How Do You Measure Distance From Septic Tank To House? (Correct answer)

How far should a septic tank be from the property line?

  • So, this means that your septic tank should be far away from your property line so that it is safe for your family, but also for others around the neighborhood. At least ten feet away from the property line is the common distance, but you should double-check with your state regulations as well. Where Should a Septic Tank Be Placed?

How far is septic tank from house?

Requirements vary from one area to another, but the normal minimum distance from the house is 10 feet. If you’ll be using a private well for drinking water, however, note that many state departments of health require a minimum of 50 feet between a new septic tank and a well, according to APEC Water.

How do you mark a septic tank location?

In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter. If you do not find the lid by probing, shallow excavation with a shovel along the tank’s perimeter should reveal the lid.

How far does a septic tank have to be from a boundary?

Legally you should ensure that your septic tank is 15 metres away from another property which will help you avoid placing a tank too close to any fencing.

How close can leach field be to house?

Common guidelines require at least 50′ clearance distance between a well and a septic system tank or 150′ between a well and a septic drainfield or leaching bed but you will see that different authorities may recommend different distances. Local soil and rock conditions can make these “rules of thumb” unreliable.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

Can a metal detector find a septic tank?

If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector. Based on your conclusions in Step 3, if your septic tank is likely made from concrete or steel, a metal detector can make the task of locating it much easier. But not just any metal detector will do.

How do you find a septic tank in the snow?

Outside the home, in the same side of the house where the lines are located, look for a melted area of snow, about 36″ (3 feet) or more wide. Snow may melt the fastest over the septic tank due to using warmer water than the frozen ground around it!

How far should sewage treatment be from house?

At least 10 meters away from any habitable building.

How close can you build next to a drain field?

– A full foundation must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 20 feet from the leaching area. – A slab foundation such as a garage must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 10 feet from the leaching area. – Concrete columns for a deck must be 5 feet from the leaching area and not disturb the septic system.

How close to a house can a sewage treatment plant be?

The Sewage Treatment Plant must be sited more than 7m from habitable property. The soakaway must be a minimum of 10 metres from a watercourse, 15 metres from a building and 50 metres from a borehole or spring.

How do I calculate the size of my drain field?

Drainfield Size

  1. The size of the drainfield is based on the number of bedrooms and soil characteristics, and is given as square feet.
  2. For example, the minimum required for a three bedroom house with a mid range percolation rate of 25 minutes per inch is 750 square feet.

How far apart are drain field lines?

The trenches are dug about 6 feet apart on center (center of pipe to center of next pipe) which allows, in good design, space for a set of replacement trenches to be placed between the original ones when the first set fails.

How far do field lines extend from septic tank?

Your septic system site plan is typically drawn right on top of your property survey showing the septic tank ‘setbacks’ with tank 5-10 feet from the house, the leach field at least 20 feet from the house, at least 100 feet away from wells and streams, 25 feet away from dry gulches, and 10 feet away from the property

Septic Tank Location – DISTANCE TO SEPTIC TANK

  • POSTING a QUESTION or COMMENT on the topic of utilizing measures to locate the septic tank or cleanout access cover.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. The following measurements were taken to locate the septic tank: Using measures to find a septic tank when the position of the tank is unknown or when the location of the septic tank is not visually visible is explained in detail in this article. This article outlines the processes to be followed when utilizing measurements to locate a septic tank.

The septic tank can also be located for a variety of other purposes, such as checking and testing septic systems when purchasing a property, or for safety considerations, such as ensuring that the septic tank cover is in excellent shape.

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DISTANCE TO TANK – How To Measure The Possible Distance From House to Tank

SEPTIC VIDEOS has videos that demonstrate how to locate the septic system, septic tank, and septic drainfield. Also read SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION—how to locate the leach fields—for more information. In our sketch at left, we marked the location of waste lines exiting the building and then took accurate one-inch measurements to locate the septic tank center as well as the onsite seepage pits. We measured from the centers of each of these to prominent site features in order to determine how far the septic tank is from the building.

The steps outlined below deal with measuring the placement of a septic tank after it has already been erected.

  • You may discover SEPTIC VIDEOS where you can learn how to locate your septic system, including how to locate your tank and septic drainfield. SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION – how to locate the leach fields is also covered in this section. In our sketch at left, we marked the location of waste lines exiting the building and then took accurate one-inch measurements to locate the septic tank center as well as the onsite seepage pits. We measured from the centers of each of these to prominent site features in order to determine how far the septic tank was from the building. These measurements were taken at the time of the installation of the septic tank and seepage pits, making life easier for the next owner. When a septic tank has already been erected, the next stages will discuss how to measure the position of the tank.
  • In terms of distance: The septic tank will be positioned outside the building on an arc created with its radius distance from the building equal to the length of a snake that was fed into the home drain until it was stopped by an obstruction until it is filled with water. Typically, the septic tank is around 10 feet away from the structure. By means of an electronic sensor: The septic tank may be pinpointed with pinpoint accuracy using technological means: Some plumbing contractors can locate the precise position of the septic tank at this stage by inserting a special plumbing snake into the main home drain pipe and running it through the house. The metal plumbing snake receives an electrical signal that is supplied into it. The signal from the plumbing snake may be detected by a receiver located outside. The precise course of the snake in the underground drain line may be traced all the way to the tank by passing the receiver, which functions as a type of electronic metal detector, over the surface of the land. Equipment for Locating Septic Tanks is also available. EQUIPMENT FOR LOCATING SEPTIC TANKS in this particular article

Whenever this specialized electronic plumbing snake equipment is not accessible, we rely on visual cues found in the home, at the site, and outside in the vicinity of possible septic tank placements, as well as some judicious digging to locate the septic tank. No, we don’t have to dig up the entire land to do this. Finding the septic tank involves a combination of visual inspection and excavation techniques, which are detailed below.

Reader CommentsQ A

(11th of April, 2015) Is it possible to have a sewage pipe running from the house to the septic tank that is longer than 150 feet? Are there any restrictions on the maximum distance that may be traveled between a septic system and a house? Thank you very much.

Reply:

on the 11th of April, 2015 Is it possible to have a sewage line running from the house to the septic tank that is longer than 150 feet? seth said. Are there any restrictions on the maximum distance that may be maintained between a septic system and a house? I appreciate it.

Septic Tank Location Articles

  • SIZE AND LOCATION OF THE SEPTIC DRAINFIELD
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • HOW TO FIND THE SEPTIC TANK
  • THE DISTANCE TO THE SEPTIC TANK
  • FINDING THE MAIN WASTE LINE EXIT
  • POSITIVE SEPTIC TANK LOCATIONS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK LOCATING EQUIPMENT
  • SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • SEPTIC TANK GRASS OR SNOWMELT
  • SEP

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How Much Distance Should Be Between My Septic Tank and My Well?

EPA and the Department of Housing and Urban Development suggest that a septic tank be located at least 50 feet away from a well that is used to provide drinking water. This is also a requirement for loans sponsored by the Federal Housing Administration, or FHA, however exceptions can be made in certain circumstances. The Code of Maryland Regulationsrequires specified spacing between septic components and wells, which we discuss in further detail in the next section.

Recommended Distances Between WellsSeptic Components

As a result of local rules or soil conditions, local authorities may mandate greater distances between a well and a septic component than those suggested by the Environmental Protection Agency. When property limitations or elevation changes are involved, components can be brought closer together in other circumstances. The following are the regulations for distances between wells and septic components in the state of Maryland for wells that are intended for water distribution: d) 100 feet from identifiable sources of contamination and designated subsurface sewage disposal areas if the proposed well will utilize an unconfined aquifer as a water supply source; e) 50 feet from identifiable sources of contamination and designated subsurface sewage disposal areas if the proposed well will utilize a confined aquifer as a water supply source; and f) 50 feet from any sewage gravity or force main, except as provided in B(3) of this regulation.

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The Maryland Department of the Environment’s Regulation of Water Supply, Sewage Disposal, and Solid Waste, Chapter 04: Well Construction, is the source for this information.

Possible Contaminants from Septic Systems

When a well is located too close to a septic system or other source of wastewater, a range of pollutants, such as the following, might infiltrate your well water:

  • Salmonella and E. coli are examples of bactria. Viruses, such as norovirus or hepatitis A
  • Bacteria
  • And parasites detergents and soaps that include phosphorus. Chemicals derived from paint, drain cleaners, and other common home items
  • Heavy metals, iron, and copper are examples of such materials.

These pollutants, when present in large quantities, can cause illnesses or disorders. If you have reason to believe that your well has been polluted, it is critical that you have your water tested as quickly as possible. If a problem is discovered, water treatment techniques such as chlorination, reverse osmosis, activated charcoal filtration, or ultraviolet light purification may be able to restore your water to a safe drinking temperature. If this is not the case, it may be essential to make repairs to the well or septic system.

Call Water Doctor for Water Testing or Treatment in Maryland

If you are concerned about the quality of your drinking water, our staff at Water Doctor can assist you with this. We provide water quality testing for wells and municipal systems, as well as a number of treatment methods that can assist in the correction of the majority of water quality issues in the area. In collaboration with you, our specialists can evaluate the most appropriate solutions for your demands and budget, whether it is a single system, such as reverse osmosis, or a mix of various systems, such as water softeners, charcoal filtration, and ultraviolet purification.

For more information on our water testing and treatment services, call Water Doctor at 877-677-9275 now! Since 1979, we have been providing residential and business services to clients throughout Maryland.

Well / Septic Distance Certification

Is it possible that you’ve experienced a deal fall through because a Distance Certification was required at the last minute and failed? Was your customer dissatisfied with the fact that they were now on the hook for the costs of a home inspection, appraisal, and other related expenses? At the very least, this newsletter should be able to provide some light on the issue at hand. We are one of the few HUD Consultants in the region, and we are proud to be one of the best. In practice, this means that we are frequently called upon to assist with HUD 203(k) loans and FHA type loans, in order to do HUD Write Ups and Distance Certifications.

So, what exactly is a Distance Learning Certification?

An independent certified individual, such as HHI, will be asked to verify the distance in feet between the well and various parts of the septic system whenever it is needed.

The following are the minimum distances that must be maintained.

  • The distance between the well casing and the Septic Tank is 50 feet
  • The distance between the well casing and the front border of the drain field is 100 feet
  • The distance between the well and Septic components and the property lines is 10 feet.

Many older properties do not fulfill these very minimal requirements, and as a result, the transaction often falls through. When appraisers can detect and verify these distances themselves, they are more likely to do so than not. However, when they are unable to do so, I am frequently contacted to find these features and to conduct and write up the Distance Certifications on their behalf. Then, if they fail to satisfy the bare minimal requirements, the contract is off the table. Our approach is to identify this requirement as early as possible, even before the evaluation process begins.

  • My opinion is that when your customer uses one of these types of loans, you should inquire with the lender involved about whether or not a Distance Certification would be required.
  • If the well casing, septic tanks, and drainfield are easily identified, you may not even need to engage a professional to certify the property.
  • This service is available for $100 if you are hesitant and wish to have this information verified up front before moving further.
  • Let’s face it, your customer believes you are an expert in this field and depends on your knowledge and experience in these subjects.

We recognize that some realtors, particularly those who are new to the profession, may be unaware that this is a possibility or even a need in some cases. So, maybe, we’ve put some light on the subject for you now.

Distance from Septic Tank to house – Wastewater Treatment Distances

A few items to consider before investing in a new wastewater treatment solution (such as a domestic wastewater treatment plant (DWTP), septic tank (percolation area), polishing filter, or even packaged systems) include the installation process. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a distance calculation that specifies that your septic tank must be:

  • A distance of 5 metres from a surface water soakaway
  • 10 metres away from a watercourse or stream
  • 10 metres away from an open drain
  • And 50 metres away from any lake or shoreline.

A distance of 5 metres from a surface water soakaway; 10 metres away from a watercourse or stream; 10 metres away from an open drain; 50 metres away from any lake or shoreline

How Far Should You Put the Septic Tank From the House?

Image courtesy of Kwangmoozaa/iStock/Getty Images.

In This Article

  • Amount of distance from the home
  • Basic safety concerns
  • Suggestions for a successful installation

For those who don’t have access to a municipal sewage system, an alternate solution, such as a septic tank and field lines, will be required. The design and operation of these systems are fairly straightforward. When designing a septic system, you must keep in mind the requirements of local construction codes as well as public health concerns.

Tip

Depending on where you live, local ordinances and regulations that specify the distance between the septic tank and the home vary. However, the normal minimum distance is 10 feet between the two structures. Consult your local ordinances and regulations for a detailed answer as to how far your septic tank must be installed from your home. Requirements differ from one location to the next, although the standard minimum distance from the home is 10 feet in most cases. In the case of a private well for drinking water, however, keep in mind that many state departments of health demand a minimum distance of 50 feet between a new septic tank and a well.

It is possible that the septic tank will be placed considerably closer to the structure since it will be easier and require less plumbing in some cases.

Basic Safety Considerations

The distance between the septic tank and the home is dictated by local ordinances and regulations, which vary depending on where you live. However, the common minimum distance is ten feet. You should check with your local ordinances and regulations for a particular answer on how far your septic tank must be located from the house. The requirements vary from one location to another, but the standard minimum distance from the home is ten feet in most instances. If you want to use a private well for drinking water, however, keep in mind that many state departments of health mandate a minimum distance of 50 feet between a new septic tank and a well, according to APEC Water & Wastewater.

It is possible that the septic tank will be placed considerably closer to the structure since it will be easier and require less plumbing in some circumstances.

It is ultimately your responsibility as a homeowner to determine where your tank will be installed; thus, keep a careful eye on the issue as your house is being built.

Tips for a Successful Installation

Plan ahead of time to get your water supply switched on prior to installing your septic tank. You must fill the tank with water as soon as it is placed in its final position for this to be possible. This has absolutely nothing to do with the septic system itself, but it is a prudent precaution. In the event of a heavy downpour, the groundwater may swell and a septic tank may float out of the ground, even if it has been buried. If this occurs, contact a qualified professional immediately. Repairing any damage done to the lines or to the tank itself, as well as putting the tank back in its original location, may be a costly and time-consuming endeavor.

Initially, you may be confident that you will remember the exact location of the marker when it is time to top up the tank — which is generally every three to five years — but your memory may fade over time.

USDA and FHA distance requirements for well and septic

When working in rural communities, it is customary to have a property that is serviced by a private well. However, there are several crucial measures that must be taken into consideration while defining the minimum property specifications. This video guide will lead you through the USDA and FHA distance requirements for wells and septic systems, as well as what to watch out for during your next real estate transaction. If you have not already done so, please feel free to obtain our most recent “USDA Blueprint for Success” by clicking on the link provided below.

  1. As a brief refresher, USDA loans follow the FHA HUD Handbook criteria for minimum property requirements, therefore the distances and measurements in today’s video will be relevant to both FHA and USDA house loans.
  2. The following minimum distance restrictions between wells and sources of pollution are mandated by the HUD Handbook for existing construction: 1 tenth of a mile from the property line 2.
  3. In the event that the relevant Property line is near to a residential property, the local well distance regulations will apply.
  4. If the distance requirements of the local authority are greater than those specified in the HUD Handbook, the local authority’s requirements will take precedence.
  5. While houses with wells may need additional precautions, I always advise not to be afraid–instead, be informed, since information is power.
  6. As an Approved USDA Lender, we have the knowledge and skills to assist you in achieving your dream of becoming a homeowner.

Simply contact us by phone or email to discuss your situation and allow us to demonstrate the “Metroplex”difference! Sean [email protected] (800) 806-9836 Ext. [email protected] The following is the link to our “USDA Blueprint for Success” document:

Well and Septic Distance Requirements for FHA Loans

Property that is serviced by a private well might be commonplace while working in rural settings. When defining minimum property standards, there are several crucial metrics that must be taken into consideration. This video guide will lead you through the USDA and FHA distance requirements for wells and septic systems, as well as what to watch out for during your next real estate purchase. If you have not already done so, please feel free to obtain our most recent “USDA Blueprint for Success” by clicking on the link provided below: A terrific educational resource for both homebuyers and their Realtors, this free handbook is meant to assist you in walking through the USDA process step-by-step.

  1. USDA and FHA regulations for well and septic system distances are outlined below.
  2. We will also be focusing on existing properties with private wells rather than new construction homes or properties connected to a public water supply for today’s presentation.
  3. 2.
  4. Local authorities may accept a reduction in this distance to 75 feet if the septic tank drain field is 100 feet away.
  5. Nevertheless, if the subject Land is close to non-residential property or a public road, there must be a minimum separation distance of 10 feet between the subject Property and the road.
  6. Due to the fact that these distances are not generally estimated until after the sales contract has been received and the loan application has been submitted, please notify us as soon as possible if you have any issues so that we can investigate and provide recommendations.
  7. Our knowledge and skills as an Approved USDA Lender enable us to assist people in achieving their dream of becoming homeowners.

Simply contact us by phone or email to discuss your situation and allow us to demonstrate the “Metroplex”difference. Sean [email protected] (800) 806-9836, extension 280 To access our “USDA Blueprint for Success,” please click on the following link.

FHA Minimum Distance Between a Well and Septic Tank for Existing Construction

Wells and septic tanks aren’t the only things that need to be separated from one another. As a result, the distance restrictions are primarily concerned with water rather than any other form of pollution. A septic tank, a drain field, and other sources of pollution are all possible.

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FHA Distance Requirements Existing Homes

  • Wells and septic tanks are not the only things that require a certain amount of space. As a result, the standards for distance are primarily concerned with water rather than any other form of pollution. Septic tanks, drain fields, and other sources of pollution are all possibilities.

Despite this, there are occasional deviations in particular situations. The length of the septic tank drain field may be lowered to 75 feet if the local government approves it. Additionally, if the property line is adjacent to a residential property, the well distance regulations of the local government should be followed. However, if the land is adjacent to non-residential property or a public road, there must be a minimum of a 10-foot separation between the two properties. In circumstances where the local government grants permission for greater distances, this will take precedence over the restrictions outlined above.

In the case of a well or septic tank, it is strongly advised that you arrange a well water test and septic tank inspection prior to purchasing the house.

FHA Minimum Distance Between a Well and Septic Tank for New Construction

A buyer who acquires a new house must meet a number of more specific conditions.

  • Ten feet from the property border
  • Fifty feet from the septic tank
  • Hundred feet from the absorption field
  • And hundred feet from the seepage pit or cesspool Sewer lines with permanent water tight joints are 10 feet in length
  • Other sewer lines are 50 feet in length
  • And chemically poisoned soil is 25 feet in length. When impermeable layers of clay, hardpan, or rock protect the ground surface, the depth can be decreased to 15 feet. 50-foot-deep dry well
  • Other regulations – always consult with the appropriate local authorities

Similarly to the current dwelling criteria, any local government regulations take precedence over the foregoing and may be followed. Another piece of advice for first-time home buyers is to make time to attend the septic system inspection. Not only may possible concerns be highlighted in depth to the borrower, but it also serves as an excellent educational opportunity. Learning how to maintain and service a septic system is an important part of a good education. HUD.gov is the official website of the Federal Housing Administration.

How Far Does A Septic Tank Have To Be From A House

Has it occurred to you that you need to install a new septic tank for your house, or that you are constructing and planning your ideal home for the first time? In any case, you must ensure that your septic tank is installed in the proper location so that it may perform its functions without interfering with the operation of the house. Septic tanks or fields must be located at least five feet away from your residence. In most circumstances, however, tanks are situated even further away from the house, often around 10 feet away in most cases, while leach fields are located approximately twenty feet away from the house.

How Far Does a Septic Tank/Field Need to Be From a House?

Have you considered installing a new septic tank for your house, or are you in the process of planning and building your ideal home for the first time? If so, we can help. You must ensure that your septic tank is installed in the proper location so that it may perform its functions without interfering with the operation of the house. Septic tanks or fields must be installed at least five feet away from your residence. Tanks are often located further away from the house, typically around 10 feet away in most circumstances, while leach fields are typically located approximately twenty feet away from the house.

Knowing where it should go on your own will enable you to choose where it should be placed and how far away from the home it has to be from the house.

How Far Does a Septic Tank Have to Be From a Well?

When it comes to septic tank installation, there should be no other water sources nearby that might interfere with the process. As a result, if you have a well that is within sight of your home, you must make certain that the tank and the field are located a sufficient distance away from it. So, how far away does it have to be in order to be considered? This might vary depending on the situation, but there are certain general guidelines that you can follow. The health and safety standards in most states demand that any waste containers, including septic tanks, be at least fifty feet away from any wells in order to ensure public health and safety.

It is crucial to note, however, that this is a rule that may differ significantly depending on which state you reside in and how strict the regulations are.

That particular number will be the one you must follow if your state has a rule that dictates that you have the tank or fields at a greater distance from the house.

How Far Does a Septic Tank Need to Be From a Property Line?

A septic tank must be built in a location that is sufficiently remote from a property line before it can be used effectively. In order to guarantee that the tank is positioned at a sufficient distance from the property line, you must measure such that it is at least 10 feet away from the boundary. This is mostly due to the fact that the tank and drain fields should not be located in an area where a large number of people will be walking. If your neighbors come by and stroll about your property, they shouldn’t have to deal with the issue of something happening to the drain fields because they had to go to grab their dog or because they wanted to drop something off on your doorstep while they were there.

If this occurs and the liquid escapes onto municipal property, you may be penalized for failing to keep the liquid a sufficient distance away from city property.

In most cases, you should keep your pets at least 10 feet away from the property border, but you should double-check with your state’s requirements as well.

Where Should a Septic Tank Be Placed?

A septic tank must be built in a location that is sufficiently remote from a property line before it can be considered functional. In order to guarantee that the tank is situated at a sufficient distance from the property line, you must measure so that it is at least 10 feet away. Because the tank and drain fields should not be located in an area where a large number of people will pass by them, this is the case. If your neighbors come by and stroll about your property, they shouldn’t have to deal with the issue of anything happening to the drain fields because they had to go to grab their dog or because they wanted to leave something down on your doorstep while you were away.

If this occurs and the liquid escapes onto municipal property, you may be penalized for failing to keep the liquid a sufficient distance away from the city property.

The standard distance is at least ten feet from the property line, but you should double-check with your state requirements as well to be sure you are complying with them.

How Much Land Is Needed for a Septic Tank?

Your property must have enough open space for the tank to be able to be installed safely and securely there. If the available area is insufficient, you may be unable to incorporate it into the soil. But how much property do you need to put a septic tank on in order to do so? The typical lot size required for the installation of a septic tank and field is around half an acre. This offers you the space you need to determine the best location for the tank itself as well as a location for the drain fields if needed.

This is something that you really do not want to have to deal with, therefore it is preferable to have the room in the first place in order to attempt and make the best of what you’ve been given.

Conclusion

Installing a new septic tank on your property is a major undertaking that must be completed correctly the first time. It is important to understand the project’s ins and outs, even if you have specialists complete the job on your behalf, so that you are certain that all state and federal rules are being followed. In order to avoid having any difficulties with your septic tank or drain fields in the future, and to avoid being fined or having to pay to have it fixed later on, you should take the following steps: As a result of the restrictions outlined in this article, you may construct your septic tank and drain field in accordance with state requirements, transforming your property into the ideal location for a home or transforming your existing home by constructing a system around it.

You may have your septic tank system installed and connected in a matter of hours, no matter how you go about doing it.

Septic System Owner’s Guide

What kind of computer system do you have? In North Carolina, there are many distinct types of septic systems in use, but the vast majority of the over 2 million systems in use throughout the state are minor variations of the typical septic system. This system includes a septic tank as well as a drainfield that is filled with gravel (usually two to six trenches). Since the mid- to late-1990s, classic gravel aggregate trenches have been phased out in favor of innovative gravel-less trench designs, which have become increasingly popular.

  1. Some of the most often used gravel-free trenches nowadays are either long and narrow, tunnel-shaped chambers in the trenche, or gravel replacements such as expanded polystyrene aggregate.
  2. A booklet from the Cooperative Extension Service, AG-439-13, Septic Systems and Their Maintenance, outlines the typical system, easy adjustments to it, and the most significant maintenance requirements.
  3. The application of these technologies is now widespread, whether in new housing projects or in the replacement or repair of malfunctioning septic systems in residences and businesses.
  4. In order to address this, state regulations provide specified maintenance requirements for a number of these more advanced technology.
  5. Furthermore, state regulations mandate that the health department examine these systems on a regular basis.
  6. Are you familiar with the location of your septic system and repair area?
  7. If you do not have a copy of your septic system permit or a soil evaluation document, contact your local health department.
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This Septic System Owner’s Guidefile folder should contain the following items: It is normally possible to establish the location of a septic tank and drainfield by looking at a copy of the permit and consulting with a septic contractor, a consultant, or the local health department A “repair area or replacement area,” in which a second drainfield might be constructed if necessary, has been required on nearly all home sites approved since the early 1980s, according to state law.

It should be noted on your septic system permit that this repair area was designated by the health department when the site was allowed.

Some Important Facts to Understand About Your Septic System

  • In what form of septic system do you have
  • Where is it situated
  • And where is the repair area situated? Is the septic system up and running? In the past, has it been kept up to date? What can you do on a day-to-day basis to ensure that your system continues to function properly? What kind of maintenance will be required in the future

On the grid labeledSeptic System Layout, draw a rough sketch of your home, septic system (including both the tank and drainfield), repair area, and any other essential features (such as your driveway). The distance between the home and the access port on the septic tank should be measured and recorded when having your septic tank drained. This will assist you in locating it again. You may also want to indicate the position of your tank as well as the limits of your drainfield in your yard. If you do not have a riser installed over the access port for your septic tank, you may want to consider having one put in.

  1. Even when properly maintained, septic tanks can contain harmful gases and pollutants, as well as bacteria and other germs that can cause major health problems if not addressed.
  2. Is your septic system in proper functioning order?
  3. Many individuals are unaware that untreated sewage that has accumulated on the surface of the ground might be a health threat.
  4. Before fixing a malfunctioning septic system, you must get a permit from the local health authority, according to state regulations.
  5. What kind of upkeep has been carried out?
  6. If you are purchasing an existing house, you should ask the seller a few critical questions, such as the following:
  • What is the age of the system
  • What is the location of the tank and drainfield (they may or may not be on the same property or even on the same parcel of land)
  • When was the last time the tank was pumped
  • What is the frequency with which it has been pushed
  • Is it necessary to clean the “effluent filter” in the septic tank on a regular basis (effluent filters are required for systems established after 1999)
  • Has there been any indication of a likely failure? In what location can I get a copy of the permit and documentation proving how effectively (or poorly) the system has been maintained
  • Do you know whether any improvements have been made to the house that would necessitate expanding the capacity of the system? Is the system still operational, and if so, when and by whom was it repaired?

If the house has only recently been constructed, request that the septic system contractor give you with a “as built” schematic, which may include elements that were not included in the permit. If the house is equipped with a pump, request that the contractor and the local health agency supply specifics on how the pump was initially installed. In order to properly care for your septic system, you must manage it on a day-to-day basis as well as perform periodic maintenance and repairs. Layout of a septic system.

  • However, the drainfield does not have an indefinite capacity. The average daily water use per person is 50 gallons. Even for brief periods of time, the soil drainfield has a maximum daily design capacity of 120 gallons per bedroom, which is routinely exceeded. Overloads can occur at any time of year, on a daily basis, or on weekends. Fix any leaky faucets or toilets you may have. Water conservation will help you get more use out of your system.

A limited amount of capacity exists in the drainfield. Each person uses 50 gallons of water on a daily basis on average. In most cases, even for short periods of time, the soil drainfield has a maximum daily design capacity of 120 gallons per bedroom; In addition to seasonal overloads, daily and weekend overloads are also possible. Fix leaky faucets and toilets as soon as possible. It is possible to extend the life of your system by conserving water.

  • It is not acceptable to utilize your septic tank as a garbage can for items such as cigarette butts, tissues, feminine hygiene products, cotton swabs, cat litter, coffee grinds, or disposable diapers. Reduce the amount of time you use your garbage disposal. These contribute a significant amount of additional solids. It is not recommended to throw fat or cooking oil down the drain. You should avoid putting toxic chemicals into your system, such as solvents and oils. You should avoid using paint thinners and paint thinners that have been dumped. You should avoid disinfectants and pesticides. Conserve your funds. Most of the time, commercial septic tank additives are not required.

It is not acceptable to utilize your septic tank as a garbage can for items such as cigarette butts, tissues, feminine hygiene products, cotton swabs, cat litter, coffee grinds, or disposable diapers; Use of your waste disposal should be limited. Solids are significantly increased as a result of these additions. It is not acceptable to throw fat or cooking oil down the drain. You should avoid putting dangerous chemicals into your system, such as solvents and oils. You should avoid using paint thinners and abandoned pharmaceuticals.

Conserve your resources by cutting back on expenses.

In most cases, commercial septic tank additives aren’t required.

  • Maintain a layer of plants on the soil over the drainfield to prevent soil erosion from occurring. Don’t drive your car above the system’s limits. Try to avoid building over the system or in the repair area. The natural shape of the terrain immediately downslope of the system should be preserved, and this region should be protected against excavation (cutting and filling). Neither asphalt nor concrete should be used to cover the tank or drainfield.

Maintain a layer of plants on the soil over the drainfield to avoid erosion of the soil. It is not permissible to drive automobiles on the system. Avoid building over the system or in the repair zone. Ensure that the land immediately adjacent to the system maintains its natural shape, and that it is protected against excavation (cutting and filling). Neither asphalt nor concrete should be used to cover the tank or drainage field.

  • You shouldn’t install a separate pipe to transport washwater to a side ditch or into the woods. This is against the law

The house and the yard (site maintenance)

  • Conserve and preserve the area where your septic tank and drainfield are located
  • Trees that thrive in moist environments should be cut down and removed. Willows, elms, sweetgums, and certain maples are examples of such trees. Surface water should be diverted away from the tank and drainfield by landscaping the yard. Inspect the system to make sure that water from the roof, gutter, and foundation drains does not overflow
  • It is recommended that if your system is located at the base of a slope, you build a french drain to channel subterranean water. Ensure that drainage ditches, subsurface tiles, and drainage outlets are kept in good condition so that water may readily flow from them.

Sewage treatment system (Septic tank)

  • Tanks should be elevated if they are 6 inches or deeper below the surface. They offer quick and convenient access for solids measurement and pumping, as well as for cleaning the effluent filter. The rate at which sludge and scum build in the tank is measured. Make a note of this information and provide it to your expert pumper. Solids should be pushed out of the tank as necessary. Most septic tanks have two sections
  • It is necessary to have them drained out. More information about pumping frequency can be found in the Cooperative Extension Service document AG-439-13, Septic Systems and Their Maintenance, which is available online. It is not necessary to wait till your drainfield collapses before having your tank pumped. By that time, the drainfield may have been completely destroyed. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure when it comes to septic systems.
Preventive Maintenance Record
Date Work Done Firm Cost
Your Septic System Installer
Name:
Address:
Phone:
Date System Installed:
  • Tanks should be elevated if they are 6 inches or deeper below the ground. They offer quick and convenient access for solids measurement and pumping, as well as for cleaning the effluent filter
  • The rate at which sludge and scum build in the tank is being measured here. Make a note of this information with your expert pumper. Keep the tank clean by pumping solids out of it as necessary. Get both compartments of your septic tank pumped because most of them do. Additional information about pumping frequency can be found in the Cooperative Extension Service article AG-439-13, Septic Systems and Their Maintenance. Don’t put off having your tank pumped until your drainfield collapses. This may be too late to save the drainfield. It is said that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure when it comes to septic systems.

Regulations and safeguards are necessary.

  • Any system that includes a pump should be operated by a state-certified subsurface system operator. In the case of low pressure pipe (LPP) systems erected or repaired after July 1, 1992, as well as underground drip irrigation systems, aerobic treatment units (ATUs), peat biofilters, sand biofilters, textile biofilters, and other sophisticated systems, a permit will be required by law. Those interested in obtaining a list of state-certified subsurface system operators should contact the North Carolina Water Pollution Control System Certification Commission at 919-707-9089. Between planned maintenance visits, check to see that the pump and electrical components are still in proper operating order. Germs found in sewage have the potential to cause disease. Never go into a septic tank unless absolutely necessary. Toxic and explosive gases are present in the tank, posing a threat. Tanks that are more than a decade old may collapse. Electrical controls provide a risk of electric shock and sparking. Children should not be able to open the septic tank lid, hence it should be secured. Do not attempt to repair a malfunctioning system on your own time. Obtain a repair permit and employ a contractor with extensive expertise

For further information about septic systems, speak with an Extension agent in your county or the local public health agency. This paper is an updated version of a previous publication. It is with gratitude that we acknowledge Tom Konsler (Orange County Health Department), Deanna Osmond, Mitch Woodward, and Grace Lawrence (North Carolina Cooperative Extension) for their contributions to the document’s peer review, as well as Debra Ireland for her work on the document’s graphic design, layout, and editing.

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