Where Would I Find My Septic Tank Drawings? (Solution)

How do I locate my septic tank drain lines?

  • You can also request a septic tank diagram of your drain field. However, if you still cannot find your septic tank drain lines, you can hire a professional to assist you. There are many different reasons you may need to locate the field lines to your septic tank.

Where can I get a diagram of my septic system?

The contractor who designed and installed the septic tank on your property should have filed an as-built diagram at the local health authority. If you have the contact information of the contractor, you can request them for the diagram and then you can use it to locate your septic tank.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

Will metal detector find septic tank?

If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector. Based on your conclusions in Step 3, if your septic tank is likely made from concrete or steel, a metal detector can make the task of locating it much easier. But not just any metal detector will do.

How do you tell if your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  1. Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  2. Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  3. Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  4. You Hear Gurgling Water.
  5. You Have A Sewage Backup.
  6. How often should you empty your septic tank?

Can you walk on a leach field?

Your family can walk on a well-maintained drain field without fear of encountering puddles of affluent and dangerous bacteria. Bicycles and tricycles are also acceptable because they are not heavy enough to compress or disturb the soil.

How often should I clean my septic tank?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How many lids are on a septic tank?

A septic tank installed before 1975 will have a single 24-inch concrete lid in the center of the rectangle. A two-compartment tank installed after 1975 will have two lids of either fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at opposite ends of the rectangle.

Do I have to change my septic tank?

Under the new rules, if you have a specific septic tank that discharges to surface water (river, stream, ditch, etc.) you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

How do you dig a septic tank lid?

You can locate the lid of your septic tank by poking the ground every few feet with a metal probe. Lids can be buried up to a foot deep on average, so be sure to investigate any bumps that may indicate something is buried underneath.

What is OWTS?

An Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTS) is a privately owned and maintained sewage disposal system. They are commonly referred to as septic systems. All OWTS have two basic components: a two-compartment septic tank and a disposal field.

How do you know if your septic system is failing?

The first signs of a failing septic system may include slow draining toilets and sinks, gurgling noises within the plumbing, sewage odors inside, continuing drainage backups, or bacteria in the well water. The area of the strongest odor will point to the location of the failure in the septic system.

Find Septic soakaway / drainfield location using documents

  • Send in your question or comment regarding septic tank and drainfield records, sketches, or diagrams that demonstrate component placement – utilizing documented information to locate the septic system
  • And

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Using records to locate a septic drainfield or soakbed is described as follows: How to get records and revew papers in order to locate a septic tank, drainfield, or soakaway bed in a home or business. How to request paperwork that can document the septic system design “as approved” as well as that which was “as built” is explained in detail.

We also have anARTICLE INDEX for this topic, and you can use the SEARCH BOXes at the top and bottom of the page to obtain the information you need quickly and easily.

How to Use Septic System Records to Find the Drainfield – Whom to Ask – How to Find the Septic Leach Fields – Part 3

When it comes to septic systems, understanding where the drainfield is may be difficult because they are often underground systems. Finding the drainfield can be difficult because they are usually hidden. Because haphazard excavation by hand is extremely time-consuming and because haphazard excavation by backhoe can cause unnecessarily extensive damage to both a septic system and a homesite, drawing a sketch of the location of a septic tank, distribution box, and drainfield trenches or pits is a valuable document to prepare and keep with a home.

  • Ask the owner if they have any sketches to leave with you; if they don’t have any sketches but know where the septic components are, walk the property with them and produce your own sketch of the septic components.
  • Because anybody seeking for the system in the future is likely to start by locating the point where the sewage line exits the building, a former service worker or contractor understood it was a dependable location to leave a sketch.
  • In certain cases, even though septic system and drainfield layout drawings have been submitted, it is possible that the “as built” drain field will not be identical to the plan filed since blockages might be identified during the drain field installation process.
  • The septic tank’s center may be located using the simple but accurate measurement triangle depicted in the diagram below.
  • It is not need to be visually appealing, to scale, or costly.
  • Never rely on the local health agency or the building department to have drawings that show where the fields are located precisely.
  • During our investigation, we discovered that one municipality had purposefully destroyed 50 years’ worth of septic and other construction plan records because they were tired of being pestered by residents who wanted that information and then complained when it turned out to be incorrect.
  • Speak with contractors who are listed under the categories of Excavation, Plumbing, and Septic System Service since the excavator who has installed or worked on the property of your concern may be classified under one of those categories but not all of them.
  • This article series, as well as our accompanyingSEPTIC LOCATION VIDEO, demonstrates how to locate the leach field or drainfield section of a septic system by going around a site with a camera.

(Septic drain fields are sometimes referred to as soil absorption systems or seepage beds in some circles.)

Reader CommentsQ A

@Joseph Coburn, please display the records regarding your septic system. Yes, Joseph, I’d be delighted to assist you in locating the leach bed on your property: Simply follow the “how to identify the drainfield” techniques and procedures outlined in the articles listed above under “Recommended Articles” labeled “How to Find the Drainfield.” LOCATION OF THE SEPTIC DRAINFIELD – BEGIN HERE PRECISE DRAINFIELD PIPE LOCATION – follow these procedures if you need to be precise with your drainage pipe location.

  1. More drainfield choices and approaches are available, including: It is necessary to excavate in order to locate drainage fields.
  2. REMARKING DRAINFIELD LOCATIONS OUT OF THE BOUNDS OF THE POSSIBLY UNLIKELY CLUES FROM THE VISUAL WORLD LOCATE THE DRAINFIELD VIA VISUAL INSTRUCTIONS LOCATE THE SEPTIC TANK IN ORDER TO FIND THE LEACH BEDS LOCATE @Dan Dyer, thank you for your comment.
  3. also have a look at the comments on your identical post at The location of my drain field has been discovered, and I need to figure out where the rest of it is before I can proceed to complete the task on time.
  4. As well as this, see THE LOCATION OF THE SEPTIC TANK AND THE LOCATION OF THE SEPTIC D-BOX Attempting to locate a septic system Septic drain field is located at 13368 East 49th Drive in Yuma.
  5. I’m looking to discover if there is any public information on a septic tank located at 5391 Hollis Goodwin rd.
  6. Continue reading at an SURPRISING DRAINFIELD LOCATIONALITY Select a topic from the closely-related articles listed below, or browse the entireARTICLE INDEX for more information.

Septic Drainfield Location Articles

  • Clearance Disturbances, Septic System
  • Odors, Septic or Sewer
  • Locations of Septic Components
  • Septic Drainfield Inspection Test at Home
  • Septic Drainfield Location
  • Septic Drainfield Inspection Test at Work
  • LOCATION OF THE DRAINFIELD PIPE, EXACT
  • EXCAVATE TO LOCATE THE DRAINFIELD
  • REASONS FOR LOCATION OF THE DRAINFIELD
  • Recordings to LOCATE the DRAINFIELD
  • SURPRISING DRAINFIELD LOCATIONS
  • UNLIKELY DRAINFIELD LOCATIONS
  • VISUAL CLUES LOCATE the DRAINFIELD
  • VISUAL CLUES LOCATE the SEPTIC TANK
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD RESTORERS
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD SIZE
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD SHAPE
  • SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO FINDfor information on locating the septic tank, chamber, drywell, or seepage pit
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD RESTORERS
  • SEPTIC TAN SEPTIC VIDEOSon the location of the septic system

Suggested citation for this web page

It is necessary to keep records in order to locate the drainfieldDatInspect A pedia.com- online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair and guidance on issue avoidance. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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Citations can be shown or hidden by selecting Show or Hide Citations. InspectApedia.com is a publisher that provides references. Daniel Friedman is an American journalist and author.

How to locate a septic tank

A home’s construction year and whether a copy of the septic permit is accessible determine the procedure for locating a septic tank on a property, which might take many weeks or months. Please choose one of the scenarios listed below and follow the instructions.

For homes built in the last five (5) years or less

Obtain a copy of your septic tank permit from your local Department of Health and Human Services office. Please fill out as much of the information below as possible to help us expedite the search:

  • Number of the tax map
  • Lot number
  • Block number
  • Address in the physical world
  • When the system was installed or when the house was built (if this information is available)
  • Name of the original permit holder (if any information is available)
  • Name of the subdivision (if the property is located within a subdivision)

A copy of a septic tank permit can be obtained from a local DHEC office by any individual or group, regardless of whether or not they own the land in question.

For homes older than five (5) years or if a copy of the septic permit was not able to be located.

It is recommended that you call an experienced septic contractor who will come to the site and assist you with the identification of the current septic system. You may find a list of licensed septic installers by clicking here.

Tags

Septic Tank Alerts Septic Tank Alerts

How to locate a septic tank

A home’s construction year and whether a copy of the septic permit is accessible determine the procedure for locating a septic tank on a property, which might take many weeks or months. Please choose one of the scenarios listed below and follow the instructions.

For homes built in the last five (5) years or less

Obtain a copy of your septic tank permit from your local Department of Health and Human Services office. Please fill out as much of the information below as possible to help us expedite the search:

  • Number of the tax map
  • Lot number
  • Block number
  • Address in the physical world
  • When the system was installed or when the house was built (if this information is available)
  • Name of the original permit holder (if any information is available)
  • Name of the subdivision (if the property is located within a subdivision)

A copy of a septic tank permit can be obtained from a local DHEC office by any individual or group, regardless of whether or not they own the land in question.

For homes older than five (5) years or if a copy of the septic permit was not able to be located.

It is recommended that you call an experienced septic contractor who will come to the site and assist you with the identification of the current septic system. You may find a list of licensed septic installers by clicking here.

Tags

Septic Tank Alerts Septic Tank Alerts

See also:  How To Properly Seal The Septic Tank Access Cover? (Perfect answer)

How To Find My Septic Tank

  1. What is a septic tank
  2. How do I know if I have a septic tank
  3. And how do I know if I have a septic tank Identifying the location of your septic tank is critical for several reasons. The Best Way to Find a Septic Tank
  4. What to Do Once You’ve Discovered Your Septic Tank

You may have fallen in love with your new house because of its appealing good looks and characteristics, but there is almost certainly more to your new home than meets the eye. In many cases, the characteristics that make your house run more effectively and allow you to live a pleasant, contemporary life are not readily apparent. Septic tanks, for example, are an important part of your home’s infrastructure. A septic system is responsible for regulating and managing the wastewater generated by your home.

“How can I locate my septic tank?” is one of the most often requested inquiries we receive.

When your tank’s lid is difficult to locate – especially if you are not the original homeowner – you may be at a loss for what to do or where to look for the lid when you need it.

The majority of the time, all of the components of the septic tank are buried between four inches and four feet below ground level.

In order to do so, it is necessary to first comprehend the functions of septic tanks and septic systems and why it is important to know where yours is located.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Your septic tank’s location is not a closely guarded secret. There will be a method for you to locate it and make a note of its position for future reference, and below are a few examples of such methods.

What Is a Septic Tank?

Having a functioning septic tank is an important aspect of having an effective septic system. In the United States, around 20% of households utilize a septic system to handle their wastewater. Houses in rural parts of New England are the most likely to have a septic system, with residences in the Eastern United States being the most prevalent location for septic systems. When there are few and far between residences, it is typically more efficient and cost-effective to employ a septic system to manage wastewater rather than relying on a public sewage system to handle waste water.

  • Typically, a septic tank is a container that is waterproof and composed of a material such as concrete, polyethylene, fiberglass, or a combination of these.
  • An important function of a septic tank is to hold on to wastewater until any particulates in the water separate themselves from the water.
  • Any liquid that remains in the tank eventually drains into a leach field or a drainfield, where it is known as “effluent.” The dirt in the leach field aids in the filtering of the water and the removal of bacteria, viruses, and other pollutants that may be present in it.
  • Septic tanks erected in Onondaga County must contain input and outlet baffles, as well as an effluent filter or sanitary tees, in order to effectively separate particles from liquids during the treatment process.

How Do I Know If I Have a Septic Tank?

What is the best way to tell if your home has a septic tank? There are generally a few of different methods to tell. Examining your water bill might help you identify whether or not your house is served by a septic system or is part of the public sewage system in your neighborhood. If you have a septic system for wastewater management, you are likely to receive a charge from the utility provider for wastewater or sewer services of zero dollars. In the case of those who are fortunate enough to have a septic system, it is likely that they may not receive any water bills at all.

  • A lack of a meter on the water line that enters your property is typically indicative of the fact that you are utilizing well water rather than public utility water, according to the National Association of Realtors.
  • A septic system is likely to be installed in your home if you reside in a rather rural location.
  • Septic systems are likely to be installed in all of these buildings, which means your home is likely to be as well.
  • When a septic tank is present, it is common to find a mound or tiny hill on the property that is not a natural structure.

Checking your property records is a foolproof method of determining whether or not your home is equipped with a septic system. Your home’s building permit and drawings will almost certainly include details concerning the existence (or absence) of a septic tank on your site.

Why It’s Important to Know the Location of Your Septic Tank

You might wonder why you should bother trying to discover out where your septic tank is. There are several important reasons for this:

1. To Be Able to Care for It Properly

The first reason you should try to locate your septic tank is that knowing where it is will help you to properly repair and care for it in the future. The standard guideline is to avoid erecting structures or placing heavy objects on top of the septic tank. It’s possible that you don’t want to park your car or truck on top of it, and you don’t want visitors to your house to park their cars on top of it, either. Due to the weight of the automobiles, there is a possibility that the tank would collapse due to excessive pressure.

2. If You Want to Landscape or Remodel Your Property

If you want to build an addition to your home or perform some landscaping around your property, you will need to know where your septic tank is located. Nothing with deep or lengthy roots should be planted on top of or in the area of your tank, since this can cause problems. If roots are allowed to grow into the pipes of your septic system, it is conceivable that your system will get clogged. When you know where the tank is going to be, you may arrange your landscaping such that only shallow-rooted plants, such as grass, are in close proximity to the tank.

For starters, the tank’s weight might lead it to collapse due to the weight of the construction.

3. If a Problem With Your Tank Occurs

Knowing where your tank is buried might also assist you in identifying problems as soon as they arise. Consider the following scenario: you wake up one morning and see that there is flooding or ponding water in the region surrounding your septic tank – a sign that your system is overwhelmed and that an excessive amount of water is being utilized all at once.

4. Ease of Getting It Fixed

Once you have determined the location of your sewer system, you can quickly send a plumber to it in the event that something goes wrong with the system, saving everyone both time and money. Get in Touch With A Plumber Right Away

1. Use a Septic Tank Map

First and foremost, make use of a road map. Using a map is frequently the quickest and most convenient alternative. Most counties keep records of the installation of septic tanks at all of their residents’ residences. These maps should include schematics that illustrate the specific placement of the tank on the land, as well as measurements that allow you to measure and locate the tank’s exact location on the property. Never mind that landmarks may shift over time depending on when the tank was built, so if there are a few more shrubs or a tree nearby, don’t rule out that location as a possibility.

  • If you are unable to locate a map or other paperwork that identifies the location of your septic tank, there are a few locations to try to see if you can obtain a map of the area.
  • The county health department is responsible for keeping track of septic systems.
  • A septic tank’s position could be depicted on a survey map, for example.
  • The creation of your own map and documentation may be worthwhile if you cannot locate a map or blueprint of your property and nothing appears to be on file regarding it at the county health department or another municipal agency.

In this way, if you ever decide to sell your property, you will be able to supply the new owner with everything they will need to locate the tank and properly manage their septic system.

2. Follow the Pipes to Find Your Septic Tank

Whether or not there is an existing map of your septic tank on file, or whether or not you choose to develop one for future reference or for future homeowners, you will still need to track down and find the tank. One method of accomplishing this is to follow the sewer lines that lead away from your residence. The septic tank is situated along the sewage line that goes from your home and into the yard, as we’re sure you’re aware. Find a four-inch sewer pipe in your basement or crawl space. This is the line that will lead to your septic system and should be accessible from the ground level.

  • In general, though, you’re searching for a pipe with a diameter of four inches or more that leaves your home via a basement wall or ceiling.
  • By inserting a thin metal probe (also known as a soil probe) into the earth near the sewage line, you can track the pipe’s location.
  • The majority of septic tanks are located between 10 and 25 feet away from your home, and they cannot be any closer than five feet.
  • Going via the sewage line itself is another method of locating the septic tank utilizing it.
  • Drain snakes are typically used to unclog clogs in toilets and drains, and they may be used to do the same thing.
  • When the snake comes to a complete halt, it has almost certainly reached the tank.
  • While drawing the snake back, make a note of how far it has been extended and whether it has made any bends or turns.
  • When looking for your septic tank, you may use a transmitter that you flush down the toilet and it will direct you straight to the tank.

3. Inspect Your Yard

Septic tanks are designed to be as unobtrusive as possible when they are erected. With the passage of time, and the growth of the grass, it might be difficult to discern the visual indications that indicated the exact location of your septic tank’s installation.

However, this does not rule out the possibility of finding evidence that will take you to the location of your septic tank in the future. First and foremost, you want to rule out any potential locations for your septic tank, such as:

  • Under a road or similar paved surface, for example. Right up against the house (the tank must be at least five feet away)
  • Directly in front of the home Immediately adjacent to your well (if you have one)
  • In close proximity to trees or densely planted regions
  • In the shadow of a patio, deck, or other building

Once you’ve ruled out any potential locations for your tank, it’s time to start hunting for indications as to where it may be hiding in plain sight. Keep your eyes peeled as you go about your property, looking for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground tank. When looking at your property, you could see a hill or mound on the ground, which is frequently an indication that there is a septic tank nearby. One further item to consider while searching for the right septic tank for your home is the amount of grass or other foliage in your yard.

Alternatively, if the tank was not adequately buried, you may observe a “bald patch,” which is an area where the grass is struggling to grow in the vicinity.

4. Talk to Your Neighbors

If your neighbors have septic systems as well, they may be able to assist you in locating your tank. Inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tanks in relation to their residences. Having a polite conversation with your neighbors regarding septic systems not only provides you with a means to figure out where yours is, but it may also serve as a friendly introduction to the other residents of your community.

5. Look for Your Septic Tank Lid

It is only the first step in the process to discover where your septic tank is located. After you’ve located your tank, the following step is to locate the lid. You can locate it with the help of your soil probe. The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around five feet by eight feet. The perimeter of the tank should be marked with a probe once it has been probed around. A shallow excavation with a shovel within the tank’s perimeter and near the center (or broken into halves for a two compartment tank) should show the position of the lid or lids if you are unable to feel them by probing.

The tank itself is likely to be filled with foul-smelling vapors, if not potentially hazardous ones.

What to Do After You Find Your Septic Tank

Once you’ve determined where your tank is, it’s time to bring in the specialists. Trust us when we say that opening a septic tank is not something that just anybody wants to undertake. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy and must be lifted using special lifting gear in order to be removed. Since the vapors are potentially dangerous due to the contents of the tank, please respect our advice and refrain from attempting to open the tank yourself. An exposed septic tank can be hazardous to anybody wandering around your property’s perimeter, and if someone were to fall into it, it might be lethal owing to the toxicity of the sewage in the tank.

However, before you send in a team of experienced plumbers, there are a few things you can do to ensure that others do not experience the same difficulty locating the tank and to make locating the tank in the future easier.

1. Mark Its Location

The likelihood is that you will not want to post a large sign in your yard that reads “Septic Tank Here!” but you will want to leave some sort of marking so that you can quickly locate the tank and lid when you need them. In an ideal situation, the marker will be substantial enough that it will not blow away in the wind and will not be readily moved by children who are playing in the yard. A patio paver, a potted plant, or a decorative gnome or rock are just a few of the possibilities. In addition to putting a physical sign beside the septic tank, you may draw a map or layout of the area around it to illustrate its position.

See also:  Who Installs A Septic Tank Pipe? (Solution found)

2. Take Care of Your Septic Tank

Taking proper care of your tank may save you hundreds of dollars over the course of its lifetime. The expense of maintaining your system could be a few hundred dollars every few years, but that’s a lot less than the thousands of dollars it might cost to repair or replace a damaged tank or a malfunctioning septic system. Two strategies to take better care of your septic tank and system are to avoid utilizing your drain pipes or toilets as garbage cans and to use less water overall. Things like paper towels, face wipes, and cat litter should not be flushed down the toilet since they are not designed to be flushed.

In addition, installing low-flow faucets and high-efficiency toilets can help you reduce the amount of water used in your home.

For example, you don’t want to be washing load after load of laundry or running your clothes washer at the same time as your dishwasher all at the same time.

Call a Professional Plumber

Maintenance of a septic system is not normally considered a do-it-yourself activity. In the Greater Syracuse region, whether your septic tank requires pumping out or cleaning, or if you want to replace your tank, you should use the services of a reputable plumbing firm to do the job right. If you’ve attempted to locate your septic tank on your own and are still unsure of its position, it may be necessary to enlist the assistance of a professional local plumber. Our team at Mr. Rooter Plumbing of Greater Syracuse can assist you with locating, maintaining, or replacing your home’s sewage tank.

Request an Estimate for the Job

How to Find My Septic Tank Lines

Credit: Petegar/E+/Getty Images for the image

In This Article

  • Septic System Fundamentals
  • Identifying and Locating a Septic Tank on Your Property
  • Conducting Regular Inspections
  • Checking for Clean-Outs
  • Identifying Natural Indicators
  • Viewing System Diagrams
  • Seek Professional Assistance
  • Check the distribution box
  • Understand the size and scope of the project.

Are you curious about the location of your septic lines? It is critical to know where the septic tank is located on a property in order to properly manage and preserve the system. For example, you don’t want to pave over the ground or grow trees too close together in a forest. It is possible to obtain a copy of the septic tank diagram of the drain field, which will give you a fair sense of where the pipes will go. If this is not the case, you may need to attempt some other methods of locating septic drain lines.

The solids and liquids are separated within the tank by a baffle or wall that is built inside the tank.

When pipes get clogged or when drain fields become too saturated with fluids, problems arise. Other issues might arise as a result of incorrect placement, design defects, or bad installation.

Locating a Septic Tank on Your Property

Begin your search for the septic tank lines at the residence first. Drain lines from the home’s plumbing should be traced to the septic tank, which is typically located 10 to 20 feet from the home’s exterior. The drain line connects the tank’s end, which is located opposite the house, to the leach field. Check the natural slope of the ground to see whether the leach field may be found there. It is never a good idea to look for drain lines using heavy gear, wrecking bars, or jackhammers. Before excavating, contact your local electric utility provider or gas company to determine the location of underground gas or utility lines.

Plunge the long, thin metal probe into the earth until you can feel it strike the tank and feel the tank’s edges.

Perform Regular Inspection

According to industry experts, you should examine your septic tanks and, if required, pump them out once every three years. If you are experiencing gurgling sounds in your house or water backing up after your system has been repaired, a saturated drain field might be the source of the problem. Drain fields that have been clogged or damaged are unable to be rectified. In order for the septic system to function properly again, you’ll need to have a new drain field installed. Find capped clean-outs that are a few inches vertically above the ground in the leach field itself, or check behind a wall or in a closet in the basement for capped clean-outs.

  • You can visually trace the orientation of the pipe from the clean-out if there is no other information available.
  • Credit: Kyryl Gorlov/iStock/Getty Images for the image.
  • When you are looking for the lines, look for grass or vegetation that greens in stripes when the grass surrounding it browns.
  • Putting hot water into your system might cause snow or ice to melt above the drain pipes if the system is not properly insulated.
  • If you have a deep system, as is the case for homes with basements, you will most likely not be able to observe natural signs since the drain field is too deep to be seen from above.
  • Unless the system was built without a permit, the blueprints or designs for septic system installations are kept on file with the local health authority until the system is operational.
  • If your search does not provide any relevant results, you can request a record search based on your street address or the tax account number associated with the property.
  • If the agency has a copy of the record, they will mail it to you.
  • If you don’t have a drawing of the septic system, you need enlist the assistance of a disposal system contractor or a certified liquid waste transporter to find it.

Another option is to purchase a flushable transmitter from a plumbing or rental business, or you may contract with a tank cleaning firm. The signal from the transmitter is picked up by a hand-held receiver after it has been flushed down the toilet.

Check the Distribution Box

There are certain septic tanks that feature an extra distribution box that is located a few feet from the tank on the tank’s downstream side. Water is channeled into the trenches by ports and pipes in the box. It is recommended that, if your system includes a distribution box, the box’s top be designed to expose the orientation of the ports that connect to the drain field lines. It is feasible to locate the box with a probe, but extreme caution should be exercised. Avoid applying excessive force to the probe, since this may result in damage to the box.

In most cases, individual drain lines run perpendicular to the intake line, but they may also branch into an H-pattern or other patterns that are appropriate for the terrain.

Find the location of your septic drain lines so that you can safeguard the area in and around them with a little detective work.

How to Find Septic Tanks

Every septic tank will eventually get clogged with solid waste and will need to be drained and cleaned. Pumping out the septic system on a regular basis is essential to maintaining it in excellent functioning order. But what can you do if you don’t know where the septic tank is? What are your options? How to locate and locate your septic tank will be covered in this section. Septic tanks should not be installed in any one location because each property is unique. Septic tanks are difficult to detect, but there are several principles and indicators that might assist you.

How to Locate Septic Tanks: Using Public Records:

  1. Inquire with the previous owner of the property. This may be the quickest and most convenient method of locating a septic tank. Simply contact the previous owner and inquire as to the whereabouts of his or her septic tank. In spite of the fact that the previous owner should have shared this information with you when selling the home, it is easy to forget normal maintenance data. If you are unable to contact the previous owner or if the previous owner does not know the location of the septic tank, do not give up hope just yet. There are several alternative methods of locating a septic tank
  2. However, Consult the County Records for more information. The county should have a copy of the septic tank installation permit documents for your property on file. This file should include a schematic or map of the property that shows the location of the septic tank. If the septic tank was erected more than a decade ago, the information may or may not be on file. Call a few different septic tank pumping companies in your area. It’s conceivable that your septic tank was installed by a local business or contractor. Check with several businesses to check whether they have your address on file.

How to Identify Septic Tanks on Your Own Septic tanks are hardly the most visually appealing or pleasurable of systems to see. They are installed in such a way that they are hardly visible and are not visually highlighted or exhibited. In the event that your septic tank is actively being concealed, you will have to figure out how to locate it. One method of locating the septic tank is to trace the waste line from the house to the septic tank’s location. Identify where the sewage line departs the home, which is usually in the basement, and then travel to the same location outside the property.

Consider the area where a septic tank is most likely to be found.

  • Usually between 10 and 20 feet away from the structure. It should not be too near for reasons of health and safety. When it comes to building costs, it is preferable to keep excavating to a minimum by not locating it too far away. From the house, it’s all downhill. Gravity is used to transfer waste in the majority of plumbing systems. This is not always the case, however, because certain systems make use of pumps. Is there a well, a stream, or any other site feature on your property that might have an impact on the installation of a septic tank? There cannot be a septic tank in close proximity to wells or the property line. Seek out bald places where there is no grass growth, which might indicate the presence of a shallow-buried septic tank top. Locate any green grass, which may be indicative of a septic tank that is overflowing or leaking
  • Assuming you already know where to go, here’s what you should be looking for now:

How to Locate Septic Tanks Using Visual Indications

  • What is the appearance of a septic tank? Septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 4ft x 8ft. Knowing this, seek for a rectangular depression or a rectangular region of sparse grass growth in a rectangle area of sparse vegetation. When septic tanks are placed shallowly and close to the surface, the outcome is often sparse or uneven grass growth
  • This is due to the fact that they are buried shallowly and close to the surface. Pipes that are unexplained. Air vents and cleanouts are common features of septic systems. If you notice pipes jutting out of the ground, it is possible that they are for the septic system. Copper is not used in the construction of these pipes, which are typically 4 to 6 inches in diameter and composed of cast iron or white or black plastic. Detecting an unpleasant odor implies that you have located the drainfield and that it is failing
  • Wet places that haven’t been explained. if there is an area of your land that is perpetually wet or moist for no apparent reason, it is possible that this is the location of your septic tank. Most of the time, it is accompanied by disagreeable smells. Look for markers such as a stake, stones, or other sorts of objects. In order to indicate the position of the septic tank’s pumpout access, it is customary practice to post a marker. Boxes for electrical equipment. Pumps and grinders are commonly seen in septic tanks that are powered by electricity. If you have an electrical connection or box protruding from the ground distant from the home and are unsure what it is for, it is possible that it is for the septic system
  • Lush green grass
  • Or irrigation system. This might be the case if your property has a single patch with especially lush green grass and you have not watered or fertilized it. If this is the case, the septic tank may be positioned in this location. Unfortunately, that lush green grass indicates that you are experiencing seepage from your septic tank
  • Nonetheless, Random dirt depressions in the earth, each measuring around 2 square feet, which may indicate a former excavation for tank pumping
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So, what exactly is the appearance of a septic tank? Septic tanks are around 4ft x 8ft in size and have a rectangular shape to them. Assuming this is true, search for a rectangular depression or a rectangular region with sparse grass growth in a rectangle pattern. It is common for grass growth to be sparse or uneven in areas where sewage tanks are buried deeply and near to the surface. PIPES WITHOUT AN EXPLANATION Septic systems may include air vents and cleanouts to allow for proper ventilation and drainage.

This type of pipe has a diameter ranging from 4 to 6 inches and is composed of cast iron or white or black plastic rather than copper.

Wet areas that haven’t been explained if there is an area of your land that is perpetually wet or moist for no apparent reason, it is possible that this is the location of your septic tank Odors that are often associated with it are also present.

When installing a septic tank, it is customary practice to identify the position of the pumpout entrance on the tank.

In the case of an electrical connection or box protruding from the ground away from the home and you are unsure of what it is for, it is possible that it is for the septic system; lush green grass This might be the case if your property has a single patch with unusually lush green grass and you have not watered or fertilized it.

You are experiencing seepage from your septic tank as a result of your lush green lawn.

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You know your septic system drainfield is out there� but just where is it? It is important to locate it so you can avoid damaging it by:
  • Building a road over the drainfield
  • Parking or operating heavy equipment on the drainfield
  • Planting trees or bushes in close proximity to a drainfield is prohibited. Creating soil disturbances through a landscaping project or the presence of cattle

In addition, knowing where your drainfield is located allows you to inspect the drainfield for symptoms of trouble, such as damp soil and foul aromas. You should obtain a copy of the record sketch for your particular system. It is a diagram that shows where the various components of your septic system are placed. This diagram was previously referred to as a “as-built” or “record drawing.” You can obtain further information by contacting the Thurston County Permit Assistance Center (PAC) at 360-786-5490 or by downloading the Request for Record Drawing/Permit Information form.

SW in Olympia, Washington (PAC Hoursof Operation-LimitedHours Please Check Before You Leave).

This is the tax identification number that appears on your county tax bills.

(If you do not know your tax parcel number, contact the County Assessor’s office.) The level of detail and quality of the record drawings varies substantially.

a more recent diagram will indicate the tank, drainfield, replacement area (which will be used in the future if a replacement field is required), and any additional components of your system, such as a pump chamber or mound It is also possible to record the dimensions of the tank and the length of the drainfield lines.

  • If you don’t water your grass in the late summer, you may notice green stripes in your yard as a result. These are the regions that are prone to flooding along the drainfield pipes. When it is cold outside, the regions above your pipes may be the first spots where frost melts in your yard. Do you have any ports for monitoring or clean-outs? These are tubes or pipes with a white cap that are cut off at or near the ground level. Drainfield pipes include liquid level indicators that are situated at the ends of the pipes, which allow you to monitor the amount of liquid in the pipes. Examine the regions leading away from the septic tank with great caution. Avoid the use of heavy steel wrecking bars or other probing equipment that might cause damage to the septic tank top or other components of the system. Take note of any signs you see, such as shallow, parallel depressions that may indicate drainfield trenches. The installation of a drainfield among huge trees or in particularly rough terrain is quite unlikely. Examine the area beneath the home where the sewer line emerges from the foundation. The septic tank is typically located within 10 feet of the foundation
  • However, this might vary. Engage the services of a competent business to send down echo-locators
For more information on troubleshooting problems,contact the Septic Help Line at 360-867-2669.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

It may seem impossible to imagine that one of the largest and most visible elements of your whole plumbing system is also one of the most difficult to locate, but when your property is served by a septic system, this is perfectly true. A strong explanation for this is because septic tanks are huge, unattractive, stink horrible and give off an unwarranted impression of dirt. Not only does burying them underground assist to prevent them from harm, but it also provides you with additional useable space on your property and conceals what would otherwise be a blight on your landscape.

This site is dedicated to assisting you in locating your septic system without the need for any time-consuming digging.

How To Find A Septic Tank: Step By Step

It is critical to maintain the health of your septic tank since it is responsible for securely storing and handling the wastewater that drains from your house. It is necessary to pump your septic tank once every 1-3 years, depending on the number of people living in your household and the size of your tank, in order to avoid septic tank repairs or early failure, which means you must be familiar with the location of your tank. It’s not often simple to identify your septic tank, and many plumbers charge extra for this service, which is especially true if your tank’s lid is buried beneath.

The Plumbing Experts have put out all you need to know about locating the septic tank on your property in this blog post for your convenience.

1. Gather Some Helpful Tools

Septic tank location may be made much easier with the use of several simple instruments and techniques. To locate your septic tank, you only need to know the following information: A soil probe is one of the most useful instruments for locating a septic tank. It is a tiny piece of metal that is used to puncture through the earth and detect anything that could be buried underneath. Start at the point where your sewage line exits your home and work your way straight out, inserting your soil probe every two feet along the way.

Using this method, you may also locate the cover for your septic tank.

While we highly advise keeping your cover clean and exposed in the event that you require emergency septic service, we recognize that this is not always the case.

2. Use a Septic Tank Map

If you are a new homeowner who is trying to figure out where your septic tank is, a septic tank map should be included in your inspection documentation. You can use this information to assist you in pinpointing the exact position of your storage tank. If you don’t have access to this map, there are a few of additional strategies you might employ.

3. Start Ruling Areas Out

The location of a septic tank cannot be constructed in specific areas due to the risk of causing major damage to your property or tank, as specified by local rules. Your septic tank will not be affected by the following:

  • Immediately adjacent to your well
  • Beneath your home
  • Directly against your home
  • For example, underneath your driveway
  • Under trees
  • And other locations. Structures like a patio or deck are good examples of this.

4. Inspect Your Property

If you take a hard look around your land, there’s a high possibility you’ll be able to locate your septic tank without having to do any probing whatsoever. In many circumstances, a septic tank may be identified by a slight dip or slope on your land that cannot be explained by any other means. Due to the fact that the hole that your contractors excavated for your septic tank may not have been exactly the proper size, they proceeded to install the tank anyhow. This is a rather regular occurrence.

When there is a minor divot or depression, it indicates that the hole was too large and that your contractors simply did not fill the depression to level the hole.

The likelihood of your septic tank being discovered in a few specific locations is quite high.

  • Your water well, if you have one (for a variety of reasons that are rather clear)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a driveway, sidewalk, or patio unless they were added after the home was built and no one conducted a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built If there is any particular landscaping

5. Inspect Your Yard

A comprehensive investigation of your yard may be necessary to discover your septic tank considerably more quickly in some cases. The following are important items to check for in your yard:

  • It is possible that a comprehensive survey of your yard can assist you in finding your septic tank much more quickly. In your yard, search for the following important things:

The metal soil probe can let you find out for certain whether or not your septic tank is located in a certain area of your yard or not.

As soon as your metal soil probe makes contact with the tank, you may use your shovel to dig out the grass surrounding it and discover the septic tank lid.

6. Follow Your Sewer Main/Sewer Pipes

Following your sewage lines is one of the most straightforward methods of locating your septic tank. These pipes have a diameter of roughly 4 inches and are commonly found in the basement or crawlspace of your house. They are not dangerous. Following the pipes from your house out into your yard, using your metal soil probe every 2 feet or so until you reach the tank, is a simple process once they are located. Aside from that, every drain in your home is connected to your sewage main, which in turn is connected to your septic tank.

The likelihood that one of your major sewer lines is located in your basement or crawlspace is high if you have exposed plumbing lines in your basement or crawlspace.

If the line is labeled, it is usually made of plastic or rubber.

7. Check Your Property Records

Lastly, if all else fails, a search of your property’s public records will almost certainly reveal the location of the tank you’re looking for. Your builders most likely secured a permit for your property because septic systems are required to be installed by law in every state. In order to do so, they had to develop a thorough plan that depicted your property as well as the exact location where they intended to construct the tank. This is done to ensure that the local health department is aware of the tank and is prepared to deal with any issues that may arise as a result of its presence.

If you look hard enough, you may be able to locate the original building records for your home without ever having to get in your car or visit your local records center.

What to Do Once You Find Your Septic Tank

Upon discovering the position of your septic tank, you should mark its location on a map of your property. Use something to indicate the location of your lid, such as an attractive garden item that can’t be changed, to help you locate it. A birdbath, a rock, or a potted plant are just a few of the possibilities. You are now ready to arrange your septic tank inspection and pumping service. Contact us now! If you have any more concerns regarding how to locate your septic tank, or if you want septic tank servicing, please contact The Plumbing Experts at (864) 210-3127 right now!

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