems are useful in the Zero Waste Movement’s attempts to reduce waste.

WHY PEOPLE CHOOSE SEPTIC SYSTEMS

The advantage of using a septic tank over a sewage system is that they are significantly less expensive and more durable. Because it is a closed system that does not require any external energy, it does not generate a monthly bill and can last for decades before it needs to be upgraded. Septic systems make a good contribution to the health and well-being of the local ecosystem from an environmental perspective. During the process of pushing water through a drain field, it serves to nourish local bacteria and microorganisms, which in turn supports the growth of both plants and bacteria in the area.

  1. As a result, if toxins-containing items are introduced into these systems, they can have severe consequences not just for the mechanisms of the tank, but also for the entire ecosystem.
  2. Septic systems are not designed to protect groundwater from the chemicals contained in some home items.
  3. When purchasing new appliances, look for ones that are most suited for septic systems, such as high-efficiency toilets or washing machines that are Energy Star certified.
  4. Please choose natural laundry detergent that is made for both high-efficiency and normal machines.
  5. There are several natural alternatives to synthetic disinfectants that are safe for use in a septic system, for example.

Some of the stronger natural disinfectants, such as hydrogen peroxide and thyme oil, may still need to be diluted with water before being injected into the system due to their intensity; this is especially true for the thyme oil.

HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS TO AVOID

Water softeners are devices that soften water.

  • The use of water softeners is becoming more popular.

Oil, gasoline, paint thinners, solvents, photography chemicals, weed or bug killers are just a few examples of what you may get away with.

  • It is possible that these pollutants will poison Septic Systems and endanger the water supply.

Using Cooking Oil

  • It is possible for solidified frying fat, such as that from bacon, to build up in the tank and cause blockages in the entering and exiting pipes.
  • While these oils are pleasant to the touch, they have the potential to block the drain field and coat the waste within the tank, making it ineffective at decomposition.

Kitty Litter is a type of litter that is used for cats.

  • The majority of kitty litter is made of clay, which can block pipes.
See also:  How Much Is A 1000 Gallon Concrete Septic Tank? (Correct answer)

CLEANING PRODUCTS TO AVOID

Cleaners and disinfectants that are antibacterial

  • Antibacterial and disinfectant products are not required in most household circumstances (they were originally developed to sanitize hospitals), and they will kill beneficial bacteria that aid in the proper functioning of your septic tank.

Chlorine Bleach is a kind of disinfectant.

  • A septic tank’s microorganisms might be killed or disrupted if it receives too much bleach. Additionally, it is hazardous to aquatic life. It is very likely that the bleach from your wastewater is being released directly into the groundwater if your septic tank is located close to a natural water system
  • If your septic tank is located close to a natural water system, it is very likely that the bleach from your wastewater is being released directly into the groundwater through your septic system.

Drain Cleaners that are chemical in nature

  • When these materials are used to unclog the drain, they destroy the microorganisms in the tank, resulting in the need for expensive repairs.

Products containing methylisothiazolinone are referred to as

  • Methylisothiazolinone is a synthetic compound with antibacterial characteristics that is found in a variety of consumer items. It is most often found in cleaning products, where it serves as a synthetic preservative. Apart from the fact that it is a frequent allergy, various investigations have revealed that it is also poisonous to aquatic life.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANING PRODUCTS

Natural ingredients at their best.

  • Please remember that your septic tank does not filter out chemicals or pollutants, and that the waste it produces is returned directly into the surrounding ecosystem. This is why it is critical to utilize natural cleansers that will not contribute to the rising quantity of synthetic chemicals that are severely harming our natural environment.

Biodegradable

  • Product formulations should only contain biodegradable substances that will degrade in a natural setting, rather than persistent synthetic compounds that might accumulate in a product. Inquire as to whether your cleaning products, especially those used on a regular basis such as dishwasher detergents, are truly non-toxic and completely biodegradable.

Certified by a third party

  • It is critical to seek third-party certification that the items that flow through your septic system and into the environment will not have a harmful influence on the ecosystem. Examples of such organizations are Ecocert and The Environmental Working Group. By doing so, you may be confident that the items you select are truly better for the environment and are not merely making unfounded “green” claims for the sake of branding. To determine which products are best for your septic system, see the Environmental Working Group’s Healthy Cleaning Guide rating.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANING PRODUCTS LIST

Septic systems are quite fragile. A 1,000-gallon septic tank may be completely decontaminated with just two gallons of chlorine bleach, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. While even a tiny amount of the wrong chemicals may cause havoc on your septic system, the majority of all-natural cleansers are safe to use on your system. Natural cleaning solutions that are non-chlorine, non-ammonia, non-antibacterial, non-toxic, and biodegradable can assist you in keeping your septic system in good operating condition.

  • System failure can be catastrophic. The bacteria in a 1,000-gallon sewage tank can be killed with as little as two gallons of chlorine bleach. Most all-natural cleansers are suitable for use in septic systems, unlike certain chemicals that can be harmful in little amounts. Keep your septic system in good operating condition by using natural cleaning chemicals that are free of chlorination, ammonia, antibacterial agents, toxins, and are biodegradable. You may safely clean and disinfect your house using the following natural, ordinary products:

SEPTIC SAFE BATHROOM CLEANERS

While it’s simple to utilize all-natural cleaning solutions in the majority of places of your house, the bathroom is one area where chemical cleansers are almost always a given. A clean bathroom is crucial for your health, but cleaning your shower, tub and other bathroom surfaces does not require the use of harsh chemicals to get the desired results. These natural bathroom cleansers are highly effective and do not harm septic systems:

  • The natural enzymes in white vinegar will break down soap scum and foul smells
  • White vinegar is inexpensive and readily available. Baking soda – The abrasive texture of baking soda is ideal for polishing brass bathroom fittings. To get optimum disinfection power on surfaces, mix 12 cup of borax with 12 cup of water.

TOILET CLEANERS SAFE FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS

The toilet is infamous for being a filthy environment. It might be tempting to use strong cleaning agents to ensure that germs are completely destroyed. Many toilet bowl cleaners contain bleach, and others are even formulated with hydrochloric acid to remove stains from the bowl. Natural, plant-based cleansers, on the other hand, are robust enough to clean your toilet while still being the safest for the health of your septic system and the health of your family. Make sure to avoid using cleansers that include hazardous ingredients such as harmful bleach or ammonia as well as phosphates and petroleum-based compounds, which can disrupt your septic system.

Here is a list of natural toilet cleansers that are safe to use in a septic tank:

  • Baking soda is a scouring agent that is both affordable and effective. Pour half of a small box of baking soda into the toilet bowl and leave it to rest for at least an hour. Immediately after mixing, flush the liquid down the toilet before cleaning it with a toilet brush. White Hard water stains in the toilet bowl may be broken down with the aid of household vinegar, which has a high acidity. Pour one cup of vinegar into the bowl and let it aside overnight. In the morning, scrape the surface. If you use baking soda along with the vinegar, you’ll find that their effects cancel each other out and become ineffectual.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANING

Natural cleaning solutions are generally considered to be safe for use in septic systems. Take the guesswork out of selecting items for use in septic systems by using a product comparison chart. “Septic Safe” is a label that appears on products that are safe for use in septic systems. Most of these materials are natural and biodegradable, and they will appropriately degrade within the tank without interfering with the bacteria’s ability to function. Consumer items such as housekeeping and cleaning products are one of the most serious threats to septic systems.

Being environmentally conscious means using items that are safe for septic tanks and taking responsibility for what you put in the water and the soil.

Products that you use on a regular basis, such as laundry detergent and dish soap, should be handled with extra caution. Even if you have centralized sewage, use septic-safe products to keep your home and yard clean.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANERS: FAQ

In the world of septic systems, there is contradicting information regarding what is safe and what is potentially dangerous. Here, we clarify the air on some often asked issues about septic cleaners:

1. IS VINEGAR SAFE FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS?

Vinegar is completely harmless to septic systems and will not do any damage to them. White vinegar and apple cider vinegar are wonderful cleaning tools that may be used throughout the house, including the laundry room, kitchen, bathroom, and other areas. Because it is non-toxic and 100 percent natural, vinegar of any kind is completely safe for your septic system and your household.

2. WHAT DRAIN CLEANERS ARE SAFE FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS?

Drain cleaners are famously harsh because they are required to be so. It might require a significant amount of force to break through the buildup in pipes. However, only a few drain cleaners, when used in moderation, are suitable for septic systems. Drain cleaners that foam, solidify, or crystallize can cause harm to the system and should not be utilized. To avoid causing harm to the system, use septic-safe liquid drain cleaning only when absolutely necessary. Non-chemical methods such as a pipe snake can be used to safely clear clogged drains that have become stubborn.

SAFE SEPTIC CLEANING WITH ASPENCLEAN

To ensure that all of their laundry detergents and cleaning chemicals are completely septic-safe, AspenClean employs the same natural, biodegradable, and ecologically friendly cleaning materials as they use in their professional cleaning service. It is possible to ensure that your home will receive a high-quality clean while not causing damage to your septic system by utilizing natural laundry detergents, dish soaps, as well as their house cleaning services and supplies.

5 Cleaning Products That Damage Your Septic System

You may have heard that some cleaning chemicals can be harmful to the organisms in your septic tank. This is true. However, avoiding bleach is only the beginning of your efforts. Here are five types of cleaning chemicals to avoid using in favor of alternatives that are less harmful to your septic system. 1. Sodium hypochlorite In addition to harming the beneficial anaerobic bacteria in your septic tank, chlorine bleach also has antibacterial qualities that affect the microorganisms (both aerobic and anaerobic) in your septic leach field.

  1. The way you use the bleach makes a difference, as well.
  2. In comparison to a capful of bleach poured into a washing machine to whiten laundry or cleaners poured into a toilet bowl, these trace amounts are less likely to cause problems.
  3. Even non-bleach detergents frequently include components that you don’t want to be flushed down the toilet with your wastewater.
  4. Another reason to be cautious about the detergents you use is that powdered detergents have been shown to accelerate the formation of clogs in pipes, particularly when used excessively.
  5. Look for high-quality, phosphate-free products and use only a little amount of them.
  6. And, as it turns out, the regular use of antibacterial soap can be detrimental to the septic system’s ecology.
  7. Non-antibacterial hand soap should be used at the bathroom sink in order to avoid this problem.

4.

Before purchasing one of these cleaners, check for surfactants and phosphates, just like you would with any other.

While it’s true that a toilet cleaner is unlikely to eliminate all of the bacteria in your septic system on its own, it may still do some damage since the chemicals may accumulate quickly if the cleaner is used with every flush.

The reason they are extremely caustic and harmful, far more so than regular home detergents, is because of this.

Drain cleaners are dangerous not only to your family and pets, but also to your septic tank and drainfield, due to the high concentration and harshness of the chemicals in them.

Instead of utilizing chemical drain cleaners, call a plumber for assistance.

These five cleaning agents are all known to harm the interior flora of your septic system.

Initially, septic systems may appear difficult and picky, but if you follow a few easy principles and hire a professional to take care of any necessary maintenance or repairs, you should be in good condition.

If your septic system is in need of an inspection or pumping, contact GYST Consulting immediately.

5 Household Products that Are Bad for Your Septic

Going about your daily routine around the house, it’s likely that your septic system isn’t at the forefront of your thoughts. As a matter of fact, we don’t normally give them much attention when we’re throwing away everyday items like paper towels and detergent. There are certain goods on the market that may appear harmless to you, but can cause havoc on your septic system, resulting in a bill that is far greater than the product’s original cost. Here is a list of five commonly used goods that might be causing damage to your septic system.

AmmoniaBleach

While ammonia and bleach are excellent for cleaning your bathroom and removing stains from your clothes, a high amount of either can cause catastrophic damage to your pipes and septic system if used excessively. Because of the antibacterial qualities of bleach, it might inhibit the growth of bacteria that break down particles in your septic tank, which is undesirable. If you’re feeling extra creative, you might experiment with an all-natural DIY bleach alternative, such as one that has hydrogen peroxide, lemon juice, baking soda, and water as the main ingredients.

Laundry Detergent

The detergent that is used to wash clothing often contains impurities such as phosphates and surfactants, which makes it excellent for cleaning but detrimental to your septic system’s performance. The chemical can seep into your drain field and contaminate your drinking water if it is used too frequently. Because detergent is more concentrated than soap, a small amount goes a big way in terms of cleaning power. New plant-based detergents are becoming more popular and readily available in supermarkets, so try switching to a different brand the next time you run out of your regular soap.

Drain Cleaner

Ironically, drain cleaning isn’t all that beneficial to the health of your pipes. If you’re using it on a weekly basis to clear clogs, you may want to consult with a professional who can pinpoint the cause of the problem and fix it. Using drain cleaning too frequently might have a negative impact on your septic system’s ability to function correctly. Using a tiny quantity in combination with water makes the mixture too diluted to be harmful to the beneficial bacteria in your septic system. As an alternative, you might try a DIY treatment consisting of baking soda mixed with vinegar or lemon juice.

Cooking Grease

However, drain cleaning is not really beneficial to your drain. The use of a professional to address the cause of the problem may be warranted if you’re using it on a weekly basis to treat blockages. Abusing your septic system by using drain cleaner too frequently might have a negative impact on its performance. Using a tiny quantity in combination with water makes the mixture too diluted to do harm to the beneficial microorganisms in your septic system. Alternatively, you might try a DIY treatment consisting of baking soda mixed with vinegar or lemon juice.

Cat Litter

Your kitten may be a favorite of yours, but your septic system is not so enthusiastic! If the litter is made of clay, it has the potential to clog your pipes as well. Once clay is mixed with water and allowed to dry, it has the potential to solidify and obstruct the flow of solids to your septic system. Keep an eye out for litter that is advertised as flushable. It is preferable to be safe and simply throw it away in the garbage. If you discover that your septic system is not functioning properly as a result of the presence of hazardous products, please contact us at 800-595-7907 or complete our online form.

We can get it back up and running correctly, as well as provide you with advise on how to avoid such problems in the future. Felix Septic Service2020-05-19T15:39:46-04:00https://www.felixsepticservice.com

Protecting Your Septic Tank System from Cleaning Chemicals

Riverside, California 92504-17333 Van Buren Boulevard Call us right now at (951) 780-5922. When it comes to household septic systems, it is likely that you will not consider them until there is a problem. Unfortunately, when there is an issue, it is almost always a costly and time-consuming one to deal with. If your home is one of the more than 25 percent of residences in the United States that rely on a septic system to treat domestic plumbing waste, you should be aware of the best practices for keeping the system in good working order.

See also:  How To Locate My Septic Tank Beaufort County Sc? (Solved)

But what about the laundry detergents and cleaning chemicals that you use on a weekly basis around the house.

Choose Septic Friendly Cleaning Products

The most obvious indication that a product is suitable for use with septic systems is the presence of a label declaring that it is safe for use in such residences. To identify any potentially hazardous chemical, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assigns it a registration number. This signifies that the product is suitable for use in both the residence and the septic system. These labels can be found on a variety of everyday household products. Any biodegradable or ecologically friendly product is entirely acceptable for use in septic systems and can be found in most grocery stores.

Septic Safe Labels

Having a label that states that a product is safe for use in septic systems is the most obvious evidence of its safety for this use. Each potentially hazardous substance is assigned a registration number by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). According to this label, the product is safe for use in both the home and the septic system. The following labels can be seen on a wide variety of everyday home goods. In addition to being totally acceptable for use in septic systems, any biodegradable or ecologically friendly product is also perfectly safe to use.

Household Bleach

Using bleach-containing products in tiny amounts with septic systems is not harmful to the system. Although bleach is effective in killing bacteria, when diluted with water, as is common in most domestic uses, it is not powerful enough to eliminate all of the germs in the tank’s interior. Nonetheless, it is critical that bleach not be used in excess since a high concentration of bleach can cause harm to the septic system. To safeguard the beneficial bacteria in the tank, wherever feasible, use alternatives to chlorine bleach.

All-Purpose Cleaners

Disinfectants that are mild, such as laundry detergents and any other products that may be used without gloves, are typically safe to use in septic systems. The best detergents are those that are phosphate-free and low-sudsing. You may also use natural detergents to clean your clothes. Other all-purpose surface cleansers are also suitable for use in the home.

These cleansers do not contain the harsh chemicals that might harm septic lines or the bacteria that lives within the tank, as found in other brands. For the safest usage, look for cleaning products that are non-toxic, biodegradable, and free of chlorine.

Ammonia Cleaner

When used in tiny amounts, cleaning solutions containing ammonia as well as pure ammonia are completely safe for use in septic systems. In septic tanks, ammonia does not destroy the germs that grow there. It is not recommended to combine chemicals such as bleach and ammonia.

Water-Based Cleaners

Septic systems are safe to use with almost any type of water-based cleaner. This includes carpet cleaning products as well as tub and toilet cleansers and disinfectants. In order to be classified as a water-based cleaner, the first component listed on the label should be water. Chemicals included in water-based cleansers are less harmful to the fragile septic system since they do not contain strong solvents.

Septic-Safe Drain Cleaner

The use of liquid and crystal cleansers is effective in cutting through grease and blockages. These products do, however, include potentially hazardous substances such as sodium hydroxide, lye, sulfuric acid, and hydrochloric acid. When used in large quantities or at high concentrations, they can cause corrosion in metal pipes and the destruction of beneficial microorganisms throughout the septic tank.

Products To Avoid Putting In Your Septic System

What you should be concerned about is not just the septic tank cleaning chemicals, but also other factors. You should also be cautious about allowing any of the goods or substances listed below to enter your home’s septic system.

  • Water softeners: When you use water softeners, the microorganisms in your septic tank may suffer as a result. They have the potential to generate larger concentrations of trash to be released into the environment. Products containing oil: Gasoline, solvents, paint thinners, and pesticides are all known to poison septic systems and have a negative impact on water supply. Oil-based bath products: While using bath oils may make you feel wonderful, they are not beneficial for your home’s septic system. They have the potential to block pipes and deposit a coating on garbage. In this way, the waste is prevented from decomposing, leaving the system completely useless. Grease: Grease from fatty meals such as bacon can accumulate in the tank. Clogged pipes might arise as a result of this
  • Nonetheless, Drain cleansers: To clear a clogged drain, homeowners frequently use drain cleaners. However, if you do not use safe materials, they might cause the microorganisms in your septic tank to become inactive. Caustic cleansers should be avoided at all costs. It is preferable to use hot water or a sewer snake in this situation. Medicines: Never flush away any drugs that have been left over. Pharmaceuticals have the potential to disrupt the bacterial equilibrium in your septic system, resulting in septic system failure. They also contribute to the spread of “superbugs,” which are antibiotic-resistant germs that represent a threat to the health of the entire population. Using antibacterial hand soap or any product claiming to be antibacterial should be avoided not only because of the obvious harm they could do to the bacterial colony your septic system requires to function, but also because they are now being linked to the development of antibiotic resistant “super-bugs” (bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics). Toilet cleaners that operate on their own: In addition to killing the germs in your toilet, the antibacterial compounds in automated toilet cleaners destroy the microorganisms in your septic tank as well. These toilet cleansers have the potential to result in a septic tank that is overflowing with blue water and a large amount of dead bacteria. Cleaning the toilet using a mix of baking soda and white vinegar, on the other hand, will provide similarly effective foamy results that are harmless. Dishwasher detergents are available in a variety of strengths. Dishwasher detergent is more likely than laundry detergent to include phosphates and surfactants, both of which are toxic to the microorganisms in your septic tank and should be avoided. They can also flow through your septic tank to the drain field, where they can ultimately permeate the soil and leach into ground water, putting you and your family at danger for drinking water contamination. Look for and use detergent that is free of phosphates.

The Use of Water Softeners: When you use water softeners, the microorganisms in your septic tank may be harmed. Increased concentrations of trash can be released into the environment as a result of its use. Produts containing oil: Petrol, solvents, paint thinners, and pesticides may all contaminate and pollute the septic system, as well as contaminating and polluting water supplies. Oil-based bath products: While using bath oils may make you feel wonderful, they are not beneficial for your house’s septic system.

  1. In this way, the waste is prevented from decomposing, rendering the system useless.
  2. Clogged pipes might arise as a result of this situation.
  3. The microorganisms in the septic tank, on the other hand, can be destroyed if you do not use safe materials.
  4. The use of hot water or a sewer snake will be more effective in this situation.
  5. Pharmaceuticals have the potential to disrupt the bacterial equilibrium in your septic system, resulting in septic failure and other problems.
  6. Toilet cleaners that operate on an automatic cycle: In addition to killing germs in your toilet, the antibacterial compounds used in automated toilet cleaners destroy microorganisms in your septic tank as well.
  7. Cleaning the toilet using a mixture of baking soda and white vinegar, on the other hand, will provide similarly effective foamy results that are harmless.

This type of chemical can flow through your septic tank and into the drain field, where it can eventually seep into the soil, putting you and your family at danger of drinking water that has been poisoned. Phosphate-free detergent should be sought out and used.

  • Disposable diapers
  • Sanitary napkins or tampons
  • Paper towels or bandages
  • Dental floss
  • Condoms
  • Hair
  • Cigarette butts
  • Disposable diapers
  • Disposable diapers Coffee grinds
  • Kitty litter
  • And so on.

Care with Laundry Detergents

It is possible that your laundry contributes a significant portion of the volume in your septic system. It is likely that the majority of the laundry detergents available at your local grocery shop include some form of environmental contamination. Check the label carefully for the contents; the majority of big brands of liquid fabric softener are petroleum-based. They cover your garments with oil, which then leaks into your septic tank. As an alternative, you can use plant-based fabric softeners or just add 1 1/4 cup of distilled white vinegar into the washing machine before starting the cycle.

This causes oil to seep into your garments and into your septic tank.

Surfactants, which are foaming agents, are found in all soaps and detergents, and they are used to create foam.

Unfortunately, they have a negative impact on cell membranes and microorganisms, and they will harm the bacteria colony in your septic system.

Avoid or Reduce Disinfectant Use

Another important piece of septic tank advice is to be cautious when selecting the cleansers and chemicals that you use around your house or business. Your septic tank’s ability to operate correctly is dependent on the presence of ‘friendly’ bacteria. The problem is that many disinfectants, bleaches, and household cleansers are especially formulated to kill bacteria. Use organic and biodegradable home items wherever feasible to reduce the likelihood of septic tank issues. If you use drain cleaners, never let them enter the system since even a tiny amount of these harsh chemicals may wreak havoc on the microorganisms in the system and create septic tank issues.

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Choosing the cleansers and chemicals that you use around your house is another important piece of septic tank knowledge to know and remember. For your septic tank to work correctly, it must be populated with “friendly” bacteria. The difficulty is that a large number of disinfectants, bleaches, and household cleansers are intended expressly to kill bacteria. Organic and biodegradable home items should be used wherever feasible to minimize septic tank issues. Don’t use drain cleaners since even a tiny amount of these harsh chemicals can cause havoc on the microorganisms in your system, resulting in septic tank difficulties.

Safe Cleaners For Your Septic System – Crews Environmental

You should be aware of what cleaning products are acceptable to use in your house if you have a septic system. Is Borax a cleaning product that should be avoided in homes with a septic system? What about bleach, do you think? Using an excessive amount of chemicals will disrupt the bacterial equilibrium required for a healthy septic tank.

When the balance is disrupted, issues will occur. Systems begin to clog, and the drain field begins to malfunction. Because everyone must clean, septic-safe chemicals should be used for the greatest results.

  • Some chemical-based cleaning solutions are safe for septic systems to handle in tiny quantities. Don’t go crazy with your enthusiasm. Utilize natural cleaning products instead to be on the safe side
  • When it comes to septic systems, the best choice is to purchase goods that have been labeled as safe for use with them. A number is assigned by the Environmental Protection Agency to chemicals and pesticides, and that number will be used to assess the safety of the substance. Septic systems are not harmed by environmentally friendly chemicals or biodegradable cleansers
  • Nonetheless, When it comes to laundry detergent, the best options are those that are phosphate-free (minimal sudsing), nontoxic, biodegradable, and not chlorinated. These cleansers do not include any strong chemicals that might harm the microorganisms in a septic tank if used improperly. Good bacteria and enzymes are killed by phosphate-based cleaning agents used in sewage treatment plants. When used in tiny volumes, ammonia products are completely safe for use in septic systems. In septic tanks, ammonia does not destroy the germs that grow there. Chemicals, such as bleach, should not be used with ammonia. Generally speaking, most water-based cleansers (those including water as the initial component) are acceptable to use in septic tanks. It is important to use drain cleaning, even septic-tank friendly ones, with caution in order to avoid harm to your septic system. Do not use foam drain cleaners
  • Only liquid drain cleaners should be used
  • Certain household goods that you currently use and have on hand are safe to use in your septic system. Baking soda, vinegar (both white vinegar and apple cider vinegar), Borax, OxiClean, and bleach are some of the items that may be used to clean extremely well while still being safe for septic systems to utilize. As an added bonus, oxidized bleaches are a less dangerous option to chlorine bleach. When you flush your toilet with Epsom salts, it can be good to your septic tank’s drain field, since it increases the amount of magnesium in the soil, which promotes plant development.

4 Household Products That Aren’t Good for Your Septic Tank

Disposing of liquid waste by washing it down the drain of your sink or bathtub is one of the simplest methods available. The condition of your septic tank should be taken into consideration before you mindlessly dispose of waste in this manner, though. Because bacteria in your tank are responsible for decomposition of waste, you must avoid flushing anything that will harm or destroy these microscopic creatures. Bacteria normally decompose 95 percent of trash, leaving only 5 percent to be recycled.

While many home chemicals will have no effect on these bacteria, there are a few common types of products that might cause irreversible damage to the health of your tank’s microorganisms.

1. Ammonia and Bleach

These strong cleaning equipment may assist you in getting a sparkling bathroom, but they can also do significant damage to your tank. Small amounts of these chemicals, like as the amount you use while cleaningclothes, should not be dangerous in large quantities, though. If you flush a full bottle down the toilet, on the other hand, you risk causing major damage to the microorganisms in your tank.

2. Laundry Detergent

Laundry detergent differs from soap in several ways, none of which are positive. Phosphates and surfactants, which are common in laundry detergents, are environmental hazards that should be avoided. These substances can seep into your drainfield, posing a threat to animals and poisoning your drinking water.

3. Dishwasher Detergent

Nonylphenol ethoxylate surfactants and phosphates are also included in dishwashing detergent in the same amounts as in laundry detergent. If these harmful chemicals make it through your tank without killing bacteria, they can ultimately seep into the surrounding soil and can spread to adjacent water sources, where they will kill fish and other aquatic species, among other things.

4. Drain Cleaner

Using drain cleaners in little amounts should not be too detrimental to your tank because they become too diluted to do significant damage to microorganisms. If, on the other hand, you treat your drains on a weekly or even monthly basis, your tank may be in danger of being clogged. Because cleaning products include caustic chemicals, your bacteria counts may drop to dangerously low levels as a result of the usage of these products.

See also:  What Can I Put On A Septic Tank Spill? (Correct answer)

Top 10 Items To Avoid Putting In Your Septic System

Submitted byRobert Robillard on Home Repairs, Plumbing, and Electrical

Caring for Your Septic System

If you have a septic system in your home, you must exercise extreme caution when it comes to the household goods that you use. Septic systems rely on bacteria to break down wastes and sediments, but in order for these bacteria to live, they must be in a certain environment. If you use the incorrect type of detergent in your washing machine or the incorrect drain cleaner, you may wind up destroying the microorganisms in your septic system, leaving it inoperable.

Overflows, obstructions, flooded drain fields, and even groundwater pollution can result as a result of this. To ensure that your septic system continues to work correctly, stay away from these common home goods.

Medicines

When you have unused prescriptions on hand, it might be tempting to flush them down the toilet to eliminate them. DON’T. Pharmaceuticals have the potential to disrupt the bacterial equilibrium in your septic system, resulting in septic system failure. They also contribute to the spread of “superbugs,” germs that are resistant to antibiotics and represent a threat to the health of the entire population. Improperly disposed of drugs damage groundwater, putting the environment and, more importantly, your own drinking water at risk of contamination.

In a countrywide survey conducted in 2000, pharmaceuticals were discovered in 80 percent of the rivers and streams examined.

To safely dispose of medications

The temptation to flush away leftover drugs is strong when you have them on hand. DON’T. Pharmaceuticals have the potential to disrupt the bacterial equilibrium in your septic system, resulting in septic failure and other problems. They also contribute to the spread of “superbugs,” germs that are resistant to antibiotics and represent a threat to the health of the entire community. When drugs are improperly disposed of, they pollute groundwater, putting the ecosystem at risk as well as your personal drinking water supply.

A countrywide survey conducted in 2000 discovered pharmaceuticals in 80 percent of the rivers and streams examined.

Non-Septic Safe Toilet Paper

The only item that should be flushed into your septic tank is human waste, and that should be done using a septic safe toilet paper. A toilet paper that is biodegradable and dissolves fast is essential. On the packaging, look for the words “Septic Safe.” After evaluating 21 brands for softness, strength, and ripping ease in March of 2014, two brands stood out: White Cloud 3 Ply Ultra and Charmin Ultra Strong, however the Charmin did not disintegrate as rapidly as the White Cloud.

“Flush-able Wipes” and other Clogging Hazards

Flushable wipes, despite the fact that they are advertised as such, are anything but; they can take up to 10 minutes to break up and provide a significant clog danger.

Laundry Detergents

It is possible that your laundry contributes a significant portion of the volume in your septic system. It is likely that the majority of the laundry detergents available at your local grocery shop include some form of environmental contamination. Look for the following:

Low Suds or Biodegradable:

Surfactants, which are foaming agents, are found in all soaps and detergents, and they are used to create foam. They work by lowering the surface tension of fluids, letting them to flow more freely between solids and so remove dirt from the surface of objects.

Unfortunately, they have a negative impact on cell membranes and microorganisms, and they will harm the bacteria colony in your septic system. Fortunately, they decay rapidly and do not constitute a significant hazard to groundwater.

Low or no phosphorous and nitrogen:

We are fortunate in that nutrient pollutants such as phosphates and nitrates are now being phased out of the detergents we use since they encourage the growth of algae and weeds that choke out fish and wildlife in our ponds, lakes, streams, and rivers.

Chlorine free:

Chlorine bleach is extremely hazardous and should be avoided if possible, or used in small amounts when necessary. Unfortunately, chlorine bleach is included in a variety of cleaning and disinfecting products. Alternatives that are more effective include oxygen-based bleaches for laundry and white vinegar for disinfection.

Antibacterial Soaps

Avoid using antibacterial hand soaps and any product that claims to be antibacterial. This is not only due to the obvious harm they could do to your bacterial colony, which is required for your septic system to function, but it is also due to the fact that they are now being linked to the development of antibiotic resistant “superbugs.” The good old-fashioned soap and water will suffice.

Automatic Toilet Cleaners

In addition to killing the germs in your toilet, the antibacterial compounds in automated toilet cleaners destroy the microorganisms in your septic tank as well. These toilet cleansers have the potential to result in a septic tank that is overflowing with blue water and a large amount of dead bacteria. A mixture of baking soda and white vinegar, used to clean the toilet, will provide similarly effective foamy results that are completely safe.

Dishwasher Detergents

Dishwasher detergent is more likely than laundry detergent to include phosphates and surfactants, both of which are toxic to the microorganisms in your septic tank and should be avoided. They can also move through your septic tank to the drain field, where they can eventually seep into the soil and leak into ground water, putting your family at danger of drinking polluted water. Look for and use detergent that is free of phosphates.

Drain Cleaners

Drain cleaners should not be used by any homeowner, including those who do not have septic systems in their homes. Chemical drain cleaners not only have the potential to harm beneficial bacteria in your septic tank, but they may also eat away at your pipes! The caustic soda or lye employed in them is a potent oxidant and can result in serious burns if ingested or handled improperly. If your drains are blocked, it is far preferable to spend a little extra money to call a plumber to unclog them rather than using a chemical drain cleaner to clear them.

DIY Drain Cleaner:

  1. Add 1/2 cup baking soda to the drain and let it sit for a few minutes before adding 1/2 cup white vinegar mixed with extremely hot water to the drain. Allow for a few minutes of resting. This will trigger a chemical reaction, resulting in a lot of foaming, therefore stop the drain or cover it with a towel. The mixture will begin to work immediately, breaking down any fats into salt and inert gas. Boiling water should be used to flush

Bath Oils

Pour boiling water down the drain; add 1/2 cup baking soda and allow to rest for a few minutes; add 1/2 cup white vinegar mixed with extremely hot water; and flush the drain. Allow yourself a few minutes of resting time before continuing. A chemical reaction will occur, resulting in a lot of foaming, therefore stop the drain or cover it with a towel to prevent this from happening again. Efforts will be made to break down any fats in the combination into salt and harmless gas. Boiling water should be used to flush.

Solvents

Don’t flush anything inorganic down the toilet such as paints, solvents, insecticides, oils, or anything else that might kill the bacteria.

Other UnsafeSeptic Items – Things not to flush include

  • Disposable diapers
  • Sanitary napkins or tampons
  • Paper towels or bandages
  • Dental floss
  • Condoms
  • Hair
  • Cigarette butts
  • Disposable diapers
  • Disposable diapers Coffee grinds
  • Kitty litter
  • And so on.

Author’s Bio:Steve McGonagle, proprietor of Septic Genie, assists homeowners in diagnosing and resolving their septic system problems. The Septic Genie method, which was first patented in 1995, has assisted hundreds of households in restoring their damaged septic systems while avoiding the expensive cost of “dig and replace.” is a website dedicated to providing trouble-free septic systems for life. ​

9 Ways You’re Destroying Your Septic Tank

Unlike those of us who live on municipal sewer systems, those who live on septic tanks need pay closer attention to what happens when they flush the toilet or where all of the dishwater goes. If they do not, they may find themselves in trouble later on down the road. Listed here are the most typical mistakes that homeowners do when it comes to abusing their septic tank, in order to assist you in protecting your house from damage. These should be avoided at all costs, or else you will be forced to pay the price (literally).

1. Flushing Paper Products

Not everything that is made of paper is acceptable for flushing down the bathroom toilet. Paper goods such as tissues, paper towels, tampons or sanitary products, as well as certain thicker toilet paper, may clog your system if you flush an excessive amount of them down the toilet. Wet wipes are yet another product that should never be flushed down the toilet or into a septic system. Even the “flushable” wipes have been demonstrated to not break down as they should, resulting in serious consequences.

Keep the paper goods that you flush down the toilet as basic as possible.

Everything else should be disposed of properly.

2. Pouring Grease Down the Drain

You might believe that dumping grease down the kitchen sink or flushing it down the toilet is totally OK while the grease is still hot. This is just incorrect, people. Grease is one of the most detrimental substances to your septic system. After cooling, it congeals and clogs the pipes almost immediately. As with the arteries leading to the heart, fatty diets cause them to become blocked with fatty deposits. Flooding is caused by clogged drains, which results in a lot of money being spent. The most effective technique to deal with grease is to allow it to cool and harden before scraping it into a container or sealable bag that can be thrown away immediately after.

3. Using Too Much Drain Cleaner

It is intended to be used in drains, so if you pour a little extra down the sink, it will perform even better. That appears to be rational, doesn’t it? Wrong. When you pour large volumes of harsh chemicals or drain cleaner down your sink or toilet, you are causing irreparable damage to your pipes and plumbing system. Your plumbing will deteriorate first and foremost as a result of dangerous substances. For the second time, they eliminate the beneficial bacteria in your tank that digest and break down waste to keep your system operating properly.

Drain cleaner should only be used when absolutely necessary and as instructed to eliminate obstructions. “Too much of everything is bad,” as my grandmother used to say, and she was right.

4. Introducing Additives to Your System

Those advertisements for a septic tank enzyme supplement that you see on TV every now and then? It asserts that natural enzymes aid in the breakdown of waste, increasing the efficiency of your system and boosting its overall performance. Make no mistake: septic tank additives can potentially do more harm than help to your septic system. The enzymes break down materials too quickly, causing the smaller particles to float to the surface and then spill out into your drain field, clogging it up even worse.

What is the solution?

Allow your tank to operate in its natural state, as it was intended.

5. Flushing Cat Litter

You might believe that because kitty litter includes waste, it is okay to flush it down the toilet. That is not true, and many individuals continue to flush it down the toilet, causing damage to their septic system. Cat litter can be extremely destructive to plumbing, and if it is flushed down the toilet, it can cause a severe blockage. Cat litter is often composed of clay, and pouring it through your pipes or, more critically, into your septic tank can cause difficulties since, unlike garbage, clay does not decompose.

When it comes to litter removal, it is preferable to keep it away from your plumbing and dispose of it in the garbage.

6. Neglecting to Pump Your Tank Regularly

If you don’t get your septic tank drained on a regular basis, you’re increasing the likelihood of it failing. This is one of the disadvantages of using a septic system rather than a municipal water connection. tanks have a limited capacity and must be emptied every 3 to 5 years, or even more frequently if you use your system frequently. If you don’t drain your tank eventually, it will back up and overflow into your home through your plumbing fittings, causing damage. Nobody wants to be responsible for that shambles!

7. Planting Trees and Shrubs on Your Drain Field

If you don’t get your septic tank drained on a regular basis, you’re putting it at risk of collapse. When compared to a municipal water connection, this is one of the disadvantages of using a septic system. tanks have a limited capacity and must be emptied every 3 to 5 years, or even more frequently if your system is heavily used. The water in your tank will ultimately back up and overflow into your home through your plumbing fittings if you do not drain it properly. Nobody wants to be responsible for that shitstorm!

8. Washer Lint Overload

However, if you wash a lot of synthetic clothing, the lint and fibers in the unclean washing water can seep into your septic system and cause it to overflow. If you have a septic system that is overflowing, call a professional. The beneficial bacteria and enzymes that work so hard to break down solids are unable to digest synthetic fibers, and as a result, the system becomes overburdened, resulting in costly system repairs.

Installing a lint filter on your washer’s drain is one option. Alternatively, The Family Handyman provides a wonderful instruction on how to build one for yourself on their website.

9. Installing a Garbage Disposal

Unless you have a tank-based septic system in place, it is not suggested that you install a garbage disposal in your house. The food in your tank does not drop to the bottom, despite the fact that the bacteria are grinding it up into minute particles. As a result, solids pile up quicker than the bacteria can break them down. If you do have a disposal, exercise extreme caution while putting things down it. Non-food objects may find their way into your garbage disposal, even if you are extremely careful.

One option for dealing with food waste is to compost it, which can then be used in your garden later on.

Septic systems require special attention and maintenance to ensure that they continue to perform properly.

If you take proper care of your septic tank, it will last you for years with little maintenance required.

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