How To Pour A Septic Tank Top? (Question)

  • Mix 1/3 of a cup of vinegar with 1/3 of a cup of baking soda and pour the fizzy mixture into the clogged sewer drain immediately. It provides a ready access point from where clearance of mainline is performed. We always try to check the tank first.

How deep should top of septic tank be?

Dig Up The Lids In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter. If you do not find the lid by probing, shallow excavation with a shovel along the tank’s perimeter should reveal the lid.

How thick is a concrete septic tank lid?

The exterior walls of the septic tank are made of concrete, normally 4 inches thick.

Should I install a riser on my septic tank?

Having a riser in place can also significantly reduce the cost of septic tank maintenance over time through the ease of access and time on the job saved. Plus you will be spared digging up your lawn every time as well.

How many lids are on a septic tank?

A septic tank installed before 1975 will have a single 24-inch concrete lid in the center of the rectangle. A two-compartment tank installed after 1975 will have two lids of either fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at opposite ends of the rectangle.

How much soil should be on top of a septic tank?

the depth of soil backfill over the septic tank lid or septic tank riser lid, ranging from 0″ (which means you should see it) to just a few inches (which means grass may be dead in this area) to 6-12″ or even more.

How deep are drain fields buried?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

How far apart are septic tank lids?

The distance between lids will be different for each sized tank: 1000 gallon tank = 6-6.5 ft.; 1250 gallon = 7-7.5 ft.; 1500 gallon = 8.5-9 ft.. Dig up the outlet chamber access lid. If you are extraordinarily lucky, the as-built drawing is accurate and you have hit the lids spot on.

How do you cover a septic tank lid?

The Do’s For Hiding Your Septic Tank

  1. Plant tall native grasses with fibrous roots around the opening to conceal the tank lid from view.
  2. Place a light statue, bird bath or potted plant over the septic lid.
  3. Septic tank risers and covers are an alternative to concrete and blend into green grass.

Are septic tanks reinforced?

Precast septic tanks are typically manufactured in two pieces, either with a seam at the lid or midseam. Steel reinforcement is used according to the tank design to provide additional structural capacity during handling, installation, testing and use. Usually precast septic tanks are manufactured in two pieces.

How Can I Make a Concrete Septic Cover?

Home-Diy At the absolute least, every septic tank has a cover, which not only aids in the release of gas but also gives access to the tank for septic firms that need to empty or examine it for leaks. You may construct a concrete septic cover, which provides more protection and discourages animals from attempting to enter the system. if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.removeChild(sources); then this.onerror = null; this.src = fallback; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace; (//$/, “), ‘/public/images/logo-fallback.png’) (//$/, “), ‘/public/images/logo-fallback.png’) ” loading=”lazy”> ” loading=”lazy”> Septic tank covers made of concrete are a reliable method of keeping them secure.

Measure and Pour

Measure the top of the septic tank cover area, and then use that measurement to construct a frame around which to pour the concrete. The frame should be constructed of aluminum or any other malleable metal that can be pulled away from drying or cured concrete without damaging the structure. Increase the width of the concrete cover frame by an inch or two on each side so that it overhang the top of the entrance and completely covers it. Then, pour a thick layer of heavy-duty cement into the frame and smooth it out with a rubber mallet.

After you are pouring, make sure there are gaps around the border of the frame so that when it dries, you can easily remove the cover from the frame without damaging the frame.

Allow at least one day for the concrete to cure before attempting to remove it.

Handles and Installation

As soon as the concrete has been poured and is beginning to dry, add metal handles to the wet cement so that you may raise and move the cover with more ease. In an ideal world, these metal handles would be created from bent steel beams similar to those used in construction, but they may be made from just about any sort of metal that will enable concrete to harden around it firmly. Lift and transport the cover to the septic tank, making sure it fits over the entrance, when the concrete has set and the handles are in place.

Security of Cement Cover

It is unlikely that someone will attempt to remove the massive concrete cover that you have erected for your septic system in the majority of circumstances. Even so, placing a metal bar over the top of the concrete and locking it in place may be a smart idea for covers used in more sensitive situations, such as commercial buildings or public places of worship.

When a metal bar is attached to a piece of metal or chain that has been screwed into the concrete or metal around the top of the septic system, it may be secured in place. Fortunately, the bar can be simply removed, allowing for access to the septic tank underneath.

The Drip Cap

  • At the absolute least, every septic tank has a cover, which not only aids in the release of gas but also gives access to the tank for septic firms that must empty or examine it for leaks. Afterwards, pour a generous amount of heavy-duty cement into the frame and smooth it out
  • Using the handles, raise and carry the cover to the septic tank to ensure that it fits over the entrance
  • Once the concrete has cured, remove it from the tank and discard it.

How septic tank lids and covers are saving you money – Aeration Septic

A septic tank system may be one of the most expensive mechanical elements on a property, making it one of the most important investments. It is also one of the least thought about or comprehended of all the concepts. It may be tempting to flush it down the toilet and forget about it, but doing so may be quite costly in the long run, since regular maintenance and monitoring can help to avoid pricey repair fees. Risers and lids for septic tanks are an excellent and cost-effective solution to ease future maintenance and monitoring of the tank.

What are septic tank risers and lids?

While your septic tank is located beneath the earth, septic tank risers provide a big diameter “well” that allows for a safe access point to the sewage tank to be located at ground level if necessary. The lid is attached to the top of the riser and is designed to completely encapsulate the system in an airtight and watertight manner. In this way, surface water and debris such as grass clippings, mulch, and soil are prevented from entering the tank. It also helps to keep gases and smells from leaking from the septic system as well.

There are several benefits to septic tank risers and lids

First and foremost, having a clearly visible septic tank lid on the property serves as a pleasant reminder that a septic system is in place. However, whereas older-style concrete coverings were considered to be heavy and unattractive, current plastic lids are lightweight and made to integrate with the surrounding environment. These lightweight variants make it simple and cost effective to install, monitor, and service your septic system, and they are also easy to transport. Savings on expenses By establishing an access point at ground level, service experts will have an easier time locating the septic system for routine maintenance, repairs, or to pump out the septic tank as necessary.

  1. Stainless steel threaded fasteners are used to connect lids to the riser and keep them in place to avoid tampering by minors and potential falls into the septic tank.
  2. The high duty riser and lid systems placed at ground level are sturdy enough to withstand being mowed directly over.
  3. As a result, there is no need to spend the additional time and energy trimming around them.
  4. At Aeration Septic Inc, we provide several different types and sizes of septic tank covers and lids.

Boston Poured Concrete

Because your home’s septic system is out of sight and out of mind for the most of its useful life cycle, we might lose sight of how critical it is to the overall health of the building. If you live or work in the Boston area, D.A. Welch Construction offers a highly competent team ofconcrete pouringexperts that can help you with septic tank repairs or installations.

Because of its strength and longevity, concrete septic tanks are the most common form of tank available on the market. We can provide the greatest installation and repair services for your septic system so that you don’t have to worry about it.

Let Us Install Your Septic System

D.A. Welch Construction, in addition to providing the highest-quality poured concrete foundations and retaining walls, also provides septic system installation. In terms of materials, you have three alternatives to pick from when building a septic system in your Boston house or business: concrete, plastic, and fiberglass. Damage to plastic tanks might occur as a result of changes in the soil or vibrations above ground. As a result of their small weight, fiberglass tanks are susceptible to being dislodged and float away, resulting in thousands of dollars in repairs and replacement.

Welch Construction, we provide the finest quality service and materials available anywhere in the country.

Their resistance to the environment means that changes in soil, vibration, or even tree roots will not have an effect on their performance.

Welch Construction has over 25 years of expertise in the poured concrete area, making them the business you can rely on for the greatest results and a project done correctly from the beginning to the conclusion.

Septic System Repairs

Despite the fact that concrete septic tanks are the strongest and most lasting alternative available on the market, no material is fully impenetrable to injury or decay. D.A. Welch Construction has the knowledge and experience to fix any problems that may arise with your Boston septic system. Contact us now to learn more. You should call a professional to examine and repair your septic tank if you ever smell sewage gas on your property or see wet areas in your yard that aren’t supposed to be there.

Our skilled staff employs the most up-to-date methods to repair and restore your tank to its original condition.

Welch Construction is the best Boston concrete contractor you can rely on for the peace of mind you deserve when it comes to having your septic system fixed.

If you are looking for a Boston area septic system service, please call D.A. Welch Construction at (617) 698-7268 or complete our online request form.

  • ASK a question or make a comment about how to open a septic tank safely and properly for inspection or cleaning.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Instructions on how to open the septic tank. The location of the septic tank cleanout or cover, as well as the access and opening processes. We discuss some of the things to look for before opening the septic tank, such as subsidence, indications of recent work, and septic tank coverings that are not suitable to use. Then we demonstrate how to remove the septic tank lid or the access port cover from the tank.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page. Use the SEARCH BOX to discover the information you’re looking for quickly.

Procedures for Safe Opening of a Septic Tank, Cesspool, or Drywall for Inspection or Cleaning

The following are the contents of the article:

  • How to remove the lid from a septic tank
  • When it comes to pumping out the septic tank, which septic tank entrance should be used? Why
See also:  How To Install A Clean Out Line Septic Tank?

In this septic tank pumpout article series, you’ll learn how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks, as well as how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks using photos. In addition to septic pumping tank truck operators, this guideline is meant to provide basic information to homeowners and septic service providers that are concerned about septic system maintenance.

  • There is a risk of dangerous, perhaps deadly collapse due to subsidence (depressions or low regions in the earth) near the location of the septic tank. Evidence of recent construction activity that may necessitate further investigation in order to determine the status of the septic system
  • Backup or effluent breakout at the surface of the ground in the septic tank region.
  • Here is an example of a septic tank cover that was discovered atop an unstable home-made collection of concrete blocks that had been piled by the owner to serve as an access well to his septic tank. Because the masonry blocks were misaligned and loose, and because the tank aperture into which the cover opened was bigger than the cover, there was a serious collapse risk that may have resulted in a deadly hazard. We covered the area with plywood and roped it off, and we quickly informed the residents and the property owner of the situation, both verbally and in writing

Procedure for Opening the Septic Tank Pumping Access Port

It is necessary to clean the septic tank using a cleanout port, which is normally positioned in the center of the tank. A small access opening, such as one over an intake or outlet baffle, does not provide enough space for adequate sludge removal from the septic tank bottom, and it increases the likelihood of future clogging of the tank’s inlet or outlet due to partially removed floating scum that has not been completely removed from the tank bottom. In this particular scenario, we already had the measurements to the exact placement of the septic tank cleanout cover due to previous work.

A wrecking bar is set to be used to remove the cover from the vehicle.

Reader CommentsQ A

@Ron, In order for a concrete septic tank lid to be correctly erected, it must feature both access openings and cast in iron loops to which a hoist may be attached. Alternatively, if your septic tank cover does not have those points of purchase for lifting, you will require a flat bar and a larger wrecking bar to pry up the excavated lid from the septic tank sufficiently to allow you to put a chain around the lid, most likely two Chainz, and lift the lid with a hoist and tripod mechanism or you will use an on-site motorized hoist.

  • 1/2 x 27/4 removing the top of a septic tank @Phil, Although what you describe is theoretically doable, it may be less expensive and more rational to do so in a different way.
  • This is due to the fact that just stitching a circular hole does not ensure that I am creating a hole through which the lid will not be dropped.
  • Edge My concrete septic tank, which was constructed when the home was built in 1979 and does not have any manholes or openings for pumping out, is in poor condition.
  • Is it feasible to cut two manholes using a concrete saw that are 20″/24″ in diameter and then build risers and a cover on top of them?
  • Could you please share a picture of the tank top?
  • It is common for the concrete top to be tapered; nevertheless, it may just be trapped by effloresent salts and filth.
  • I have a feeling that simply tugging will not be effective.

This would have stopped leaks but would have made it extremely difficult to open the tank for the next person who needed to open the tank.

Repeat this process many times all around the cover’s perimeter.

For me, this has worked almost every time in the past.

It is recommended that you build a septic tank riser that is sealed to the tank top, as well as a new secure cover on top of the riser if your septic tank lid is not near to the ground level.

Never work on your own.

I’ve erected two wood 4x4s on top of the lifting ring to provide additional support.

All I’ve done three times is shattered those 4x4s.

Do you have any recommendations?

A septic tank pumping provider can remove plastic bags, tiny pebbles, and other debris from your tank, as well as the sediments, scum, and sludge that has accumulated there.

What is the best way to get them out?

When the septic tank is drained out, would it make sense to place a plastic bag over the top hole of the tank to keep the odors contained?

Gerard A plastic bag as a sewer line cap doesn’t seem right to me – it’s not durable, it’s the incorrect material if a cover is required, and if it’s a vent rather than an access pipe, the vent must be open to the atmosphere and protected from animal intrusion.

What is the function of this item?

A typical septic tank is equipped with clean out access covers that are strategically placed.

Maybe something as basic as a flat piece of concrete or stone will be sufficient, or maybe something more complex.

To be quite honest, I would have expected the contractor who dug the hole to be accountable for ensuring that the system was repaired and safe.

What should I do to solve it?

What store would I go to in order to acquire septic tank covers?

A few years ago, I had a beautiful new house built for me.

I have three plastic polylok lids, one of which is above ground and is for the pump.

I’d like to purchase risers so that I may build all three at a depth of around 6 inches below ground level.

What are the advantages and disadvantages.

Do you have any other suggestions?

I apologize for the lengthy post.

Sorry, but “True Bolt” isn’t a phrase I’m familiar with or associate with septic tank lids in any way.

Although this is not always the case, Mary, as the pumper may be able to access the entire tank bottom from a single opening depending on the tank’s size and shape; however, if your pumper is unable to do so from a single opening, you may want both openings opened to inspect the condition of the tank baffles.

There are two holes in my septic tank. Is it necessary to open both doors for a pump out?

Question:cannot find the manhole cover of the septic tank

(8th of August, 2014) “We’ve located the cesspool concrete lid (about 12 foot diameter), but after digging a 2 foot perimeter, we were unable to locate the manhole cover, which was required for an inspection.” vicki levin stated Help? My husband is becoming increasingly upset with the digging!

Reply:

If it’s a cesspool, rather than a septic tank, and it’s spherical, the access lid is normally located in the center of the container.

Question: how do i remove septic tank lid that is stuck

The entrance lid would normally be in the center of the cesspool, if it is in fact a cesspool rather than a septic tank, and it is spherical.

Reply:

Anon:WARNING: If the septic tank cover, lid, or access aperture has partially caved in or sank into the tank, the condition is extremely dangerous – an unsecure cover implies that someone might fall into the tank, which is generally lethal very quickly. Please keep everyone away from the septic tank area until such time as you have had the tank inspected and opened for additional inspection by a professional. Depending on the tank type and condition, lifting the lid may necessitate the use of a pry bar or wrecking bar, as well as a small portable winch (which is unusual).

Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Pumping ProcedurePumper Truck Operation Articles

  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION
  • MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • HOW TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN NOT TO PUMP A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO FIND A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK
  • INSPECT THE SEPTIC TANK BEFORE PUMPING
  • SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION PROCEDURE
  • SEPTIC TANK LEVELS OF SEWAGE
  • PUMPER TRU

Suggested citation for this web page

HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK at Inspect a Tank An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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How to Make a Septic Tank Cover

  • 2-foot length of 1-inch diameter plastic pipe
  • U-bend made of 1-inch diameter plastic pipe
  • A large plastic barrel
  • An electric or manual saw
  • And a hammer. Door knobs that are big and strong

It is not necessary to undertake a significant building project in order to replace a septic tank lid. Some septic tank covers, which are designed to lay on top of a tank to protect it from excess moisture – and to shield you from unpleasant odors – have been known to disintegrate and collapse into the tank itself. The worst-case situation is the replacement of the whole tank, which can cost thousands of dollars in labor and materials.

It is possible to rebuild a concrete tank lid if the structural integrity of the septic tank has not been harmed by the collapsed cover. This will guarantee that the bacteria in your tank continue to grow and that your septic system continues to work.

Step 1

Cut a huge shape out of the bottom of the plastic barrel that is approximately 1 foot deep. In order to properly cover the whole septic tank entrance, the form should be larger than the tank opening plus a few inches to allow for overlap. Place the plastic pipe in the centre of the barrel, vertically up, in the center of the barrel. The pipe will serve as a tank vent when it is installed.

Step 2

According to the manufacturer’s directions, mix the cement well. Fill the barrel to a depth of 4 to 6 inches with the liquid.

Step 3

Place the handles on top of the cement and secure with screws. To ensure that the handles reach at least 3 inches into the cement, they should be at least 3 inches long. Allow at least 24 hours for the cement to dry. After that, you should be able to lift the septic tank cover by the handles.

Step 4

Remove the barrel from the concrete with a saw. Make sure that the cover fits tightly over the top of the septic tank when it is placed over the tank. The U-bend should be attached to the top of the straight pipe that emerges through the cover. The U-bend will allow rainwater to escape from the tank without accumulating any of it.

See also:  Septic Tank Under House How To Fix? (Question)

Tip

Select a plastic barrel that is large enough to cover the opening of the septic tank drain. It is possible that you will need to cut the tank in the middle and use a piece of plywood for the bottom half of the form.

Warning

Do not let the septic tank lid fall to the ground. It will be rather heavy, and if it is dropped, it may shatter – or cause other objects to break.

How to Replace a Concrete Septic Lid

Septic systems employ a concrete cap to limit the infiltration of smells and sewage into the surrounding soil. Every five years, the lid must be removed in order for the septic system to be emptied out and the tank to be cleaned. When concrete septic tank covers become cracked or damaged in any way, they must be replaced immediately. Purchases of this nature can be made online or at a home improvement store in your area. Many septic tanks are equipped with risers, which allow the lid to be seen above ground.

Make arrangements with the utility companies to come out and mark the position of electricity and water lines before beginning work on a concrete septic lid replacement.

How to Replace a Concrete Septic Lid (with Pictures) Image courtesy of creatingmore/E+/GettyImages.com

Dig Down to the Septic Lid

Spade or shovel the dirt around the concrete septic lid until you reach the septic tank lid, and then remove the septic tank lid. Septic tanks are typically located 12 to 14 inches below the surface of the earth. In order to have enough area to work when taking the septic tank top off the septic tank, it is preferable if you dig a perimeter around it that is 16 inches wide.

It’s also a good idea to dig 2 inches past the seam where the lid and tank come together. If your lid is mounted on a riser, there is no need to poke around underneath.

Lift Off the Lid

A pry bar should be inserted between the top of the septic tank and the lid. Instruct your assistant to grip the handle on the top of the lid. One end of the concrete septic tank lid may be lifted up by pressing down on the pry bar. Instruct your assistant to pull the lid handle and slide the lid to the side while you work. You may need to repeat the method for the opposite end of a big rectangular lid if the lid is rectangular in shape. With the assistance of your companions, lift the septic tank lid away from the tank.

Check the seal on the top of the septic tank for damage.

Measure the Lid

Using a tape measure, measure the length and breadth of the aperture to your septic tank chamber. Purchase a replacement sewer cover from Home Depot or another supplier depending on the measurements you’ve taken thus far. The old lid should be placed back on top of the septic tank, or the tank entrance should be covered with a tarp if it will be several days until your new lid comes.

Clean the Seal

Using a putty knife, scrape away any remaining old seal from the top of the septic tank if necessary. The majority of the seal will fall out in large chunks. With a wire brush, clean the top of the tank entrance to remove any remaining traces of the seal as well as any loose concrete.

Install the New Lid

One end of the new septic tank lid should be lifted while the other end is lifted by your assistant. Lower the concrete lid over the septic tank with care, ensuring that the seal between the tank and the lid is compressed. If you have to dig to get to the septic tank, you should cover it with the earth.

adding riser to concrete lid

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Septic Tank – adding riser to concrete lid
Author:kratman (GA)Question from homeowner on addingrisers to a concrete lid. I have a concrete tank (estimated at 1,500 gals, circa late 70’s) and the top is about 3 feet below ground level. The lid is composed of a series on concrete “planks” that are the width of the tank long and about 2.5 feet wide. So the planks sit laterally on top of the tank to form the lid. I am unsure how many planks are in total (since the entire lid was not exposed when it was recently pumped), but I would guess four planks total.Since the lid is so deep and pumping it made a real mess in my side yard from digging the area to expose the first plank, I wanted to add risers. The septic company wanted $1,500 to add two risers at both ends; but I wanted to explore some options. How does one add a riser to the plank units? Or would I go about getting this manufactured (precast company, etc)? I would guess the entire plank is replaced, but since they are only 2.5 wide, the riser diameter presents a problem. Thank in advance.
Post Reply
Re: Septic Tank – adding riser to concrete lid
Author:KCRoto (MO)Don’t take this wrong- I highly recommend having a riser installed to allow access to the tank.That being said, I don’t think that the average homeowner is up to the task of installing it.There are several factors in play.You need to have a riser that is larger than the current lid or has the same inside diameter as the opening you have currently.Then you need to consider the amount of weight that you are adding to the rim of the current opening.If you are adding too much weight, you could cause it to cave in.Also consider the weight of the riser itself when you would be installing it.Do you have the capability to set it properly?If you can handle the challenge, then I suggest contacting a local concrete vault or fabrication company; they can get you what you need as far as a riser and new tank lid.This forum isn’t for pricing, but I can tell you that in my opinion, adding risers, lids, and installation to two spots doesn’t seem unrealistic.
Post Reply
Re: Septic Tank – adding riser to concrete lid
Author:sharp1 (IL)The weight of the new lid and risers will be less than the weight of the 3′ of dirt removed. The company that cast the original tank and lid is probably in your area if still in business.
Post Reply
Re: Septic Tank – adding riser to concrete lid
Author:hj (AZ)Usually, the two end sections have “square” access openings above the baffles. if so, a section of 6″ ABS or PVC will cement into the opening with female adapters and plugs on top.
Post Reply
Re: Septic Tank – adding riser to concrete lid
Author:KCRoto (MO)Unless you installed it, you are making it up as you go.Septic tanks aren’t made to specific dimensions anywhere.I have seen concrete in varying sizes, shapes, and thicknesses. I have found them made of clay, steel, and plastic.Every concrete vault manufacturer has its own design, lid size, and placement.
Post Reply
Re: Septic Tank – adding riser to concrete lid
Author:Wheelchair (IL)I can tell you what I did.It worked for us.Our septic tank was 1200 gallon and concrete. We had 3 slabs, each having 2 loops of re-bar for lifting them.Each slab was about 3 ft x 5 ft and were laid side by side.I did exactly what you want to do.I made a frame using 2 X4 and plywood under.I was able to obtain a 3 ft piece of 20 inch PVC pipe.I secured the pvc inside of the form and secure everything with rows of re-bar.I oiled all of the wood and used plastic bags as a liner to keep the concrete off the forms.My neighbor was pouring a slab of concrete in his drive was and he had some extra material.3 wheel barrels and I pour the concrete into my form. I added 2 hook loops and let the concrete dry for 3 days before I removed the forms. The slab with the 3 ft stack was lifted and place on the edge of the septic tank.We back filled with dirt and sand to compact the area to almost the top of the stack.I went to a specality shop that sold septic system supplies.Only then did I realize that the industry made 4 inch x 22 inch, stackable flange pieces that snapped together to form any height.I purchased a 22 inch dome cover and placed it over the 20 inch pvc pipe.It worked perfectly and allowed me to add an additional 3-4 inches of dirt over the cover. No one walks on the cover.Removing 3-4 of dirt is a lot easier to do and repair.I’m happy and that was over 3 years ago.That’s 3 snowy winters.Best Wishes
Post Reply
Re: Septic Tank – adding riser to concrete lid
Author:hj (AZ)Maybe so where you are, but here, almost EVERY tank, regardless of who made it has an access port above the baffles. They also usually have a large center port, but no one installs a riser at that one.
Post Reply
Re: Septic Tank – adding riser to concrete lid
Author:KCRoto (MO)Many of the older tanks here don’t even have baffles.
Post Reply
Thanks to all
Author:kratman (GA)ok Thanks. All good ideas. I had thought about pouring the lid myself, and may do that. But I will speak to a tank manufacturer in the area first.I have not checked the middle of the tank for an existing access hole but will do that as well. 3 feet of Georgia clay is not much fun. Thanks. Kratman.Edited 1 times.
Post Reply
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How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

All septic tanks eventually fill with sediments and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain in excellent functioning order. If the tank’s lid is not on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located. A typical septic tank is 4 inches to 4 feet underground, with all of its components, including the cover, buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underneath. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the surface of the ground.

Consult A Map

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank.

If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your efforts. When you acquire a house, a schematic of your septic system may also be included as part of the home inspection process.

Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land. After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if it is there. Locate the same spot outside and make a note of it. Insert a thin metal probe into the earth, identify the 4-inch sewage line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the property. Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet apart from the home in all states except Alaska.

Whenever the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene it indicates that the tank has been located.

Locate The Lid

The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 5 feet by 8 feet. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its boundaries and outline the rectangle’s boundary using a pencil. A septic tank that was built before 1975 will have a single concrete lid that is 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. If the tank was built after 1975, it will have two covers made of fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at the ends of the rectangle and centered at the ends of the rectangle.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

Mark The Spot

Make a note on the ground near where the tank was pumped by a professional and the lid was buried to serve as a reference in the future. In order to keep track of where you are, you should choose a hefty circular patio tile that is embedded in the ground. Additionally, draw your own map of the area and store it with your other important papers.

Concrete Septic Tank Lid: Sizes, Weight & Cost (Explained)

An underground septic tank is used to store all of the foul-smelling soil that travels through the drain. A concrete septic tank not only removes the obstruction from the drain, but it also helps to maintain our environment clean. For the purpose of inspection and cleaning, a concrete-made septic tank lid is always required for the concrete septic tank to function properly.

It also prevents the foul odor that emanates from the tank from reaching its surroundings outside of the tank. As a result, we have included a brief explanation of the sizes, weights, and prices of the concrete septic tank lid in this post.

How big and thick is a concrete septic tank lid?

Depending on the size of the tank, a concrete septic tank lid might be as large as 30 inches. The concrete tank lid can have a thickness of more than 3 inches, and the concrete thickness can range between 3000 and 6000 PSI, depending on the application. If the lid is composed of firm concrete with a high PSI, the thickness of the lid might be greater than 6 inches in some cases. The size of a septic tank lid is typically determined by the size of the actual septic tank. Because the typical dimension of a concrete septic tank is 40 inches by 60 inches, this is the most common configuration.

In addition, the size of the septic tank varies based on the size of the concrete tank used in the system.

Before discussing the thickness of a septic tank lid, it is important to remember that the thickness of the lid is directly proportional to the strength of the concrete.

A thicker lid can be used in this situation if the thickness is greater than 5 inches.

How much does a concrete septic tank lid weigh?

Most of the time, an unpainted concrete septic tank lid weighs between 10 and 12 pounds. The weight of the lid, on the other hand, is determined by the quality of the concrete as well as the strength of the concrete itself. If the primary sewage tank is 5 inches by 7 inches in dimension, a septic tank lid might weigh as much as 15 pounds. It is critical to accurately balance a septic tank lid in order to avoid damage to the tank. This is due to the fact that you will need to lift the septic tank’s cover in order to clean and check it.

Because the thickness of the lid will determine how much weight it will have, the greater the thickness of the lid will be.

If the PSI of the concrete is between 4000 and 6000, the weight of the lid might be greater than 15 pounds.

How much does a concrete septic tank lid cost?

Concrete sewage tank lids are typically priced based on the size of the primary septic tank. The cost of a lid that will precisely cover septic tanks ranging in size from 9000 to 13000 gallons (which is the largest) will be in the neighborhood of $500 or more. The typical size, which is 25 inches in length, will cost around 40 dollars to purchase. According to industry standards, the cost of a concrete septic tank lid is typically determined by the size of the concrete lid.

The most expensive concrete septic tank lid is 130 inches in diameter and costs around 500 dollars. This sized lid will fit around a septic tank that holds 13000 gallons of water in its holding tank.

How to build a concrete septic tank lid?

We’ve outlined the quickest and most straightforward procedure for constructing a septic tank cover. The following is a description of the procedure:

Measurement:

First and foremost, you will need to determine the size of the mouth or entrance region of your septic tank, which can be found here. Then, using a measuring tape, you must precisely determine the location of the septic tank’s perimeter.

Build a frame:

The following phase will be to construct a frame that will be based on the same measurement as the septic tank’s mouth. Aluminum or dry wood should be used to construct the frame. However, make certain that the frame is free of the cement once it has dried.

Pour the cement:

You have now finished pouring the cement into the frame. It is important to keep the lid thick enough to be durable and long-lasting, so make sure you keep it at least three inches thick. The surface of the cement must next be smoothed and flattened to complete the process. Check to see that you have used light-duty cement instead of heavy-duty cement.

How many lids should a concrete septic tank have?

Depending on the size of the septic tank, it may require at least two lids. This is because pouring concrete for your septic tank might be a difficult task. When you initially attempt to construct a lid for your concrete septic tank, you should be able to construct at least two lids. The reason for this is that, if you construct two covers for your septic tank, you will have an easier time during the cleaning and inspection processes. Additionally, if you include two lids to the septic tank, the ventilation system of the septic tank will run more smoothly.

How much does it cost to replace a septic tank lid?

The cost of constructing an average-sized septic tank lid will be around 60 dollars. A septic tank system with two lids will cost between 110 and 120 dollars, depending on how many are included. If you choose the heavy-duty free cement, the price will be somewhat greater than if you do not. Because strong duty-free cement provides a long-lasting and durable finish to the lid. Additionally, the cost of fabricating a custom-sized septic tank lid will be in the neighborhood of $100. To be more specific, it will cost more than 500 dollars to construct the largest possible lid, which is 130 inches in diameter.

How to lift and replace the concrete septic tank lid?

Lifting and replacing a concrete sewage tank lid is far more difficult than installing a new septic tank lid, as you may imagine. As a result, we’ve covered the quickest and most straightforward method of removing and replacing the concrete septic tank lid:

Dig around the lid:

First and foremost, you must excavate around the septic tank. Because it will provide additional room for lifting the lid. In order to dig around the lid, you will need to dig around 15 inches deep. It is preferable if you dig up the area surrounding the septic tank lid that is 15 inches in diameter after the first 15 inches.

Lift up the septic tank lid:

You will need to raise the lid with the assistance of a stout bar or pry bar at this point.

Insert the bar between the tank’s lid and the tank’s bottom. You will next need to ask your assistance to lower the opposite end of the bar until it is flush with the ground. Repeat the procedure until the lid of the tank is entirely removed from the entrance of the tank’s opening.

Install the new lid:

It is now necessary to determine the size of the septic tank’s opening. Then you must purchase the lid, making certain that the measurements are accurate. Install the new lid by gently holding it in place with the assistance of your assistant. Finally, place the cover on top of the septic tank and secure it in place.

Can you replace a concrete septic lid with plastic?

If your septic tank requires frequent examination and cleaning, you can opt to replace the concrete septic cover with a plastic one. Because most septic tanks need to be cleaned after 1 to 2 years, they are built with a thick cover to prevent this from happening. If you have a septic tank that has to be cleaned on a regular basis, it is preferable to use plastic covers. However, because plastic lids are easily lifted up, ensure sure the lock system on the plastic lid is functional.

Should septic tank lids be airtight? How to seal a concrete septic tank lid?

Yes, it is vital to seal the septic tank from the outside world. Because it is possible that exterior water will seep into the septic tank. Additionally, if your septic system is placed on top of the soil, it is essential that the septic tank be correctly installed. If this is not done, the tank will overflow due to the exterior water. Although many types of sealant ropes can be used to seal a concrete septic tank lid, the most common one is silicone. There are several different types of butyl sealants available on the market that may be used to firmly seal the septic tank lid.

Final thoughts

Septic tank lids are available in a variety of sizes ranging from 25 to 50 inches in diameter. Furthermore, the thickness of a typical-sized lid can reach up to 3 inches. However, the cost of a standard-sized lid is 50 dollars, and it may occasionally be even more expensive than this. In addition, the weight of a 25-inch lid might be as much as 50 pounds in some cases.

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