Who To Call To Look At Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

Just call your county health department! Check with your local health department to see if they have a property survey map and septic tank map.

  • If the liquid level in the tank is high (near or at the top of the tank), then you need to call a septic contractor. A normal level indicates a clog between the cleanout and the tank—work for a plumber. If you can’t find the cleanout or open the tank to check the liquid level, then it’s not possible to be sure who to call.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

How do you check for septic tank problems?

8 Signs of Septic System Failure

  1. Septic System Backup.
  2. Slow Drains.
  3. Gurgling Sounds.
  4. Pool of Water or Dampness Near Drainfield.
  5. Nasty Odors.
  6. Unusual, Bright Green Grass Above Drainfield.
  7. Blooms of Algae in Nearby Water.
  8. High Levels of Coliform in Water Well.

Who is responsible for maintaining a septic tank?

You have a legal and social responsibility to maintain your septic system in good working order. A neglected septic tank is a serious health risk and causes harm to the environment. Your tank will have to be emptied (de-sludged) less often, saving you money. If the system fails it will be expensive to repair.

Do plumbers handle septic tanks?

Plumbers specialize in the piping system throughout your house. Working with your home’s water supply, they can install or repair pipes, faucets, garbage disposals, toilets, and water heaters. Septic companies, on the other hand, deal with the septic system outside of your home.

How do you find a buried septic tank?

Tips for locating your septic tank

  1. If the septic tank lid is underground, you can use a metal detector to locate it.
  2. You can use a flushable transmitter that is flushed in the toilet and then the transmitter is tracked with a receiver.

How do I know if my house has a septic tank?

One way to determine whether or not your home has a septic system or is served by the public sewer system is to look at your water bill. If you are using a septic system for wastewater management, then you’re likely to see a charge of $0 for wastewater or sewer services from the utility company.

Is my septic tank full or clogged?

If the septic tank is completely clogged, water will back up into the house quickly. If the septic tank is only partially clogged, the drains will become slow as the water struggles to wind its way down into the septic tank.

How can you tell if your septic tank is leaking?

Signs of Septic Tank Problems

  1. Foul Odor. If you smell sewer gases, this may mean that one of the system’s lids is either damaged or out of position.
  2. Lush Vegetation.
  3. Soggy Yard.
  4. Standing Water Around Septic Tank.
  5. Toilets or Sinks Are Backing up or Slow to Drain.
  6. Alarm Sounds.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

Do I have to replace my septic tank by 2020?

Under the new rules, if you have a specific septic tank that discharges to surface water (river, stream, ditch, etc.) you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

Do septic tanks need servicing?

Septic tanks should be inspected every 1 to 3 years. Whenever you move into a home with a septic tank, the tank should be pumped and inspected. Septic Tank maintenance is important because continued neglect of a tank may result in system failure or the need for replacement of the soil absorption area.

Who pays to empty septic tank?

It is not unusual for the tenant (you) to be responsible for the upkeep of the tank. That is, you will be responsible for ensuring you maintain the septic system and pay for pump-outs. This is, generally speaking, perfectly normal.

Is septic same as sewer?

The main difference between a septic system and a sewer system is, a septic system treats your wastewater on site. Usually, it’s placed underground on the land your house is built on. Sewer systems take the wastewater away from your home and route it underground to a treatment plant typically operated by the city.

Is it plumbing or septic?

A plumber usually deals with pipes that bring clean water into your home and wastewater out. Also, water leaks, toilets, faucets, and fixtures. A septic service deals with all the components of the septic system. From the plumbing that handles the waster water, filters, tank, and drain field.

What do septic field lines do?

Septic Fields Distribute Liquid Effluent The pipe or the galleries are placed in a bed of gravel that helps disperse the liquid. As the effluent percolates through it, the soil absorbs residual bacteria and particles so that by the time the water reaches the aquifer deeper underground, it’s pure enough to drink.

How To Find My Septic Tank

  1. What is a septic tank
  2. How do I know if I have a septic tank
  3. And how do I know if I have a septic tank Identifying the location of your septic tank is critical for several reasons. The Best Way to Find a Septic Tank
  4. What to Do Once You’ve Discovered Your Septic Tank

You may have fallen in love with your new house because of its appealing good looks and characteristics, but there is almost certainly more to your new home than meets the eye. In many cases, the characteristics that make your house run more effectively and allow you to live a pleasant, contemporary life are not readily apparent. Septic tanks, for example, are an important part of your home’s infrastructure. A septic system is responsible for regulating and managing the wastewater generated by your home.

“How can I locate my septic tank?” is one of the most often requested inquiries we receive.

When your tank’s lid is difficult to locate – especially if you are not the original homeowner – you may be at a loss for what to do or where to look for the lid when you need it.

The majority of the time, all of the components of the septic tank are buried between four inches and four feet below ground level.

In order to do so, it is necessary to first comprehend the functions of septic tanks and septic systems and why it is important to know where yours is located.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Your septic tank’s location is not a closely guarded secret. There will be a method for you to locate it and make a note of its position for future reference, and below are a few examples of such methods.

What Is a Septic Tank?

Having a functioning septic tank is an important aspect of having an effective septic system. In the United States, around 20% of households utilize a septic system to handle their wastewater. Houses in rural parts of New England are the most likely to have a septic system, with residences in the Eastern United States being the most prevalent location for septic systems. When there are few and far between residences, it is typically more efficient and cost-effective to employ a septic system to manage wastewater rather than relying on a public sewage system to handle waste water.

Typically, a septic tank is a container that is waterproof and composed of a material such as concrete, polyethylene, fiberglass, or a combination of these.

An important function of a septic tank is to hold on to wastewater until any particulates in the water separate themselves from the water.

Any liquid that remains in the tank eventually drains into a leach field or a drainfield, where it is known as “effluent.” The dirt in the leach field aids in the filtering of the water and the removal of bacteria, viruses, and other pollutants that may be present in it.

Septic tanks erected in Onondaga County must contain input and outlet baffles, as well as an effluent filter or sanitary tees, in order to effectively separate particles from liquids during the treatment process.

How Do I Know If I Have a Septic Tank?

What is the best way to tell if your home has a septic tank? There are generally a few of different methods to tell. Examining your water bill might help you identify whether or not your house is served by a septic system or is part of the public sewage system in your neighborhood. If you have a septic system for wastewater management, you are likely to receive a charge from the utility provider for wastewater or sewer services of zero dollars. In the case of those who are fortunate enough to have a septic system, it is likely that they may not receive any water bills at all.

  1. A lack of a meter on the water line that enters your property is typically indicative of the fact that you are utilizing well water rather than public utility water, according to the National Association of Realtors.
  2. A septic system is likely to be installed in your home if you reside in a rather rural location.
  3. Septic systems are likely to be installed in all of these buildings, which means your home is likely to be as well.
  4. When a septic tank is present, it is common to find a mound or tiny hill on the property that is not a natural structure.
  5. Checking your property records is a foolproof method of determining whether or not your home is equipped with a septic system.

Why It’s Important to Know the Location of Your Septic Tank

You might wonder why you should bother trying to discover out where your septic tank is. There are several important reasons for this:

1. To Be Able to Care for It Properly

The first reason you should try to locate your septic tank is that knowing where it is will help you to properly repair and care for it in the future. The standard guideline is to avoid erecting structures or placing heavy objects on top of the septic tank. It’s possible that you don’t want to park your car or truck on top of it, and you don’t want visitors to your house to park their cars on top of it, either. Due to the weight of the automobiles, there is a possibility that the tank would collapse due to excessive pressure.

2. If You Want to Landscape or Remodel Your Property

If you want to build an addition to your home or perform some landscaping around your property, you will need to know where your septic tank is located. Nothing with deep or lengthy roots should be planted on top of or in the area of your tank, since this can cause problems. If roots are allowed to grow into the pipes of your septic system, it is conceivable that your system will get clogged. When you know where the tank is going to be, you may arrange your landscaping such that only shallow-rooted plants, such as grass, are in close proximity to the tank.

For starters, the tank’s weight might lead it to collapse due to the weight of the construction. A second issue is that getting access to the tank becomes more difficult if a permanent building has been constructed on top of it.

3. If a Problem With Your Tank Occurs

Knowing where your tank is buried might also assist you in identifying problems as soon as they arise. Consider the following scenario: you wake up one morning and see that there is flooding or ponding water in the region surrounding your septic tank – a sign that your system is overwhelmed and that an excessive amount of water is being utilized all at once.

4. Ease of Getting It Fixed

Once you have determined the location of your sewer system, you can quickly send a plumber to it in the event that something goes wrong with the system, saving everyone both time and money. Get in Touch With A Plumber Right Away

1. Use a Septic Tank Map

First and foremost, make use of a road map. Using a map is frequently the quickest and most convenient alternative. Most counties keep records of the installation of septic tanks at all of their residents’ residences. These maps should include schematics that illustrate the specific placement of the tank on the land, as well as measurements that allow you to measure and locate the tank’s exact location on the property. Never mind that landmarks may shift over time depending on when the tank was built, so if there are a few more shrubs or a tree nearby, don’t rule out that location as a possibility.

  • If you are unable to locate a map or other paperwork that identifies the location of your septic tank, there are a few locations to try to see if you can obtain a map of the area.
  • The county health department is responsible for keeping track of septic systems.
  • A septic tank’s position could be depicted on a survey map, for example.
  • The creation of your own map and documentation may be worthwhile if you cannot locate a map or blueprint of your property and nothing appears to be on file regarding it at the county health department or another municipal agency.

2. Follow the Pipes to Find Your Septic Tank

Whether or not there is an existing map of your septic tank on file, or whether or not you choose to develop one for future reference or for future homeowners, you will still need to track down and find the tank. One method of accomplishing this is to follow the sewer lines that lead away from your residence. The septic tank is situated along the sewage line that goes from your home and into the yard, as we’re sure you’re aware. Find a four-inch sewer pipe in your basement or crawl space. This is the line that will lead to your septic system and should be accessible from the ground level.

  1. In general, though, you’re searching for a pipe with a diameter of four inches or more that leaves your home via a basement wall or ceiling.
  2. By inserting a thin metal probe (also known as a soil probe) into the earth near the sewage line, you can track the pipe’s location.
  3. The majority of septic tanks are located between 10 and 25 feet away from your home, and they cannot be any closer than five feet.
  4. Going via the sewage line itself is another method of locating the septic tank utilizing it.
  5. Drain snakes are typically used to unclog clogs in toilets and drains, and they may be used to do the same thing.
  6. When the snake comes to a complete halt, it has almost certainly reached the tank.
  7. While drawing the snake back, make a note of how far it has been extended and whether it has made any bends or turns.
  8. When looking for your septic tank, you may use a transmitter that you flush down the toilet and it will direct you straight to the tank.

If you only want to keep an eye on the condition of your tank and don’t need to dig it up and inspect it, you may thread a pipe camera into the sewer pipe to see what’s happening.

3. Inspect Your Yard

Septic tanks are designed to be as unobtrusive as possible when they are erected. With the passage of time, and the growth of the grass, it might be difficult to discern the visual indications that indicated the exact location of your septic tank’s installation. However, this does not rule out the possibility of finding evidence that will take you to the location of your septic tank in the future. First and foremost, you want to rule out any potential locations for your septic tank, such as:

  • Under a road or similar paved surface, for example. Right up against the house (the tank must be at least five feet away)
  • Directly in front of the home Immediately adjacent to your well (if you have one)
  • In close proximity to trees or densely planted regions
  • In the shadow of a patio, deck, or other building
See also:  How Do I Clean The Septic Line Going Into The Tank? (Solution)

Once you’ve ruled out any potential locations for your tank, it’s time to start hunting for indications as to where it may be hiding in plain sight. Keep your eyes peeled as you go about your property, looking for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground tank. When looking at your property, you could see a hill or mound on the ground, which is frequently an indication that there is a septic tank nearby. One further item to consider while searching for the right septic tank for your home is the amount of grass or other foliage in your yard.

Alternatively, if the tank was not adequately buried, you may observe a “bald patch,” which is an area where the grass is struggling to grow in the vicinity.

4. Talk to Your Neighbors

If your neighbors have septic systems as well, they may be able to assist you in locating your tank. Inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tanks in relation to their residences. Having a polite conversation with your neighbors regarding septic systems not only provides you with a means to figure out where yours is, but it may also serve as a friendly introduction to the other residents of your community.

5. Look for Your Septic Tank Lid

It is only the first step in the process to discover where your septic tank is located. After you’ve located your tank, the following step is to locate the lid. You can locate it with the help of your soil probe. The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around five feet by eight feet. The perimeter of the tank should be marked with a probe once it has been probed around. A shallow excavation with a shovel within the tank’s perimeter and near the center (or broken into halves for a two compartment tank) should show the position of the lid or lids if you are unable to feel them by probing.

The tank itself is likely to be filled with foul-smelling vapors, if not potentially hazardous ones.

What to Do After You Find Your Septic Tank

Once you’ve determined where your tank is, it’s time to bring in the specialists. Trust us when we say that opening a septic tank is not something that just anybody wants to undertake. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy and must be lifted using special lifting gear in order to be removed. Since the vapors are potentially dangerous due to the contents of the tank, please respect our advice and refrain from attempting to open the tank yourself. An exposed septic tank can be hazardous to anybody wandering around your property’s perimeter, and if someone were to fall into it, it might be lethal owing to the toxicity of the sewage in the tank.

However, before you send in a team of experienced plumbers, there are a few things you can do to ensure that others do not experience the same difficulty locating the tank and to make locating the tank in the future easier.

1. Mark Its Location

The likelihood is that you will not want to post a large sign in your yard that reads “Septic Tank Here!” but you will want to leave some sort of marking so that you can quickly locate the tank and lid when you need them. In an ideal situation, the marker will be substantial enough that it will not blow away in the wind and will not be readily moved by children who are playing in the yard. A patio paver, a potted plant, or a decorative gnome or rock are just a few of the possibilities. In addition to putting a physical sign beside the septic tank, you may draw a map or layout of the area around it to illustrate its position.

2. Take Care of Your Septic Tank

Taking proper care of your tank may save you hundreds of dollars over the course of its lifetime. The expense of maintaining your system could be a few hundred dollars every few years, but that’s a lot less than the thousands of dollars it might cost to repair or replace a damaged tank or a malfunctioning septic system. Two strategies to take better care of your septic tank and system are to avoid utilizing your drain pipes or toilets as garbage cans and to use less water overall. Things like paper towels, face wipes, and cat litter should not be flushed down the toilet since they are not designed to be flushed.

In addition, installing low-flow faucets and high-efficiency toilets can help you reduce the amount of water used in your home.

For example, you don’t want to be washing load after load of laundry or running your clothes washer at the same time as your dishwasher all at the same time.

Call a Professional Plumber

Maintenance of a septic system is not normally considered a do-it-yourself activity. In the Greater Syracuse region, whether your septic tank requires pumping out or cleaning, or if you want to replace your tank, you should use the services of a reputable plumbing firm to do the job right. If you’ve attempted to locate your septic tank on your own and are still unsure of its position, it may be necessary to enlist the assistance of a professional local plumber. Our team at Mr. Rooter Plumbing of Greater Syracuse can assist you with locating, maintaining, or replacing your home’s sewage tank.

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Looking for Your Septic Tank? Here’s How to Find It

“It’s 9 o’clock, do you know where your septic tank is?” says the interrogator. Maybe this is a little over the top, but it’s a question that many of our clients have asked over the years. In particular, new homeowners who are unfamiliar with the inner workings of their home or who haven’t needed septic tank servicing yet should be aware of the risks involved.

Knowing where your septic tank is located is essential for routine maintenance and when you wish to add additional landscaping to your property. If you’re looking for a tank, we have some suggestions that may be of assistance.

Why you need to know where your septic tank is located

If your house does not have access to municipal sewage services, it is almost inevitable that you have a septic tank to redirect and store all of your wastewater someplace on your property’s subterranean drainage system. While a septic system is trustworthy and cost-effective, it does not operate without some kind of upkeep. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, a septic tank should be examined at least once every three years and drained every three to five years at the absolute least.

In either of these scenarios, you’ll need to know the location of your septic tank so that you can arrange for it to be serviced.

How to find your septic tank

  1. Inquire with your neighbors– If you have a septic tank, it’s possible that your neighbors have, too. Perhaps you’ll be fortunate enough to come across someone who knows where your tank is or who can assist you in narrowing down your search
  2. Obtain information from public records– It is possible that your local county or municipality has an existing septic tank map on file, which contains a schematic and the measurements of your property. Examine the home inspection report you received when you purchased your house to see if there is any mention of the presence of a septic tank and the location of the tank before going to your local records office. Start in the basement and discover the sewer pipe that leaves the house if you have to locate the tank by yourself. Pipe with a diameter of four inches is usual for this application. After that, go outside and around to the opposite side of the wall. Then, using a metal soil probe to poke small holes in various locations around your property, trace the pipe’s course until you reach the tank. When you strike the flat top surface of the tank with the probe, you’ll notice a distinct change. Consider your surroundings– If you have a huge property, locating a needle in a haystack might seem like a daunting task. To make your search more efficient, you can eliminate locations near structures, paved surfaces, the water well, and, ideally, regions with extensive trees or landscaping from consideration. Another possibility is that you may notice a patch of grass that is a little greener or that is growing more quickly around the tank. Locate the septic tank lid– Regardless of how you pinpoint the position of the tank, you may need to perform a little digging in order to expose the lid. You may use the soil probe to determine the perimeter of the tank – most tanks will be around 5 7 feet in length and width. As soon as you’ve outlined the edges, start shoveling in the middle and working your way around the perimeter until you reach the lid. However, unless you’re servicing the tank immediately away, there’s no reason to lift the top and let the noxious odors out into the environment.

If you have a septic tank, it’s possible that your neighbors have one as well, so ask around. Perhaps you’ll be fortunate enough to come across someone who knows where your tank is or who can assist you in narrowing your search. Public records may have a septic tank map of your land that contains a schematic and the measurements of your property. Check with your local county or municipality. Take a look at the home inspection report from when you purchased the house to see if there is any mention of a septic tank and where it is located before travelling to your local records office.

  • The diameter of this pipe is usually four inches.
  • Trace the course of the pipe until you reach the tank by poking tiny holes in the earth with a metal soil probe.
  • To make your search more efficient, you can eliminate places near structures, paved surfaces, the water well, and, ideally, regions with large trees or landscaping from your list of possibilities.
  • Identifying the location of the septic tank lid may need some digging to locate the tank’s lid, no matter how well you pinpointed its location.
  • Once you’ve outlined the edges, start shoveling in the middle and working your way around the perimeter until you reach the top of the container.
  • The post was published on July 16, 2019 under the category Septic Tank System.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

It may seem impossible to imagine that one of the largest and most visible elements of your whole plumbing system is also one of the most difficult to locate, but when your property is served by a septic system, this is perfectly true. A strong explanation for this is because septic tanks are huge, unattractive, stink horrible and give off an unwarranted impression of dirt. Not only does burying them underground assist to prevent them from harm, but it also provides you with additional useable space on your property and conceals what would otherwise be a blight on your landscape.

This site is dedicated to assisting you in locating your septic system without the need for any time-consuming digging.

How To Find A Septic Tank: Step By Step

It is critical to maintain the health of your septic tank since it is responsible for securely storing and handling the wastewater that drains from your house. It is necessary to pump your septic tank once every 1-3 years, depending on the number of people living in your household and the size of your tank, in order to avoid septic tank repairs or early failure, which means you must be familiar with the location of your tank. It’s not often simple to identify your septic tank, and many plumbers charge extra for this service, which is especially true if your tank’s lid is buried beneath.

1. Gather Some Helpful Tools

Septic tank location may be made much easier with the use of several simple instruments and techniques. To locate your septic tank, you only need to know the following information: Septic tank location may be made much easier with the use of many instruments. To locate your septic tank, you only need to know the following information.

2. Use a Septic Tank Map

If you are a new homeowner who is trying to figure out where your septic tank is, a septic tank map should be included in your inspection documentation. You can use this information to assist you in pinpointing the exact position of your storage tank. If you don’t have access to this map, there are a few of additional strategies you might employ.

See also:  When Should I Clean My Septic Tank? (Correct answer)

3. Start Ruling Areas Out

The location of a septic tank cannot be constructed in specific areas due to the risk of causing major damage to your property or tank, as specified by local rules. Your septic tank will not be affected by the following:

  • Immediately adjacent to your well
  • Beneath your home
  • Directly against your home
  • For example, underneath your driveway
  • Under trees
  • And other locations. Structures like a patio or deck are good examples of this.

4. Inspect Your Property

If you take a hard look around your land, there’s a high possibility you’ll be able to locate your septic tank without having to do any probing whatsoever. In many circumstances, a septic tank may be identified by a slight dip or slope on your land that cannot be explained by any other means. Due to the fact that the hole that your contractors excavated for your septic tank may not have been exactly the proper size, they proceeded to install the tank anyhow. This is a rather regular occurrence.

When there is a minor divot or depression, it indicates that the hole was too large and that your contractors simply did not fill the depression to level the hole.

The likelihood of your septic tank being discovered in a few specific locations is quite high.

  • Your water well, if you have one (for a variety of reasons that are rather clear)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a driveway, sidewalk, or patio unless they were added after the home was built and no one conducted a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built If there is any particular landscaping

5. Inspect Your Yard

A comprehensive investigation of your yard may be necessary to discover your septic tank considerably more quickly in some cases.

The following are important items to check for in your yard:

  • If your septic tank is overfilled, sewage can leak out into the ground and function as fertilizer for your lawn, resulting in lush green grass. A area of grass that is very lush and green is a good sign that your septic tank is just beneath it
  • Puddles that don’t make sense: If your septic tank is seriously overfilled, it is possible that water will pool on your grass. Another telltale indicator that your septic tank is below ground level is an unexplainable pool of water. Ground that is uneven: When installing septic tanks, it is possible that the contractors will mistakenly create high or low patches on your grass. If you come across any uneven terrain, it’s possible that your septic tank is right there.

The metal soil probe can let you find out for certain whether or not your septic tank is located in a certain area of your yard or not. As soon as your metal soil probe makes contact with the tank, you may use your shovel to dig out the grass surrounding it and discover the septic tank lid.

6. Follow Your Sewer Main/Sewer Pipes

Following your sewage lines is one of the most straightforward methods of locating your septic tank. These pipes have a diameter of roughly 4 inches and are commonly found in the basement or crawlspace of your house. They are not dangerous. Following the pipes from your house out into your yard, using your metal soil probe every 2 feet or so until you reach the tank, is a simple process once they are located. Aside from that, every drain in your home is connected to your sewage main, which in turn is connected to your septic tank.

The likelihood that one of your major sewer lines is located in your basement or crawlspace is high if you have exposed plumbing lines in your basement or crawlspace.

If the line is labeled, it is usually made of plastic or rubber.

7. Check Your Property Records

Lastly, if all else fails, a search of your property’s public records will almost certainly reveal the location of the tank you’re looking for. Your builders most likely secured a permit for your property because septic systems are required to be installed by law in every state. In order to do so, they had to develop a thorough plan that depicted your property as well as the exact location where they intended to construct the tank. This is done to ensure that the local health department is aware of the tank and is prepared to deal with any issues that may arise as a result of its presence.

If you look hard enough, you may be able to locate the original building records for your home without ever having to get in your car or visit your local records center.

What to Do Once You Find Your Septic Tank

Upon discovering the position of your septic tank, you should mark its location on a map of your property. Use something to indicate the location of your lid, such as an attractive garden item that can’t be changed, to help you locate it. A birdbath, a rock, or a potted plant are just a few of the possibilities.

You are now ready to arrange your septic tank inspection and pumping service. Contact us now! If you have any more concerns regarding how to locate your septic tank, or if you want septic tank servicing, please contact The Plumbing Experts at (864) 210-3127 right now!

Plumber Or Septic Tank Company? Who Should I Call?

Upon discovering the position of your septic tank, you should mark the site on a map of your property. A ornamental garden element that can’t be readily relocated should also be used to designate the location of the lid when it’s closed. A birdbath, a rock, or a potted plant are just a few examples of what you might use. The time has come for you to arrange for a septic tank checkup and pumping service. Call The Plumbing Experts at (864) 210-3127 if you have any more concerns about how to locate your septic tank or if you want septic tank servicing right away.

Count How Many Drains Are Backed Up

It’s possible that you initially noticed the problem in the kitchen sink, but are there any other fixtures that are clogging up with water? Check all of the toilets, sinks, and bathtubs in the house to see if any of them are experiencing the same problem as the one you are experiencing. If numerous fixtures are clogged at the same time, the septic tank is most likely the source of the problem. If only one fixture is clogged, it is generally best to call a plumber for assistance. However, if the problems are located on the ground level or in close proximity to the septic tank, it may still be a septic problem.

How Old Is The Septic System?

The septic system in your home degrades with time, just like any other component of your property. You should anticipate your septic system to last roughly 25 years on average, but this can vary depending on a variety of factors such as consumption, household size, and whether or not periodic maintenance has been conducted. It’s generally best to hire a plumber if the septic tank is brand new and hasn’t been used yet. If the tank, on the other hand, is ancient, it may be necessary to contact a septic firm.

Check The Septic System Cleanout

The small PVC pipe between your house and the tank should be visible, and it should either stand out slightly or be level with the ground to determine if the septic system cleanout is in working order. Pulling off the cap and peering into the cleanout will reveal the following: If there is no standing water, it is likely that there is a problem between the cleanout and the home, and a plumber should be hired to resolve the problem. Standing water can indicate one of two things: either there is a blockage between the cleanout and the tank (in which case a plumber should be called), or the septic tank is overflowing (call a septic company).

Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service offers a homeowner’s guide to septic systems that include further professional recommendations.

How to Care for Your Septic System

Septic system maintenance is neither difficult or expensive, and it does not have to be done frequently.

The maintenance of a vehicle is comprised of four major components:

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order. Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract.

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Everything that goes down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet, ground up in the trash disposal, or poured down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system, which is where it belongs. What you flush down the toilet has an impact on how effectively your septic system functions.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system. A simple rule of thumb is to never flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Cooking grease or oil
  • Wipes that are not flushable, such as baby wipes or other wet wipes
  • Photographic solutions
  • Feminine hygiene items Condoms
  • Medical supplies such as dental floss and disposable diapers, cigarette butts and coffee grounds, cat litter and paper towels, pharmaceuticals, and household chemicals such as gasoline and oil, insecticides, antifreeze, and paint or paint thinners

Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed!

Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.
See also:  How To Empty Mobile Home Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed. Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Over time, all septic tanks become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to continue functioning properly. Septic tank lids are frequently located at ground level. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. In the event that you have recently purchased a property and are unsure as to where your septic tank is located, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank. Noteworthy: While every property is unique, septic tanks are usually typically huge and difficult to build.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the municipal records. The most straightforward method of locating your septic tank is to review the building plans for your home that were approved by the local government. You should have received an application from the business that installed the septic tank, which should contain schematics and specifications that will help you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was installed. 2. Look for highs and lows in your data. The majority of septic tanks are constructed in such a way that they are barely noticeable.

  1. 3.
  2. Almost usually, your septic tank will be constructed near where the main sewage line exits your property.
  3. Septic tanks are typically positioned between ten and twenty-five feet away from a home’s foundation.
  4. When you do, that’s when your septic tank comes into play!
  5. Look for the Lid.
  6. You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and installed after 1975.
  7. Those areas should be excavated in order to disclose the lids.
  8. Get in touch with the pros.
  9. Lifting concrete lids will necessitate the use of specialized equipment.
  10. A fall into an unprotected septic tank has the potential to be lethal.
  11. Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you may file away with your other important house paperwork.

That’s all there is to it! If you’ve been wondering where your septic tank is, you now have five alternatives to choose from, which should make finding it easier than ever. To book a plumbing service in Bastrop County, please contact us now!

How Do I Find My Septic Tank

What is the location of my septic tank? Natalie Cooper is a model and actress who has appeared in a number of films and television shows. 2019-10-24T 02:52:07+10:00

How Do I Find My Septic Tank

What Is the Best Way to Locate My Sewer Tank? Natalie Cooper is a model and actress who has been in a number of movies and television shows. 2019-10-24T 02:52:07+10:00

How Can I Find My Septic Tank?

According to standard guidelines, the septic tank should be positioned close to the home, preferably on the same side of the house as the toilet. It can be found on the grass or within a garden bed, depending on its location. Going outdoors to the same side of the home as the toilet and performing a visual check of the septic tank is a smart first step to taking in order to discover where your septic tank is. The location of the toilets from outside can be determined if you are unfamiliar with the location of the toilets (for example, if you are looking to purchase a property).

Unfortunately, the position of septic tanks can vary widely and is not always easily discernible from the surrounding landscape.

In cases where the septic tank is no longer visible, it is likely that it has become overgrown with grass, has been buried in a garden or has had a garden built over it, that an outdoor area has been added and the septic tank has been paved over, or that a deck has been constructed on top of the tank.

  • They should indicate the position of your septic tank, as well as the location of your grease trap and greywater tank, if any.
  • Alternatively, if we have previously serviced the property for a different owner, our helpful office staff can examine our records to see if there are any notes pertaining to the site.
  • A specific gadget is used to locate the location of the septic tank, and our professional will mark the location of the tank so that it may be exposed and cleaned out.
  • Using an electronic service locator, you may locate a septic tank.
  • In the event that you’re not experiencing any problems, the toilets are flushing normally, and there are no foul odors, you may ponder whether it’s best to leave things alone rather than attempting to locate and unburden a hidden septic tank.
  • Although you could wait until there is a problem, this would almost certainly result in a significant amount of additional charges.
  • Does it make sense for me to have many toilets and also multiple septic tanks?

It is decided by the number of bedrooms, which in turn determines the number of people who are anticipated to reside in the house, that the size of the septic tank should be. The following is the relationship between septic tank volumes and the number of bedrooms:

  • There are three sizes of sewer tanks available: 3000L for three bedrooms, 3500L for four bedrooms, and 4000L for five bedrooms.

The most typical septic tank size is 1600L, although there are also some 3000L septic tanks available on the market. It is possible to have septic tanks with capacities as large as 3500L or 4000L, although they are not as popular, and most residences that require these capacities have numerous septic tanks in order to meet the septic litre requirements for each bedroom. Using the septic tank lid as a test, you may quickly determine whether all of the toilets in your home are linked to the same septic tank.

Check the rest of the toilets in the home by repeating the procedure.

Please call us immediately to have your septic tank pumped out or to schedule a free septic tank test when we are next in your area.

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8 Signs of Septic System Failure

Septic tanks are an important resource for both homeowners and the surrounding community. Its goal is to store domestic wastewater in an underground chamber where it may be treated at a basic level. They are generally composed of plastic, fiberglass, and concrete and serve as a sewage disposal system for the home or business owner. Sewage can leak underground and move upward in the earth if a septic unit fails, which can cause flooding. Not only may this result in serious plumbing issues, but it can also pose a health threat over time.

If that’s the case, these are the eight indicators of a failing septic system.

1. Septic System Backup

Everything that has to do with plumbing in your home is tied to your septic system. Sewage and wastewater will no longer be able to enter the tank if your septic system malfunctions or becomes overburdened. Instead, it will remain in the pipes until it begins to rise to the surface again. Sewage and wastewater back up into sinks, drains, and even into your toilet as a result of this condition. A clogged septic tank is the most obvious indicator of a failing system. You should contact a qualified plumber as soon as you discover this symptom to get it repaired.

2. Slow Drains

Slow drainage might also be caused by a clogged septic tank. For example, if a septic tank is completely filled, it will no longer actively collect wastewater from the ground. This implies that your pipes will become blocked with sewage and will be unable to drain your plumbing appliances properly. Your drains will become naturally sluggish in draining water or other liquids, as a result of this phenomenon. Even if you utilize the best gear available to unclog your drain, you will not be successful since the fundamental problem is located in the septic tank.

Having slow drains is the first sign of an imminent septic system backup, which occurs when your drains cease to function at all and wastewater backs up into your home.

3. Gurgling Sounds

When using plumbing appliances, you should also be on the lookout for any unusual sounds that may occur. For example, if you flush your toilet and hear strange gurgling sounds, you should call a plumber right once to assess the situation. Toilets generally emit water-related sounds that subside once the flushing cycle is completed. If, on the other hand, you hear sounds that sound like an upset stomach, you may have a serious problem. If you are hearing gurgling noises coming from your drains, the same logic applies.

4. Pool of Water or Dampness Near Drainfield

It is no longer possible to absorb wastewater in a septic tank when it is damaged or fails. This indicates that wastewater will naturally seep out of the earth as a result of the groundwater table. It has the potential to create a significant pool of wastewater near the drain field, as well as cause dampness in the same area. These are the most obvious indications of a failing septic system, and they should not be ignored. A pool of water near the drainfield will often appear as if it has been raining on your lawn for an extended period of time.

If you have reason to believe that your septic tank is full or broken, make a point of actively looking for these signs.

5. Nasty Odors

One such tell-tale indicator of a failing septic system is the development of foul odors near the drainfield and plumbing equipment. If you notice strong and nasty scents when you walk outdoors and tread onto your grass, it is possible that your septic tank has failed. If the bad aromas emanating from your house are the same as those emanating from the office, you can reach a similar conclusion. It is likely that sewage has entered your home through the drainfield and into your main drain line, resulting in these foul odors.

6. Unusual, Bright Green Grass Above Drainfield

Have you ever seen people applying mulch, fertilizers, and manure to their lawns in order to encourage it to grow more quickly? It is possible that sewage has the same features as manure, namely that it contains nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus, and micronutrients that plants can use to thrive. When you see exceptionally green grass near your drainfield, it is likely that wastewater is leaking into your lawn from the drainfield itself. Due to the fact that grass is naturally green, identifying this symptom might be difficult.

Pay close attention to your drainfield in order to identify this problem before it becomes too serious.

7. Blooms of Algae in Nearby Water

If you live near a body of water, such as a lake or pond, keep an eye out for sudden algal blooms that appear out of nowhere. Due to the fact that most people consider the presence of algae to be a normal occurrence, diagnosing this symptom can also be difficult.

Algal blooms, on the other hand, occur when a large concentration of algae forms in a body of water. They appear to be unnatural and to be the result of excessive algae contamination in the water. When wastewater is present, it can contribute to the growth of algae that is abnormal.

8. High Levels of Coliform in Water Well

A neighboring water well may also be able to identify abnormal amounts of coliform bacteria as well as high quantities of nitrogen dioxide (nitrogen dioxide). However, if your septic system fails, the water in your well will get contaminated with bacteria and harsh chemicals by effluent from the surrounding area. Give Us a Call Right Now! Any problems with your septic tank now occupy your thoughts? If this is the case, please contact us at (941) 721-4645 to talk with a member of our staff. You may also learn more about our septic services by visiting this page.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Do you have any other queries concerning septic systems? Please let us know. If this is the case, you may find a comprehensive list of FAQs farther down on this page.

How much do septic system repair services cost?

  • A septic system repair service might cost anywhere from $500 to $2,000 in labor and materials. The ultimate cost is determined by the extent of the task, the number of hours worked, and other factors.

Can a septic drainfield be repaired?

  • Even though there is no quick remedy for drainfield repair, it is achievable if you employ an expert plumber or septic system specialist.

How often do septic systems need to be replaced?

  • Septic systems may endure for more than 40 years if they are properly maintained. Every three years, the average septic tank should be examined and pumped out in order to avoid long-term problems and septic system failure.

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