What Happens If Chemicals Get Mixed In Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

While a few household chemicals are broken down in a septic tank, many household chemicals are toxic to the bacteria that consume the solid waste. This can result in damage to your home’s septic system and have a negative impact on the surrounding soil and groundwater.

  • There are many harmful chemical substance contained in pesticide like DDT, DDE, DDD, Metam sodium, Carbamate and so much more that will poison and caused deceased to human. Pouring pesticide to your septic tank will be mixed with ground water and will poisoning human.

What chemical kills septic tank?

Caustic soda or lye at high levels in a septic tank risks killing the bacteria needed to break down sewage pathogens both in the tank itself and also in the soil into which the septic tank effluent is discharged.

What happens if bleach gets in your septic tank?

When household chemicals get introduced to your septic tank, it kills the live bacteria inside that is needed to break down and treat the waste properly. Once the chemical or bleach kills the bacteria, it causes “die-off” and it builds up in the septic tank with nowhere to go.

What can damage a septic system?

9 Ways You’re Destroying Your Septic Tank

  • Flushing Paper Products.
  • Pouring Grease Down the Drain.
  • Using Too Much Drain Cleaner.
  • Introducing Additives to Your System.
  • Flushing Cat Litter.
  • Neglecting to Pump Your Tank Regularly.
  • Planting Trees and Shrubs on Your Drain Field.
  • Washer Lint Overload.

What causes a septic tank to explode?

The most common reason that septic tanks explode is the methane gas. The organic matter that ends up in your septic tank breaks down, as it should. Another reason they may explode is improper ventilation which causes the methane gas to reach levels that are too high and unsafe which could result in an explosion.

Do I need to add chemicals to my septic tank?

Chemicals and other additives promoted to keep a septic system “healthy” or “free-flowing” or “nourished” are generally not required nor recommended by any known expert sources.

What chemicals should you avoid with a septic tank?

But to make it even clearer, here are the top ten household products to avoid when you have a septic tank.

  • Fabric softeners.
  • Latex products.
  • Medicines.
  • Antibacterial soap.
  • Cosmetics.
  • Drain cleaners.
  • Bleach.
  • Dishwasher and laundry detergent.

Is Gain detergent safe for septic systems?

Is Gain Laundry Detergent Safe for Septic Systems? What Laundry Detergent Is Safe for Septic Systems? Is ALL Laundry Detergent Safe for Septic Systems? Yes, ALL laundry detergent is safe for septic systems.

Can you pour milk down the drain if you have a septic tank?

If not the trash. A man who has a septic tank service told us to buy a gallon of whole milk and let it go bad a few days and flush it into the septic tank to feed the bacteria. He said to do this about once a month.

Is vinegar safe for septic tanks?

Will baking soda hurt a septic system? Baking soda and other common household solutions such as vinegar are not harmful to your septic system. Harsh chemicals such as bleach and ammonia can disrupt the good bacteria in your septic tank and should not be used as part of a septic treatment.

How do you know if your septic field is failing?

The first signs of a failing septic system may include slow draining toilets and sinks, gurgling noises within the plumbing, sewage odors inside, continuing drainage backups, or bacteria in the well water. The area of the strongest odor will point to the location of the failure in the septic system.

How do you know if your leach field is failing?

The following are a few common signs of leach field failure: Grass over leach field is greener than the rest of the yard. The surrounding area is wet, mushy, or even has standing water. Sewage odors around drains, tank, or leach field.

What happens if you never pump your septic tank?

What Are the Consequences of Not Pumping Your Tank? If the tank is not pumped, the solids will build up in the tank and the holding capacity of the tank will be diminished. Eventually, the solids will reach the pipe that feeds into the drain field, causing a clog. Waste water backing up into the house.

Can you burn over a leach field?

You will also want to avoid doing anything that overwhelms the system with too much water. To protect the lifespan of your drainfield, avoid these activities. Burning piles of leaves or branches over the drainfield, as the heat could damage the plastic pipes below, if they are buried shallowly.

Can a septic system explode?

A septic tank can explode Septic tank explosions are extremely rare so it might sound farfetched but yes, a septic tank can actually explode. Methane gas is usually produced as a by-product during anaerobic digestion of organic waste in the septic tank. This gas is highly flammable.

Are Household Chemicals Broken Down in a Septic Tank?

Chemical additives can be used to revitalize and accelerate the development of bacteria in septic tanks, which can be beneficial. These bacteria are critical to the overall health of a septic system. For begin, they contribute to increasing the pace at which organic waste decomposes. This prevents the septic tank from becoming overflowing. The use of additives also aids in the pumping of the septic tank. Because the bacterial activities will have liquefied the organic waste, pumping the tank will be cleaner and simpler.

However, this is not always the case.

This toxicity has a negative impact on the bacteria population in the septic tank, and the most straightforward approach to remedy the issue is to use biological additives.

As a result, you may use them to renew your system and, as a result, improve the digestion of organic waste in the tank.

Limit Household Cleaners

Biological additives can be used to revitalize and accelerate the development of bacteria in a septic tank. These bacteria are critical in maintaining the health of a septic system. For begin, they contribute to increasing the pace at which organic waste is decomposed. This prevents the septic tank from becoming overflowing too rapidly. The use of additives also aids in the easier pumping of the septic tank. Because the organic waste will have been liquefied by the bacterial activities, pumping the tank will be cleaner and simpler.

Unfortunately, the vast majority of septic system owners inadvertently utilize harmful compounds that end up in their septic tank.

Bio-biological Sol’s additives are manufactured from enzymes and bacteria, and they inject billions of bacteria into the septic tank.

Avoid Drain Cleaners

Drain cleansers are very caustic and should be avoided. If your home is connected to a septic system, you should avoid using drain cleaners. When applied appropriately, liquid drain cleaning chemicals can react with the clog and become diluted before going into the septic tank. However, even in little amounts, these chemicals can cause damage to the system. Drain cleaner, when used repeatedly, destroys the beneficial bacteria in a septic tank and, when used in excessive quantities, can cause damage to drains and pipes.

Cleaning clogged drains in septic systems using a plumbing snake or a vinegar and baking soda solution are both safer alternatives to chemical drain cleaners.

Solvent-Based Products

It is possible for soil and groundwater contamination to occur when solvents are disposed of through a septic system. Petroleum-based solvents have a reputation for being combustible. Nail polish remover, degreasers, and hobby glues are all examples of common household solvents. Motor oil, antifreeze, and gasoline are among the automotive compounds included in this category. Consequently, undiluted chemicals leak through the leach field and into the soil and groundwater since these items do not mix with water and are not properly degraded in a septic tank.

These materials are frequently recycled at auto supply stores and municipal garbage sites, among other places.

Detergents and Other Chemicals

If you have a septic system, you should purchase low-phosphorus laundry and dishwashing detergent to use in conjunction with your washing machine and dishwasher. It is possible for phosphates to cause damage to rivers, lakes, and waterways by encouraging algae development, which deprives plants and fish of oxygen. It is also difficult for the bacteria in the septic system to proliferate and break down the solid waste in the system due to the excessive use of bath and body oils that are discharged into it through bathtubs.

Safe Cleaners For Your Septic System – Crews Environmental

If you have a septic system, it’s critical that you understand which cleaning chemicals are safe to use around it. Is it okay to use borax in a house that has a septic system? What about bleach, do you think? Using an excessive amount of chemicals will disrupt the bacterial equilibrium that is necessary for a functioning septic tank. When the equilibrium gets out of whack, issues occur. System clogs begin to form, and the drain field begins to malfunction. Cleaning is a must for everyone, so choose septic-safe chemicals for the greatest results.

  • Having a septic system makes it critical to understand which cleaning solutions are appropriate to use. In a residence with a septic system, is it safe to use borax? Is there anything to be said for chlorine? Using an excessive amount of chemicals will disrupt the bacterial equilibrium that is necessary for a healthy septic tank to function properly. It is difficult to function properly when the equilibrium is wrong. System clogs begin to form, and the drain field begins to become inoperative. Cleaning is a must for everyone, so choose septic-safe cleansers for the best results possible.

Septic Safe Products and the Ones to Avoid

In the event that you have a septic system, it is critical to understand which cleaning chemicals are acceptable to utilize. Is it okay to use borax in a home that has a septic system? What about bleach, you ask? Using an excessive amount of chemicals will disrupt the bacterial balance necessary for a functioning septic tank. When the equilibrium gets out of whack, issues develop. Systems begin to clog, and the drain field begins to fail. Everyone has to clean, so choose septic-safe cleansers for the greatest results.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE “SEPTIC SAFE”?

If you were born and reared in a city, it’s likely that you have little awareness about septic tanks and systems. Septic systems are an alternate drainage solution for rural households that do not have access to centralized sewage infrastructure. To answer all of your questions, Septic Systems are a type of drainage system. They transport waste and water from a residence to a specialized septic tank, where microorganisms are used to separate waste from the surrounding water. This type of tank makes use of perforated pipes that discharge the water into a piece of soil known as a drainage field.

As a closed-loop system, septic systems are useful in the Zero Waste Movement’s attempts to reduce waste. Find out how you can reduce your own carbon impact and begin your Zero Waste journey now.

WHY PEOPLE CHOOSE SEPTIC SYSTEMS

The advantage of using a septic tank over a sewage system is that they are significantly less expensive and more durable. Because it is a closed system that does not require any external energy, it does not produce a monthly cost and can endure for decades before it has to be upgraded. Septic systems make a good contribution to the health and well-being of the local ecosystem from an environmental perspective. During the process of pushing water through a drain field, it serves to nourish local bacteria and microorganisms, which in turn supports the growth of both plants and bacteria in the area.

  • As a result, if toxins-containing items are introduced into these systems, they can have severe consequences not just for the mechanisms of the tank, but also for the entire ecosystem.
  • Septic systems are not designed to protect groundwater from the chemicals contained in some home items.
  • When purchasing new appliances, look for ones that are most suited for septic systems, such as high-efficiency toilets or washing machines that are Energy Star certified.
  • Please choose natural laundry detergent that is made for both high-efficiency and normal machines.
  • There are several natural alternatives to synthetic disinfectants that are safe for use in a septic system, for example.

HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS TO AVOID

Water softeners are devices that soften water.

  • Water softeners have the potential to damage the microorganisms in the septic tank, resulting in higher amounts of waste and grease being released into the drain field.

Oil, gasoline, paint thinners, solvents, photography chemicals, weed or bug killers are just a few examples of what you may get away with.

  • It is possible that these pollutants will poison Septic Systems and endanger the water supply.

Using Cooking Oil

  • It is possible for solidified frying fat, such as that from bacon, to build up in the tank and cause blockages in the entering and exiting pipes.
  • While these oils are pleasant to the touch, they have the potential to block the drain field and coat the waste within the tank, making it ineffective at decomposition.

Kitty Litter is a type of litter that is used for cats.

  • The majority of kitty litter is made of clay, which can block pipes.

CLEANING PRODUCTS TO AVOID

Cleaners and disinfectants that are antibacterial

  • Antibacterial and disinfectant products are not required in most household circumstances (they were originally developed to sanitize hospitals), and they will kill beneficial bacteria that aid in the proper functioning of your septic tank.

Chlorine Bleach is a kind of disinfectant.

  • A septic tank’s microorganisms might be killed or disrupted if it receives too much bleach. Additionally, it is hazardous to aquatic life. It is very likely that the bleach from your wastewater is being released directly into the groundwater if your septic tank is located close to a natural water system
  • If your septic tank is located close to a natural water system, it is very likely that the bleach from your wastewater is being released directly into the groundwater through your septic system.

Drain Cleaners that are chemical in nature

  • When these materials are used to unclog the drain, they destroy the microorganisms in the tank, resulting in the need for expensive repairs.

Products containing methylisothiazolinone are referred to as

  • Methylisothiazolinone is a synthetic compound with antibacterial characteristics that is found in a variety of consumer items. It is most often found in cleaning products, where it serves as a synthetic preservative. Apart from the fact that it is a frequent allergy, various investigations have revealed that it is also poisonous to aquatic life.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANING PRODUCTS

Natural ingredients at their best.

  • Please remember that your septic tank does not filter out chemicals or pollutants, and that the waste it produces is returned directly into the surrounding ecosystem. This is why it is critical to utilize natural cleansers that will not contribute to the rising quantity of synthetic chemicals that are severely harming our natural environment.

Biodegradable

  • Product formulations should only contain biodegradable substances that will degrade in a natural setting, rather than persistent synthetic compounds that might accumulate in a product. Inquire as to whether your cleaning products, especially those used on a regular basis such as dishwasher detergents, are truly non-toxic and completely biodegradable.

Certified by a third party

  • It is critical to seek third-party certification that the items that flow through your septic system and into the environment will not have a harmful influence on the ecosystem. Examples of such organizations are Ecocert and The Environmental Working Group. By doing so, you may be confident that the items you select are truly better for the environment and are not merely making unfounded “green” claims for the sake of branding. To determine which products are best for your septic system, see the Environmental Working Group’s Healthy Cleaning Guide rating.
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SEPTIC SAFE CLEANING PRODUCTS LIST

Septic systems are quite fragile. A 1,000-gallon septic tank may be completely decontaminated with just two gallons of chlorine bleach, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. While even a tiny amount of the wrong chemicals may cause havoc on your septic system, the majority of all-natural cleansers are safe to use on your system.

Natural cleaning solutions that are non-chlorine, non-ammonia, non-antibacterial, non-toxic, and biodegradable can assist you in keeping your septic system in good operating condition. Natural, ordinary items such as the ones listed below are safe to use to clean and disinfect your home:

  • Baking soda, borax, and salt are all ingredients in distilled white vinegar.

SEPTIC SAFE BATHROOM CLEANERS

While it’s simple to utilize all-natural cleaning solutions in the majority of places of your house, the bathroom is one area where chemical cleansers are almost always a given. A clean bathroom is crucial for your health, but cleaning your shower, tub and other bathroom surfaces does not require the use of harsh chemicals to get the desired results. These natural bathroom cleansers are highly effective and do not harm septic systems:

  • The natural enzymes in white vinegar will break down soap scum and foul smells
  • White vinegar is inexpensive and readily available. Baking soda – The abrasive texture of baking soda is ideal for polishing brass bathroom fittings. To get optimum disinfection power on surfaces, mix 12 cup of borax with 12 cup of water.

TOILET CLEANERS SAFE FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS

The toilet is infamous for being a filthy environment. It might be tempting to use strong cleaning agents to ensure that germs are completely destroyed. Many toilet bowl cleaners contain bleach, and others are even formulated with hydrochloric acid to remove stains from the bowl. Natural, plant-based cleansers, on the other hand, are robust enough to clean your toilet while still being the safest for the health of your septic system and the health of your family. Make sure to avoid using cleansers that include hazardous ingredients such as harmful bleach or ammonia as well as phosphates and petroleum-based compounds, which can disrupt your septic system.

Here is a list of natural toilet cleansers that are safe to use in a septic tank:

  • Baking soda is a scouring agent that is both affordable and effective. Pour half of a small box of baking soda into the toilet bowl and leave it to rest for at least an hour. Immediately after mixing, flush the liquid down the toilet before cleaning it with a toilet brush. White Hard water stains in the toilet bowl may be broken down with the aid of household vinegar, which has a high acidity. Pour one cup of vinegar into the bowl and let it aside overnight. In the morning, scrape the surface. If you use baking soda along with the vinegar, you’ll find that their effects cancel each other out and become ineffectual.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANING

Natural cleaning solutions are generally considered to be safe for use in septic systems. Take the guesswork out of selecting items for use in septic systems by using a product comparison chart. “Septic Safe” is a label that appears on products that are safe for use in septic systems. Most of these materials are natural and biodegradable, and they will appropriately degrade within the tank without interfering with the bacteria’s ability to function. Consumer items such as housekeeping and cleaning products are one of the most serious threats to septic systems.

Being environmentally conscious means using items that are safe for septic tanks and taking responsibility for what you put in the water and the soil.

Even if you have centralized sewage, use septic-safe products to keep your home and yard clean.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANERS: FAQ

In the world of septic systems, there is contradicting information regarding what is safe and what is potentially dangerous. Here, we clarify the air on some often asked issues about septic cleaners:

1. IS VINEGAR SAFE FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS?

Vinegar is completely harmless to septic systems and will not do any damage to them. White vinegar and apple cider vinegar are wonderful cleaning tools that may be used throughout the house, including the laundry room, kitchen, bathroom, and other areas. Because it is non-toxic and 100 percent natural, vinegar of any kind is completely safe for your septic system and your household.

2. WHAT DRAIN CLEANERS ARE SAFE FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS?

Drain cleaners are famously harsh because they are required to be so. It might require a significant amount of force to break through the buildup in pipes. However, only a few drain cleaners, when used in moderation, are suitable for septic systems. Drain cleaners that foam, solidify, or crystallize can cause harm to the system and should not be utilized.

To avoid causing harm to the system, use septic-safe liquid drain cleaning only when absolutely necessary. Non-chemical methods such as a pipe snake can be used to safely clear clogged drains that have become stubborn.

SAFE SEPTIC CLEANING WITH ASPENCLEAN

To ensure that all of their laundry detergents and cleaning chemicals are completely septic-safe, AspenClean employs the same natural, biodegradable, and ecologically friendly cleaning materials as they use in their professional cleaning service. It is possible to ensure that your home will receive a high-quality clean while not causing damage to your septic system by utilizing natural laundry detergents, dish soaps, as well as their house cleaning services and supplies.

Are Baking Soda and Vinegar Safe for Septic Systems?

The answer to this question is an unequivocal “yes!” We get a lot of inquiries regarding cleaners and best practices in septic systems, and this one is simple — the answer is an unequivocal “yes!”

Baking soda and vinegar are safe

Using baking soda and vinegar as drain cleaners is both safe and effective, and, best of all, they are completely safe for your septic tank and drain field to use. Bleach and ammonia-based cleansers (which include most of the products in the cleaning aisle of big-box retailers) can be hazardous to the beneficial microorganisms in your septic tank. Instead of killing the beneficial bacteria in your tank, baking soda and vinegar help to keep your septic system running efficiently for far longer periods of time and with less maintenance necessary.

How to use baking soda and vinegar

Consequently, you may be asking how to clean with baking soda and vinegar in your home environment. Here are a few of our favorite ways to utilize these powerful and economical cleansers in your kitchen and bathroom, in no particular order: Drains that become clogged are a big nuisance. Even if your septic system is not backed up, it is crucial to keep an eye out for indicators of a problem. Baking soda may be used to clear tenacious filth from your pipes, which may be causing minor backups. A couple of teaspoons of baking soda and a cup or two of boiling water should suffice (you can also add white vinegar for a bit more punch).

It’s an excellent method to avoid the high cost of a plumber’s visit as well as the inconvenience of blocked drains – so give it a shot first!

These work as a toilet bowl cleaner as well

These natural cleansers are also effective as a toilet bowl cleaning, which is rather remarkable! For this reason, a combination of baking soda and liquid castile soap is recommended by the manufacturer. You may have heard of castile soap, but you may not be aware of the reasons behind its cult-like appeal. Many people swear by the cleansing abilities of castile soap, as well as the fact that it is non-toxic – despite the fact that it is a vegetable-based soap that is devoid of animal fats and synthetic additives.

To clean a toilet bowl, liberally sprinkle it with baking soda and flush it down the toilet.

When used as a scouring agent for sinks, showers, tubs, and countertops, baking soda is quite effective.

You won’t even miss the toxic conventional cleansers you used to use after adding basic white vinegar and liquid castile soap to your cleaning arsenal. The majority of them were steadily destroying your septic system while you were using them.

You don’t have to harm your septic tank

Cleaning our kitchens and bathrooms is a necessary, but it does not have to be done at the expense of your septic system. Thank you for reading, and please do not hesitate to contact us at any time if you have any septic tank inquiries or to arrange a septic tank pumping or cleaning. We’re more than delighted to assist you.

Things You Should Never Put in a Septic Tank

  1. What is the significance of maintaining a healthy septic tank
  2. And What Goes Into Your Septic Tank
  3. Septic Tank Do’s and Don’ts
  4. How Do Things Get Into Your Septic Tank
  5. What Cleaning Products Can Be Used in the Home That Are Septic Safe
  6. How to Dispose of Garbage for a Healthy Septic Tank
  7. How to Use the Toilet for a Healthy Septic Tank
  8. How to Tell If Your Septic Tank Is Full
  9. The Importance of Keeping Your Septic System in Good Working Order

If your septic system is properly maintained, it should provide you with no problems; nevertheless, you must be extremely cautious about what you put down your drains. Knowing what should and should not be flushed down your septic tank will help you avoid costly septic tank problems in the future. This is also true for your waste disposal system. To provide an example, a frequently asked topic about the waste disposal is whether coffee grounds are harmful to septic systems or not. Is it harmful to a septic system to use coffee grounds?

In general, the most often asked questions by homeowners are: What should I put in my septic tank and what should I not put in my septic tank?

Why Is It Important to Maintain a Healthy Septic Tank?

Your septic system is an extremely important component of your property. While it frequently goes unseen, it is operating around the clock to dispose of the garbage generated by your household. The fact that many homeowners do not notice their septic tank on a regular basis leads to a high rate of failure or forgetting to schedule basic septic tank repair. The failure to maintain your septic system can result in a variety of problems, including:

  • Leach fields and septic tanks that are overflowing or oozing
  • A disagreeable sewage odor
  • Overflowing toilets leading in the accumulation of harmful waste in your home

Maintenance of your septic tank on a regular basis is necessary for a variety of reasons, including the following:

1. Property Value

When it comes time to sell your land and house, a septic tank inspection may reveal problems that indicate your system hasn’t been properly maintained for a long period of time. This might result in you losing out on a possible sale.

2. Good Health

Proper septic tank maintenance can result in serious health consequences if wastewater that has not been correctly treated is allowed to leak into your well, yard, and nearby surface water. If your septic tank has been ignored for an extended period of time, backwash may run into your home, introducing bacteria into your home.

3. Protects the Environment

On a daily basis, wastewater is disseminated below the surface of the earth in an amount of over 4 billion gallons. Groundwater contamination can occur as a result of untreated or inadequately treated domestic wastewater, and this can be harmful to the ecosystem. A faulty septic system may cause the release of viruses, bacteria, and hazardous chemicals into local waterways, as well as into the ground, streams, lakes, and rivers, among other places, causing devastation to local ecosystems and the death of species.

4. Financial Savings

On a daily basis, wastewater is disseminated below the surface of the earth in an amount greater than 4 billion gallons. It is possible that contaminated groundwater will enter the environment as a result of untreated or inadequately treated domestic trash.

Inadequate septic system performance can result in the discharge of viruses, bacteria, and harmful chemicals into local waterways and other bodies of water such as the ground, streams, lakes, and rivers, among other things, causing devastation to local ecosystems and the death of wild animals.

How Do Things Get Into Your Septic Tank?

Septic systems remove floatable debris such as fats and oils from solids and digest organic stuff in the wastewater they process. In a soil-based system, the liquid waste from your septic tank is discharged into different perforated pipes that are buried in chambers, a leach field, or other particular components that are designed to gently release the effluent into the ground. The following are examples of how objects can get into your septic tank:

  • Waste such as diapers, cigarette butts, and coffee grounds that degrade slowly or are not entirely flushed down drains
  • Lint from synthetic fibers is emitted by washing machines. There are no bacteria in the drain and tank septic field to break it down
  • Therefore, it is not broken down. When garbage disposers are used often, they might discharge an excessive amount of solid waste into your septic system. It is possible for shrubs and tree roots to obstruct and cause harm to a drain field

Septic Tank Do’s and Don’ts

What you put in your septic tank will have a significant impact on its capacity to perform its function. Coffee grounds, for example, are not compatible with septic systems. It is possible to save yourself a lot of headaches and money by educating everyone in your home about what is and isn’t acceptable for your septic tank. You can also extend the life of your septic system and protect the health of your property, family, and the environment by educating everyone in your home.

Things You Should Never Put In Your Septic Tank

You should never put the following items in your septic tank, and you should avoid the following items in your septic tank as well.

1. Do Enlarge Your Septic System If Needed

You should never put the following items in your septic tank, and you should avoid the following items in your septic tank as well as the following:

2. Don’t Put Hazardous Waste Into the System

You should never put the following items in your septic tank, and you should avoid the following items in your septic tank.

3. Do Limit the Number of Solids

A large amount of solids flushed down the toilet will cause your septic tank to fill up extremely quickly. You should not flush the following objects down the toilet:

  • Cat litter, coffee grounds, cigarette butts, dental floss, disposable diapers, earplugs, sanitary napkins or tampons are all acceptable substitutes for these items.
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If you have a septic tank, you should never dump coffee grinds down the toilet. It is recommended that you avoid introducing materials into the system that do not degrade fast as a general rule.

4. Don’t Put Anything Non-Biodegradable in Your Septic System

Don’t put materials into your septic tank system that aren’t biodegradable, such as the following:

  • However, cigarette butts, disposable diapers, paper towels, plastics, sanitary napkins or tampons are prohibited.

5. Do Install an Effluent Filter

Make certain that an effluent filter is installed on your septic tank. This will assist to reduce the amount of particles that exit the tank and will extend the life of your system.

6. Don’t Put Grease or Fat Into the System

Perhaps to your surprise, grease and oil can cause a septic system to fail by clogging up the drain field and contaminating the soil around it, causing it to fail. Soil that has been polluted will be unable to absorb and assimilate liquids from your system. If you have major problems with your septic tank system, you may be forced to replace it.

7. Do Run Full Dishwasher and Washing Machine Loads

Dishwashers and washing machines should only be used when they are completely loaded. Alternatively, select the appropriate load size for your washing machine. It is inefficient to wash tiny loads of clothing with huge amounts of water since it wastes both electricity and water.

8. Don’t Put Any Chemicals Into Your System

Don’t flush chemicals down the toilet, such as the following:

  • Gasoline, insect or weed killers, oil, photographic chemicals, paint thinners, solvents, and other compounds

If you have one of these, it has the potential to pollute your septic tank, endangering the water supply for your entire area. Make a Time for Consultation

What Household Cleaning Products Are Septic Safe

Another important piece of septic tank advice is to be cautious when selecting the cleansers and chemicals that you use around your house or business. Your septic tank’s ability to operate correctly is dependent on the presence of ‘friendly’ bacteria. The problem is that many disinfectants, bleaches, and household cleansers are especially formulated to kill bacteria. Use organic and biodegradable home items wherever feasible to reduce the likelihood of septic tank issues. If you use drain cleaners, never let them enter the system since even a tiny amount of these harsh chemicals may wreak havoc on the microorganisms in the system and create septic tank issues.

There are a variety of opinions on this subject.

Many people believe that running Epsom salt through their septic tanks will help to break down waste.

To observe the acidic advantages of Epsom salt, you’d have to flush a significant amount of it into your tank. The following are examples of household cleaning solutions that are safe for septic systems:

1. Safest Bathroom and Toilet Cleaners

Your bathroom may retain a lot of germs, so it’s important to clean it on a regular basis. However, you will require septic-safe cleansers such as:

  • Green Works 99 percent naturally derived toilet bowl cleaner
  • CLR Calcium, Lime, and Rust Remover
  • CLR BathKitchen Foaming Action Cleaner
  • CLR BathKitchen Foaming Action

It is not recommended to use crystal drain cleaners to unclog plumbing blockages in your toilet or sink since they might be hazardous to your septic system.

2. Safest Floor Cleaners

The following are examples of safe floor cleaners:

  • BISSELL Advanced Professional SpotStain + Oxy
  • ECOS PRO Neutral Floor Cleaner Concentrated 1:128
  • BISSELL Pet Stain and Odor
  • BISSELL Advanced Professional SpotStain + Oxy

3. Safest Dishwashing Detergents

Regardless of whether you’re using the dishwasher or cleaning your dishes by hand, the following are some safe options:

  • A few examples include: Dropps dishwashing pods, Amway Home Dish Drops automatic dishwashing powder, Aldi Foaming Dish Soap, and more.

4. Safest Kitchen, All-Purpose and Glass Cleaners

These items are completely safe to use around your home:

  • Cleaners from Amway include L.O.C. Multi-Purpose Cleaner, Green Works 98 percent Naturally-Derived GlassSurface Cleaner Spray, ECOS Glass + Surface Cleaner Vinegar, and ECOS Glass + Surface Cleaner Vinegar.

5. Safest Odor Removers

Here are several odor-killing options that are safe for septic systems:

  • In addition to Fresh Wave Odor Removing Spray, ECOS Pet Kitty Litter Deodorizer, and Earth Friendly Products Everyday Stain and Odor Remover are also recommended.

Garbage Disposal Tips for a Healthy Septic Tank

Many people are unaware of this vital piece of septic tank knowledge, but you should avoid using your garbage disposal more than necessary. If you absolutely must have a trash disposal, choose for a top-of-the-line type that grinds waste finely, as this will aid in the decomposition of waste materials and the prevention of septic tank problems by reducing the amount of time waste takes to disintegrate. You may also set up a kitchen waste compost bin so that you don’t have to throw potentially hazardous products into your garbage disposal system.

1. Don’t Pour Coffee Grounds Down Your Drain

Many people are unaware of this vital piece of septic tank knowledge, but you should avoid using your garbage disposal more than is necessary at any one time. A trash disposal is not always necessary, but if you do have to have one, make sure it is a top-of-the-line type that grinds waste finely. This will aid in the decomposition of materials and the prevention of septic tank issues. You may also set up a kitchen waste compost bin so that you don’t have to send potentially dangerous stuff down the garbage disposal.

2. Only Dispose of Rotted Soft or Unconsumed Perishables Into Your Garbage Disposal

Bananas, tomatoes, and oranges that are over a year old are OK. However, avoid using your trash disposal for anything that might cause sludge to build up along the inner walls of your sewage pipes or clog a drain.

3. Consider an Alternative to Your Garbage Disposal

Consider making a compost pile in your backyard out of your outdated vegetables as an alternative to throwing it away. Rather from ending up in your septic tank or landfill, decomposing vegetables and fruits may nourish and feed the soil, accomplishing a more beneficial function than they would if they ended up in a landfill.

Toilet Tips for a Healthy Septic Tank

Consider making a compost pile in your garden out of your outdated vegetables as an alternative to throwing it away. Rather than ending up in your septic tank or landfill, decomposing vegetables and fruits may nourish and feed the earth, accomplishing a more beneficial function.

  1. Decrease the number of times you flush the toilet. Using the toilet numerous times before flushing is recommended. Make use of toilet paper that is designed for use with a septic tank. When it comes to toilet paper, the type that breaks up easily when wet is the best choice. It is not recommended to use a disinfecting automated toilet bowl cleanser, such as those containing acid compounds or bleach. Using these products, you may destroy the bacteria in your septic tank that is important for a productive operating system with a gradual release, ongoing action. Tampons should not be flushed into the toilet. Tampons in a septic system is an issue that many individuals have and are perplexed by the answer to. This is due to the fact that there are now tampons available that are so-called bio-degradable and can be flushed down the toilet. Tampons, on the other hand, are among the items that should not be flushed down the toilet or into a septic tank. If you want to be on the safe side, never dump tampons down the toilet
  2. This is the greatest rule of thumb here.

How to Tell If Your Septic Tank Is Full

When properly maintained, your septic tank is an efficient means of disposing of the wastewater generated by your household. Septic systems must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to work effectively. Many people are unsure as to when this type of action is required in their situation. The following are some indications that it is time to pump your septic tank:

1. Pooling Water

If you notice huge pools of water near your septic system’s drain field, this might signal that the system has overflowed, especially if it hasn’t rained recently.

When your tank reaches capacity, the solid waste in the tank might block the drain field of the field pipe system, causing liquid to rise to the surface. If you see this, your tank will need to be properly pumped out.

2. Odors

In addition to garbage, your septic tank collects gray water from sources such as the following: The odor-causing gasses that can emanate from your drains, toilets, drain field, and outside septic tank area can begin to emanate as the septic tank begins to fill up. If you begin to notice unusual scents outside or inside your house, it is possible that your septic tank is overflowing and has to be drained.

3. Sewage Backup

It is possible to have nasty sewage backup in your toilets, sinks, and bathtub if you have a clogged sewage tank. The sewage can overflow and flood your floors, rendering your home uninhabitable and hazardous if you allow the situation to continue to spiral out of control.

4. Slow Drains

If you discover that your home’s drains and toilet flushes are still slow after you’ve tried to clear them, it’s possible that you have a clogged septic system.

5. Gurgling Water

Another symptom that your septic tank is overflowing is gurgling sounds pipes coming from your drains or toilet bowl. This is something that you would definitely want an expert to come in and check.

6. Lush Lawn

Having gurgling sounds pipes in your drains or toilets is another indicator that you have a clogged sewage system. This is something that you should certainly have a professional come in and look at.

7. Trouble Flushing

An further sign that your septic tank needs to be cleaned is if you’re experiencing difficulties flushing your toilet or if the water you’re trying to flush is not being absorbed by the toilet.

Maintaining a Healthy Septic System Is Important

In addition, if you’re having difficulties flushing your toilet and the water that you’re trying to flush isn’t getting into the toilet, your septic tank may require emptying.

Contact Mr. Rooter of Syracuse, N.Y., Your Septic System Professionals

Mr. Rooter Plumbing of Syracuse, New York, is comprised of a group of qualified specialists that are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to attend to your septic tank problems. Septic tanks are something that our skilled team at Mr. Rooter has a lot of experience with. Once we’ve been in and completed the cleaning, maintenance, or repairs to your septic system, we’ll provide you instructions on how to keep up with the best upkeep of your system when we’re not there to help you. It is critical to understand the principles of your home’s septic tank and how it operates in order to recognize problems as they occur.

In addition to video drainage inspections, we have sophisticated diagnostic equipment that allow us to discover and correct issues before they become expensive repairs.

Request an Estimate for the Job

3 Septic System Myths: Debunked

Food should never be disposed of in the garbage disposal. This is a typical expression among those who possess a septic system. Some individuals, however, believe that the phrase â€don’t flush your supper down the kitchen sink†means that they shouldn’t use their garbage disposal at all, which is incorrect. ” Your septic tank is capable of handling tiny pieces of food resulting from routine waste disposal use. Small pieces of food are broken down by the sewage tank’s ecology and bacterial population.

  1. Grease in your sink is one thing you definitely don’t want to happen.
  2. Grease is a dual menace since it is both a plumbing and a septic adversary.
  3. This might result in drainfield failure, which would be a very expensive problem.
  4. Never flush cleaning products down the toilet or down the sink.
  5. It is never a good idea to dispose of cleaners and solvents that are not permitted for flushing down a sink or drain into your sink or toilet, much alone any drain in a house that is on septic.
  6. A modest infusion of bleach from a load of laundry will have no effect on the bacteria and water in your septic tank, which holds several thousand gallons of water.
  7. These vast quantities of highly concentrated chemicals are not suitable for disposal in a septic tank.

Also keep in mind that devices that release chemicals continuously, such as a toilet bleach puck, are not suggested.

Never flush uncooked cleaners, bleach, or other home chemicals down the toilet or down the sink.

It is possible that breaking this regulation will result in your septic tank being “broken.” 3.

Keep your money in your pocket.

The ecology simply need the normal bacteria that it obtains from naturally occurring human waste to function properly.

There are no well-established studies that demonstrate significant benefits from the use of additives.

Most additives, according to the Washington State Health Department, have no beneficial influence upon the performance of on-site systems and, in fact, can pollute groundwater aquifers, render septic drainfields useless, and cause homeowners to incur significant costs in repairs.

However, they are not required and are only a “gimmick” for producing money.

Stopping your tiny troubles in their tracks before they grow into large difficulties is essential! You may also leave a comment and one of our managers will get back to you! For a complete list of Stamie Lyttle’s services, please check our Residential Septic Services page.

8 Dangerous Chemicals to Avoid in Septic Tank

You’ve probably seen some sort of sewer monster movie where everything happens as a result of a chemical reaction in some kind of chemist’s septic tank. Well, I’m sorry to break it to you, but that’s not true, and the effect of chemicals in septic tanks is not so detrimental, at least not in that manner. In fact, even while chemicals in septic tanks will not convert you into a monster, there are more practical ways that chemicals might injure you. The septic tank, which serves as the final dumping ground for your family, must have a large number of microbes, some of which will aid in the process and others which will hinder it.

  • They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology.
  • However, it will be quite terrible to learn that some of the items placed in septic tanks are toxic and might potentially cause harm to the environment, humans, and the septic tank system itself.
  • Gasoline (sometimes known as kerosene) Always avoid flushing this chemical down the toilet and even worse, pouring it into your septic tank.
  • It is likely that plants may be unable to grow in that location as a result of this disruption, or even worse, that the current plant will be destroyed.
  • Secondly, antibiotics are used in some and many waste water treatment house management systems to treat waste water that will be consumed on site.
  • Nevertheless, a little quantity of it, such as that produced by a person who takes an antibiotic and then excretes it in their urine, would have no effect on the septic tank at all.
  • 3.PhosphateWith the chemical formula (PO34), this chemical is mostly employed in cleaning products, with some of them being used in detergents that contain this kind of hazardous chemical as a component of their composition.
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Pouring this type of chemical into your septic tank water treatment system would not be a good idea due to the possibility that it may mix with your drinking water.

Even some phospate is prohibited from exporting or importing since it is classified as a dangerous substance that cannot be imported or exported.

Magnesium SulfateThis chemical is most often found in the product known as epsom salt, which is used in toiletries.

It has the potential to cause a variety of complications, including renal troubles.

More information about dangerous chemicals found in toiletry products may be found here.

As stated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), chemicals to avoid in a septic tank, the amount of chlorine required to disinfect cleared wastewater effluent ranges between 5 and 20 mg/L.

The high concentration of chlorine in a septic tank has the potential to create chlorine gas, which is harmful to the human respiratory system, eyes, and skin health.

In the United States, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established a permissible exposure limit for elemental chlorine of one part per million (ppm), or three milligrams per cubic meter of air.

Hydrochloric acid HCLM (hydrochloric acid lye solution) Any plumber may use this chemical to clear clogs from their pipes.

Hydrochloric acid (HCL) is considered a powerful acid since it has the ability to generate gaseous forms of it.

The harm that this acid can do includes irreversible damage to the respiratory system, eyes, skin, and intestines.

(See this page for further information on the acid in water reaction.) 7.

Generally speaking, septic systems are interconnected with the city sewer system.

The effect of a medicine compound on their septic system is unknown.

Eighth, pesticidesThere are several toxic chemical substances present in pesticides, such as DDDT, DDDD, Metam sodium, Carbamate, and many more, that may poison humans and cause them to die.

The only way to avoid this negative effect is to simply avoid pouring the herbicide into the septic system. So, those are the chemicals to avoid using in a septic tank, as well as a brief explanation of why they are toxic and suggestions on how to avoid using them.

Protecting Your Septic Tank System from Cleaning Chemicals

Is it possible that you’ve seen a sewer monster movie in which everything happens due of a chemical reaction taking place in some kind of chemical-filled septic tank? As much as I dislike telling you this, the story is not true and the effect of chemicals in septic tanks is not that harmful, at least not in this way. In fact, even though the chemicals will not turn you into a monster, there are more realistically harmful things that chemicals can do to you in a more realistic way. When used as the last dumping ground for your family, it is essential that the septic tank has many different types of microbes; otherwise, some of them will aid in the process while others are harmful or even harmful.

  1. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-proven technology.
  2. However, it will be quite terrible to learn that some of the items placed in septic tanks are toxic and might potentially cause harm to the environment, humans, and the septic tank system as a whole.
  3. Fuel (gasoline) is an important component of transportation.
  4. In addition to disrupting soil nutrient composition, gasoline has the potential to inflict environmental damage.
  5. Because of this, it would be prudent to avoid flushing the substance down your drain to avoid any negative consequences.
  6. Using this system in a hospital or nursing home raises concerns since the amount of antibiotics used in the hospital or nursing home cannot be properly treated, and the bacteria needed by the septic tank was killed as a result.
  7. As a result, it is preferable to isolate antibiotic waste from the rest of the waste stream.

When phosphate is taken in large quantities, it is known to induce a variety of diseases in humans.

Treatment of raw/primary wastewater, Treatment of final effluent of biological plants (postprecipitation), and Treatment contemporaneous with the secondary biologic reaction are all options if you have phospate in your septic tank system (co-precipitation).

Epsom salt, which is composed primarily of magnesium sulfate, is a popular toiletry product.

In addition to renal issues, it might cause other issues.

See this page for further information on potentially hazardous chemical residues in cosmetics and toiletries.

Following the recommendations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US Environmental Protection Agency), the level of chlorine required to disinfect cleared wastewater effluent ranges between 5 and 20 mg/L.

The large amount of chlorine present in a septic tank has the potential to generate chlorine gas, which is harmful to the human respiratory system, eyes, and skin health, among other things, Please use chlorine-based products only at the concentrations recommended by the manufacturer to avoid this negative impact.

  1. (14) Harmful cleaning chemicals– compounds– side effects (for additional information, see: 14Harmful cleaning chemicals– compounds– side effects) Hydrochloric acid (HCLM) is number six on the list.
  2. This can sometimes free up the pump, but it will also in rare circumstances cause it to malfunction.
  3. Using powerful chemicals is not recommended due to the adverse effects that they may have on the body.
  4. You can replace any powerful acid to be put into your septic system; however, organic chemicals are preferable for removing any blocking issues.
  5. Septic systems are known to be interconnected with the municipal sewer system.
  6. their septic system as a result of the use of drugs and chemicals Due to the clear legal prohibition against doing so, the government has already taken steps to safeguard us by explaining the law in its entirety.
  7. It is possible that spilling pesticide into your septic tank can combine with ground water and poison humans.

Only by not pouring pesticide into a septic system can this negative effect be avoided entirely. These are the chemicals to avoid in your septic tank, as well as a brief explanation of why they are toxic and suggestions on how to prevent them, as a summary

Choose Septic Friendly Cleaning Products

The most obvious indication that a product is suitable for use with septic systems is the presence of a label declaring that it is safe for use in such residences. To identify any potentially hazardous chemical, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assigns it a registration number. This signifies that the product is suitable for use in both the residence and the septic system. These labels may be seen on a variety of everyday home goods. Any biodegradable or ecologically friendly product is entirely acceptable for use in septic systems and can be found in most grocery stores.

Septic Safe Labels

Having a label that states that a product is safe for use in septic systems is the most obvious evidence of its safety for this use. Each potentially hazardous substance is assigned a registration number by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). According to this label, the product is safe for use in both the home and the septic system. The following labels can be seen on a wide variety of everyday home goods. In addition to being totally acceptable for use in septic systems, any biodegradable or ecologically friendly product is also perfectly safe to use.

Household Bleach

Using bleach-containing products in tiny amounts with septic systems is not harmful to the system. Although bleach is effective in killing bacteria, when diluted with water, as is common in most domestic uses, it is not powerful enough to eliminate all of the germs in the tank’s interior. Nonetheless, it is critical that bleach not be used in excess since a high concentration of bleach can cause harm to the septic system. To safeguard the beneficial bacteria in the tank, wherever feasible, use alternatives to chlorine bleach.

All-Purpose Cleaners

Disinfectants that are mild, such as laundry detergents and any other products that may be used without gloves, are typically safe to use in septic systems. The best detergents are those that are phosphate-free and low-sudsing. You may also use natural detergents to clean your clothes. Other all-purpose surface cleansers are also suitable for use in the home. These cleansers do not contain the harsh chemicals that might harm septic lines or the bacteria that lives within the tank, as found in other brands.

Ammonia Cleaner

When used in tiny amounts, cleaning solutions containing ammonia as well as pure ammonia are completely safe for use in septic systems. In septic tanks, ammonia does not destroy the germs that grow there. It is not recommended to combine chemicals such as bleach and ammonia.

Water-Based Cleaners

Septic systems are safe to use with almost any type of water-based cleaner. This includes carpet cleaning products as well as tub and toilet cleansers and disinfectants.

In order to be classified as a water-based cleaner, the first component listed on the label should be water. Chemicals included in water-based cleansers are less harmful to the fragile septic system since they do not contain strong solvents.

Septic-Safe Drain Cleaner

The use of liquid and crystal cleansers is effective in cutting through grease and blockages. These products do, however, include potentially hazardous substances such as sodium hydroxide, lye, sulfuric acid, and hydrochloric acid. When used in large quantities or at high concentrations, they can cause corrosion in metal pipes and the destruction of beneficial microorganisms throughout the septic tank.

Products To Avoid Putting In Your Septic System

What you should be concerned about is not just the septic tank cleaning chemicals, but also other factors. You should also be cautious about allowing any of the goods or substances listed below to enter your home’s septic system.

  • Water softeners: When you use water softeners, the microorganisms in your septic tank may suffer as a result. They have the potential to generate larger concentrations of trash to be released into the environment. Products containing oil: Gasoline, solvents, paint thinners, and pesticides are all known to poison septic systems and have a negative impact on water supply. Oil-based bath products: While using bath oils may make you feel wonderful, they are not beneficial for your home’s septic system. They have the potential to block pipes and deposit a coating on garbage. In this way, the waste is prevented from decomposing, leaving the system completely useless. Grease: Grease from fatty meals such as bacon can accumulate in the tank. Clogged pipes might arise as a result of this
  • Nonetheless, Drain cleansers: To clear a clogged drain, homeowners frequently use drain cleaners. However, if you do not use safe materials, they might cause the microorganisms in your septic tank to become inactive. Caustic cleansers should be avoided at all costs. It is preferable to use hot water or a sewer snake in this situation. Medicines: Never flush away any drugs that have been left over. Pharmaceuticals have the potential to disrupt the bacterial equilibrium in your septic system, resulting in septic system failure. They also contribute to the spread of “superbugs,” which are antibiotic-resistant germs that represent a threat to the health of the entire population. Using antibacterial hand soap or any product claiming to be antibacterial should be avoided not only because of the obvious harm they could do to the bacterial colony your septic system requires to function, but also because they are now being linked to the development of antibiotic resistant “super-bugs” (bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics). Toilet cleaners that operate on their own: In addition to killing the germs in your toilet, the antibacterial compounds in automated toilet cleaners destroy the microorganisms in your septic tank as well. These toilet cleansers have the potential to result in a septic tank that is overflowing with blue water and a large amount of dead bacteria. Cleaning the toilet using a mix of baking soda and white vinegar, on the other hand, will provide similarly effective foamy results that are harmless. Dishwasher detergents are available in a variety of strengths. Dishwasher detergent is more likely than laundry detergent to include phosphates and surfactants, both of which are toxic to the microorganisms in your septic tank and should be avoided. They can also flow through your septic tank to the drain field, where they can ultimately permeate the soil and leach into ground water, putting you and your family at danger for drinking water contamination. Look for and use detergent that is free of phosphates.

Other Unsafe Septic Items – Other items that should not be flushed include

  • Disposable diapers
  • Sanitary napkins or tampons
  • Paper towels or bandages
  • Dental floss
  • Condoms
  • Hair
  • Cigarette butts
  • Disposable diapers
  • Disposable diapers Coffee grinds
  • Kitty litter
  • And so on.

Care with Laundry Detergents

It is possible that your laundry contributes a significant portion of the volume in your septic system. It is likely that the majority of the laundry detergents available at your local grocery shop include some form of environmental contamination. Check the label carefully for the contents; the majority of big brands of liquid fabric softener are petroleum-based. They cover your garments with oil, which then leaks into your septic tank. As an alternative, you can use plant-based fabric softeners or just add 1 1/4 cup of distilled white vinegar into the washing machine before starting the cycle.

This causes oil to seep into your garments and into your septic tank.

Surfactants, which are foaming agents, are found in all soaps and detergents, and they are used to create foam.

Unfortunately, they have a negative impact on cell membranes and microorganisms, and they will harm the bacteria colony in your septic system.

Avoid or Reduce Disinfectant Use

Another important piece of septic tank advice is to be cautious when selecting the cleansers and chemicals that you use around your house or business. Your septic tank’s ability to operate correctly is dependent on the presence of ‘friendly’ bacteria. The problem is that many disinfectants, bleaches, and household cleansers are especially formulated to kill bacteria. Use organic and biodegradable home items wherever feasible to reduce the likelihood of septic tank issues. If you use drain cleaners, never let them enter the system since even a tiny amount of these harsh chemicals may wreak havoc on the microorganisms in the system and create septic tank issues.

Contact Us

Maintaining a healthy balance between anaerobic and aerobic microorganisms in your septic system is critical for overall system performance. We at West Coast Sanitation understand that you are busy and do not have time to deal with septic issues. One of the most effective methods to maintain this balance and ensure that your septic system continues to function properly is to have your tank pumped on a regular basis.

Please contact us as soon as possible at (951) 780-5922. Thank you. If you have any questions, we have specialists standing by to help you resolve them and get your system back up and running.

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