Where To Place A Septic Tank In Relation To Leach Field? (Question)

Choose a low elevation area For water to leave the septic tank and travel to the drain field, it has to utilize gravity or pumps. Now, if you can, choose a low elevation area that’s just below the septic tank so that gravity can push the wastewater to the leach field.

  • Look for the septic tank uphill from the building: if a pumping system is installed the tank may be anywhere, but still we needed space and soil depth to locate it. If there is an obviously “constructed” area of earth fill (a mound system) serving as a probable leach field, the tank may be at the near (to building) end of that mound.

How do I decide where to put my septic tank?

Ideally, a septic tank should be placed on level ground. If possible, the tank should be placed on high ground in order to avoid flooding and seeping. It will be important that you look around and avoid steep slopes or areas of dense tree roots that can damage your entire system.

Can a leach field be higher than septic tank?

Uphill areas, areas that are higher than the elevation of the septic tank are not a first choice to contain the drainfield or leaching beds. Unless a septic pump or effluent pump system are installed (you’d find wiring, and perhaps alarms) the drain field is going to be at or below the elevation of the septic tank.

How far should a septic leach field be from your house?

Local codes and regulations that stipulate the distance of the septic tank from the house vary depending on the locale, but the typical minimum distance is 10 feet.

Where should a leach field be placed?

Choose a low elevation area For water to leave the septic tank and travel to the drain field, it has to utilize gravity or pumps. Now, if you can, choose a low elevation area that’s just below the septic tank so that gravity can push the wastewater to the leach field.

Where should a drain field be placed?

Scan the area for markers: The location of your septic tank should be marked by a cement marker the size of a manhole cover. Look for it 10 to 20 feet away from your home. Once you locate the tank, follow the downward-most path and check for an empty downward-sloping field. You may have just found your drain field.

How far down are leach lines?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

How long will a leach field last?

Under normal conditions and good care, a leach-field will last for 50 years or more. Concrete septic tanks are sturdy and reliable but not indestructible.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

How close can you build next to a septic tank?

– A full foundation must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 20 feet from the leaching area. – A slab foundation such as a garage must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 10 feet from the leaching area.

How far apart should a well and septic tank be?

Department of Health in many States requires that new septic tanks or human-waste lagoons to be installed at least 50 feet from a well. Septic tank drain fields must be at least 100 feet from a well.

How far is distribution box from septic tank?

The D-box is normally not very deep, often between 6″ and two feet to the top of the box. You may also see a pattern of parallel depressions, typically about 5 feet apart, that mark the individual drainfield leach lines. The D-box will at or near end of the drainfield area that is closest to the septic tank.

How do septic tanks and leach fields work?

How Does a Leach Field Work? The lines or pipes in the septic leach field have small holes along their sides and bottom. The solid waste remains in the septic tank, stopped by a filter. The bacteria in the leach field septic layer then digest the organic materials, purifying the wastewater.

Does a leach field need to be level?

The water level should always be at the level of the drain line connecting the septic tank to the leaching field. If the water level is higher than the drain line, it means that the leaching field cannot hold any more water and it is backing up into the septic tank.

What is the difference between a drain field and a leach field?

Septic drain fields (also called leach fields or soil absorption areas) are one part of a household septic system. Drain fields are areas of land, specifically designed to help filter and remove contaminants from wastewater.

A Guide to Possible Septic Tank Locations

  • In order to properly maintain their septic systems, homeowners should be aware of the following items that should never be flushed down the toilet or down the sink. In addition to clogging pumps and pipelines, these things can overtax or completely disrupt the biological digestion occurring within the system.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. The following is a guide to septic tank placement depending on site characteristics: This article outlines processes for locating a septic tank by taking into consideration the types of septic tank placements that may be available at a given site. How to locate a septic tank when its position is unknown or when it is not physically evident where it should be located is explained in detail in this article.

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How to Find the Septic Tank by Looking Outside the Building

The photo at the top of the page illustrates a bad method of locating a septic tank: driving over it and becoming trapped. In order to determine where septic components may be buried, it is helpful to conduct a reconnaissance of the construction site to look for areas that could fairly be expected to contain a sewer tank or drainfield.

POSSIBLE TANK LOCATIONS – Site Conditions Determine Possible Septic Tank Locations

If you are unfamiliar with the concept of a septic system, please refer to the “More Reading” articles listed below. It is possible to have a decent notion of where some septic system components may even fit on a property if you have a broad understanding of what they are, how big they are, and how they are connected together. A clear stretch of fill is visible across the yard in front of our client’s new home, as seen in the illustration to the left. Everywhere else on this home site was densely wooded and marshy, as was the case throughout the rest of the property.

You can see the original grade in the distant photo, where the contractor built a mound in a natural swale that turned out to be a natural creek.

But that is an other tale.

Look around the building site with these septic tank location tips in mind

  • Septic tanks are almost always on the property, however in uncommon circumstances such as the subdivision of a family home, the tank may be on another neighbor’s property. SIGNIFICANT DISTANCES IN SEPTIC CLEARANCE Septic tanks require a buried area of at least eight feet of dirt, while special “low boy” tanks can be installed in as little as four feet of soil and modern wastewater treatment systems can be installed completely above ground. (Exploring sophisticated aboveground systems will not be a problem for you. See DETAILS OF SEPTIC TANK DESIGN and See SEPTIC TANK DEPTHfor a discussion of the soil depth from the top of a septic tank that has been erected
  • Septic tanks are almost always on the property, however in uncommon circumstances such as the subdivision of a family home, the tank may be on neighboring property. Check out DISTANCES FOR SEPTIC CLEARANCE
  • To be buried in the earth, septic tanks require a minimum of eight feet of dirt, while special “low boy” tanks can be installed in as little as four feet of soil and modern wastewater treatment systems can be installed above ground completely. (Seeing sophisticated aboveground systems will not be a problem for you.) Please see DETAILS OF SEPTIC TANK DESIGNand Refer to SEPTIC TANK DEPTHfor a discussion of the soil depth from the top of a septic tank that has been installed.
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD SHAPE: describes the shape, size, and placement factors for a septic drainfield or leaching bed

Septic Tank Location GuidesStandards

  • In order to reduce the contamination of ground water by microorganisms, SEPTIC TANK SITING was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in 1987.

. Continue reading atSEPTIC TANK DEPTH, or choose a topic from the closely-related articles listed below, or see the completeARTICLE INDEX for more information. Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Tank Location Articles

  • DISTANCES OF SEPTIC CLEARANCE
  • LOCATION OF SEPTIC DRAINFIELD
  • SIZE OF SEPTIC DRAINFIELD
  • LEVELS OF SEPTIC SYSTEM INSPECTION
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO FIND-HOME
  • THE DISTANCE TO THE SEPTIC TANK
  • FIND THE MAIN WASTE LINE EXIT
  • POSSIBLE SEPTIC TANK LOCATIONS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK LOCATING EQUIPMENT
  • SEPTIC TANK LOCATION SKETCH
  • SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • SEPTIC TAN
  • Mistakes made during septic tank pumping
  • SEPTIC TANK PUMPING SCHEDULE
  • SEPTIC TANK RAISERS
  • And more.

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INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. All of the water that leaves your home drains down a single main drainage pipe and into a septic tank. An underground, water-tight container, often composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, serves as a septic system’s holding tank. Its function is to retain wastewater for a long enough period of time to allow particles to sink to the bottom and form sludge, while oil and grease float to the surface and produce scum. Sludge and scum are prevented from exiting the tank and moving into the drainfield region by compartments and a T-shaped outlet. After that, the liquid wastewater (effluent) exits the tank and flows into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered hole dug in unsaturated soil that serves as a drainage system. Porous surfaces are used to release pretreated wastewater because they allow the wastewater to pass through the soil and into the groundwater. In the process of percolating through the soil, wastewater is accepted, treated, and dispersed by the soil, finally discharging into groundwater. Finally, if the drainfield becomes overburdened with too much liquid, it can flood, causing sewage to flow to the ground surface or resulting in toilet backups and sink backups. Finally, wastewater percolates into the soil, where it is naturally removed of harmful coliform bacteria, viruses, and nutrients. Coliform bacteria are a kind of bacteria that may be found in the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals, with humans being the most common host. As a result of human fecal contamination, it is a sign of this.

The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has built an animated, interactive model of how a residential septic system works, which you can view here.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • You make use of well water. In your home, the water pipe that brings water into the house does not have a meter. In the case of a water bill or a property tax bill, you will see “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” It is possible that your neighbors have a septic system

How to find your septic system

You can locate your septic system once you have confirmed that you have one by following these steps:

  • Taking a look at the “as constructed” drawing of your house
  • Making a visual inspection of your yard for lids and manhole covers
  • Getting in touch with a septic system service provider for assistance in locating it

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly. Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

Septic Tank Installation Placement

Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses. It is most noticeable in dry times when the drainfield is lush and green. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement. A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield; and

First Things First

The very first thing that needs to be done before a septic system can be built is to call your local regulating agency and ask them to evaluate the installation procedure in your particular location. Permits will be required, and your builder or contractor will be responsible for obtaining them.

See also:  How To Collapse A Septic Tank? (Best solution)

Consider Your Terrain

A septic tank should be installed on flat ground wherever possible. If at all feasible, the tank should be sited on high ground to minimize flooding and seepage of water. It will be critical for you to glance about and avoid steep slopes or locations with extensive tree roots, which might cause harm to your complete system if not avoided.

Plan for Your Drain Field

A septic system is comprised of several components, not only the tank. A drain field, also known as a leach field, is a large area of land that serves as a gigantic soil filter. When deciding where to install a septic system, the condition of the soil is a critical consideration. The ideal form of soil is a sandy, absorbent soil with a high water holding capacity. It is critical to stay away from areas of dense clay – something that is not always easy to achieve in Georgia. It may be necessary to prepare the soil in order to provide a proper environment for a septic system.

Our knowledgeable specialists at Septic Service Pro are here to assist you with all of your septic system issues. Please get in touch with us for a free estimate or to book a consultation. Septic Service Pro has provided this advertisement.

How to locate your septic tank and your drainfield

Septic systems on-site are used for accepting and treating wastewater in homes that are not linked to the municipal wastewater management system. A septic system is comprised of three components: a septic tank, a drain field, and piping. As a homeowner, it is your responsibility to properly operate and maintain your septic system in order to avoid system failure. For example, depending on the legislation in your area, you may be compelled to pump it on a regular basis. It is impossible to perform maintenance operations, however, if you do not know where the tank is located.

Steps to follow to locate your septic tank and drain field

The contractor that designed and constructed the septic tank on your property should have submitted an as-built diagram with the local health authority before starting work on the project. In the event that you have the contractor’s contact information, you can ask them for a schematic, which you can then use to pinpoint the location of your septic tank. If you do not have a copy of the schematic, you can request one from the local authorities. Depending on whether the installed system included electrical components, the schematic may be available at the regional building department offices.

  • If you are unable to locate the tank using this diagram, you will need to do more research on the land in order to determine its position.
  • This pipe is commonly found in the basement of a home, and it is a 4″ black pipe with a cleanout at the bottom.
  • Simply look for possible access coverings or a structure that might be concealing it.
  • These pumps are used to remove waste from the building.
  • It is supposed to be connected to the sewage output pipe.
  • As soon as you’ve discovered the sewer outlet in your basement, you may use it to figure out where the sewer line departs your home through an outside wall.
  • As a result, it is probable that the tank will be positioned around the corner from the building.

Tips for locating your septic tank

Septic tank lids should be visible from the outside. An underground riser may have been added, which will make it simple to find your septic tank in some instances.

However, it is conceivable that the septic tank cover is buried underground, which is especially true for older homes. Following are some pointers to assist you in locating the septic tank in this and other similar situations.

  • It may be possible to discover the septic tank lid underneath using a metal detector if it is buried. Prevent wearing footwear that contains steel or any other metal in order to avoid interfering with the readings of the detector
  • Instead, you can use a flushable transmitter that is flushed down the toilet and then tracked with a receiver. When it comes to septic tanks, the strongest signal will be seen close to the intake region of the tank.

Depending on whether the septic tank is above or below ground, you may have to dig to get to it. Construction materials for septic tanks include concrete, fiberglass, or plastic, and their shapes can range from oblong to cylindrical to rectangular. The majority of modern septic tanks will have their lids positioned in the center of the tank, and the lid should be within three feet of the ground surface in most cases. However, depending on a variety of conditions, such as farming and other human activities on the property, it is conceivable that it will be significantly deeper.

Additionally, you may use a small steel rod to probe the earth in order to pinpoint exactly where the tank is located as you continue digging.

Inspecting the tank

It is critical to thoroughly inspect and evaluate your septic tank and its contents when it has been identified. First and foremost, you may unscrew the lid to inspect the scum and sludge layer beneath it. In addition, the use of tracer dye tablets allows you to check the septic tank without having to dig it up. If you use tracer dye pills, all you have to do is flush them down the toilet and wait for a maximum of two days. Because of the way the tablets dissolve in water, if there is a problem with the septic system, you will see that the leach field has a glowing green hue surrounding it.

It is possible that someone will fall into the tank, causing significant damage or possibly death.

Conclusion

You can identify your septic tank without assistance from a professional, but it is a good idea to have someone who is properly educated in septic tank maintenance examine and maintain your septic tank on your behalf. The effluent filter in your tank should be washed into the open septic tank rather than on the ground in your yard if your tank has one. It may also be a good idea to make a note of the position of the septic tank when it has been discovered. This will be beneficial to anyone else who may require access to the septic tank in the future.

Septic tanks release combustible and hazardous gases, and as a result, they must be located in an open area.

Things You Can (and Can’t) Put on Your Septic System’s Leach Field

You can identify your septic tank without assistance from a professional, but it is a good idea to have someone who is properly educated in septic tank maintenance examine and maintain your septic tank on an ongoing basis for you. If your tank is equipped with an effluent filter, it should be rinsed into the open septic tank rather than on the ground in your yard. In addition, it may be beneficial to make a note of the position of the septic tank after it has been discovered. The information provided here will be useful to anybody else who may require access to the septic tank in the future.

The presence of septic tanks in the open is required due to the release of combustible and hazardous gases.

YouCanPlant Vegetation That Benefits the System

However, contrary to common thought, it is really a good idea to include some types of plants in a septic field to help with the process of evapotranspiration and to decrease the adverse effects of erosion, which can leave the field vulnerable to damage. You can plant a variety of shallow-root plants in your septic field to help improve the aesthetic appeal of your property while also benefiting the health of your system. Some examples of shallow-root plants to consider planting include holly shrubs, boxwood shrubs, azalea shrubs, hollyhocks, violets, wild violets, and spring bulbs.

istockphoto.com

YouCan’tPlant Vegetation That Harms the System

While there are certain advantages to growing certain types of vegetation on your septic field, if you plant the wrong sort of vegetation, you may have difficulties. In addition to pussy willow bushes and Japanese willow shrubs, aspen trees and birch trees as well as blue mist spireas and edible vegetable plants are examples of vegetation that should not be planted on a septic field. Although a vegetable garden may appear to be beautiful, there is the possibility that hazardous bacteria, such as E.

Raised gardens are also not a smart idea since the additional weight of the soil and bed constructions can cause the septic pipes to become damaged or even collapse.

In certain cases, these root systems can wrap around septic field pipes, causing the septic effluent to be trapped and flooding the surrounding area.

YouCanInstall an Open-Air Kennel

However, if you have a dog and want to provide it with a safe place to play without worrying about it running away, you may build a basic open-air kennel on top of your sewage field, which will reduce the amount of weight that is placed on top of the septic field. Although it should be emphasized that the roof and any form of floor that would lie on top of the grass are not permitted since these modifications would obstruct the evapotranspiration process in the grass. The most basic definition of a suitable open-air dog kennel is a gated space where the dog may run about freely.

Aside from that, make certain that the fence posts are set away from the septic field pipes to avoid accidently damaging a pipe when digging a posthole for the fence. istockphoto.com

YouCan’tInstall Structures

However, if you have a dog and want to provide it with a safe place to play without worrying about it getting away, you may build a basic open-air kennel on top of your septic field, which is less expensive than most other options. Although it should be emphasized that the roof and any form of floor that would lie on top of the grass are not permitted since these modifications would interfere with the evapotranspiration process. It is essentially a gated space where the dog may run freely that constitutes an ideal open-air kennel.

Aside from that, make certain that the fence posts are set far enough away from the septic field pipes to avoid accidently damaging one of the pipes when digging the fence posthole.

YouCanSet Up a Lightweight Swing Set

Some people may consider this large field to be a waste of space, but children and pets may play freely in it without encountering any difficulties, making it an ideal location for a lightweight swing set for the kids. Because of its tiny size and lightweight construction, this type of playground equipment is often reserved for children under the age of ten. These considerations also make it feasible to put up a swing set for some outside recreation time. Just make sure that the swing set does not have any large roofed portions that may obscure the sun and cause damage to the beneficial plants in the surrounding region before purchasing it.

YouCan’tInstall Semipermanent Playground Equipment

A permanent or semipermanent play structure may seem like an excellent idea given the amount of open space afforded by the septic field, but this might result in a slew of difficulties if it is not done properly. Large play structures are sometimes excessively heavy, placing strain on the septic field and potentially bending or breaking pipes that are only a foot or two below the surface of the ground. This type of play structure also normally requires a plastic sheet to assist prevent flooding and erosion surrounding the playground; however, when this barrier is placed over a septic field, it interferes with the process of evapotranspiration, which can result in both erosion and flooding in the field.

istockphoto.com

YouCanSet Up Volleyball and Badminton Courts

A permanent or semipermanent play structure may seem like an excellent idea given the amount of open space afforded by the septic field, but this can result in a slew of difficulties if it is not installed correctly. In general, large play structures are too heavy, placing strain on the septic field and potentially bending or breaking the pipes that are barely a foot or two below the surface of the ground. This type of play structure also normally requires a plastic sheet to assist prevent flooding and erosion surrounding the playground; however, when this barrier is placed over a septic field, it interferes with the process of evapotranspiration, which can result in erosion and flooding in the field.

Septic field operation is impaired by the presence of sand, gravel, and other playground materials, therefore even sandboxes can be detrimental to the system. istockphoto.com

YouCan’tInstall Tennis or Basketball Courts

Tennis and basketball vary from volleyball and badminton in that they often require a paved surface in order to be played correctly. If you want to pave over your septic field for any purpose, whether to create a parking area, a patio, or to establish a tennis or basketball court, you should think twice. Because of the inclusion of concrete, not only does the process of evapotranspiration become impossible, but it also adds a large amount of weight to the septic field pipes, which may lead them to collapse.

YouCanBuild a Fence

The process of installing a fence in the yard becomes more difficult in the presence of an aseptic system because you must ensure that the postholes can be excavated and the posts installed without harming the septic field pipes is completed safely and without incident. When using an exact plan that specifies where the pipes are to be laid, it is feasible to construct an enclosed septic field, or even a pipeline that runs directly over it. Remember to take the time to carefully map out the exact location of the fence posts and to continue with caution while digging the holes for these supports.

Additionally, ensure that the system may still be accessed for maintenance when it is required to do so.

YouCan’tAdd a Pool or Water Features

Pools, ponds, and streams are all wonderful additions to a property, but they must be maintained away from septic fields to avoid contamination. The presence of ponds or streams that are too close to the septic field increases the possibility of them becoming wastewater runoff points, lowering the efficacy of the system and generating areas surrounding the residence where hazardous pollutants, such as E. coli, can concentrate. Due to the fact that they must be dug out and erected in the ground where the septic pipes are located, inground pools should be a no-brainer, but even above-ground pools can cause issues.

Additionally, the weight of the pool, especially when it is full, will likely crush the pipes and cause the entire septic system to backup.

5 Things Homeowners Should Know About Their Septic Drain Field

There are certain distinctions in care, usage, and budgeting that you should be aware of, whether you’re a new homeowner with an existing septic system or considering about purchasing or building a home without sewer hookups. This document outlines three ways in which your budget will be affected if your wastewater is treated using a septic system. 1. You will not be required to budget for municipal sewer service. Because the municipal wastewater system normally processes all of the water, the cost of city sewage service is sometimes determined by how much water you purchase from the city.

  1. A large number of homes with septic systems also rely on wells for fresh water rather than municipal water, which means you’ll likely save money in that department as well.
  2. It is necessary to include septic maintenance in your budget.
  3. Although you are not required to pay the city for the usage of your septic system, you will be responsible for the costs of maintenance if you want the system to continue to function properly.
  4. It is possible that these maintenance and repair expenditures will build up over time, so you may want to consider setting up an emergency fund to cover any unforeseen repair bills.
  5. You’ll also need to budget for the cost of a single inspection and begin saving for the cost of a tank pump.
  6. Spreading the expenditures out over several months is the most effective budgeting strategy, even for an expense such as tank pumping that does not occur every year, because it allows you to better estimate the costs ahead of time.
  7. You may need to set aside money for septic tank replacement.
See also:  How Do You Get Blueprints Of Sewer And Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

The tank and leach field may not need to be replaced if you have a reasonably recent septic system and plan to sell your home within a few years.

If, on the other hand, your home’s septic system is more than a decade old, you’ll want to start looking into how much a new system would cost you as soon as possible.

For example, if the previous owners did not do routine maintenance or if the system was installed on clay soil, the system may need to be replaced.

It is a prudent decision to begin putting money aside in anticipation of this eventuality.

When you have a septic system, you may use these three strategies to budget differently.

Make an appointment with us right away if you’re searching for someone to pump out your septic tank or to complete an annual examination of your septic system. Our experts at C.E. Taylor and Son Inc. would be happy to assist you with any septic system assessment, maintenance, or repair needs.

How a Septic System Works – and Common Problems

This Article Discusses Septic Tanks are a type of septic tank that is used to dispose of waste. Field Sizing and System MaintenanceProblems with the Leach FieldSystem Performance Questions and comments are welcome. See Also: Septic System Frequently Asked Questions Articles on SEPTIC SYSTEM may be found here. In locations where there are no municipal sewage systems, each residence is responsible for treating its own sewage on its own property, which is known as a “on-site sewage disposal system,” or septic system, more popularly.

One of the most commonly seen types of leach field is composed of a series of perforated distribution pipes, each of which is placed in a gravel-filled absorption trench.

SEPTIC TANK

The wastewater is collected in the septic tank once it has been discharged from the residence. Septic tanks are normally between 1,000 and 2,000 gallons in capacity and are composed of concrete, strong plastic, or metal, depending on the model. Highly durable concrete tanks, which should endure for 40 years or more provided they are not damaged, are the most common. Many contemporary tanks are designed with two chambers in order to maximize efficiency. Household wastewater is collected in the septic tank, where it is separated and begins to degrade before being discharged into the leach field.

  • In the tank, oil and grease float to the top of the tank, where they are known as scum, while solid waste falls to the bottom, where they are known as sludge.
  • Bacteria and other microorganisms feed on the sediments at the bottom of the tank, causing them to decompose in an anaerobic (without oxygen) process that begins at the bottom of the tank.
  • Solids and grease must be pushed out of the system on a regular basis in order for it to continue to function effectively.
  • Each gallon added to the tank results in one gallon being discharged to the leach field, leach pit, or other similar treatment facility.

A large amount of water delivered too rapidly to the tank may discharge untreated effluent, along with oil and particulates, into the leach field, where it may block the field and cause a backup.

Leach Field

When used properly, a leach field (also known as a “drain field”) is a series of perforated pipes that are typically buried in gravel trenches 18 to 36 inches below grade — deep enough to avoid freezing, but close enough to the surface that air can reach the bacteria that further purify the effluent (see illustration below). As little as 6 inches might separate you from the ground surface, depending on your soil type and municipal regulations. It is customary to cover the perforated pipes with approximately two inches of gravel and a layer of topsoil that is 18 to 24 inches in depth.

  1. Grass is often sown above the ground.
  2. The leach field is comprised of rows of perforated pipes in gravel trenches that are used to spread wastewater over a vast area in order to further purify it.
  3. A bacteria-rich slime mat forms where the gravel meets the soil, and it is responsible for the majority of the water purification work.
  4. Despite the fact that wastewater freezes at a far lower temperature than pure water, freezing is still a hazard in cold areas.
  5. The leftover pathogens are converted into essential plant nutrients by these organisms, while sand, gravel, and soil filter out any solids that remain.
  6. If the system is operating effectively, the filtered wastewater will return to the aquifer as naturally clean water that is suitable for human consumption at this stage.
  7. Alternative systems may be permitted in situations when traditional leach fields are unable to function properly owing to poor soil conditions or a high water table.
  8. Special systems may also be necessary in regions where there are flood plains, bodies of water, or other ecologically sensitive areas to protect against flooding.

SIZING THE LEACH FIELD

Using perforated pipes put in gravel-filled trenches, the drain field is sized to accommodate the number of beds in the house. In order for the system to function successfully, the leach field must be appropriately sized for the soil type and amount of wastewater, which is normally determined by the number of bedrooms in the house. In order for the liquid to seep into the soil, it must be permeable enough to do so. As a result, the denser the soil, the larger the leach field that is necessary.

  1. Better to have surplus capacity in your system than to have it cut too close to the bone.
  2. Septic tank backup into your house, pooling on the surface of the earth, or polluting local groundwater are all possibilities if the ground is incapable of absorbing the liquid.
  3. Dense clay soils will not absorb the liquid at a sufficient rate, resulting in a backlog.
  4. If the soil is mostly composed of coarse sand and gravel, it might drain at such a rapid rate that untreated sewage can poison the aquifer or damage surrounding bodies of water.
  5. Alternative systems may be permitted in situations when traditional leach fields are unable to function properly owing to poor soil conditions or a high water table.

These systems sometimes cost twice or three times as much as a regular system and require significantly more upkeep. Near flood plains, bodies of water, and other ecologically sensitive places, special systems may also be necessary to protect people and property.

SEPTIC SYSTEM CAREMAINTENANCE REQUIRED

If you take good care of your system, you will be rewarded with years of trouble-free operation. Pumping the septic tank on a regular basis is necessary to remove the particles (sludge) and grease layer (scum) that have built up in the tank. The solids will ultimately overflow and spill into the leach field, decreasing its efficacy and diminishing its lifespan if this is not done. The rehabilitation of a clogged leach field is difficult, if not impossible; thus, constant pumping is essential!

  • Cooking fats, grease, and particles may also wash into the leach field if the tank is too small for the amount of water being used or if the tank is overcrowded on a regular basis.
  • Extra water from excessive residential consumption or yard drainage can overwhelm the system, transporting oil and particles into the leach field and causing it to overflow.
  • In addition, don’t try to complete a week’s worth of laundry for a family of five in a single day.
  • To minimize overburdening the system, the following measures should be taken:
  • Distribute your washing loads and other high-water-use activities across the week
  • And In the kitchen and bathroom, use low-flow appliances, faucets, and fixtures. Toilets, in general, are the source of the greatest amount of water use. Water should be diverted away from the leach field from the yard, gutters, and basement sump pumps.

In addition, refrain from flushing sediments, strong chemicals, and just about anything else down the toilet or sink other than biological waste and white toilet paper. Avoid using garbage disposals in the kitchen. If you really must have one, keep it for small non-meat bits only. Avoid flushing chemicals or paints down the toilet since many chemicals can destroy beneficial microorganisms or cause water contamination in the surrounding area. Avoid flushing the following down the toilet:

  • Grease, fats, and animal scraps
  • Paints, thinners, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals
  • And a variety of other materials sanitary napkins, tampons, and other supplies Paper towels and disposable diapers are examples of such products. Egg shells, coffee grounds, and nut shells are all good options. Antibacterial soaps and antibiotics are available.

It is preferable to put grass over the leach field and to refrain from driving or parking in the vicinity. Excessive weight placed on top of the drain field might compress the earth, diminishing its efficiency as a drain field. Drain pipes can also become clogged by trees and plants with invasive roots. In order to prevent damage to the leach field, the following measures should be taken:

  • Heavy machinery should not be driven, parked, or stored on top of the leach field (or septic tank). Placement of a deck, patio, pool, or any other sort of construction over the leach field is prohibited. Remove any large trees or other plants with deep roots from the leach field. Grass is the most effective groundcover.

Even with careful use and routine maintenance, however, leach fields are not guaranteed to survive indefinitely. It is inevitable that the soil will get saturated with dissolved elements from the wastewater, and that the soil will be unable to absorb any more incoming water. The presence of an odorous wet area over the leach field, as well as plumbing backups in the house, are frequently the first indicators that something is wrong. Many municipalities mandate septic system designs to incorporate a second “reserve drain field” in the case that the first field fails.

A well constructed and maintained system should last for at least 20 to 30 years, if not longer than that. After a few tears, the initial field will naturally heal and may be used once again when the situation calls for it to be. More information on Septic System Maintenance may be found here.

SEPTIC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE PROBLEMS

Poor original design, abuse, or physical damage, such as driving heavy trucks over the leach field, are the root causes of the majority of septic system issues. The following are examples of common situations that might cause a septic system to operate poorly: Plumbing in the home. obstructed or insufficient plumbing vents, a blockage between the home and the septic tank, or an insufficient pitch in the sewer line leading from the house are all possible causes. Sewage tank to leach field connection Septic tank and leach field blockage caused by a closed or damaged tank outlet, a plugged line leading to the leach field caused by tree roots, or a blockage caused by sediments that overflowed from the tank Piping in the leach field.

  • Most of the time, tree roots do not make their way through the gravel bed and into the perforated pipe.
  • Reduced flows, achieved through the use of flow restrictors and low-flow faucets and fixtures, may be beneficial.
  • Because of the seasonal high water table, the soil around the trenches might get saturated, reducing the soil’s ability to absorb wastewater.
  • This may frequently be remedied by adding subsurface drains or curtain drains to intercept the water flow into the leach field region and to lower the water table in the immediate area around the drainage system.
  • Likewise, see: In order to do a perc test, who should I hire?
  • Is It Possible for Septic Systems to Last a Lifetime?
  • Performing an Inspection on a Septic System When Is the Best Time to Take a Perc Test?
  • Examination of the WellSEPTIC SYSTEMView allSEPTIC SYSTEMarticles Return to the top of the page

Can You Have a Septic Tank Without a Leach Field at Home?

This is a question that is frequently posed in Northern Indiana. “Can I have a septic tank without a leach field?” the homeowner inquires. During this blog post, we’ll take a deeper look at that question. First and foremost, we must clarify the nature of the question. Interested in learning if you can build a new septic system for a new home that is equipped with only a septic tank and no leach field? If this is the case, the plain and simple response is no. Those codes are written by the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH), which is in charge of regulating septic systems in the state.

This implies that new house construction must be supplied by an aseptic system, which includes not just a septic tank, but also a system for treating wastewater and releasing the treated water back into the environment.

a leach field, a sand mound, an Advanced Treatment System (ATS), or another technology recognized by the Illinois Department of Health and Human Services.

What about an existing home whose old system has problems, is failing, and needs replaced?

For properties whose septic systems have failed and are in need of repair or replacement, the ISDH has included measures in its codes to address this situation. Wastewater will be treated on-site as long as there is adequate space on the land, taking into consideration any setbacks (50 feet from well, for example). A holding tank may be placed on an existing property if there is inadequate room owing to small lots that were platted many years ago, resulting in an inability to fulfill setbacks, such as 25′ from a body of water, and there are no other choices.

Our area in Northern Indiana is home to a large number of lakes, each of which has a number of small lots marked around its perimeter many years ago, with a number of older homes built on them.

See also:  How Much Area You Need To Install A Septic Tank? (Solution found)

Because of the limited physical lot sizes, it is common that when you remove everything within a 50-foot radius of the well, a 50-foot radius of all surrounding wells, and 25-foot radius of the lake’s border, there is actually no land left to safely treat the wastewater.

Let’s look at the question from an alternative angle…

For example, you can have an ancient farmhouse that was built a hundred years ago, and no one knows where the septic tank is, or if it even has one at all. No records exist since the county no longer maintains such kind of documents, which dates back many years. Moreover, you might be thinking, “Where does my wastewater go?” You may be the owner of a septic tank that does not have a leach field in this situation! Many years ago, in the history of mankind.there was a time when builders created houses in the country that were fed by septic tanks, but the wastewater ran directly from the septic tank through a drainage pipe, finally ending up in a stream or drainway.

As a result, these systems are no longer lawful, and the state has mandated that they not be fixed until they are brought up to code.

Call Shankster Bros. today for all your septic system problems and needs!

Home-Diy A septic system is a sort of sewage system that is used to remove wastewater from properties that do not have access to municipal sewage systems. if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.removeChild(sources); then this.onerror = null; this.src = fallback; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace; (//$/, “), (//$/, “), ‘/public/images/logo-fallback.png’) is a fallback logo image. ” loading=”lazy”> ” loading=”lazy”> After passing through the septic tank, water is discharged onto the drain field.

A drain field is made up of a series of perforated pipes that channel the wastewater into the ground and into a drainage system (also known as a leach field). Maintaining the cleanliness of your drain field might alert you to problems with your septic system.

  1. To find out if your local municipality has the records from the installation of your septic system, you should contact them. This can provide you with accurate information on the location of the drain field. Look for tubes or pipes in your yard that have white caps on the ends of the tubes or pipes. The caps, which are referred to as monitoring ports, allow you to check the amount of liquid in the drain pipes. The caps are positioned at the end of the drain field
  2. They are made of concrete. Take a look at the surface of your lawn to see if there are any locations where the earth has been flattened in parallel rows. This can be used to identify the drain field. Check your yard for indicators of a drain field to see if there is one. During the winter, seek for spots where the frost melts the most quickly to save time. When your lawn begins to turn brown in the summer due to the heat and lack of water, check for green stripes in the grass. The grass is lush and green in these regions as a result of the moisture provided by pipes in the drain field. Engage the services of a competent organization to find the drain field
  3. And

The Drip Cap

  • A septic system is a sort of sewage system that is used to remove wastewater from properties that do not have access to municipal sewage systems. The caps, which are referred to as monitoring ports, allow you to check the amount of liquid in the drain pipes. Find green stripes in the lawn throughout the summer, when your grass begins to turn brown due to the heat and lack of water
  • They are signs of healthy grass. The grass is lush and green in these regions as a result of the moisture provided by pipes in the drain field.

A Beginner’s Guide to Septic Systems

  • Septic systems are used to dispose of waste from homes and buildings. Identifying the location of the septic tank and drainfield
  • What a Septic System Is and How It Works Keeping a Septic System in Good Condition
  • Signs that a septic system is failing include:

Septic systems, also known as on-site wastewater management systems, are installed in a large number of buildings and houses. It is easy to lose sight of septic systems, which operate quietly, gracefully, and efficiently to protect human and environmental health due to their burying location. Septic systems are the norm in rural regions, but they may also be found in a lot of metropolitan places, especially in older buildings. It is critical to understand whether or not your building is on a septic system.

Is Your Home or Building on a Septic System?

It is possible that the solution to this question will not be evident. If a structure looks to be connected to a sewage system, it may instead be connected to a septic system. It is fairly unusual for tenants to be unaware of the final destination of the wastewater generated by their residence. Some of the hints or signs listed below will assist in determining whether the facility is served by a septic system or whether it is supplied by a sewer system:

  • Answering this question may not be as straightforward as you may expect. If a structure looks to be connected to a sewage system, it might potentially be connected to a septic system instead! Most tenants are unaware of what happens to the wastewater from their residence, which is not unusual. It will be easier to detect whether or not a structure is equipped with a septic system or is serviced by a public sewer system if the following indications or signs are present:

It’s possible that the solution to this question will not be evident. When a facility looks to be connected to a sewage system, it may instead be connected to a septic system. It is not unusual for tenants to be in the dark regarding what happens to the wastewater generated by their residence. Some of the hints or signs listed below can assist you in determining if the facility is served by a septic system or whether it is supplied by a sewer system:

Locating the Septic Tank and Drainfield

Finding a septic system may be a difficult process. They can be buried anywhere in the yard, including the front, back, and side yards. After a few years, the soil may begin to resemble the surrounding soil, making it impossible to distinguish the system from the surrounding soil. It is possible that in dry weather, the grass will be dryer in the shallow soil over the tank and greener over the drainfield, where the cleansed water will be released, but this is not always the case, especially in hot weather.

  1. The contractor who built the house should have presented the initial owner with a map showing the tank and drainfield locations, according to the building code.
  2. The installation of the system, as well as any modifications made to it, would have been examined by your local health authority.
  3. Unfortunately, if the system is very old, any records related with it may be insufficient or nonexistent, depending on the situation.
  4. Look for the point at where the wastewater pipes join together if the building is on a crawlspace or has an unfinished basement.
  5. The sewer line that runs through the structure is referred to as the building sewer.
  6. To “feel” for the tank, use a piece of re-bar or a similar metal probe.
  7. If you use this free service, you may avoid accidentally putting a rod through your gas or water line.

Try to locate the tank after a rainstorm, when the metal probe will be more easily maneuvered through moist dirt.

This should be done with care; extreme caution should be exercised to avoid puncturing the building sewer.

A tank is normally 5 by 8 feet in size, however the dimensions might vary.

Be aware that there may be rocks, pipes, and other debris in the area that “feels” like the tank but is not in fact part of the tank.

However, it is possible to have the lid or access port positioned on a riser in addition to being on the same level as the top of the tank in some cases.

Once the tank has been identified, make a rough drawing of its placement in relation to the house so that it will not be misplaced again!

It may be easier to discover the drainage lines now that the tank has been identified, particularly if the area has been subjected to prolonged periods of drought.

How a Septic System Works

Typical sewage treatment system (figure 1). It is composed of three components (Figure 1): the tank, the drain lines or discharge lines, and the soil treatment area (also known as the soil treatment area) (sometimes called a drainfield or leach field). The size of the tank varies according to the size of the structure. The normal home (three bedrooms, two bathrooms) will often include a 1,000-gallon water storage tank on the premises. Older tanks may only have one chamber, however newer tanks must have two chambers.

  1. The tank functions by settling waste and allowing it to be digested by microbes.
  2. These layers include the bottom sludge layer, the top scum layer, and a “clear” zone in the center.
  3. A typical septic tank is seen in Figure 2.
  4. It is fortunate that many of the bacteria involved are found in high concentrations in the human gastrointestinal tract.
  5. Although the bacteria may break down some of the stuff in the sludge, they are unable to break down all of it, which is why septic tanks must be cleaned out every three to seven years.
  6. In addition, when new water is introduced into the septic tank, an equal volume of water is pushed out the discharge lines and onto the drainfield.
  7. The water trickles out of the perforated drain pipes, down through a layer of gravel, and into the soil below the surface (Figure 3).
  8. A typical drainfield may be found here.
  9. Plants, bacteria, fungus, protozoa, and other microorganisms, as well as bigger critters such as mites, earthworms, and insects, flourish in soil.
  10. Mineralogical and metallic elements attach to soil particles, allowing them to be removed from the waste water.

Maintaining a Septic System

The most typical reason for a septic system to fail is a lack of proper maintenance. Septic systems that are failing are expensive to repair or replace, and the expense of repairs rests on the shoulders of the property owner (Figure 4). Fortunately, keeping your septic system in good working order and avoiding costly repairs is rather simple. Figure 4. Septic system failure is frequently caused by a lack of proper maintenance. It is in your best interests to be aware of the location of the system, how it operates, and how to maintain it.

  • You should pump the tank if you aren’t sure when the last time it was pumped.
  • It is not permissible to drive or park over the tank or drainage field.
  • No rubbish should be disposed of in the sink or the toilet.
  • It’s important to remember that garbage disposals enhance the requirement for regular pumping.
  • When designing a landscape, keep the septic system in mind.
  • It is also not recommended to consume veggies that have been cultivated above drainfield lines (see Dorn, S.
  • Ornamental Plantings on Septic Drainfields.

C 1030).

Any water that enters your home through a drain or toilet eventually ends up in your septic system.

Don’t put too much strain on the system by consuming a large amount of water in a short period of time.

Additives should not be used.

Various types of additives are available for purchase as treatment options, cleansers, restorers, rejuvenator and boosters, among other things.

To break up oil and grease and unclog drains, chemical additives are available for purchase.

Pumping out the septic tank is not eliminated or reduced by using one of these systems.

They remain floating in the water and travel into the drainfield, where they may block the pipes. Acids have the potential to damage concrete storage tanks and distribution boxes.

Signs a Septic System is Failing

The most typical reason for a septic system to fail is a lack of upkeep. The expense of repairing or replacing a failing septic system is borne by the property owner, who bears the burden of the repairs (Figure 4). Fortunately, keeping your septic system in good condition and avoiding costly repairs is rather simple. Failure of a septic system is frequently caused by improper maintenance (see Figure 4). The knowledge of where the system is, how it operates, and how to maintain it is essential for your safety.

  1. You should pump the tank if you aren’t sure when the last time it was done.
  2. Avoid driving or parking in the vicinity of the tank or drainage field.
  3. No rubbish should be disposed of in the sink or in the toilet!
  4. Recall that garbage disposals increase the frequency with which you must pump your system.
  5. When designing a landscape, keep the septic system in mind.
  6. In addition, eating veggies that have been cultivated above drainfield lines is not a good idea (see Dorn, S.
  7. Ornamental Plantings on Septic Drainfields.

C 1030).

Septic systems collect all of the water that flows down drains and toilets.

Never put too much strain on the system by consuming large quantities of water in a short period of time.

Use of additives is strictly prohibited.

Various types of additives are available for purchase as treatment options, cleansers, restorers, rejuvenator and boosters, among other uses.

To break up oil and grease and unclog drains, chemical additives are marketed on the marketplace.

Pumping out the septic tank is not eliminated or reduced by using one of these methods.

These microscopic particles remain floating in the water and migrate into the drainfield, where they may block the lines. Acids have the potential to erode concrete storage tanks and distribution boxes, among other things.

  • Sinks and toilets drain at a snail’s pace
  • Plumbing that is backed up
  • The sound of gurgling emanating from the plumbing system House or yard aromas that smell like sewage
  • In the yard, there is wet or squishy dirt
  • Water that is gray in hue that has accumulated
  • An region of the yard where the grass is growing more quickly and is becoming greener
  • Water contaminated by bacteria from a well

Slowed-draining sinks and toilets Plumbing that is backed up Sounds of gurgling coming from the plumbing system the presence of sewage odors in the house or yard Yard dirt that is wet or squishy; Greyish-colored water that has accumulated; An region of the yard where the grass is growing quicker and greener than the rest; Water contaminated by bacteria from a well.

Figures 2 and 3 reprinted with permission from: CIDWT. 2009. Installation of Wastewater Treatment Systems. Consortium of Institutes for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment. Iowa State University, Midwest Plan Service. Ames, IA.

History of the current status and revisions Published on the 15th of August, 2013. Published on March 28th, 2017 with a full review.

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