Why Would A Septic Tank Have A Motor? (Solution)

Why do you need a septic tank pump?

  • Why Do You Need a Septic Tank Pump. A septic tank pump is required when you need to pump the effluent from a septic tank or sewage treatment plant up to a higher level. This may be necessary when you either have a raised percolation area or soakaway.

How long does a septic tank motor last?

The average life expectancy is 5 to 7 years for a residential sewage pump and 5 to 15 years for a commercial sewage pump. Life expectancy of the pump depends on many different factors, some of which are the quality of the pump, how often the pump has to run, and the electrical supply to the pump.

Does a septic tank have a pump?

A septic system consists of two main parts: a septic tank and a drainfield. Some systems also have a pump tank.

How much does a septic motor cost?

Septic Pump Repair Cost Repairing a septic pump costs $250 to $400 on average. Replacing one costs $1,000 or more. New pump prices range from $250 to $1,000.

How do I know if my septic pump is working?

To test if the pump is working, first turn the pump on by turning the second from the bottom float upside down. While holding that float upside down, turn the next float up (that would be the second from the top), upside down. You should hear the pump turn on.

How much is a new pump for a septic tank?

Septic Tank Pump Replacement The average cost to replace a failed pump ranges between $800 and $1,400 including labor.

Why would a septic tank need a pump?

Waste and sewage is removed from a septic tank into the drain field either through gravity or with the help of a septic system lift pump. Pumps are usually necessary for septic tanks that sit lower than the drain field and gravity is unable to carry and/ or push the effluent out of the tank.

What happens if septic pump fails?

Most septic systems fail because of inappropriate design or poor maintenance. Failure to perform routine maintenance, such as pumping the septic tank generally at least every three to five years, can cause solids in the tank to migrate into the drain field and clog the system.

How do you tell if your septic tank is full?

How to tell your septic tank is full and needs emptying

  1. Pooling water.
  2. Slow drains.
  3. Odours.
  4. An overly healthy lawn.
  5. Sewer backup.
  6. Gurgling Pipes.
  7. Trouble Flushing.

How do you know if your septic tank needs to be replaced?

5 Signs it’s Time to Replace Your Septic System

  1. Age of the System. It’s pretty common for a septic system to last 40 years or longer, which means if you buy a new home, you might never need to replace it.
  2. You’ve Outgrown the System.
  3. Slow Drains.
  4. Standing Water in the Yard.
  5. Nearby Contaminated Water Sources.

What is a pretreatment septic system?

Pretreatment components remove many of the contaminants from the wastewater to prepare the effluent for final treatment and dispersal into the environment. The level of treatment is selected to match the receiving environment and the intended use.

How often pump septic tank?

Inspect and Pump Frequently Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

Can you pump a septic tank yourself?

Technically, you can clean a septic tank yourself. However, professionals do not recommend that you do so. A professional has the tools needed to properly pump your tank. A professional also has the knowledge and training to remove all of the waste from your tank and dispose of it properly.

Why is my septic pump not working?

First check your circuit breaker, and then try to use a multimeter or similar device to check wires in the septic system for damage to see what needs to be replaced. A fuse is blown or circuit breaker is tripped. Replace fuses as needed. Note the size recommended by the pump manufacturer and pump nameplate rating.

What to do after septic is pumped?

After you have had your septic tank pumped by a trusted septic company, there are some things you can and should do as the septic system owner.

  1. 1) Get on a Schedule.
  2. 2) Take Care of the System.
  3. 3) Know the Parts of Your System.
  4. 4) Check Other Possible Issues.

What is a Septic Tank Pump

Pump for septic tanks In the context of septic tanks, this term refers to a submersible water pump that is positioned either in the last chamber of the tank or in a separate pump sump after the tank. A septic tank pump is a tiny electrical water pump that may be submerged in wastewater and is used to pump out sewage. The pump will be activated and deactivated by a float switch when the chamber fills with water. When the pump is turned on, a little impeller in the pump rotates, which causes the water to be forced upward via the pipes to which the pump is attached.

Why Do You Need a Septic Tank Pump

When it comes to pumping effluent from a septic tank or sewage treatment plant to a higher level, a septic tank pump comes in handy. This may be important if you have either a raised percolation area or a soakaway in your yard. It may also be required in situations when the ultimate sewage disposal destination is positioned upslope from the septic tank outlet, making it impossible for wastewater to flow to the final effluent disposal point by gravity.

Installing a Septic Tank Pump in a Septic Tank

Pumps for septic tanks can either be put directly into an existing septic tank or at a pump station that is connected to the septic tank. The pump should not be installed directly in your septic tank, unless your tank is a single chamber septic tank. In the case of single chamber septic tanks, installing a septic tank pump will result in the pumping out of particles that have accumulated. Solids can accumulate in a soakaway or percolation area, causing it to get clogged. If you have a two- or three-chamber septic tank, you may put a submersible septic tank pump in the final chamber of the tank to help with drainage.

It is possible that the pump will become clogged with tiny particulates if this step is not taken.

Installing a Septic Tank Pump in a Separate Pump Sump

Pumping septic tank effluent is best accomplished by the installation of a septic tank pump in a separate chamber or the purchase of a pre-assembled pump station. A packaged pump station will typically include a pump that has been preinstalled into a chamber that has been outfitted with the requisite gate valves and non-return valves.

Septic Tank Filters

It is preferable to place septic tank filters, also known as bristle filters or effluent filters, in front of a pump station if at all possible. These filters are a very easy and effective solution to protect your pump from being damaged by foreign objects. The effluent filter captures and retains any tiny particulates that are present in the wastewater as it runs into the pump chamber. If possible, this filter should be fitted in a 110mm/4″ T piece under a manhole so that it may be readily removed and washed once or twice each year.

Septic Tank Pump Alarms and Controls

A septic tank pump alarm should always be installed in conjunction with the installation of a septic tank pump. These are typically comprised of a float switch that is hooked into a miniature alarm panel. If the pump fails, the water level in the pump chamber rises since no water is being pushed away from the pump chamber. The rising water level activates the float switch, which in turn triggers an alert and the flashing of a beacon to warn of the impending danger.

In addition, alarms with a GSM dial-out feature are offered. A septic tank alarm provides you with prior notice of a pump failure or obstruction, allowing you to take prompt action in the event that your sewers backup and flood.

Septic Tank Pump Costs

Septic tank pumps for residential use are not very pricey items. Normally, they cost £150/€175 per person. The cost of installing the pump may be the same as if you hired a professional septic tank repair firm to do the work for you. Pumps with greater capacity may be necessary when pumping a big commercial septic system, when pumping over a long distance, or when pumping from an elevated position.

How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are typically found in rural locations that lack access to centralized sewage systems. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-proven technology. One of the most common types of wastewater treatment systems is comprised of two parts: the septic tank and the drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic materials and extract floatable substances (such as oils and grease) and solids from the wastewater. These systems discharge the liquid (referred to as effluent) from the septic tank into a series of perforated pipes buried in the soil or into chambers or other specific devices designed to gently release the effluent into the soil over time. Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, and phosphorus, among other contaminants. Prior to discharging wastewater into the environment, several alternative systems are designed to evaporate or disinfect the waste.

The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has built an animated, interactive model of how a residential septic system works, which you can view here.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • You make use of well water. In your home, the water pipe that brings water into the house does not have a meter. In the case of a water bill or a property tax bill, you will see “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” It is possible that your neighbors have a septic system

How to find your septic system

You can locate your septic system once you have confirmed that you have one by following these steps:

  • Taking a look at the “as constructed” drawing of your house
  • Making a visual inspection of your yard for lids and manhole covers
  • Getting in touch with a septic system service provider for assistance in locating it

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly. Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

Troubleshooting Pumps: The Pump Motor Doesn’t Run

Check the wires in the septic system for damage with a voltmeter or comparable gadget to determine whether or not they need to be replaced.

Interested in Pumps?

Get the latest Pumps articles, news, and videos delivered directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Pumps+ Receive Notifications Checking for faults with a septic pump’s electrical system, the pump itself, and its controls are all important first steps when it won’t start. Dealing with electricity may be extremely dangerous; thus, exercise extreme caution while working with electricity and turn off power supply breakers when testing components inside the electrical system. If you are not 100 percent sure in your ability to execute any of these tests safely, consult with a specialist before proceeding.

Electrical problems

If the pump does not appear to be operating at all, does not respond to any testing, and does not appear to be pumping effluent, it is possible that there is a wiring issue.

Examine your circuit breaker first, and then try to use a voltmeter or similar equipment to check the wires in your septic system for damage to determine whether or not they need to be changed. If the wires are damaged, replace them.

  1. A fuse has blown or a circuit breaker has been triggered on the circuit. Check the fuses and circuit breakers. Fuse replacement is necessary as needed. Take note of the pump manufacturer’s suggested size as well as the pump nameplate rating. In the event that a circuit repair is required, contact an electrician. The power cord for the pump is improperly connected and makes poor contact with the pump. The pump cable cap prongs should be checked for tightness and corrosion if the system is equipped with a piggyback plug in. Alternatively, replace the plug, clean the plug prongs with abrasive paper, or have the electrical receptacle changed
  2. The branch circuit wiring is insufficient to support the pump load. Check the voltage on the line and compare it to the manufacturer’s standards if necessary. The pump should be hooked into a separate circuit breaker from the rest of the system (or fuse). If the circuit breaker also supplies electricity to other outlets or appliances, an additional outlet should be added so that the pump has its own circuit breaker as well. The pump motor overload tripped the circuit, which necessitated the call for an electrician. Allow the pump to cool for five to ten minutes before reconnecting it to the power source. If the overloadtrip occurs again, remedial action should be taken. Verify that the line voltage is within specifications by comparing it to the manufacturer’s specs. Check the voltage of the branch circuit with an electrician or with the power provider. Make sure that the pump is connected to a separate branch circuit since the voltage provided is insufficient. Voltagenmust be within 10% of motor ratings on either side of the equation. Check that adequate power is being sent through the system by measuring the voltage at the pressure switch, the control box, and any other components through which power is being delivered. a. If you notice that the electricity is too high or too low at the power panel, you may need to call the electric utility provider for assistance. Thermal overload and shutdown will occur as a result of low voltage at the pump. Call your local electrician to fix the circuit and, if necessary, contact your energy supplier. Check the controlpanel connections and watertightness as well. Look for clear evidence of flaws and wear on the control panel with a visual inspection. Check for faulty connections as well as burned or melted components. Perhaps your prior examination of the power supply at your control panel led you to the conclusion that a bad splice connection or broken conduit could be the source of your problem. Make a visual inspection of any electrical splice connections for corrosion and other visible evidence that power is not being delivered to the pump. It is important to ensure that the conduit, and thus the wire within it, has not been damaged (for example, if it has been struck by a lawn mower).

Pump problems

It is possible that the motor for the lift pump is not functioning properly, in which case power is still flowing to the pump but it is unable to function. At this stage, make sure that the pump is not clogged and that it is capable of performing its intended function; otherwise, the pump will need to be fixed or replaced totally.

  1. Theimpeller has been blocked or restricted. Disconnect the power, remove the pump from the sump, and inspect it for freedom of rotation of the impeller and shaft. Clean the volute and impeller, and remove any obstructions
  2. The bearings have frozen in their positions. Disconnect the power, remove the pump from the sump, and inspect it for freedom of rotation of the impeller and shaft. Lower bearing of the column pump should be free and lubricated. In order to repair the pump bearing, contact a licensed service shop. The water level is not sufficiently enough to activate the control switch. Water should be added to the sump to make it turn on. Control floats or weights must be readjusted
  3. An internal motor problem exists. Pump should be removed, power should be disconnected, and rated voltage should be connected before the controlswitch is actuated. To have your vehicle repaired or replaced, contact an authorized service shop.

Float/control problems

In comparison to a float tree, a pump linked to a line is used. If the pump detects sewage levels using a float, the float may become caught or destroyed, in which case the pump will not operate. Usually, you can adjust the float or otherwise correct it so that it floats normally again, but if the problem is severe enough, you may need to replace the float totally.

  1. The operation of the float is hampered or restricted in some way. Water should be added to the sump to make it turn on. Make any necessary adjustments to the control floats or weights. If the float rod is bent or obstructed by debris, consider adding a separate float tree to make pump removal and float operation easier. If the float rod is bent or obstructed by debris, consider replacing it. Examine and keep an eye on things. Make necessary adjustments to the control floats or weights
  2. The float switch is faulty. Remove the pump, turn off the power, connect the power to the rated voltage, and turn on the controlswitch. Inspect for deformation, charred or melted components, or a significant amount of black discoloration. Unplug the pump’s chord from the piggyback plug on the floatswitch, and then reconnect the cord. To test the pump, just put the plug straight into an electrical outlet. If the pump continues to run, the float switch has failed and must be replaced. (Do not keep the pump plugged in for an extended period of time or it may burn out.) Make any necessary adjustments to the control floats or weights. Replace the liquid level control with a new one. Give the pressure switch a thorough visual inspection to check for flaws and wear and tear. Turning on and off switches is essential for a fully functioning system, and they are reasonably priced.

a little about the author Sara Heger, Ph.D., is an engineer, researcher, and lecturer in the Onsite Sewage Treatment Program at the University of Minnesota’s Water Resources Center. She holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering and a master’s degree in environmental science. She has given presentations at several local and national training events on topics such as the design, installation, and administration of septic systems, as well as research in the related field. Her responsibilities include serving as the education chair for the Minnesota Onsite Wastewater Association and the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association, as well as serving on the National Science Foundation’s International Committee on Wastewater Treatment Systems.

See also:  How To Determine Gallons Based On Septic Tank Dimensions? (Solution)

Heger will respond as soon as possible.

This article is part of a series on troubleshooting pumps:

  • If the pump motor does not turn on, troubleshooting is necessary. Pump problems include: the pump turns on, but there is no water
  • The pump turns on, but there is no water. Pump problems include the following: the pump runs continuously or cycles too frequently
  • Pump problems include the following: the pump makes a lot of noise
  • Pump Troubleshooting: There is a strong odor of sewer gas

What is a Septic Pump and Why do You Need One? [+6 FAQs Answered]

If you have a septic tank, you may be wondering whether or not you require a septic pump for your system. Read on to find out more. Because there are several different types of septic tank pumps, it is important to understand how they function and what they are used for. Septic tanks are subterranean systems that are used by property owners who do not have access to the city’s sanitary sewage system. Different tanks all function in a somewhat different way. The sewage from your septic tank will eventually travel via drain pipes and into your drain field, where it will be treated by the soil in your drain field.

What is a septic tank pump and why do I need one?

A septic tank pump is an optional component of your septic system that you may purchase. There are several different types of septic pumps that you may require depending on your needs and conditions. Most of the time, the submersible pump is installed in the final chamber of a two-compartment storage tank. A separate pump chamber is normally located outside the main septic tank if you just have 1 septic tank in your home. Simply call our office if you are unsure about the type of septic pump you have installed.

Do You Need a Septic Lift Station?

Septic systems that do not require the additional assistance in transferring your wastewater down the drain field are not normally equipped with them. If your waste is moving at a rate of around two feet per second, you do not require a septic system lift pump. This indicates that gravity is doing a sufficient enough job with your home or business.

However, if your septic tank is located substantially below the drain field, gravity may have a more difficult time doing its function. A septic system lift pump aids in the movement of water through the system so that it may flow into the drain field.

Do You Need A Sewage Ejector Pump?

Pump for sewage ejection Remove any sewage that has accumulated inside your home. Do you have a bathroom in the basement of your home? Then you may require the use of a sewageejector pump.

Do You Need a Sump Pump?

Do you have trouble dealing with standing water? Then you may require the services of a sump pump! Sump pumps are designed to remove standing water from their area in order to assist avoid backups from occurring.

How does a septic pump work?

Does standing water cause you problems in your home or business? It is possible that you may require a sump pump. In order to prevent backups, sump pumps are used to transport standing water away from their source.

Why do you need to pump a septic tank?

The proper pumping of a septic tank is essential in preventing sewage backflows. Heavy sediments sink to the bottom of your tank, forming a sludge layer on the bottom of your tank. Over time, this muck accumulates in the drain. If the amount of effluent in your septic tank accumulates to a dangerous level, it might overrun your drain field. Septic tanks must be pumped on a regular basis, approximately every three to five years. If you utilize a garbage disposal or have other alternative systems, you may need to have your septic tank drained more regularly than usual.

What happens when a septic pump stops working?

The failure of your septic pump causes your wastewater to run where it shouldn’t — to the ground surface level or directly into your house. The sewage does not pass through the soil or gravel of your leach field; instead, it travels into your house, where it might cause a backup. Because sewage contains diseases and bacteria that can be harmful, it is essential to call a plumber as soon as possible. Do you get a feeling that your pump isn’t performing properly? Keep a look out for the following frequent warning signs of a failing septic system:

  • It seems like your toilet, sink, and drain are backing up more regularly. Your sinks and showers are taking a long time to drain
  • Your plumbing fittings are making gurgling noises
  • This is concerning. The area around your septic tank has become a puddle of water. You notice a bad odor in the vicinity of your septic tank. In the area where your septic tank is buried, grass and vegetation are growing more fast than usual.

Increased frequency of clogging of your toilet, sink, and drain Water is draining slowly from your sinks and showers. Your plumbing fittings are making gurgling noises; this is troubling. The area around your septic tank is accumulating standing water. When you are close to your septic tank, you notice a nasty odor; In the area where your septic tank is buried, grass and vegetation are growing more swiftly.

  • Bearings that have been frozen
  • A propeller that has become clogged Defects with the internal motor
  • The water level is too low for the control switch to be activated
  • Float switch that is not working properly
  • Float rod that has been bent or obstructed A circuit breaker that has tripped or a fuse that has blown
  • The power wire is not making appropriate contact with the wall outlet. The wiring on the branch circuit is insufficient to support the pump’s load. An overloaded pump motor that has tripped
  • The conduit has been damaged. Connections to the control panel that are not working properly
  • The voltage is less than plus or minus 10% of the motor’s rated voltage

Prevent Issues With Our Septic Service

By scheduling periodic septic tank maintenance, we may spot problems with your septic tank before they get out of control or expensive. Septic tank pumping should be performed on a regular basis to maintain your tank operating effectively. Your septic system should last you 20 to 30 years if you maintain it on a regular basis. If you take good care of your pump station, it can survive as long as 10-15 years. The installation of a septic tank pump alarm is a fantastic method to be proactive in this situation.

If your septic tank pump malfunctions, an alarm will ring, alerting you to the problem.

Our plumbers would be happy to connect this float switch to the little alarm panel on your behalf. This way, you’ll be able to stay on top of things before your leach field overflows and a sewage backup takes place.

Emergency Services for Atlanta’s Septic Systems

By scheduling periodic septic tank maintenance, we may spot problems with your septic tank before they become out of hand or expensive. Septic tank pumping should be performed on a regular basis to maintain your tank working smoothly. Your septic system should last you between 20 and 30 years if you keep it in good condition. If you take good care of your pump station, it can endure for up to 15 years. Installing a septic tank pump alarm is an excellent approach to be proactive in this situation.

In the event that your septic tank pump malfunctions, an alarm will sound.

You’ll be able to stay on top of things before your leach field overflows and a sewage backup happens.

How to Fix a Septic Tank Pump That Is Not Working

  • Rubber gloves, a water hose, safety goggles, and a face mask are all recommended.

A properly functioning effluent pump is important to the successful operation of a septic system. Effluent pumps are the beating heart of any well functioning septic system. When material washes into the pump chamber from the main septic tank, it might cause clogging of the effluent pump. In order to protect the pump chamber of the septic tank from pump debris, baffles are installed just above the outflow openings. These baffles can be broken by septic tank corrosion or by overzealous pumping firms, allowing dirt, grease, and oils to flow into the pump chamber and into the pump.

Pump Removal and Cleaning

At your home’s electrical panel, turn off the breaker that controls the septic pump.

Step 2

The effluent pump should be unplugged from the electrical outlet.

Step 3

Remove the manhole cover from the pump chamber of the septic tank and place it somewhere safe.

Step 4

Discover and disconnect the union that separates the septic pump from the rest of the plumbing system in your home.

Step 5

Lift the pump out of the tank with the help of the lift rope linked to the pump and place it on the ground.

Step 6

Invert the pump and remove any debris that has accumulated on the impeller. Using a water hose, flush the impeller housing to eliminate any leftover debris that may have accumulated.

Pump Replacement

The lift rope is used to lower the pump back into the tank.

Step 2

Reattach the union on the pump assembly so that it is secure.

Step 3

Connect the pump to the electrical panel and turn on the breaker at the panel.

Step 4

Locate the “On/Off” switch in the pump tank and raise it to the vertical, or “On” position by lifting the switch.

Step 5

Check to see if the pump is working by keeping an eye on the level of the water in the tank.

Tip

Allow a septic system maintenance firm to pump out the tank before working on the pump to make the removal process simpler to notice while working on the pump

Warning

Working near a sewage tank is quite unsafe. Wearing protective equipment such as goggles, gloves, and a face mask is recommended.

How Does a Septic Tank Work?

Mr.

Fix-It-Up-For-The-Family You may save a lot of money if you understand how a sewage treatment system works—and what can go wrong—so that you can handle your own septic system maintenance.

How does a septic tank work?

Pumping the tank on a regular basis eliminates sludge and scum, which helps to keep a septic system in good working order. It is possible for a well-designed and well built septic system to last for decades, or it might collapse in a matter of years. It is entirely up to you as long as you can answer the question of how do septic tanks function. Healthy septic systems are very inexpensive to maintain, but digging up and replacing a septic system that has completely collapsed may easily cost tens of thousands in labor and material costs.

It’s critical to understand how a septic tank works in order to maintain one.

Let’s take a look below ground and observe what happens in a properly operating septic system, shall we?

Understand that a septic system is a cafeteria for bacteria

Bacteria are responsible for the proper operation of a septic system. They decompose garbage, resulting in water that is clean enough to safely trickle down into the earth’s surface. The entire system is set up to keep bacteria healthy and busy at all times. Some of them reside in the tank, but the majority of them are found in the drain field. 1. The septic tank is the final destination for all waste. 2. The majority of the tank is filled with watery waste, referred to as “effluent.” Anaerobic bacteria begin to break down the organic matter in the effluent as soon as it enters the system.

  1. A layer of sludge settles to the bottom of the container.
  2. 4.
  3. Scum is mostly constituted of fats, greases, and oils, among other substances.
  4. Grease and oils float to the surface of the water.
  5. (5) A filter stops the majority of particles from reaching the exit pipe.
  6. The effluent is discharged into the drain field.
  7. Effluent is allowed to leak into the surrounding gravel because of holes in the drain septic field pipe.
  8. The garbage is completely decomposed by aerobic bacteria found in gravel and dirt.
  9. Potable water seeps into the groundwater and aquifer system from the surface.

Septic Tank Clean Out: Don’t abuse the system

Septic systems that have been correctly planned and constructed require just occasional ‘pumping’ to remove the sludge and scum that has built up inside the tank.

However, if you don’t understand how a septic tank works, you may unintentionally hurt or even destroy the system.

  • Drains are used to dispose of waste that decomposes slowly (or not at all). Cigarette butts, diapers, and coffee grounds are all known to cause issues. Garbage disposers, if utilized excessively, can introduce an excessive amount of solid waste into the system. Lint from synthetic fibers is emitted from washing machine lint traps. This substance is not degraded by bacteria in the tank and drain septic field. Bacteria are killed by chemicals found in the home, such as disinfecting cleansers and antibacterial soaps. The majority of systems are capable of withstanding limited usage of these goods, but the less you use them, the better. When a large amount of wastewater is produced in a short period of time, the tank is flushed away too quickly. When there is too much sludge, bacteria’s capacity to break down waste is reduced. Sludge can also overflow into the drain field if there is too much of it. Sludge or scum obstructs the flow of water via a pipe. It is possible for tree and shrub roots to obstruct and cause harm to a drain field. Compacted soil and gravel prevent wastewater from seeping into the ground and deprive germs of oxygen. Most of the time, this is caused by vehicles driving or parking on the drain field.

Get your tank pumped…

Your tank must be emptied on a regular basis by a professional. Pumping eliminates the accumulation of sludge and scum that has accumulated in the tank, which has caused the bacterial action to be slowed. If you have a large tank, it may be necessary to pump it once a year; but, depending on the size of your tank and the quantity of waste you send through the system, you may go two or three years between pumpings. Inquire with your inspector about an approximate guideline for how frequently your tank should be pumped.

…but don’t hire a pumper until you need it

Inspections and pumping should be performed on a regular basis. However, if you’re not afraid of getting your hands dirty, you may verify the sludge level yourself with a gadget known as The Sludge Judge. It ranges in price from $100 to $125 and is commonly accessible on the internet. Once you’ve verified that your tank is one-third full with sludge, you should contact a professional to come out and pump it out completely.

Install an effluent filter in your septic system

Garbage from your home accumulates into three distinct strata. The septic filter is responsible for preventing blockage of the drain field pipes.

Septic tank filter close-up

The septic tank filter is responsible for capturing suspended particles that may otherwise block the drain field pipes. Obtain an effluent filter for your tank from your contractor and place it on the outflow pipe of your tank. (It will most likely cost between $50 and $100, plus labor.) This device, which helps to prevent sediments from entering the drain field, will need to be cleaned out on a regular basis by a contractor to maintain its effectiveness.

Solution for a clogged septic system

If your septic system becomes clogged and you find yourself having to clean the filter on a regular basis, you might be tempted to simply remove the filter altogether. Hold on to it. Solids, wastewater, and scum are separated into three levels in septic tanks, which allows them to function properly (see illustration above). Solids sink to the bottom of the container, where microbes breakdown them. The scum, which is made up of trash that is lighter than water, rises to the surface. In the drainage field, the middle layer of effluent leaves the tank and goes through an underground network of perforated pipes to the drainage field.

  1. Keep the effluent filter in place since it is required by your state’s health law.
  2. Waste particles might flow through the filter and clog the perforated pipes if the filter is not used.
  3. Your filter, on the other hand, should not require cleaning every six months.
  4. A good chance is high that you’re flushing filter-clogging things down the toilet, such as grease, fat, or food scraps.
  5. A garbage disposal will not be able to break down food particles sufficiently to allow them to flow through the septic tank filtration system.
  6. Plastic items, disposable diapers, paper towels, nonbiodegradable goods, and tobacco products will clog the system if they are flushed through it.

For additional information on what should and should not be flushed down the toilet, contact your local health authority. More information on removing lint from your laundry may be found here.

Get an inspection

Following a comprehensive first check performed by an expert, regular inspections will cost less than $100 each inspection for the next year. Your professional will be able to inform you how often you should get your system inspected as well as how a septic tank functions. As straightforward as a septic system appears, determining its overall condition necessitates the services of a professional. There are a plethora of contractors who would gladly pump the sludge out of your tank, but many, in my experience, are unable to explain how a septic system works or how it should be maintained.

A certification scheme for septic contractors has been established in certain states; check with your state’s Secretary of State’s office to see whether yours is one of them.

Also, a qualified inspector will be able to tell you whether or not your tank is large enough to accommodate your household’s needs, as well as the maximum amount of water that can be passed through it in a single day.

As you learn more about how a septic tank works, your professional should be able to tell you whether or not your system will benefit from this treatment.

Alternatives to a new drain field

If an examination or a sewage backup indicate that your drain field is in need of replacement, the only option is to replace it completely. As a result, it’s important to talk with a contractor about other possibilities before proceeding with the project.

  • Pipes should be cleaned. A rotating pressure washer, used by a contractor, may be used to clean out the drain septic field pipes. The cost of “jetting” the pipes is generally around $200. Chemicals should be used to clean the system. A commercial solution (not a home-made one) that enhances the quantity of oxygen in the drain field should be discussed with your contractor before installing your new system. Septic-Scrub is a product that I suggest. A normal treatment will cost between $500 and $1,000. Make the soil more pliable. The practice of “terra-lifting,” which involves pumping high-pressure air into several spots surrounding the drain field, is authorized in some regions. Some contractors use it to shatter compacted dirt around the pipes. Depending on the circumstances, this might cost less than $1,000 or as much as $4,000 or more.
See also:  Can U Pump A Septic Tank When Its Not Full? (Best solution)

Protect your drain septic field from lint

When this device is in place, it inhibits lint from entering the system, especially synthetic fibers that bacteria are unable to digest. One of these filters, which I’ve designed and termed theSeptic Protector, was invented by me. An additional filter is included in the price of around $150 plus delivery. Learn more about how to filter out laundry lint in this article.

Don’t overload the septic system

This device prevents lint from entering the system, particularly synthetic fibers, which bacteria are unable to digest and hence cause infection. Septic Protector is the name I gave to one of these filters that I designed myself. An additional filter is included in the price of roughly $150 plus delivery. See this article for further information on how to filter out lint from your clothes.

Meet the Expert

Septic systems, according to Jim vonMeier, are the solution to America’s water deficit because they supply cleaned water to depleted aquifers, according to vonMeier. He travels the country lobbying for septic systems, giving lectures, and giving testimony. For septic system inquiries, as well as information on the operation of the septic tank, contact him by email.

How to Check Your Septic Panel and Pump Chamber

It is recommended that you inspect your pump chamber once a year to ensure that everything is in proper working order.

Follow the 11-step procedure outlined below to complete this task on your own! (Do you require further assistance? Alternatively, you may watch our instructional video below.)

‍ 1. Let’s start by inspecting the panel. Make sure the power is on by verifying the power switch to the panel is on.

The following items should be included in this general overview: The electrical box may be seen in the lower left corner of the image below, starting at the bottom of the image. Check to verify that all of the cables are firmly connected before using it. Next, take a look at the lower right corner of the shot, where you can see the discharge pipe for the pump. Check to see if it is operational (valve should be lined up with pipe). It’s now time to have some fun!

‍ FIRST.PUT ON GLOVES!That is one step you DO NOT want to miss. Remove the float tree (the pipe with a pvc handle located upright left in our picture) and pull up the alarms.

*Please keep in mind that these instructions are for a 4-float system. Some systems contain only two or three floats.

If you don’t hear an alarm, this is cause for concern. Starting at the top, I will explain the floats and how to ensure each one is working.

NOTE: If your water supply is depleted, you may need to replenish it. Fill it up a little with water from a yard hose.

7. Continue testing.

Check that the pump is operating properly by flipping the second float from the bottom upside down and then turning it back around. With your other hand, turn the next float up (which would be the second from the top) upside down while still holding the first float. You should be able to hear the pump start up. As soon as you have confirmed that the pump is operational, just release these two floats. There’s one more float to go. The top float serves as an alert in case of high water. Turn it over down to see whether this is the case.

8. Now is the time to inspect the power cords.

Check to see that everything is securely tied to the float tree and not just hanging free. Zip ties can be used to reattach any stray cables.

9. Securely return the float tree to its holder and coil any dangling cords so that they are out of the water.

In the event that your septic alarm goes off, it may surely create some anxiety and uncertainty; and if you happen to be experiencing this right now, then you’ve arrived to the correct location! Don’t be concerned; it does not necessitate urgent action. Instead, take your time to go through this full essay so that you will be prepared to act now or in the future if the situation arises. What Septic Systems Are and How They Work The alarm works in conjunction with the septic system to alert you when the water level within the pump tank has increased to an unsafe level or has decreased to an unsafe level.

The timer is in charge of regulating the time intervals during which the pump is permitted to pump wastewater into the drainage system.

Thus, during periods of excessive water use, the drain field is kept from getting overflowing, which might cause damage to the drainage system.

A large amount of water is injected into the system in between pumping cycles for whatever cause, and the water has nowhere else to go but back into the system’s pump tank.

Depending on how much water was and continues to be put into the system and how the pump is set up to operate on a timer, it may take many pumping cycles until the water levels are returned to normal. Causes of the alarm going off in the first place

  1. There is an excessive amount of water being put into the septic system. This is the result of excessive water use, which might be caused by multiple loads of laundry, an excessive quantity of dishwashing, or a disproportionate number of long showers.
  1. In the septic system, there is an excessive amount of water being released. If you have been doing a lot of laundry or dishwashing, or taking a lot of long showers, you may have noticed this. It is the effect of excessive water use.
  1. It’s possible that one of the components of the septic system is malfunctioning. If anything goes wrong with your system — including the pump and floats — the alarm and timer will go off and the septic system will stop working correctly.

The Best Thing to Do If Your Alarm Goes Off Alternatively, if you hear an alert, you should press the red button or turn on the alarm box. The alarm will be turned off as a result of this action. There should be a red light and a green light on the alarm box, which should be situated someplace on the unit. The green light indicates that the alarm is operational and should be left on at all times. It is shown by a red light if the alarm is getting a signal from the pump tank indicating that the water level is increasing above or decreasing below what is expected.

  1. If the breaker occurs to be tripped, look around the septic tanks to see if there is any standing water.
  2. It is possible that the red light on the alarm box will go out on its own after allowing the septic system to operate for a couple of pump cycles (which should take approximately 10-15 hours).
  3. If the red light turns off, it signifies that the system is operating properly and that it only needs to catch up with the extra water that has overflowed into the storage tank.
  4. To be clear, an alarm signal from the septic system does not always imply that sewage is about to back up into the house right away.
  5. Do you require septic system repair on a regular basis or emergency service?
  6. Want to learn more about septic systems?

Septic Tank Pump Installation Atlanta GA – Septic Tank Repair Near Me

So, the alarm goes off, what do you do? If the alarm occurs to sound, the best course of action is to press the red button or turn on the alarm box. By pressing this button, the alarm will be turned off. One or both of the lights on the alarm box should be illuminated in red and green, depending on its location. An illuminated green light indicates that the alarm is operational and that it should be kept on at all time. The red light signifies that the alarm is getting a signal from the pump tank indicating that the water level is increasing above or decreasing below the normal levels.

  1. Depending on whether or not the circuit breaker is activated, you should check to determine whether there is any standing water around the septic tanks.
  2. Use water sparingly throughout this time period if as all possible.
  3. But if your red light is still on, call your septic provider (such as Miller’s) immediately for emergency assistance!
  4. In order to allow for 24-48 hours of regular usage (though you should strive to reduce usage), the alarm is set to sound at a time when a backup will be performed.

In order to book an appointment, please call (804) 581-0001 or send an email to [email protected]. Do you want to know more about septic tanks? Septic systems may be found on our website, and in particular under the “Septic” navigation menu.

Septic Tank Pump Installation Atlanta GA

The Best Thing to Do When Your Alarm Goes Off If the alarm occurs to go off, the best course of action is to press the red button or turn on the alarm box. The alarm will be turned off as a result of this. On the alarm box, there should be a red light and a green light that can be seen from a distance. The green light indicates that the alarm is operational and should be kept on at all times. The red light signifies that the alarm is getting a signal from the pump tank that the water level is increasing higher or decreasing lower than it should be.

  1. If the breaker occurs to be tripped, look around the septic tanks to see if there is any standing water.
  2. During this period, make every effort to reduce your water consumption.
  3. But if your red light is still illuminated, contact your septic firm (such as Miller’s) immediately for emergency assistance.
  4. Until a backup occurs, the alarm is set to sound at a time that will allow for 24-48 hours of normal usage (though you should attempt to keep usage to a minimum).
  5. To arrange an appointment, please call (804) 581-0001 or send an email to our contact page.
  6. Explore our septic system web pages by selecting the “Septic” navigation tab from the top navigation bar.
  • What to Do When the Alarm Goes Off If the alarm occurs to go off, the best thing to do is to press the red button or turn on the alarm box. This will switch off the alarm. There should be a red light and a green light situated someplace on the alarm box. The green light indicates that the alarm is operational and that it should be kept on at all times. The red light signifies that the alarm is getting a signal from the pump tank indicating that the water level is increasing higher or decreasing lower than it should be. Next, make sure the sewage system is powered by checking the septic breaker. Whether the breaker occurs to be tripped, check to see if there is any standing water around the septic tanks. Allow the septic system to run a couple of pump cycles (which should take around 10-15 hours) and the red light on the alarm box may turn off on its own. Attempt to keep your water consumption to a minimum during this period. If the red light turns off, it signifies that the system is operating properly and that it only needs to catch up with the surplus water that has overflowed into the tank. If, on the other hand, the red signal is still on, contact your septic provider (such as Miller’s) for immediate service. To be clear, an alarm signal from the septic system does not necessarily indicate that sewage is about to back up into the house. The alarm is set to sound at a time that will allow for 24-48 hours of normal usage (though you should aim to keep usage to a minimum) until a backup is completed. Do you require regular maintenance or emergency service for your septic system? To arrange an appointment, please call (804) 581-0001 or send an email through our contact page. Do you want to know more about septic systems? Explore our septic system sections on our website by clicking on the “Septic” navigation option and scrolling down to “Septic Systems.”

In the event that you are experiencing any of these or other problems with your septic tank pump, or if you have discovered that your system isn’t performing correctly and requires pumping, Septic Masters is ready to assist you. We may install a new pump or repair your existing one to ensure that your septic system continues to perform properly.

Septic Tank Pump Installation Near Me

There is no one better than Septic Masters when it comes to septic tank pump installation in Atlanta, GA. You will not be disappointed with the quality of work or service that you will receive. Our staff is delighted to serve the whole Metro Area, which includes Gwinnett County, Hall County, Barrow County, Forsyth County, and other counties as well. As an added convenience, if you are suffering an issue that needs quick care, we are available to provide 24-hour emergency assistance so you don’t have to be concerned.

Septic Tank Motor Repairing

Our 24-Hour Emergency Pager is no longer in service. Thank you for your understanding. Please get in touch with us if you require further information.

ACCU-TAB CHLORINE TABLETS

Jet Inc.’s biography JetAccu-Tab chlorine tablets are specially formulated for use in on-site wastewater treatment systems, according to the manufacturer. It is possible to correctly administer Accu-Tab chlorine tablets using a Jet Tablet Feeder, or they may be used in other brands of tablet feeders.

Made in the United States of America. Please keep in mind that Accu-Tab Tablets are not intended for use with pool chlorinators. Chlorine manufactured for swimming pools or spas will not function, and using it for wastewater purification is both unsafe and illegal in certain jurisdictions.

RootX

A foaming root control solution for your septic professional, RootX Septic Tank Service and Maintenance is an efficient foaming root control solution. RootX is a root-killing agent that is used in residential sewage lines and septic systems. Septic Tank Service and Maintenance by Root X Inc. A septic system that has been damaged by root infiltration will ultimately fail and will cost you thousands of dollars to repair or replace if it is not addressed immediately.

BIO JET 7

Natural and non-toxic, Bio Jet 7 is safe for use in a variety of applications. Bio Jet 7 can be used in any home or business sewage system as part of a preventative and continuous maintenance strategy to keep it running smoothly. Bio Jet 7 should be used for fresh system starts-ups, after lengthy periods of non-use, or after a system upset to guarantee that your system is properly stabilized. Made in the United States of America. Call513-353-2260

Household Products That Will Ruin Your Septic Tank!

Natural and non-toxic, Bio Jet 7 is safe to use in a variety of applications. In any home or business septic system, Bio Jet 7 should be used as part of a preventative maintenance program that is ongoing and systematic. Bio Jet 7 should be used for fresh system starts-ups, after lengthy periods of non-use, or after a system upset to ensure that your system is properly stabilised. Product of United States of America (USA). Call513-353-2260

Why Do Septic Systems Fail?

You may be wondering how you can tell whether your septic system is failing. To begin, respond to the following questions:

  1. Do your drains empty slowly for reasons other than old, blocked pipes? If so, you may have a problem. Do you have sewage backing up into your home? Has a damp, stinky patch in your yard piqued your interest? Is your septic tank connected to a ditch or a stream for disposal? Does the water from your washing machine or sink drain into a road or a brook
  2. Is it common for you to have drainage issues after a heavy rain or when the ground is sloppy? Do you notice a puddle in your yard when you do your laundry? Do you have to pump out your septic tank on a regular basis (more than once a year)? Are there areas of your yard where the grass over or surrounding your septic tank is greener than the rest of your lawn? Has your septic tank or drainfield been moist or spongy for a week or longer despite the fact that there hasn’t been any rainfall?

If you responded “yes” to any of these questions, it is likely that your septic system has failed or is on the verge of collapsing completely. Therefore, it is not handling and disposing of sewage in an ecologically safe and environmentally sound manner. Additionally, unpleasant bacteria (fecal coliforms) or excessive concentrations of nutrients (especially ammonia) detected in both neighboring wells and surface water may indicate that your system is in difficulty. Generally speaking, a septic system has four fundamental components: the source (the house), the septic tank, the drainfield (also known as a leach field), and the soil below the drainfield (Hoover, 2004; Figure 1).

  1. The sort of system that is employed is determined by the soil and site characteristics of the lot; nevertheless, the conventional system (as seen in Figure 1) is the most typically used in the state of California.
  2. Overloading a sewage system with more water than it can absorb is a typical cause of septic system failure.
  3. The surplus water flows back into the house or onto the lawn when this flow rate is surpassed, causing damage to the structure.
  4. A change in water consumption, such as the addition of more people to the household or the installation of a water-consuming device, such as a dishwasher or washing machine, may cause your septic system to accumulate excess water.
  5. Each of these devices has the potential to introduce excessive water to your septic system and should not be connected to it.
  6. Water from roofs, roads, and paved surfaces, in particular, may be channeled onto the system drainfield.
  7. As a result, sewage backs up into the home or accumulates on the surface of the ground.

As a result, septic tanks are built to be waterproof, and surface water should be channeled away from the septic tank’s access covers in order to prevent flooding.

The North Carolina State Extension publications Septic Systems and Their Maintenance(AG-439-13) and Septic System Owner’s Guide(AG-439-22) provide information on how to properly maintain a septic system in your home.

Assuming that particles do manage to make it to the drainfield, they will block any small holes or pores in the gravel and dirt below, which will result in sewage backing up and flooding the house or surfacing in your yard.

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Pumping your tank every 3 to 5 years, depending on how often it is used, is recommended (seeSeptic Systems and Their Maintenance(AG-439-13) for detailed recommendations on pumping frequency).

A trash disposal should not be installed in a home with a septic system.

No evidence exists that additives, whether biological or chemical, have a good effect on the solids in storage tanks or the system as a whole, according to the experts.

After January 1, 1999, your system must be equipped with an effluent filter if it acquired its permit from your county health department after that date.

Maintenance of the filters is required on a regular basis.

Whenever this occurs, the filter may be cleaned with a garden hose, making sure that all of the waste on the filter is rinsed away into the inflow side of the tank, and the filter can be replaced in the tank by a septic tank pumper or the homeowner.

A septic system that has been inadequately built is a disaster waiting to happen.

The amount of area required for a drainfield is determined by the quantity of sewage that flows into the system, as well as the soil and site characteristics around the drainfield.

Nonresidential property has a flow rate that is defined by the type of use that is intended.

On the whole, sandy soils can take more wastewater than clayey soils, resulting in smaller drainfields for sandier soil types.

The soil is the most significant component of a septic system since it is responsible for processing and ultimately spreading the treated sewage in the system.

A restrictive layer that is too near to the trench bottom may also prevent the soil from properly absorbing all of the sewage, resulting in it being forced to the surface or back up into the home, among other consequences.

The vertical separation distance is the term used to describe this distance.

You may learn more about investigating before investing by reading the NC State Extension booklet Investigate Before You Invest (AG-439-12).

Because of the excessive moisture in the soil, when systems are placed in excavated areas, the soil is severely compressed and the soil pore space is smeared in those locations.

It is likely that wastewater will back up into the home or appear on top of the ground as a result of the reduced ability for wastewater to flow into soil.

This entails inspecting the height of each component on a regular basis.

It is critical that any step-downs or other devices used on sloping sites are correctly built, or else one trench may become overloaded with effluent.

Finally, the soil cover over the drainfield should be consistent and topped in order to prevent surface water from ponding on top of or flowing into the drainfield.

Driving over, paving over, or constructing a structure on top of a septic system can cause damage or destruction.

As a result, the soil might get compacted or ruts can form, exposing system components as well as potentially untreated sewage to the ground surface.

A structure built over a drainfield may create compaction or even damage to a line as a result of the weight of the structure or the position of the building’s footings, among other things.

Tree roots can clog drain lines and gravel in trenches, causing them to overflow.

Roots may also enter the septic tank or distribution box, so avoid planting trees and shrubs directly in front of or next to these devices.

The grass aids in the removal of water and the prevention of soil eroding over the various components of the system.

If this area were currently in use, it should be treated and protected in the same manner.

It is comparable to the lifespan of an asphalt shingled roof, when properly maintained, in terms of lifespan of a septic system.

Any failure, regardless of its source, is a nuisance, represents a threat to public health, and has the potential to pollute the environment.

The department will dispatch an environmental health professional who has received specialized training in examining failed septic systems to discover the root cause or reasons of the failure and to make recommendations on how to correct the situation.

The installation of water conservation equipment, for example, might be sufficient remedial steps in some circumstances. In the event of a full breakdown of the system, the installation of a new septic system may be the only viable option. Repairing a Septic System: Dos and Don’ts

  1. You have a failing or failing septic system if you responded ” yes” to any of the following questions. The company is not handling and disposing of sewage in an ecologically safe and environmentally sound manner. A sign that your system is in difficulty may also be the presence of harmful bacteria (fecal coliforms) or excessive concentrations of nutrients (especially ammonia) in both neighboring wells and surface water, respectively. Generally speaking, a septic system has four fundamental components: the source (the house), the septic tank, the drainfield (also known as a leach field), and the soil underneath the drainfield (Hoover, 2004
  2. Figure 1). In North Carolina, a variety of different septic system designs are employed. However, the conventional approach (as represented in Figure 1) is the most often employed in the state since it is the most adaptable to a variety of soil and site circumstances. Illustration of wastewater treatment and distribution in the environment (not to scale). Septic system failure is frequently caused by overburdening the system with more water than it can handle. Septic systems are built for a specified wastewater flow rate that is determined by the number of bedrooms in the residence served by the system (usually 120 gallons per bedroom per day). The extra water flows back into the home or onto the lawn when this flow rate is surpassed, causing damage to the property. It’s common for this problem to be caused by a leaking device, such as an overflowing toilet or an overflowing sink faucet. Adding a water-using item, such as a dishwasher or washing machine, or changing your water usage habits, such as having more people in the house, might cause your septic system to accumulate more water. A sump pump, icemaker, or dehumidifier draining into the septic tank might cause further difficulties. In order to avoid overflowing your septic system, each of these devices should not be linked. Additionally, drainage or runoff water from outside the house may cause the septic system to become overburdened, as well. The system drainfield may be flooded by water from rooftops, roadways, or paved surfaces, among other things. Eventually, the soil will get saturated to the point where it will be unable to absorb any further water. A backup of sewerage into the home or on top of the ground occurs as a result of this situation. Finally, if groundwater or surface water is permitted to enter the septic tank, this can also cause the system to become overburdened and malfunction. As a result, septic tanks are built to be completely waterproof, and surface water should be channeled away from the septic tank’s access covers. Septic systems, like any other big appliance, require regular maintenance to keep them running well. The North Carolina State Extension publicationsSeptic Systems and Their Maintenance(AG-439-13) andSeptic System Owner’s Guide(AG-439-22) provide information on how to properly maintain a septic system in your home. The primary function of a septic tank is to prevent sediments from entering the drainfield, which is where they belong. Eventually, if sediments get into the drainfield, they will block the small openings or pores in the gravel and dirt beneath it, causing sewage to back up into the home or pool in the yard. Early septic system failure is attributed in part to a failure to perform regular maintenance on the tank. Pumping your tank every 3 to 5 years, depending on how often it is used, is recommended (see Septic Systems and Their Maintenance(AG-439-13) for detailed recommendations on pumping frequency). Aside from that, it is recommended that the septic tank pumper verify the sanitary tee outlet or effluent filter to ensure that they are functioning properly. It is not recommended that garbage disposals be installed in houses with septic systems. Alternatively, if your house is equipped with a trash disposal or grinder pump, it is recommended that the tank be pumped more often. No evidence exists that additives, whether biological or chemical, have a good impact on the solids in storage tanks or the system as a whole, according to the literature. They are not suggested as a result of this. After January 1, 1999, your system must be equipped with an effluent filter if it acquired its permit from your local health department after that date. Finer particles are prevented from reaching the drainfield by the use of these screens. A little amount of extra maintenance is required for the filters. Your drains may become more sluggish when the filters become clogged with debris. Whenever this occurs, the filter may be cleaned using a garden hose, making sure that all of the waste on the filter is rinsed away into the input side of the tank. The filter can then be replaced in the tank by a septic tank pumper or the homeowner. Clogged filters are frequently indicative of the need to drain and refill the tank. Septic systems that have been badly constructed are doomed from the start. In order for the system to function well, it must be constructed with sufficient area and with optimal soil conditions. The volume of sewage that flows into the system, as well as the soil and site characteristics of the drainfield, dictate the amount of space that is required. A septic system is designed with the assumption that there are two persons in each bedroom and that each resident produces around 60 gallons of wastewater per day. As a result, a septic system is intended to manage a maximum flow rate of 120 gallons per day per bedroom (per floor) (two people per bedroom x 60 gallons per person per day). It is the anticipated use of the nonresidential property that determines how fast the water flows. The amount of sewage that may be safely applied to the land is determined by the soil and site characteristics. In general, sandy soils may handle more wastewater than clayey soils, resulting in smaller drainfields for sandier soil types. For the last point, the location of a seasonal high water table or a restrictive layer (such as a hard pan or rock) limits how deep the drainfield trenches may be dug below the soil surface and how long they can be. The soil is the most significant component of a septic system since it is responsible for processing and ultimately spreading the treated sewage in the environment. The sewage may not be effectively cleansed before reaching groundwater if the soil under the drainfield is too damp. A restrictive layer that is too near to the trench bottom may also prevent the soil from properly absorbing all of the sewage, resulting in it being forced to the surface or back up into the home, among other problems. Unsaturated soil between 12 and 18 inches below the drainfield trench bottom is required by state law in North Carolina, depending on the location. The vertical separation distance is the term used to describe this measurement. A team of environmental health professionals, employed by county or district health departments, is trained to assess the soil and site to determine whether or not it is acceptable for sewage treatment and dispersion. You may learn more about investigating before investing by reading the NC State Extension publicationInvestigate Before You Invest (AG-439-12). It is possible for issues to arise during the building and installation of a system, even though the system is appropriately planned for the flow rate, soil and site conditions, and other variables. Installing systems in excessively moist soil results in substantial compacting of the soil and smearing of soil pore space in the excavated region. The dirt in the trenches can become completely sealed in severe circumstances, preventing any wastewater from flowing into the underlying soil for treatment and dispersion. Because of the limited ability of wastewater to percolate into the soil, it is possible that wastewater will back up into the home or appear on top of the soil. Design specifications must be followed while installing septic systems. The height of each component must be checked as well. Sewage may not flow correctly or be dispersed equally throughout the drainfield if the trench bottoms, drain lines, or distribution box are not adequately levelled. On sloping sites, it is critical to appropriately implement step-downs or other measures to prevent one trench from becoming inundated with wastewater. A groundwater outlet must be provided in interceptor drains or other drainage systems to allow groundwater to flow away from the drainfield. Finally, the soil cover over the drainfield should be consistent and topped in order to prevent surface water from ponding on top of or flowing into the drainfields. Because big machinery may compact the earth and potentially destroy the pipes or septic tank, small, lightweight equipment should be used for landscaping. Septic systems can be damaged or completely destroyed if you drive, pave, or construct a structure over them. Because of persistent, or even occasional, abuse, the pipes and septic tank may move position or be smashed completely. As a result, the soil might get compacted or ruts can form, exposing system components as well as untreated sewage to the ground surface. In addition to restricting access for repairs and maintenance, paving over all or a section of a drainfield may prevent air from reaching the soil. It is possible that the weight of the structure or the placement of the building’s footings will result in compaction or even damage to a drainfield if a building is constructed directly over it. A septic tank that has been paved or built over will also prohibit the tank from being maintained. Drain lines and gravel in trenches may become clogged with tree roots. Remove or simply do not plant trees or bushes within 25 feet of a drainfield is the most effective technique to avoid this situation. It is possible for roots to enter the septic tank or distribution box, therefore avoid planting trees and bushes directly in front of or near these systems. The drainfield, as well as all other outdoor system components, should be covered with grass. In addition to aiding in the evacuation of water, the grass also serves to minimize soil erosion over the various components. An area left aside for prospective repairs is required by almost every septic system. If this region were now in use, it should be handled and safeguarded in the same way. The appropriate maintenance, design, and installation of a septic system are not guaranteed. Septic systems may last as long as an asphalt shingled roof if they are well-maintained, according to the National Septic Tank Association. The problem must be repaired as soon as possible and with care if a failure occurs. Whatever the reason, every failure is a nuisance, represents a threat to human health, and has the potential to harm environmental quality. If your system is failing, or if you suspect a failure, contact your local environmental health agency for further information. When a septic system fails, the department will dispatch an environmental health professional who is skilled in identifying the root cause or reasons of the failure and making recommendations for how to correct the situation. Without the permission of the local environmental health agency, do not attempt to repair the failure. The installation of water conservation devices, for example, might be a straightforward solution in some circumstances. It is possible that the installation of a new septic system will be the sole option in the event of a full system failure. The Dos and Don’ts of Septic Tank Repairs

The most effective strategy to avoid a septic system failure is to do regular maintenance on it. As previously noted, the North Carolina State Extension publicationsSeptic Systems and Their Maintenance(AG-439-13) andSeptic System Owner’s Guide(AG-439-22) provide information on how to properly maintain a septic system. Some of the actions you can take are listed below.

  1. Water should be conserved. Reduce the quantity of wastewater that has to be absorbed by the soil by using water-saving fixtures and conserving water in the kitchen, bath, and laundry, among other things. As a result, it is especially useful immediately following a large rain, as well as throughout the winter and early spring
  2. Fixtures that are leaking should be repaired or replaced. The presence of leaky fixtures causes surplus water to be discharged into the drainfield, reducing the quantity of water that needs to be absorbed by the soil. Continue to provide enough cover and landscaping over the drainfield. Make sure the drainfield is well-covered with grass in order to minimize erosion of the soil. A topped drainfield and surface swales will help to keep excess surface water from entering the trench and damaging the soil. Check to see sure gutters, downspouts, patios, walkways, and roads do not redirect water over the drainfield or septic tank, as well. Fill your tank with water on a regular basis. Keeping the drainfield clear with regular pumping keeps particles from accumulating and clogging it. Depending on how often the tank is used, it should be pumped every 3 to 5 years. It has not been demonstrated that the use of additives can considerably reduce the quantity of solids in a tank. Avoid using them in place of regular septic tank pumping
  3. Instead, limit the amount of waste that goes into your septic tank. Chemicals, solvents, cleaning fluids, paint, motor oil, gasoline, and other similar items should not be disposed of in a septic tank or drain field. They have the potential to destroy all of the good bacteria in the tank and soil, as well as contaminate the surrounding environment. Dispose of these materials appropriately at a recycling center or transfer station in your neighborhood. The following items should be disposed of in the trash: kitty litter, hygiene products, cooking oil, grease, and leftover food. Compostable waste from fruits and vegetables
  4. Do not drive or construct over any component of your septic system
  5. Inspect the system components on a regular basis. Examine the environment for signals of issues that can be rectified before a failure happens.

The Environmental Protection Agency of the United States, April 1997. Response to Congress on the Use of Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Systems, EPA 832-R-97-001b. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997. Office of Water, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. M. T. Hoover published a paper in 1990 titled Investigate the Soil Facts Before Making a Decision. AG-439-12 is the number assigned by NC State Extension. NC State University is located in Raleigh. M. T. Hoover and T. Konsler.

T.

Septic Systems and Their Maintenance: The Soil Facts State Extension, No.

T.

S.

A Guide for Septic System Owners based on Soil Facts.

AG-439-22.

J., R.

McCoy, and S.

Sandhu published a paper titled 1977.

Joseph, MI: The American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE), in Home Sewage Treatment (ASAE No 5-77).

The authors would like to express their gratitude to M.

David Lindbo is a Professor of Crop and Soil Sciences at Colorado State University.

Agent specializing in water quality and waste management in a certain area Onslow County is located in the state of North Carolina.

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