Why Would A Septic Tank Be Good To Have Near Me? (TOP 5 Tips)

What are the benefits of a septic system?

  • With a septic tank, you don’t have this recurring expense. Self-maintaining: With proper care, a septic system lasts for decades. Lifestyle choices like conserving water, limiting the use of bleach, and being careful about what goes down the drains, not only protects your septic but also the environment.

What are the benefits of a septic tank?

Advantages of septic systems

  • Easier on the environment. Regular sewer lines can sometimes leak raw sewage into the ground, contaminating our ground water.
  • Economical. Having a septic system can save you a lot of money.
  • Lower maintenance.
  • Long life expectancy.
  • Antibiotics.
  • Tree roots.
  • Water tables.
  • Disposal.

What are the pros and cons of having a septic tank?

Septic Tank Pros And Cons

  • You can save money by not having to pay for public sewer.
  • When properly maintained, septic systems are more environmentally friendly.
  • Septic tanks allow you to live further away from cities/towns.
  • Septic tanks can last up to 40 years.

Is a septic tank good or bad?

No. Many homes with septic systems also have a private well. But, the septic system is entirely independent from the well. Its purpose is not to treat wastewater so it can become drinkable, but to safely disperse it in a way that prevents contamination.

Is septic tank better than sewer?

Although septic systems require a bit more maintenance and attention, they have a number of advantages over sewer lines. Since they don’t pump wastewater long distances to be processed at a water treatment facility, they use less energy overall and have a smaller environmental impact.

Why are septic tanks bad?

One of the biggest disadvantages of septic systems are the hassles that comes with sewage backup, which is generally a sign of clogging in the tank or drain field pipes. When backups occur, the problem is more serious than a simple household drain clog because the obstruction won’t be found just inches down the drain.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

How many loads of laundry a day are safe to do with a septic tank?

Spread Out Laundry Loads These use less water which puts less stress on your septic system. Regardless of the type of appliance you have, you should still spread out your loads. Instead of doing several loads in one day, consider doing 1 load per day or space out 2 loads if you must do more in a single day.

Do septic tanks smell?

A properly-maintained septic tank should be odor-free, so if you notice a bad smell inside your home or outside near the leach field, it’s a sign that there’s a problem. Septic odors are caused by gases in the system, including carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and methane.

Does shower water go to septic tank?

From your house to the tank: Most, but not all, septic systems operate via gravity to the septic tank. Each time a toilet is flushed, water is turned on or you take a shower, the water and waste flows via gravity through the plumbing system in your house and ends up in the septic tank.

Can you sell a house with a septic tank?

If you currently have a septic tank that discharges to surface water then the sale will trigger the requirement to replace or upgrade the system. Buyers should satisfy themselves that any system is in good working order and does not cause pollution.

What to do after septic is pumped?

After you have had your septic tank pumped by a trusted septic company, there are some things you can and should do as the septic system owner.

  1. 1) Get on a Schedule.
  2. 2) Take Care of the System.
  3. 3) Know the Parts of Your System.
  4. 4) Check Other Possible Issues.

Are septic tanks hard to maintain?

Septic system maintenance is not complicated, and it does not need to be expensive. Upkeep comes down to four key elements: Inspect and Pump Frequently. Use Water Efficiently.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

What should you avoid with a septic tank?

You should not put these items into your commode:

  • Cat litter.
  • Coffee grounds.
  • Cigarette butts.
  • Dental floss.
  • Disposable diapers.
  • Earplugs.
  • Sanitary napkins or tampons.

Is septic tank necessary?

Getting rid of waste is a necessity, whether it’s done via sewer or septic tank. “A septic tank is a key component of a septic system, a small-scale sewage treatment system common in areas that lack connection to main sewage pipes provided by local governments or private corporations.

How to Care for Your Septic System

Septic system maintenance is neither difficult or expensive, and it does not have to be done frequently. The maintenance of a vehicle is comprised of four major components:

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order. Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract.

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Everything that goes down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet, ground up in the trash disposal, or poured down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system, which is where it belongs. What you flush down the toilet has an impact on how effectively your septic system functions.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system.

A simple rule of thumb is to never flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Cooking grease or oil
  • Wipes that are not flushable, such as baby wipes or other wet wipes
  • Photographic solutions
  • Feminine hygiene items Condoms
  • Medical supplies such as dental floss and disposable diapers, cigarette butts and coffee grounds, cat litter and paper towels, pharmaceuticals, and household chemicals such as gasoline and oil, insecticides, antifreeze, and paint or paint thinners

Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed! Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed. Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.

Should You Avoid a House With a Septic System?

Real estate has traditionally been the preferred investment for people seeking to accumulate long-term wealth for their families and future generations. By subscribing to our complete real estate investment guide, you will receive assistance in navigating this asset class. Whenever you have solid waste in your house, the solution is straightforward: throw it in the trash or compost it. But what about garbage that is liquid in nature? Everyone’s house generates a certain amount of wastewater, and when it comes to disposing of it, there are typically two options: a public sewage line or an on-site septic system.

Even if you’re buying a property with well water, you should consider installing a septic system to keep the water clean.

See also:  How To Make A Concrete Septic Tank Cover? (Solution found)

Or is it a decision you’re more likely than not going to come to regret, whether you’re buying a home for yourself or as an investment in the future?

What is a septic system?

Sewage systems remove wastewater from your house and channel it via a sewer line to be treated at a treatment center. The water is then treated at that facility to remove impurities and make it safe to drink, after which it is returned to the local water system that serves your house and neighborhood. According to the design of a traditional septic system, all of the wastewater that must be removed from your home is routed down a drainage pipe and into an underground septic tank. Septic tanks may be composed of several materials including concrete, fiberglass, and other composite materials.

Solids are allowed to settle to the bottom and form a scum layer.

From there, wastewater is dumped through pipelines into the surrounding soil, where it might filter through.

When you have a sewage system, you will often have a large number of residences that all feed into the same system. When it comes to sewerage systems, on the other hand, each residence is often equipped with its own septic installation.

Types of septic systems

In the event that you are unfamiliar with septic tank installation, you can select from a number of various options:

  1. An example of a traditional septic system is the one mentioned above, which is comprised of a septic tank and drain field. A chamber system is a fantastic option if you live in a wet climate with inadequate drainage. A chamber system is characterized by a succession of pipelines and chambers that are surrounded by dirt. Microbes in that soil treat wastewater before it is discharged into the environment. The maintenance of chamber systems may be more extensive than that of traditional sewage treatment systems. An aerobic system introduces oxygen into the septic tank, which aids in the addition of nutrients to the water, which is beneficial as the tank begins to empty. Again, the amount of maintenance required here may be more than that required by a traditional system. A drip distribution system, as opposed to a conventional drain field, involves the placement of pipes in shallow ground soil to transport treated water away. This reduces the need for substantial digging, which is necessary when constructing a drain field. Drip distribution systems, on the other hand, might be more expensive to construct and may need additional maintenance. A sand filter system is simply a huge box packed with sand that water passes through before being filtered out by the system. Sand systems, like chamber systems, are useful in regions where the water level is naturally high and drainage is inadequate
  2. However, the maintenance required can be more extensive than with chamber systems.

Benefits of a septic system

When you own a septic system, you are responsible for keeping it in good working order. Aside from the financial implications, this might be a positive development because it implies you can avoid difficulties by keeping up with your maintenance. With a municipal sewer system, a sewer pipe can leak or back up, and if the problem is not fixed immediately, you might find yourself with a severe problem on your hands, even if you were not the one who caused the problem. Furthermore, there is usually a price associated with utilizing a public sewer system; often, you will be charged a monthly or quarterly fee.

Moreover, when building a new home from the ground up, it is generally less expensive to install a septic system than it is to pay to have sewer lines installed – this is especially true when your home is located in an area where setting up a sewer connection would necessitate a significant amount of infrastructure investment.

The way septic tanks discharge water into the surrounding soil can encourage plant development, which is beneficial to the environment.

Septic systems have an average life expectancy of 25 to 30 years provided they are properly maintained and serviced.

Drawbacks of a septic system

A septic system, on the other hand, has various drawbacks and costs that you may have to bear in mind while installing one. Aside from the fact that septic systems need to be maintained, You’ll need to pump out your septic tank every three years (or more frequently if necessary) to keep sludge accumulation from becoming too large. The exact timing will be determined on the size of your tank. In addition, you should have your septic system inspected once or twice a year to verify that it is in proper operating condition.

For the most part, this implies that you’re restricted to flushing just human waste and toilet paper into the toilet.

  • Items such as paper towels that are thick and absorbent, feminine products, cooking oil or grease, baby wipes, and household chemicals

A septic system also means that you won’t be able to install a garbage disposal under your kitchen sink, because even though that disposal will grind up items to prevent clogged pipes, you don’t want to take the chance that those items will make their way into your septic system and cause an unhealthy buildup. Additionally, when you have a septic system, there are additional landscaping issues to take into mind. In particular, you must avoid planting trees exactly next to your septic system’s drain field; otherwise, the roots of the trees might grow into the drain field and cause the system to cease functioning correctly.

The bottom line on septic systems

A septic system often provides you with the ability to purchase property that has greater acreage and to reap the benefits that come along with that decision. If you’re looking to buy a home as an investment, the presence of additional land might be a significant selling feature. Be careful you understand the type and frequency of maintenance that will be required to keep your septic system up and running. The last thing you want is to find yourself with a pricey situation on your hands that is difficult to resolve.

Buying a Home With a Septic Tank? What You Need to Know

Published in February of this year A septic tank is one of those property features that might make prospective purchasers feel uneasy. A septic tank is a component of a home’s wastewater system that is often found in homes that are not served by municipal sewers. Instead, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, these stand-alone systems are meant to dispose of and treat the wastewater generated by a residence on their own (EPA). For anyone contemplating purchasing a property with a septic system, here are some often asked questions and answers to consider:

COUNT ON QUALITY COVERAGE.

Protect your assets and enjoy the peace of mind that comes with having Allstate insurance coverage. Request a quote Locate a representative.

How Does a Septic System Work?

A pipe gathers all of the wastewater from the residence and transports it to an underground septic tank that is completely waterproof. As explained by the Environmental Protection Agency, solids settle to the bottom of the pond while floatable items (known as “scum”) float to the top. Both are confined within the tank, which is emptied on a regular basis by a professional pumper. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the middle layer includes liquid wastewater (also known as “effluent”) that exits the tank into a buried drainfield in the yard, where the wastewater disperses into the soil.

Is the Septic System Related to the Drinking Water System?

No. Many homes that have septic systems also have a private well to provide water. The septic system, on the other hand, is completely separate from the well. Rather of treating wastewater so that it may be consumed, its objective is to safely distribute it in a manner that prevents pollution.

What Differentiates One Septic System from Another?

According to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the size of the drainfield and the quality of the soil are the primary factors that distinguish one septic system from another. In addition, the drainfield must be large enough to accommodate the volume of liquid generated by a family. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, do not use a home’s toilet, sink, or disposal as a wastebasket for dental floss, coffee grinds, kitty litter, paint, or chemicals to avoid the chance of blocking the system.

How Often Should You Get Your Septic Tank Emptied?

To remove the sludge and scum from the septic tank, it is necessary to hire a professional to pump it. The frequency is decided by the size of the tank and the degree of activity in the home (how much wastewater is generated).

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, most septic tanks should be emptied every three to five years. However, certain systems may require more frequent pumping – perhaps once a year if necessary.

What Are the Signs of a Failing Septic Tank?

Aside from routine pumping, the tank should be examined for leaks or obstructions on a regular basis. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, signs of a clogged system include foul odors that appear from time to time and fixtures that drain slowly or gurgle.

What About Maintenance Costs?

The size of the tank and drainfield, the accessibility of the tank, and the distance that waste must be hauled for disposal all influence the cost of septic system maintenance. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, pumping a tank might cost between $250 and $500.

What Should I Do Before Buying a Home With a Septic System?

Learn about the laws in your state. Some states demand a septic system examination prior to transferring ownership. However, even if your state does not need an inspection, your lender may require one anyhow. As a rule, conventional house inspections do not involve an examination of the septic system. Zillow reports that an inspection may provide a detailed assessment of the system’s integrity, identify whether it is located at an appropriate distance from a well (to minimize contamination), and check the absence of invasive tree roots in the drainfield, which could cause damage to the system.

If you do need to replace your system, the cost might vary significantly.

Owning a property with a septic tank does not have to be a frightening experience.

Related Resources:

Do you want to buy a house, but it has a septic tank, and you’re not sure what to check for when you go looking? Several considerations should be made while looking at a house that has an underground septic system. Here’s what you should do to make sure your septic system is in working order before purchasing a home. Learn about the laws in your area. Septic systems are custom-designed to compliment your property and meet local building codes. These local ordinances may include requirements for septic tank inspection, maintenance, and replacement, among other things.

  • If you decide to expand your home and add plumbing, they may also need you to install a larger septic tank to accommodate the additional waste.
  • Septic systems must be inspected and maintained on a regular basis in order to avoid complications.
  • Their job will be to search for leaks and blockages, identifying possible problems before they become major ones.
  • It is recommended that you ask to examine the tank’s inspection history before purchasing a house with a septic tank.
  • You must have a general understanding of the septic tank’s technical parameters.
  • Additionally, you must be aware of the date it was installed, because septic tanks may need to be updated every 20-40 years.
  • Make Preparations for Routine Maintenance A septic tank must be examined, maintained, and emptied on a regular basis in order to avoid problems.

Depending on the size of the tank, this can cost anywhere from $300 to $600 on average.

The distinction is that if you flush something down the toilet that shouldn’t be there, it becomes your responsibility on a septic system.

Pipes that are clogged can leak and sewage can back up into your home as a result of these obstructions.

Understand what may go wrong.

It is possible to create a large amount of mess when there are leaks, broken and clogged pipes, and flooding in a drain field.

Due to an excessive amount of liquid present either within the tank or within the drain field, a tank may fail to drain properly – or at all.

Spot Potential Problems As Soon As They Appear You must be able to recognize a possible problem before it manifests itself as a genuine one. Peculiar scents, unusual plumbing indicators, poor drainage, and backflow into your drains are all indications that your septic tank needs to be inspected.

5 Signs it’s Time to Replace Your Septic System — BL3 Plumbing & Drain Cleaning

Nobody wants sewage backing up into their yard, and there are a number of things you can do to keep your septic system from malfunctioning in the first place. But there are times when it is necessary to throw up the towel on an old system and make the investment in a new one. Because it is a costly option, you will want to be certain that it is absolutely essential. In an ideal world, efficient maintenance would preclude the need for replacement for decades, if not generations. However, years of poor maintenance may lead to the conclusion that a replacement is the best solution.

See also:  How To In Stall A Sanitary Tee For Septic Tank?

1. Age of the System

If you buy a new house, it’s possible that your septic system may endure for 40 years or longer, meaning you won’t have to replace it for a lengthy period of time. You may, on the other hand, have an older home with a septic system that has been in place for more than half a century. If you begin to notice difficulties with the system, and if you find yourself pumping it more regularly in order to maintain it operating correctly, it may be time to start planning for a new septic system installation.

2. You’ve Outgrown the System

If you buy a new house, it’s possible that your septic system may endure for 40 years or longer, meaning you won’t have to repair it for a long time. Some older homes have septic systems that have been in place for more than half a century, and this is something to consider. If you begin to notice difficulties with your system, and you find yourself pumping it more regularly in order to maintain it running correctly, it may be time to start planning for a new septic tank. If you don’t already know how old your septic system is, it’s a good idea to find out how old it is roughly.

3. Slow Drains

Having a septic problem might be indicated by the fact that your sinks or bathtub take an unusually lengthy time to empty. Because this is a tiny sign, it is possible that you are only suffering from a blockage. If, on the other hand, all of your sinks are draining slowly, it is possible that you have a more major problem. Due to sludge accumulation at the bottom of the septic tank, it is possible that the water is going more slowly through the septic tank.

4. Standing Water in the Yard

Any standing water in your yard due to a clogged septic system is a bad omen. However, it is possible that you are only in need of a repair and not a complete replacement. It’s possible that there is a problem with your drain field. It is critical that you do not disregard standing water since the problem will not go away; rather, it will only worsen. It’s possible that your septic tank isn’t the source of your difficulties. Standing water can be caused by a clogged drain field in some cases.

It is desirable to have grass and plants growing over your drain field because organisms aid in the breakdown of the liquid and prevent it from accumulating.

Aeration through mechanical means is the second option.

Your final choice is to seek a replacement. It is possible to repair the drain field without having to replace the septic tank in some situations. You should, however, plan on replacing the tank as well if you find that the majority of the difficulties you are experiencing are connected to age.

5. Nearby Contaminated Water Sources

If nitrate, nitrite, or coliform bacteria are detected in neighboring water sources, this is a strong indication that there is a problem with your septic system. If you notice contamination in water sources, it is critical that you analyze the situation as soon as possible.

Other Septic Systems Issues

The replacement of the septic tank is the most extreme circumstance. A number of these indicators might be symptomatic of simpler problems that only require little correction. If you have obstructions in your septic tank, you may need to have it pumped or have the system cleaned. If you’re concerned about a septic tank problem, the best course of action is to contact a professional for assistance. At BL3, we provide a wide range of sewage line-related services. In order to speak with a plumber, please call (405) 895-6640 in North OKC or (405) 237-1414 in South OKC.

Living with Well Water and Septic Tank

If you’re interested about what it’s like to live on a well and with a septic tank, here’s what you should know about the situation. Get quotations from as many as three professionals! Enter your zip code below to get matched with top-rated professionals in your area. We rely on water for almost everything we do in our daily lives, from drinking to brushing our teeth to cooking a meal to washing dishes. A critical consideration when purchasing a property in a more rural region is where your water utilities will come from.

It is possible that you may not have access to a municipal water and sewer connection, in which case you will be introduced to a well water and septic tank system for the first time.

How Does a Well and Septic Tank System Work?

It’s possible that you don’t pay much consideration to where your water comes from, but maintaining a well and a septic system would necessitate some expertise. In principle, the notion is straightforward; in practice, however, there are various components that homeowners should be aware of.

What Is a Well?

In its most basic definition, a well is a hole in the earth that offers access to water. A pump and pipe system is used to extract water from the ground, and a screen is utilized to filter out undesired particles in order to prevent blockages from forming. Because groundwater sources may be affected by germs and pollutants, wells that are improperly constructed can readily become contaminated. The foundation of any well is comprised of four essential components:

  • A casing constructed of steel, polyvinyl chloride pipe, or concrete pipe Although it allows for free access in the ground, the casing also prevents any leaking into the well from the surrounding environment. Grout is used as a sealer to fill in any gaps or crevices around the outside of the well, so keeping pollutants from entering. Stainless steel or slotted PVC pipe filter screen keeps gravel, sand, and other waste out of the well
  • Stainless steel or slotted PVC pipe filter screen It is necessary to pack gravel around the outside of the filter screen in order to prevent debris from entering the well or clogging the screen.

What Is a Septic System?

A septic system is a wastewater treatment system that comprises of a septic tank and a drain field that is located underground. Most of the time, these systems are located in rural locations where there is no access to centralized municipal sewers. Everything that goes into a home’s kitchen, faucets, and bathrooms goes out through a single main drainage pipe into a tank, which is buried in the earth and is completely watertight. The tank then contains all of the wastewater, gradually separating it into solids (which sink to the bottom) and oils (which rise to the surface) (which float to the top).

Once the liquid (known as effluent) is evacuated from the tank and spread into the drain field, which is a shallow, covered trench of unsaturated soil, the process is complete.

field Because of the way the drain field cleanses and disperses wastewater, it is able to eliminate a significant amount of bacteria as it filters into the soil.

Well and Septic vs. City Water and Sewer

Adobe Stock – Africa Studio – stock.adobe.com While many homes rely on well water and a septic tank because municipal services are unavailable in their area, some homeowners prefer to use these systems on a purely voluntary basis. If you have the option, both city water and well water have their own set of advantages and disadvantages that you should consider.

Pros of Well Water and Septic Systems

  • Because you are using a private well, you will not be charged a monthly water cost. Well water is more nutrient-dense and contains more minerals and nutrients than tap water. Natural catastrophes generally do not pose a threat to well water since it is safe and uncontaminated.

Cons of Well Water and Septic Systems

  • Water pollution from a septic tank, chemicals, or other contaminants is a concern. All upkeep and repairs are the responsibility of the property owner. A new septic system will cost anywhere from $15,000 to $30,000, making it an expensive investment.

Pros of City Water and Sewer Systems

  • Water quality, service, and testing are all the responsibility of the city. Owner maintenance is kept to a bare minimum. Natural catastrophes generally do not pose a threat to well water since it is safe and uncontaminated.

Cons of City Water and Sewer Systems

  • High homeowner costs for annual consumption
  • The possibility of system malfunctions or maintenance being delayed
  • Drinking water is not as pure as it once was and may include additional contaminants.

Have a System Inspection Before Buying a Home

It is common for typical house inspections to omit wells and septic systems, but it is critical that you have a full examination performed before proceeding with a purchase. If your regular house inspector does not have a specific septic inspection license, you will need to hire a qualified septic inspector to come out and check your system. It is likely that this will result in an additional charge, but the quality of the system will have long-term consequences for the health and safety of your family members.

Well Location Is Important

You can easily locate a well head by checking for a 6-inch capped pipe that will be poking out of the ground approximately a foot. This is the well head. Check to see that this pipe is at least 50 feet away from the corner of the house and at least 100 feet away from the septic drain field before installing it in your home.

Septic Systems and Drinking Water

It is critical to ensure that your septic system is in excellent functioning order in order to maintain your drinking water as clean as possible. Overflows can be caused by a variety of factors, including blocked pipes and drainage issues. A tank pumping is advised every three to four years, and you should keep an eye out for any warning signals, such as an odor in the yard or standing water near the drain field.

Avoid DIY Septic Systems

A well and septic system must be installed by a licensed and insured contractor at all times, without exception. Any well that has been excavated or bored by the homeowner poses an unacceptable level of contamination risk. Purchase a home where the system has not been properly installed and tested before making the purchase. Even though well water and septic tanks sometimes receive a bad name, the truth is that they are quite useful and offer a variety of advantages. If you’re unfamiliar with this sort of water system, do some research and speak with a local septic expert about what you should expect in terms of maintenance.

How to locate a septic tank

A home’s construction year and whether a copy of the septic permit is accessible determine the procedure for locating a septic tank on a property, which might take many weeks or months. Please choose one of the scenarios listed below and follow the instructions.

For homes built in the last five (5) years or less

Obtain a copy of your septic tank permit from your local Department of Health and Human Services office. Please fill out as much of the information below as possible to help us expedite the search:

  • Number of the tax map
  • Lot number
  • Block number
  • Address in the physical world
  • When the system was installed or when the house was built (if this information is available)
  • Name of the original permit holder (if any information is available)
  • Name of the subdivision (if the property is located within a subdivision)

A copy of a septic tank permit can be obtained from a local DHEC office by any individual or group, regardless of whether or not they own the land in question.

For homes older than five (5) years or if a copy of the septic permit was not able to be located.

It is recommended that you call an experienced septic contractor who will come to the site and assist you with the identification of the current septic system.

You may find a list of licensed septic installers by clicking here.

Tags

Septic Tank Alerts Septic Tank Alerts

Septic Tanks: Frequently Asked Questions

No. In reality, certain chemicals or therapies may cause more harm than benefit to your system, and may even speed the demise of your system. Some jurisdictions have outright prohibited their usage.

  • The use of additives does not obviate the necessity for regular pumping and maintenance of your septic tank, despite claims made in advertising. A number of products may simply push solids and grease from your tank into the drainfield, where they can cause the most damage by clogging up the air spaces between gravel and soil particles, slowing and eventually stopping the cleansing of wastewater
  • Others may simply push solids and grease from your tank into the drainfield. In order to reestablish the bacterial equilibrium of a septic tank, no biological additions are required because bacteria already exist in human excrement. Contrary to popular belief, you should never put yeast, dead animals, or raw flesh to your aquarium. Use caution when adding chemical additions, such as caustic hydroxides and sulfuric acid, as they can kill beneficial microorganisms in the tank and affect its capacity to absorb or treat liquids
  • They can also contaminate groundwater.
See also:  How To Abandon A Septic Tank In Kitsap County? (Best solution)

Will DHEC use a percolation or ‘perc’ test to determine if my property will work for a septic tank?

No, we haven’t utilized these tests since the late 1970s since they aren’t particularly accurate when it comes to evaluating septic system installation locations. Perc tests are used to determine how quickly water will drain out of a hole once it has been poured in. An area that passes the perc test during the dry season but fails the perc test during a wet stretch, when the water table is closer to the ground surface, is known as a saturated zone. Some locations in South Carolina have passed perc testing in the past, but have ended up having septic systems that are unable to function effectively during wet seasons.

Will DHEC inspect my septic tank upon request?

No, you’ll need to engage a qualified septic system professional to examine your system before you can proceed. The majority of your queries will be answered by our knowledgeable staff, who may also be able to provide some useful technical assistance.

Am I legally required to have my septic system inspected regularly?

While South Carolina law does not mandate property owners to have existing systems evaluated, several municipalities have approved legislation requiring their homeowners to have their septic systems tested on a regular basis (See next question). For those who reside in an area where there is no municipal inspection legislation in effect, the only time you would be compelled to have your septic system examined would be when you are planning to build a new house that will make use of a septic system.

You will not be able to acquire a county building permit until you have this permission.

What kinds of inspection requirements may be found in local ordinances?

Local rules differ, and some impose greater responsibilities on septic tank owners than others. For example, some municipal rules demand an inspection if you wish to make changes to the size or designated use of your house in a way that might potentially put more strain on the septic system. If you want to do this, contact your local building department. Suppose you are remodeling your two-bedroom house into a four-bedroom home or connecting your home to a system that was initially intended for a restricted usage office building as an example.

Why should I spend the money to have my system inspected regularly if not required by law?

Regular inspections detect problems early, allowing you to correct them before they have a negative impact on your family’s health, become significantly more expensive to repair, cause environmental damage, or place you in a legal liability position.

What is an alternative septic system, and are they legal in South Carolina?

Alternative systems make advantage of more recent technologies. Some people choose to treat wastewater with sand, peat, or plastic instead of soil. Others make use of wetlands, lagoons, aerators, or disinfection systems to combat the problem. A variety of electrical and mechanical components such as float switches, pumps, and other similar devices are frequently employed in alternative systems. Alternative systems need more regular and meticulous maintenance, but they can occasionally be used to establish a septic tank on land that does not have soils suited for typical septic systems or when the subterranean water level is too high for a traditional system to function properly.

The Department of Health and Human Services evaluates the adoption of alternative systems on an individual case-by-case basis.

Will a high-efficiency toilet help my septic system work better?

Toilets account for anywhere between one-fourth and one-third of total home water use. The majority of typical toilets in older homes consume 3.5 to 5 gallons of water every flush on average. Toilets that are modern and high efficiency consume 1.6 gallons or less of water every flush. The installation of a high efficiency toilet might alleviate your concerns about your septic system being swamped by domestic water. Placing a block in the toilet tank of an older toilet can also help to reduce the amount of water used for every flush.

Tags

Septic Tank Alerts Septic Tank Alerts

Septic Tank Inspections Atlanta GA – Septic Tank Inspections Near Me

Septic tanks do a difficult and nasty job, and the last thing any homeowner or business owner wants is to be forced to deal with a clogged or malfunctioning tank. Inspections of your septic tank and system are provided by Septic Masters so that you may have a better understanding of the state of your tank and system. You can be certain that your septic tank is in the best possible hands with Septic Masters since they provide the most complete septic tank inspections available in Atlanta, GA, and the whole Metro region.

Septic Tank Inspections Atlanta GA

You should constantly be aware of the form of your septic tank, just like you should be aware of the design of any other significant system in your home, in order to avoid problems down the line. Septic Masters can assist you if it has been a while since your last inspection or if you have reason to believe that something is wrong with your system. If there are any difficulties or alarming circumstances with your tank, we will do a comprehensive examination to identify them so that you can get the required repairs completed before they become a problem.

Selling a Home With a Septic System in Atlanta GA

If you are in the process of selling your house, you may be required to present documentation demonstrating that your septic system has been inspected or serviced recently. Septic Masters can assist you. Our staff will arrive on the scene, conduct a thorough examination, and present you with all of the necessary documents. It’s challenging enough to navigate the real estate process without having to worry about whether or not your septic system is in good working order as well.

Septic Tank Inspections Near Me

Septic Masters is happy to provide thorough and dependable septic tank inspections throughout Atlanta, GA and the surrounding metro region, including Gwinnett County, Hall County, Barrow County, Forsyth County, and other counties. Contact us now to book your next septic tank inspection, servicing, or pumping for your business or residential septic tank.

Department of Environmental Quality : About Septic Systems : Residential Resources : State of Oregon

In areas where houses and businesses are not linked to a municipal sewage system, a septic system is the most popular type of sewage treatment for those areas. When simplified to its most basic form, a septic system is comprised of two parts: a septic tank in which solids settle and decay and a drainfield in which liquid drained from the tank is treated by bacteria in the soil. Septic systems that are more sophisticated are constructed in places with high groundwater levels and/or poor soils.

Septic systems that are properly operating treat sewage in order to reduce groundwater and surface water contamination.

Failure to maintain your system poses a health risk to your family and your neighbors, as well as a threat to natural resources. Learn more about how septic systems function by reading this article.

Before you buy

If the land is undeveloped, inquire as to whether the property has been examined for appropriateness for septic systems by either the Department of Environmental Quality or a local government contract agent, and if so, request a copy of the site evaluation report. The following are the questions you should ask:Has the site changed since it was last evaluated?

  • Well construction, fill, roads, and other modifications can all have an impact on appropriateness. Is the land suitable for your development needs, taking into account the kind of system stated as acceptable on the report and the placement of the septic system that has been approved?

If the property has not yet been examined, you may choose to request that the present owner arrange for an evaluation to be done. Application for a site review can be made through either the Department of Environmental Quality or a local government contract agent. Before deciding to acquire the land, you must determine what sort of septic system will be necessary, as well as whether or not the permitted system site will fit your development requirements. Existing sewage treatment systems- If you are considering acquiring a home with an existing septic system, you should engage a trained inspector to assess the system before making the purchase.

  • Is it true that the system was implemented without a permit? If not, it is possible that the system is very old (permits have been necessary since 1972, and in certain counties even earlier), or that it was unlawfully built. Systems that have been illegally developed may pose a threat to public health or produce pollution. In the future, you may be forced to upgrade or replace the system, and you may be held accountable and penalized if the system malfunctions or poses a concern to public health and safety. If your family or business has a large number of members, is the system the correct size to meet their needs? Permit documents often include information on the system’s capacity in gallons per day. Typical household water use is 450 gallons per day for a four-bedroom home. How old is the system, and has it been adequately maintained over its lifetime? Is there documentation demonstrating that the septic tank was pumped on a regular basis? Have there been any difficulties or complaints that have been brought to your attention in the past? It is possible that your local permitting agency has records of complaints or infractions that have not been addressed yet. Before you moved here, how many people lived in the house? Perhaps the approach works well with a single person but not so well with four individuals. Is the septic tank connected to all of the plumbing fittings
  • And Is there evidence of a septic system failure, such as puddles over the septic tank or flooded drainfields? If the property is next to surface waterways, check to see that there are no direct discharges from the property. When it comes to septic system replacement, is there a suitable location if the existing system fails? In the event that there are any septic permit documents, they will show the replacement area that should still be “laid aside” for this purpose. What is the role of a qualified inspector? Some septic installers and pumpers have received training in the inspection of existing systems, while others specialize in the installation of new septic systems or pump tanks, as appropriate. Certified maintenance providers may also have the qualifications of a qualified inspector. The goal is to find out what their credentials are in septic system assessments (as opposed to only septic tank evaluations), as well as to obtain some recommendations. Verify the credentials of the references before hiring a contractor.

Signs of septic system failure

  • Pools of water or wet places, unpleasant aromas, and/or dark gray or black soils in the vicinity of your drainfield are all signs that something is wrong. Water from the sewer overflows into the lowest drains in the home. The sound of drains gurgling and poor draining (first check for obstructions)
  • Soapy flows onto the ground surface, into ditches, or into surface waterways It is impossible to mow over the drainfield because the earth is too soft.

Installing a new system

In order to have a new septic system installed, a two-step procedure must be followed. 1. Submit an application for a site review. The tests pits you give on your property will be evaluated by a DEQ or county agent, who will decide the size and kind of septic system that will be required, as well as the placement. 2. Submit an application for a building permit. For application forms, contact your local DEQ office or county agent, or you can obtain DEQ application forms from this website. There is a cost for both the site appraisal and the issuance of the building permit.

Maintaining septic systems

By having your septic tank tested for solids accumulation on a regular basis, you may prevent having to pay for expensive repairs. When the solids buildup in your septic tank exceeds 40%, you should have it pumped by a pumper who is licensed by the DEQ. For advice on how often to get your septic tank examined, contact the Department of Environmental Quality. Maintaining the condition of your septic tank on a regular basis (every 5 to 7 years) and checking for solids accumulation will save you money on costly repairs.

If you follow the basic septic system DO’s and DON’Ts, a properly designed and maintained system may survive for a very long period.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *