Why Use Concrete Tank For Mound Septic? (TOP 5 Tips)

Very durable: Concrete septic tanks are much more durable than their plastic counterparts. Long-lasting: Concrete tanks last a very long time. With proper maintenance and regular draining, a concrete septic tank could last up to 40 years.

  • Polyethylene, fiberglass, or concrete uses to construct it. As the sewer water enters in the septic tank, it traps this sewer water for a long time so that the solid particles settle down. As it traps the wastewater, the sludge, greases, and oils also float on the water surface.

Why have a concrete septic tank?

Concrete septic tanks are currently the most popular type of septic tank on the market. The concrete septic tank’s popularity is due to its strength, weight, and durability. More specifically as to durability, if constructed properly, concrete septic tanks have a lower likelihood of breaking, cracking, or floating.

Are concrete septic tanks better than plastic?

Cement Septic tanks are very durable than plastic tanks and, if kept properly, can have extended longevity. With regular draining and proper maintenance, a cement septic tank can last for up to 40 years. Cement septic tanks are resistant to environmental changes such as tree roots or changing soil conditions.

Does a mound septic system have a tank?

The following information will help you understand your mound system, and keep it operating safely at the lowest possible cost. A typical mound system has 3 working parts: The septic tank. The pump chamber and pump.

Which is better concrete or fiberglass septic tank?

While concrete is known for its durability, fiberglass septic tanks are even more durable. Once buried, fiberglass tanks become completely inert. Unlike concrete, it won’t degrade, rust, or weaken. Fiberglass septic tanks also require less maintenance than concrete septic tanks do.

What is the life expectancy of a concrete septic tank?

Inspectapedia estimates that a steel tank baffles will rust out in 15 to 20 years and may collapse if driven over, but a concrete tank will last 40 years or more as long as the wastewater is not acidic. It’s important to consider the life expectancy of a drain-field, too.

Do concrete septic tanks leak?

The most common problem with concrete septic tanks is that they crack, which causes leaks and problems with soil contamination. If the leaks are only minor, usually they can be repaired and sealed; allowing you to get more life out of your tank.

What’s better than a septic tank?

Plastic Chamber Leach Field Plastic chamber leach fields are great alternative septic systems for small lots and properties with high or variable groundwater tables. Plastic chambers in the shape of half pipes take the place of the gravel in the leach field and create a void for wastewater flow.

What is the cheapest septic tank?

Types of Septic Tank Systems These conventional septic systems are usually the most affordable, with an average cost of around $3,000.

Which type of septic tank is best?

The best choice is a precast concrete septic tank. Precast septic tanks hold many advantages over plastic, steel, or fiberglass tanks. This is why so many cities and towns actually require the use of concrete septic tanks.

Should you mow a septic mound?

To prevent compaction, do not allow any vehicles or heavy equipment on the mound. When mowing the lawn, use a hand mower, rather than a riding mower. This will also help protect the mound from losing soil to erosion. The slope of the mound makes it more susceptible to erosion than a conventional drain field.

How do you maintain a septic mound?

1. Inspect your septic tank once every year and pump it when needed. If the tank is not pumped periodically, solids escaping from the septic tank will clog the pump and mound. Using a garbage disposal will increase the amount of solids entering the tank and require more frequent pumping.

Why are mound septic systems so expensive?

Mound septic systems are considerably more expensive than conventional septics because they require more sophisticated construction. The cost of the electric pump and sand also contributes to the total price. Mound septic systems have an average cost between $10,000 and $20,000.

How much weight can you put on a concrete septic tank?

Consider that unless you have installed a septic tank with a “vehicle traffic rated” or Highway Traffic Rated strength cover, a typical concrete residential septic tank, following the University of Minnesota design guide (as a typical standard) is built to carry the weight of the soil covering the septic tank and a

Understanding and Maintaining Mound Systems

Many years have passed since septic tanks with gravity flow drainfields were first installed in places that were not served by municipal sewers. Not all soil and site conditions, however, are well suited for the use of these basic methods. Non-standard sewage treatment systems are frequently employed to preserve human health and water quality in regions where regular sewage treatment systems are unable to provide safe sewage treatment. A mound system is a form of non-standard system that delivers the following benefits:

  • Cycles for dosing and resting
  • Uniform dispersion of effluent a level of sewage treatment that is known
  • An increase in the distance that wastewater must travel before it reaches groundwater

The following information will assist you in better understanding your mound system and ensuring that it continues to operate properly and at the lowest feasible cost. A typical mound system is composed of three functional components:

  • The sewage treatment plant
  • The pump chamber as well as the pump
  • The mound, as well as the land designated for its replacement

The Septic Tank

A typical septic tank is a huge, dual-chambered subterranean container composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene that collects and treats waste. All of the waste water from your home is channeled into the tank. Heavy materials sink to the bottom of the tank, where they are partially decomposed by bacterial activity. The majority of the lighter substances, such as grease and oils, rise to the surface and form a scum layer on the surface of the water. A liquid layer lies between the solid layers and travels from one chamber to another as it goes through the system.

Despite the fact that it has been partially treated, it still includes disease-causing germs as well as several other contaminants.

Proper Care Includes:

  1. Septic tank maintenance should include an inspection once a year and pumping it as necessary. Solids leaking from the septic tank will clog the pump and the mound if the tank is not pumped on a regular basis, which is recommended. Because it increases the quantity of solids entering the tank and necessitates more frequent pumping, the use of a waste disposal is strongly advised. Keeping dangerous materials from being flushed into the septic tank is important. Grass, cooking oils, newspapers and paper towels, cigarette butts and coffee grounds are all prohibited from being disposed of in the tank. Also prohibited are chemicals such as solvents, oils and paint, pesticides and solvents. In order to obtain information on the correct disposal of hazardous home trash, you should contact the Humboldt Waste Management Authority. It is important to avoid the use of any form of chemical or biological septic tank additive. As previously stated, such products are not essential nor beneficial to the effective operation of a septic tank, nor do they minimize the need for routine tank pumping.

The Pump Chamber

The pump chamber is a container made of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene that collects the effluent from the septic tank. A pump, pump control floats, and a high water warning float are all included within the chamber. Pump activity can be regulated either via the use of control floats or through the use of timed controls. A series of control floats is used to switch the pump “on” and “off” at different levels in order to pump a certain volume of effluent per dose of medication. Using the timer settings, you may create dosages that are both long and short in duration, as well as intervals or rest periods between doses.

If pump timer controls are employed, the alarm will also sound to alert you if there is excessive water use in the home or if there is a leak in the system.

The alarm should be equipped with a buzzer and a bright light that can be seen clearly.

The pump discharge line should be equipped with a union and a valve to facilitate the removal of the pump. In order to transport the pump into and out of the chamber, a length of nylon rope or other non-corrosive material should be tied to it.

Proper Care Includes:

  1. Every year, inspecting the pump chamber, pump, and floats, and replacing or repairing any worn or broken parts is recommended. Pump maintenance should be performed in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications. Corrosion should be checked on electrical components and conduits. If the alarm panel is equipped with a “push-to-test” button, it should be used on a regular basis. If your system does not already have one, you should consider installing a septic tank effluent filter or pump screen. Solids can block the pump and pipes in a septic tank, thus screening or filtering the effluent is an excellent method of avoiding this from happening. It is simple and quick to inspect and clean the filter when it becomes clogged, and it helps to avoid costly damage caused by particulates entering the system. After a protracted power loss or a pump failure, it is necessary to take steps to prevent the mound from being overloaded. After the pump is turned on, effluent will continue to gather in the pump chamber until the pump starts working. When there is more effluent in the chamber, the pump may be forced to dose a volume that is more than the mound’s capacity. It is possible for the plumbing in your home to back up once all of the reserve storage in the chamber has been used up. Reduce your water use to a bare minimum if the pump is not running for more than 6 hours.

The Mound

The mound is a drainfield that has been elevated above the natural soil surface using a particular sand fill material to provide drainage. A gravel-filled bed is interspersed throughout the sand fill, which is connected by a network of tiny diameter pipes. It is necessary to pump septic tank waste into pipelines in regulated quantities to ensure equal distribution over the bed of septic tank waste. Through small diameter pores in the pipes, low-pressure wastewater trickles downhill and into the sand.

Every new mound must be accompanied by a replacement area that is clearly marked.

Proper Care Includes:

  1. Knowing where your system and replacement area are, and making sure they are protected, are essential. Before you plant a garden, erect a structure, or install a pool, double-check the position of your system and the area designated for replacement
  2. Practicing water conservation and balancing your water consumption throughout the week will help to prevent the system from being overburdened. The greater the amount of wastewater produced, the greater the amount of wastewater that must be treated and disposed. Diversion of rainwater away from the mound and replacement area from surfaces such as roofs, driveways, patios, and sidewalks. The whole mound has been graded to allow for water drainage. Structures, ditches, and roadways should be placed far enough away from the mound so that water circulation from the mound is not impeded. Keeping traffic away from the mound and replacement area, including as automobiles, heavy equipment, and cattle is essential. The pressure might compress the earth or cause damage to the pipes, for example. Creating an appropriate landscape for your mound. It is not recommended to cover your mound or replacement area with impermeable materials. Construction materials such as concrete or plastic restrict evaporation and the delivery of air to the soil, both of which are necessary for effective wastewater treatment. For the mound, grass is the ideal cover
  3. Inspecting the mound and downslope areas for smells, damp spots, or surface sewer on an ongoing basis. Check the liquid level in your mound system’s inspection pipes on a regular basis to verify if the liquid level is consistently more than 6 inches. This might be a warning sign of a potential issue. For help, contact the Division of Environmental Health of the County of Humboldt.

What If The Alarm Goes On?

If the effluent level within the pump chamber reaches the alarm float for any reason (faulty pump, floats, circuit, excessive water usage, or another problem), the alarm light and buzzer will illuminate. By conserving water (avoid baths, showers, and clothes washing), the reserve storage in the pump chamber should provide you with enough time to have the problem resolved before the next water bill arrives. To turn off the alarm, press the reset button on the alarm panel’s front panel. Before contacting a service or repair company, determine whether the problem might be caused by:

  1. A tripped circuit breaker or a blown fuse are examples of this. The pump should be on a separate circuit with its own circuit breaker or fuse to prevent overloading. A piece of equipment can cause the breakers to trip if it’s connected to the same circuit as another piece of equipment
  2. A power cord that has become disconnected from a pump or float switch. Ensure that the switch and pump connectors make excellent contact with their respective outlets if the electrical connection is of the plug-in variety. Affixed to other chamber components such as the electric power wire, hoisting rope, or pump screen, the control floats become entangled. Make certain that the floats are free to move about in the chamber. Debris on the floats and support cable is causing the pump to trip the circuit breaker. Remove the floats from the chamber and thoroughly clean them.
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CAUTION: Before touching the pump or floats, always switch off the power at the circuit breaker and unhook any power cables from the system. Entering the pump room is strictly prohibited. The gases that build up inside pump chambers are toxic, and a shortage of oxygen can be deadly. After completing the measures outlined above, contact your pump service person or on-site system contractor for assistance in locating the source of the problem. Pumps and other electrical equipment should only be serviced or repaired by someone who has previous experience.

6 ADVANTAGES OF CONCRETE SEPTIC TANKS

As a homeowner, it’s possible that you don’t give much thought to your septic tank. The most of the time, your tank will be hidden beneath the earth. When you discover that you require a septic tank repair, you are forced to confront the unpleasant but unavoidable reality of having to replace this entirely necessary home waste disposal machine. Concrete septic tanks provide six distinct advantages over other types of septic tanks, which we examine in detail in this blog post. MATERIALS USED IN COMMON SEPTIC TANKS Historically, brick or stone septic systems were used to construct local septic systems.

  • Modern septic tanks are composed of either industrial plastic or precast concrete, depending on the use.
  • Because plastic tanks have a cheaper initial cost than concrete tanks, many homeowners chose this tank type without doing a thorough cost comparison.
  • The advantages of concrete over other building materials are as follows: Both types of septic tanks are capable of performing their functions, but each material has its own set of pros and disadvantages.
  • compliance with all applicable building codes and regulations All structures in the United States that are compatible with a local septic system are permitted to have a concrete tank installed.
  • It is possible that a plastic tank will not be permitted in a certain vicinity to groundwater owing to the danger of flotation and pollution.
  • INHERENT WATERTIGHTNESSConcrete is essentially waterproof, whereas plastic and fiberglass must go through additional procedures in order to be watertight at all.
  • 3.

If the tank begins to fill up too rapidly, it will need to be pumped.

4.

In certain cases, plastic tanks can endure for enough time to be considered a temporary investment, but they will most likely need to be replaced in the not-too distant future.

LOW-RISK INSTALLATION PROCESSBecause plastic septic tanks are less robust than concrete septic tanks, the machinery used to carry and install them may cause damage to the tanks.

While concrete is usually never harmed during the installation process, it may become prone to cracking in severe conditions, such as when exposed to high-pressure corrosive chemicals or when exposed to high-temperature temperatures.

There is no danger of the tank collapsing during the pumping process.

Plastic septic tanks, on the other hand, are susceptible to collapse during the pumping process.

In spite of the fact that they must be pumped several times, concrete tanks do not collapse.

Even if you are still uncertain, it is recommended that you consult with a competent septic system professional in order to make the best selection for your home.

Do you require a new septic tank? Work with Southport Concrete Corp. on your project. We provide high-quality concrete septic tanks to both residential and commercial clients in the greater Philadelphia area.

Pros and Cons of Mound Septic Systems

Posted on Thursday, October 18, 2018 by Joseph Coupal Septic mound systems are an alternative to various septic tank systems in use today. It is situated near the surface of the earth and does not make use of a container to collect garbage. This sort of septic system disposes of waste by use of sand, and the waste is then absorbed by the ground surface. There are several advantages and disadvantages to using a mound septic system. The following are the advantages and disadvantages of using a mound septic system.

Protecting the Water Table

Thursday, October 18, 2018 – Joseph Coupal Septic mound systems are an alternative to other septic tank systems in some situations. A container for the garbage is not required because it is located towards the top of the earth. Septic systems that use sand to dispose of waste will allow the waste to be absorbed by the earth. Several advantages and disadvantages of the mound septic system exist. The following are some of the advantages and disadvantages of using a mound septic tank.

Economical

The installation of a mound septic system is less difficult than the installation of other types of septic systems. Excavating the area and installing pipes and filters are the most difficult aspects of building a mound septic system. Holding tanks for other types of septic systems will be cast from concrete or metal, depending on the system. Once the holding tanks have been completely full, a professional must be called in to empty them. A mound septic system, on the other hand, does not have this problem since the waste leaches into the sand.

For the mound septic system to function properly again, the land just has to be turned over and then dug out once more.

The Mound

In terms of what it is, a mound septic system is extremely descriptive of what it is. As soon as your mound septic system has been completed, you will be left with a mound of earth that can be clearly seen from any location where it has been put. The mound can reach a height of up to five feet. Although it is feasible to landscape the mound, you will still be left with a mound to cope with in the end.

Space Limitations

One of the most significant drawbacks of using a mound septic system is the amount of area required to properly dispose of the waste. Other types of septic systems entail the installation of a big container underground and burial of the container. These systems are quite expensive to build, yet they can be installed almost anywhere without causing damage. A mound septic system does not have a container, and digging too far into the ground brings you dangerously near to the water table. As a result, rather than digging down, you will have to dig out.

This severely restricts the location of a mound septic system, much alone the possibility of having one at all.

Smell

Because most septic systems do not smell, you will not be aware that they are there in your home. While it is possible for the regular septic system container to overflow, such an occurrence is not common. Due to the fact that the mound septic system is installed on the surface, you will not be far from the sewage.

If the trash does not seep through the earth quickly enough, it will eventually make its way to the surface. Morse Engineering and Construction can provide you with further information on septic system design. Source:doityourself.com

Plastic Vs. Concrete Septic Tank

Plastic and concrete septic tank alternatives are available whether you’re installing a new septic tank or replacing an existing one, and you’ve probably seen them before. For the most part, homeowners are not overjoyed at the notion of shelling out a significant sum of money for something that essentially does nothing but handle wastewater. Although this is a significant commitment, it is not one that should be taken carelessly. They both have advantages and disadvantages, and we hope that this list will assist you in making a more informed selection.

Plastic Septic Tanks

Increasingly popular as an alternative to concrete septic tanks are plastic septic tanks. Typically, they are pre-fabricated and have an oblong oval form with ridges running around the exterior walls. They are readily available at most home improvement stores and are ready to be installed as soon as they are delivered to your residence.

Pros

They are rather light in weight due to the fact that they are composed of plastic. They typically weigh a couple hundred pounds and can be handled with relative ease by a standard pickup truck. This means that not only is installation simpler, but it also means that all of the expenditures involved with it are reduced. Simply digging a hole, positioning the tank, and connecting the tank to the rest of your system is all that is necessary. Plastic septic tanks are a more affordable option to concrete septic tanks due to the fact that they are lighter and easier to install.

Cons

Compared to concrete septic tanks, plastic septic tanks are significantly weaker. In other words, driving anything over the tank may cause it to be crushed or otherwise damaged. Plastic septic tanks are also more susceptible to environmental variables such as soil vibrations and root penetration, which can cause cracking or warping of the tank’s outside. It is possible to fix some of the damage, but depending on how severe it is, the tank may need to be replaced entirely. In order to function correctly, septic tanks must have an adequate balance of sludge (solids), effluent (water), and scum (lightweight solids) in their contents.

If too much waste accumulates inside the tank, it can cause your system to overflow and the tank to “float” to the surface of the earth, causing damage to the plumbing lines in the surrounding area.

You will need to get them cleaned on a more frequent basis in order to prevent accumulation in the system.

Concrete Septic Tanks

Septic tanks made of concrete are a more conventional alternative. You have the option of either having a pre-cast concrete septic tank supplied to your home or having a tank put in place on your property.

As soon as the prepared option is delivered, it is ready to be implemented immediately. In order to use the poured in place method, you must first dig the hole and then create a mold to shape your tank.

Pros

Concrete sewage tanks, in contrast to plastic septic tanks, are extremely long-lasting. Typically, they may be driven over without causing any damage. However, this is not true for your plumbing lines that run to or from the tank, therefore you must use caution when driving in this area of the city. Because concrete septic tanks are massive, they are capable of handling large volumes of sewage without experiencing any issues. This implies that they require less care and cleaning than plastic and can last longer between cleanings.

Cons

The weight of concrete septic tanks allows them to manage large volumes of wastewater without experiencing any issues. They require less regular maintenance and cleaning than plastic, which means they are more environmentally friendly. Environmental variables such as soil vibrations and root penetration are less likely to cause damage to concrete septic tanks than are other types of septic tanks. They are, on the other hand, more difficult to repair than plastic tanks if they are damaged or broken.

There are a variety of criteria that go into selecting which system is the greatest fit for you.

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Types of Septic Systems

Septic system design and size can differ significantly from one neighborhood to the next, as well as throughout the country, due to a variety of variables. Household size, soil type, slope of the site, lot size, closeness to sensitive water bodies, weather conditions, and even municipal ordinances are all considerations to take into consideration. The following are 10 of the most often encountered septic system configurations. It should be noted that this is not an exhaustive list; there are several additional types of septic systems.

  • Septic Tank, Conventional System, Chamber System, Drip Distribution System, Aerobic Treatment Unit, Mound Systems, Recirculating Sand Filter System, Evapotranspiration System, Constructed Wetland System, Cluster / Community System, etc.

Septic Tank

This tank is underground and waterproof, and it was designed and built specifically for receiving and partially treating raw home sanitary wastewater. Generally speaking, heavy materials settle at or near the bottom of the tank, whereas greases and lighter solids float to the surface. The sediments are retained in the tank, while the wastewater is sent to the drainfield for further treatment and dispersion once it has been treated.

Conventional System

Septic tanks and trench or bed subsurface wastewater infiltration systems are two types of decentralized wastewater treatment systems (drainfield). When it comes to single-family homes and small businesses, a traditional septic system is the most common type of system. For decades, people have used a gravel/stone drainfield as a method of water drainage. The term is derived from the process of constructing the drainfield. A short underground trench made of stone or gravel collects wastewater from the septic tank in this configuration, which is commonly used.

Effluent filters through the stone and is further cleaned by microorganisms once it reaches the soil below the gravel/stone trench, which is located below the trench.

In terms of total footprint, gravel and stone systems are very substantial, and therefore may not be appropriate for all residential sites or situations.

Chamber System

Gravelless drainfields have been regularly utilized in various states for more than 30 years and have evolved into a standard technology that has mostly replaced gravel systems. Various configurations are possible, including open-bottom chambers, pipe that has been clothed, and synthetic materials such as expanded polystyrene media. Gravelless systems can be constructed entirely of recycled materials, resulting in considerable reductions in carbon dioxide emissions during their lifetime. The chamber system is a type of gravelless system that can be used as an example.

  • The key advantage of the chamber system is the enhanced simplicity with which it can be delivered and built.
  • This sort of system is made up of a number of chambers that are connected to one another.
  • Wastewater is transported from the septic tank to the chambers through pipes.
  • The wastewater is treated by microbes that live on or near the soil.
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Drip Distribution System

An effluent dispersal system such as the drip distribution system may be employed in a variety of drainfield configurations and is very versatile. In comparison to other distribution systems, the drip distribution system does not require a vast mound of dirt because the drip laterals are only placed into the top 6 to 12 inches of soil. In addition to requiring a big dosage tank after the sewage treatment plant to handle scheduled dose delivery of wastewater to drip absorption areas, the drip distribution system has one major disadvantage: it is more expensive.

Aerobic Treatment Unit

An effluent dispersal system such as the drip distribution system may be employed in a variety of drainfield configurations and is quite inexpensive. In comparison to other distribution systems, the drip distribution system does not require a significant mound of dirt since the drip laterals are placed inside the top 6 to 12 inches of soil. In addition to requiring a big dosage tank after the sewage treatment plant to handle scheduled dose delivery of wastewater to drip absorption areas, the drip distribution system has one major disadvantage: it is more expensive than other wastewater treatment systems.

Mound Systems

Using mound systems in regions with short soil depth, high groundwater levels, or shallow bedrock might be a good alternative. A drainfield trench has been dug through the sand mound that was erected. The effluent from the septic tank runs into a pump chamber, where it is pumped to the mound in the amounts recommended.

During its release to the trench, the effluent filters through the sand and is dispersed into the native soil, where it continues to be treated. However, while mound systems can be an effective solution for some soil conditions, they demand a significant amount of land and require regular care.

Recirculating Sand Filter System

Sand filter systems can be built either above or below ground, depending on the use. The effluent is discharged from the septic tank into a pump compartment. Afterwards, it is pushed into the sand filter. The sand filter is often made of PVC or a concrete box that is filled with a sand-like substance. The effluent is pushed through the pipes at the top of the filter under low pressure to the drain. As the effluent exits the pipelines, it is treated as it passes through the sand filtering system.

However, sand filters are more costly than a standard septic system because they provide a higher level of nutrient treatment and are thus better suited for areas with high water tables or that are adjacent to bodies of water.

Evapotranspiration System

Evaporative cooling systems feature drainfields that are one-of-a-kind. It is necessary to line the drainfield at the base of the evapotranspiration system with a waterproof material. Following the entry of the effluent into the drainfield, it evaporates into the atmosphere. At the same time, the sewage never filters into the soil and never enters groundwater, unlike other septic system designs. It is only in particular climatic circumstances that evapotranspiration systems are effective. The environment must be desert, with plenty of heat and sunshine, and no precipitation.

Constructed Wetland System

Construction of a manufactured wetland is intended to simulate the treatment processes that occur in natural wetland areas. Wastewater goes from the septic tank and into the wetland cell, where it is treated. Afterwards, the wastewater goes into the media, where it is cleaned by microorganisms, plants, and other media that eliminate pathogens and nutrients. Typically, a wetland cell is constructed with an impermeable liner, gravel and sand fill, and the necessary wetland plants, all of which must be capable of withstanding the constant saturation of the surrounding environment.

As wastewater travels through the wetland, it may escape the wetland and flow onto a drainfield, where it will undergo more wastewater treatment before being absorbed into the soil by bacteria.

Cluster / Community System

In certain cases, a decentralized wastewater treatment system is owned by a group of people and is responsible for collecting wastewater from two or more residences or buildings and transporting it to a treatment and dispersal system placed on a suitable location near the dwellings or buildings. Cluster systems are widespread in settings like rural subdivisions, where they may be found in large numbers.

Concrete vs Plastic Septic Tanks: Which is Better?

The septic tank on your property is one of the most important components of the whole plumbing system on your property. Septic tanks are designed to safely handle and manage all of the wastewater generated by your property. If your septic tank is not operating properly, you should replace or repair it as soon as possible. It is possible that your septic tank is not operating properly, causing your entire plumbing system to be interrupted. This might result in you placing yourself and your family in risk, as well as causing damage to your home or garden.

There is a good probability that you will be replacing your present septic system with a new one within a few years.

This is due to the fact that the septic tank you select will be used to service your plumbing system in the future.

Septic tanks made of sorplastic.

Plastic and concrete are the two most often used materials in the construction of septic tanks. Knowing their advantages and disadvantages will assist you in selecting the one that best matches your needs and fits inside your budget. Examine the merits and cons of each of these options separately.

Plastic Septic Tanks

Advantages

  • The purchasing price of plastic septic tanks is less expensive than that of concrete septic tanks
  • Thus, they are more cheap. Plastic septic tanks are simple to install since they are lightweight
  • They take just a small number of people to complete the job and require little time and equipment. As a result, installation costs are reduced. Poly septic tanks are lightweight and versatile, making them ideal for travel. This implies that they may be placed in a variety of locations. Plastic septic tanks are waterproof and impervious to corrosion caused by water-based substances. Additionally, they are rust-resistant. Plastic tanks are less prone to cracking than cement tanks because plastic is more flexible than cement
  • As a result, a plastic septic tank does not break as often as a cement septic tank It is more sanitary to use polyethylene septic tanks than than cement tanks
  • Plastic tanks are delivered fully assembled and ready to be fitted.

Disadvantages

  • Plastic tanks are not as durable as concrete and are quickly crushed by the weight of the container. Alternatively, they might be crushed by the weight of thick dirt or by vehicles passing over the areas where they are buried. Plastic tanks are also susceptible to the environment, which means that they might burst or crack as a result of changes in soil vibrations and environmental conditions, among other things. Solid-waste disposal systems made of cement, on the other hand, are significantly less responsive to environmental changes. Plastic septic tanks are more susceptible to deterioration than cement septic tanks because they break or wrap more frequently. In comparison to cement septic tanks, plastic tanks require more care to keep them operating properly. Concrete tanks have a longer lifespan than poly septic tanks
  • Nevertheless, they are less durable. In most cases, plastic tanks have low effluent levels and will “float” if the water level in the tank is greater than typical. This “floating” can cause extensive damage to your plumbing system as well as the septic tank itself. Plastic septic tanks are not authorized for use in all states
  • However, in certain areas they are.

When subjected to heavy loads, plastic storage tanks are readily destroyed since they are not as durable as cement. Their skeletons might be crushed by the weight of thick dirt or by vehicles passing over the areas where they are buried. Furthermore, plastic tanks are highly sensitive to their surroundings, meaning that they might burst or break as a result of changes in soil vibrations and environmental conditions. Cement septic tanks, on the other hand, are far less responsive to environmental changes.

Concrete tanks have a longer lifespan than poly septic tanks, although they are less durable.

Your plumbing system, as well as the septic tank itself, might be damaged by this “floating.” There are several states where plastic septic tanks are not permitted to be used.

Concrete Septic Tanks

Advantages

  • Cement septic tanks outlast plastic tanks in terms of durability and, if maintained properly, may survive for a lengthy period of time. In the right circumstances, with regular draining and good maintenance, a cement septic tank can endure up to 40 years or more. Cement septic tanks are resistant to changes in the environment, such as tree roots or shifting soil conditions. Concrete tanks are not adversely affected by the weight that is placed on top of them. Comparing cement septic tanks to plastic septic tanks, cement tanks are far more durable and require little maintenance. The fact that concrete tanks are highly hefty and contain large effluent levels means that they are impervious to “floating.” There are no restrictions on using cement tanks in the United States
  • They are permitted in every state.

Tanks made of cement survive far longer than plastic tanks and, if maintained correctly, can last for many years. A cement septic tank may survive up to 40 years if it is regularly drained and maintained properly. Cement septic tanks are resistant to changes in the environment, such as tree roots or shifting ground conditions. The weight of the earth above concrete tanks has no negative impact on them. When opposed to plastic septic tanks, cement septic tanks are more durable and require less maintenance.

  • Concrete septic tanks are more expensive to purchase and install than plastic septic tanks, mostly due to the weight of the concrete tanks. Concrete tanks are more difficult to carry and install than plastic tanks due to the fact that they are awkward and more big in comparison. Therefore, the cementseptic tank installation necessitates the use of heavy equipment and requires a significant amount of time. Cement tanks are also more difficult to repair and install than other types of tanks. As your cement tank is broken, it is more difficult to repair it efficiently when compared to plastic tanks. Compared to plastic tanks, cement septic tanks are more prone to corrosion due to the fact that they fracture or corrode as the tanks age, particularly if they are not properly maintained.

Selecting a Septic Tank

For many homeowners in Atlanta, GA, cement is the go-to material since it is permitted in all 50 states in the United States, including Georgia. It has been a long time since cement has been the preferred building material due of its resistance to damage caused by shifting or heaviness. Plastic septic tanks, on the other hand, are less expensive than concrete septic tanks when it comes to cost comparison. It is recommended that you use a plastic tank when you live in a distant place since cement tanks cannot compete with the simplicity with which it can be installed and transported.

Septic tanks made of cement are not recommended for use in areas with significant acidity in the soil.

Despite the fact that there are several aspects to consider when deciding between a plastic and a cement septic tank, examine your location and scenario and choose the choice that feels best for your property.

We are experts in both concrete and plastic septic tanks, and we will guide you through the process of selecting the best solution for your house. For all of your septic tank system requirements, contact The Original Plumber.

Pros and Cons of Concrete Septic Tanks

Septic tanks made of concrete offer both advantages and downsides, as you can see below. For anyone considering installing a concrete tank sewage system or troubleshooting an existing one, understanding the advantages and disadvantages of this type of system is essential. Additionally, understanding the fundamentals of concrete septic tanks may go a long way toward preventing problems with your sewage line. Remember that in order to get the full benefits of owning a concrete septic tank, you must learn how to properly manage it and care for it.

  1. It’s a long-lasting product.
  2. Concrete septic tanks, in contrast to other forms of septic tanks, notably the plastic version, are constructed of a durable material that may survive for decades if properly maintained.
  3. 2.
  4. This style of septic tank has been allowed for use in the majority, if not all, of the cities and towns in the United States.
  5. This tank is quite durable, as previously said.
  6. More importantly, you may be certain that even if you bury this tank in a shallow trench, the majority of heavy equipment commonly found in houses will not be able to readily puncture this type of tank.
  7. Constructed to hold large amounts of waste.
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The Drawbacks of Concrete Septic Tanks 1.

In spite of the fact that concrete septic tanks are solid and long-lasting, they can become prone to cracking with time, especially if you use low-quality concrete to construct your tank.

It’s also worth mentioning that the covers of older tanks may not be able to be removed completely and replaced correctly.

To their credit, the quality of the modern concrete tanks available on the market now is far higher than that of the tanks created decades ago.

Increased likelihood of contamination As a result of the cracking that occurs in older concrete tanks, there is a significant risk of waste water leaking out of such tanks.

3.

The cost of a concrete tank is higher than the cost of other types of septic systems.

4. Requires a time-consuming and complicated installation It is more difficult to build a precast concrete tank because of its sheer weight. A single person could not transport the tank and install it without the assistance of heavy machinery, like as cranes and hoists, which would be impossible.

Concrete Septic Tank

The majority of septic systems make use of concrete septic tanks. One of the primary benefits they offer over fiberglass and plastic septic tanks is that, due to their greater weight, they are less prone to “floating” than the former. There is one major disadvantage to concrete septic tanks. Because they are far heavier than other types of septic tanks, they must be moved using heavy equipment. In contrast to concrete septic tanks, which normally need a vehicle equipped with a crane and boom, fiberglass and polyethylene septic tanks are quite simple to transport.

  • The structural integrity of the septic tank will determine how well it performs over the long run.
  • The sides and bottom of the tank should be poured in a single piece to ensure the greatest possible structural stability.
  • In some instances, a water seal is installed between the wall and the ceiling.
  • It is recommended that each tank be checked for watertightness and structural integrity prior to and after installation by filling the tank halfway with water.
  • This is known as hydrostatic testing.
  • Given the possibility of some water absorption in concrete tanks, it is recommended that the tank be refilled and left to stand for an additional 24 hours.
  • It is critical that the above-mentioned method be followed again once the tank has been fitted.

Typically, a 1,000-gallon minimum order is required.

It is possible for concrete septic tanks to contain one or two chambers.

Tees or baffles installed at the tank’s inflow pipe limit the flow of incoming wastes and prevent disturbance of the settled sludge, which is beneficial.

All tanks should have easily accessible lids so that the status of the baffles can be checked and the tanks may be pumped in both compartments.

Having done your study, you may have discovered that failed septic systems are a significant financial and environmental concern in the United States.

You may find news reports about failing septic systems and tighter rules at the following website:You will also be unable to sell your house if it has a failing system. More information on how to properly manage your septic system may be found at the following website:

Alternative Septic Tanks in NJ

There are a variety of situations in which using an alternate septic system is a very wise decision. If there is a problem with the density of the soil, it is possible to use this technique – whether the soil is too shallow, too solid, or too permeable. Additional options or an alternative septic system may be necessary for properties located close to a water source in order to safeguard that source according to rules if the water table is too high. Consider the case of a customer with whom we worked who was upgrading their house and obtaining the necessary permits to build an extension that included an additional bedroom and bathroom.

With reference to the present system, the issue has the potential to have an impact on the surrounding environment as well as pose a health concern to our clients.

The homeowner had a few of alternatives when it came to dealing with the problem; they could either create a mound system or attempt to establish an alternate system.

Please keep in mind that most governments are quite open to and supportive of enabling the property owner to seek an alternate system, and when well designed, they will typically give the necessary permissions and permits.)

Advantages for an alternative septic system

Unacquainted with the many types of septic systems available? If this is the case, you are not alone. Unless your property is directly linked to the sewer system, you most certainly have a septic system in place. Sewage treatment on site is accomplished by the use of natural processes in a septic system, which is a linked system of components residing under ground. Typically, a septic system is located in the yard of a homeowner. The most typical location for septic systems is in rural locations, where there is no access to a centralized town or city waste treatment facility or sewage treatment system.

Why Concrete Septic Tanks May Be Your Best Option

First and foremost, the septic system collects and dumps the waste generated by the home in the septic tank. The septic tank then separates and pre-treats the solid waste and oils from the wastewater before releasing them into the environment. Following that, most systems direct liquid wastewater from the septic tank onto a distribution network of porous pipes that branch out from the residence and septic tank and gradually discharge the wastewater into the soil. Some septic systems, rather than just discharging wastewater into the soil, employ pumps, disinfection products, an evaporation mechanism, or simply rely on gravity to funnel wastewater through sand or other organic material before releasing the effluent into the soil.

  • The total square feet of drain field area required is determined by the number of bedrooms in the house and the soil type (arid or saturated), among other factors.
  • Septic tanks are intended to serve as the initial stop in the wastewater treatment process, and they are constructed to do so.
  • The sediments remain in the tank, while the wastewater is sent to the drain field for further treatment and dispersal when it has been treated.
  • Concrete, plastic (polyethylene), and fiberglass are the three most common materials used in construction.
  • Drain fields are plots of land that have been particularly engineered to assist in the filtering and removal of pollutants from wastewater.

Perforated pipes, which are buried within the trenches, are used to disseminate the wastewater from the home in a methodical manner. A standard septic system is comprised of a septic drain field, its associated pipe system, and a septic tank.

Conventional System

The majority of traditional septic systems are situated in single-family residences or small commercial establishments. A high number of individuals in a single area is not often served by traditional systems, which are not normally designed for this purpose. A typical system consists of the following components: Sewage treatment system (Septic tank) An underground wastewater infiltration system or a gravel-filled drain field can both be used to collect wastewater. Protects the clean drain field from additional possible impurities with a strong geofabric covering.

The wastewater (also known as effluent) is routed from the septic tank to the drain field in this location.

As soon as the wastewater passes through the clean drain field, it flows into the soil where it is continuously cleaned by naturally existing bacteria as it gently trickles its way through the soil layer and into groundwater.

The disadvantage is that it is difficult to install in homes with small lots.

Chamber System

As a viable alternative to the more frequent gravel field technique, chamber systems have been in use since the 1970s. It is common to employ chamber systems in places where the water table is high, as they reduce the likelihood of poor drainage and messy back-ups. Another need for this system is a sequence of linked pipelines and chambers, with the chambers being completely enclosed by soil. The septic pipes transport wastewater from the home to the septic tank, which subsequently transports the wastewater to the chambers.

During the last stages of wastewater treatment before it is discharged into a storm drain, bacteria in the soil release the treated wastewater into the soil as it flows downward toward the groundwater table.

The disadvantage of using an extra chamber instead of a more standard drain field is that there is an increased risk of additional maintenance.

Aerobic Treatment System

Aeration of wastewater in a septic treatment tank is accomplished by the use of aerobic treatment equipment. The infused oxygen in the wastewater aids in the addition of nutrients to the wastewater as well as the efficient start of the treatment process itself. Aerobic systems are available with tanks that may be used for both pretreatment and final treatment, as well as systems with two distinct tanks for pretreatment and final treatment, among other options. The ultimate objective is to treat and disinfect in a safe and efficient manner, without causing harm.

Advantage: This is particularly useful in locations with high water tables or in areas where there is insufficient land to construct a good drain field. The disadvantage of using an aerobic system is that, like the drip distribution system, it requires regular maintenance.

Drip Distribution System

It is not necessary to install a standard gravel-based drain field since the Drip Distribution system makes use of an underground snaking system of distribution pipes that are installed near the surface of the soil. Pipe laterals for the drip distribution system are buried in shallow ground soil, generally 6 to 12 inches below the surface of the ground. Because it eliminates the requirement for a standard drain field, this technique reduces the amount of digging required and makes it easier to reach plumbing within the drain field.

A second tank, referred to as a dosage tank, is required to take wastewater after it has passed through the septic tank in order to handle this technique.

However, in order for this to happen, the dosage tank must be connected to power.

Sand Filter System

Sand filter systems allow waste water to travel from a septic tank to a pump chamber, and then from the pump chamber to the sand filtering system. Sand filter systems are used in conjunction with septic tanks. The sand filtration system is essentially a big concrete box that is filled with sand to filter out contaminants. Following a leisurely pumping operation to the top of the box, the waste water is filtered through the sand, which treats the water prior to its discharge into the soil absorption region (see illustration).

Cons: Frequent maintenance is required.

Evapotranspiration System

In contrast to conventional septic systems, the Evapotranspiration System’s drain field is housed in a closed, waterproof field that is covered with layers of gravel and sand to keep out the elements. Once the wastewater has passed through the septic tank and into the waterproof drain field, it begins to evaporate slowly. It is important to note that, unlike other septic systems, the effluent never filters into the soil. When compared to the alternatives, the ease of installation, maintenance, and use is superior.

Benefits: The ease of use is excellent, and the difficulty of installation and maintenance is minimal.

Mound System

The mound system consists of the construction of a big sand mound that serves as a drain field. A controlled flow of wastewater is maintained throughout its journey from the septic tank to a chamber where it is pushed through to the mound. After flowing through a mound trench and percolating through the sand, the wastewater eventually trickles into the ground. Among those who live in rural locations where there is a lot of land but little absorbent soil, the mound system is a popular alternative.

Cons: It takes up a lot of room and requires a lot of upkeep.

In any case, count on having your septic tank examined once per year and pumping it at least once every six months, regardless of the system you have in place. Solid waste matter can block the pump and cause damage to the drain field if it is not pumped on a regular basis.

Garbage Disposal With Septic

Unless you reside in a septic-equipped home, it is better not to have a trash disposal. The increased volume of solid waste material will necessitate more frequent septic tank pumping and may erode the drain field, resulting in sewage back-ups in the future. Those who live in homes with septic systems may find that they must be extra cautious about what they flush down the toilet. Certain common home objects, when flushed down a toilet connected to a septic system, can create clogs, backups, and even damage to the system, resulting in not only discomfort and aggravation, but also a significant financial burden.

Chemicals may cause significant damage to and contamination of surface and groundwater, which can result in disease or even death in animals and people who consume the water.

Pesticides Oils Chemicals used in photography

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