What Will Destroy A Septic Tank? (Solution)

Any paper products like tissues, paper towels, tampons, or sanitary products, even some heavier toilet paper, will clog your system if you flush enough of it. Wet wipes are another product that you should never flush into a septic system.

  • If you want to destroy your septic system then a good long term plan is to plant trees directly on top of your drain field. The ultimate goal here is to completely handicap the drain field by clogging up the system with the tree roots. The tree roots will break through the piping and grow directly into the path of your drain pipes.

What chemical kills septic tank?

Caustic soda or lye at high levels in a septic tank risks killing the bacteria needed to break down sewage pathogens both in the tank itself and also in the soil into which the septic tank effluent is discharged.

What is harmful to septic tanks?

Don’t Put Anything Non-Biodegradable in Your Septic System Cigarette butts. Disposable diapers. Paper towels. Plastics.

What can cause a septic tank to fail?

Why septic systems fail Most septic systems fail because of inappropriate design or poor maintenance. Some soil-based systems (those with a drain field) are installed at sites with inadequate or inappropriate soils, excessive slopes, or high ground water tables.

What products are not safe for a septic system?

But to make it even clearer, here are the top ten household products to avoid when you have a septic tank.

  • Fabric softeners.
  • Latex products.
  • Medicines.
  • Antibacterial soap.
  • Cosmetics.
  • Drain cleaners.
  • Bleach.
  • Dishwasher and laundry detergent.

How do you dissolve sludge in a septic tank?

How to Reduce Sludge in a Septic Tank Without Pumping

  1. Install an aeration system with diffused air in your septic tank.
  2. Break up any compacted sludge.
  3. Add a bio-activator or microbe blend.
  4. Maintain the aeration system.
  5. Add additional Microbes as required.

Does bleach harm septic tanks?

Flushing bleach down your drains will kill all of the bacteria in your septic tank —even the good ones. They may have a corrosive effect on parts of your septic system, however. Additionally, they might also damage the natural balance of bacteria and other substances that live in your septic system.

Does hair break down in a septic tank?

Why Hair is a Such a Problem It’s composed of tough strands of proteins similar to those in your fingernails, and it’s not easily broken down by bacteria. Even if it doesn’t for years in your septic tank, it’ll almost certainly last for longer than the 24-48 hours that it sits in your septic tank.

How long does it take toilet paper to dissolve in septic tank?

Your toilet paper should dissolve in twenty minutes or less. If it doesn’t, you may want to consider buying a different brand of toilet paper that’s better for your plumbing system.

Can I shower if my septic tank is full?

Only the water would get out into the leach field in a proper system unless you run too much water too fast. The thing to do is to run your shower water outside into it’s own drain area, but it may not be allowed where you are. Used to be called gray water system.

What are the signs that your septic system is failing?

The first signs of a failing septic system may include slow draining toilets and sinks, gurgling noises within the plumbing, sewage odors inside, continuing drainage backups, or bacteria in the well water.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

What is the average lifespan of a septic system?

Age of the System It’s pretty common for a septic system to last 40 years or longer, which means if you buy a new home, you might never need to replace it. However, you might have an older home whose septic system has been in place for nearly half a century.

Is Dawn dish soap septic safe?

Yes, Dawn Platinum is septic safe!

Is baking soda and vinegar safe for septic systems?

Will baking soda hurt a septic system? Baking soda and other common household solutions such as vinegar are not harmful to your septic system. Harsh chemicals such as bleach and ammonia can disrupt the good bacteria in your septic tank and should not be used as part of a septic treatment.

Is toothpaste septic safe?

Believe it or not, but certain brands of toothpaste can actually harm your septic system. When possible, look for a natural paste or a baking soda-based toothpaste. If that is not possible, always avoid any pastes that have polyethylene in them.

5 Ways to Destroy a Septic System

Septic systems are extremely vital to the health and performance of any home, and there are several very critical requirements that must be followed in order to properly care for your septic system and allow it to function correctly. Septic systems that are properly maintained are anticipated to last for decades without experiencing any problems. This is the perfect position for the vast majority of individuals, and it is unquestionably the road that we suggest to every homeowner. Having stated that, we recognize that there are some individuals who have an inconceivable urge to damage things and waste their money on unnecessarily repairing what they have destroyed.

If that describes you, we are here to assist you.

For the average person who happens to be reading this essay.

NOTE: These suggestions and tactics are ONLY for people who want to completely damage their septic system and spend a significant amount of money doing it.

  1. If you’re seeking to completely destroy your septic system, this is an excellent place to begin.
  2. In the event that you flush anything else down the toilet, you are on your way to wreaking havoc on your septic system.
  3. The only thing that can stop you here is your own imagination.
  4. Keep Your Septic Tank From Being Pumped Septic tanks have a limited capacity and will ultimately fill up with solid waste that will need to be removed from the property.
  5. If you want to know the most effective way to destroy your septic system, avoid having your tank drained at all costs.
  6. There’s a good chance that sewage will backup into your home.
  7. Alternatively, you may plant trees directly on top of your drain field.

This is a highly healthy and natural method of treating wastewater that has been generated by your septic tank system.

By filling up the drain field with tree roots, the ultimate objective is to fully disable the drain field and prevent it from functioning properly.

Consequently, the wastewater flow will be obstructed, and the overall efficiency of the system will be reduced.

After everything is said and done though, the payback will be well worth it since the tree roots will pulverize the drain field, making everything blocked and ineffectual in the end.

Most of the time, we would advise you to add landscape features such as borders and drains to assist in diverting water away from your drain field.

Drainage fields are only capable of processing a certain amount of wastewater before the soil gets over saturated.

For this reason, we propose that you place barriers to force as much rain water as possible directly into your drain field in order to overwhelm your system in this manner.

To our dismay, we have offered these useful instruments of devastation despite our better judgment in doing so.

It is strongly recommended that you avoid following the above instructions at all costs if you are like the majority of individuals who would want to take care of their septic system and prevent costly repairs!

Household Products That Will Ruin Your Septic Tank!

Many people who have septic tanks are unaware of what they may and cannot flush down their toilets or down their sinks. It may come as a surprise to find just how delicate septic tanks are, and how many common household goods can cause harm to and/or block your septic tank if you don’t know what you’re doing. By keeping these things out from your drains, you can maintain your septic tank in good shape and avoid costly septic repairs down the road. Chemical Cleaners are a type of cleaning agent that uses chemicals to remove dirt and grime.

  • You may disturb the bacteria cycle in your septic tank by pouring anti-bacterial cleansers like bleach down your drains and down your toilets.
  • Additives Several septic tank additives make the promise that they will enhance the amount of bacteria in your septic system.
  • The Environmental Protection Agency and the American Ground Water Trust, on the other hand, warn that chemical additions may cause more harm than good to your tank.
  • Using Bath Oils Oil floats to the top of your septic tank, where it congeals and hardens to produce a layer of scum on the surface.
  • It has the ability to withstand bacterial activity and embed in the solid waste layer.
  • Grease from the kitchen Grease of any kind contributes to the buildup of scum in your septic tank.
  • Unless otherwise instructed, you should avoid dumping oil down your sinks.

In addition, dryer papers might jam the entrance baffle.

Over time, the clay will clog your pipes and cause your septic tank to fail completely.

Products Made of Latex The majority of latex-based products are not biodegradable.

If the outlet tee is missing, the latex may clog the drain field on its way out of your septic tank, causing it to back up and choke the tank.

Paints and oils are two types of media.

In order to maintain your soil and groundwater free of diseases, you must have this bacterium on hand.

Prescription medications and chemotherapy medications Even after passing through a patient’s digestive system, powerful medications may still retain active ingredients that are harmful to them.

If possible, avoid allowing drug-contaminated faeces to enter your home’s septic tank.

Some prescription medications have the potential to be harmful to the environment.

Chemicals for Automatic Toilet Cleaning Systems Automatic toilet cleaners release an excessive amount of anti-bacterial chemicals into your septic tank, causing it to overflow.

Instead, choose toilet cleansers that are suitable for septic systems.

Even minute amounts of string, on the other hand, can clog and ruin pump impellers.

In a period of time, it will encircle a pump and cause harm to your septic tank’s mechanical components.

Your tank is only capable of holding a specific amount of domestic water; it cannot accommodate big volumes of water from a pool or roof drain.

Don’t use your sinks or toilets as garbage cans; this is against the law.

Put your trash in the garbage to prevent having to pay extra in pump-out fees.

Young children, on the other hand, may be unable to comprehend how toilets function.

Rather than degrading, the clothing are likely to block your septic tank.

Butts for Cigarettes Cigarette filters have the potential to choke the tank.

For a comprehensive list of potentially dangerous goods, consult your septic tank owner’s handbook or consult with a specialist.

If possible, avoid flushing non-biodegradable goods down the toilet or down the drain. You will save money on costly repairs and you will extend the life of your tank by taking these precautions.

Top 10 products to avoid using when you have a septic tank

What you let to enter your septic tank will have a direct influence on the efficiency and lifetime of the tank itself. Bacteria exist in your septic system, and they perform an important part in the system by digesting the organic waste that enters it. As a result, it is your responsibility to avoid flushing anything down the toilet that might potentially harm the beneficial bacteria. Try to avoid flushing anything that can be disposed of properly in the garbage as a general rule of thumb However, to make it even obvious, here are the top 10 home goods that should be avoided if you have a septic tank.

Fabric softeners

Fabric softeners are a terrible choice for septic system owners because of the way they operate on a fundamental level of operation. They accomplish this by introducing slimy chemicals into clothing in order to soften the textiles. These slimy molecules are referred to as quats (quaternary ammonium compounds), and they have been shown to be effective against bacteria. Also included in the formulation is an acid-base mixture that is intended to regulate pH levels while washing in order to increase absorption.

Fabric softeners become poisonous to bacteria as a result of the presence of all of these substances, and you should avoid using them.

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Latex products

Latex materials are typically non-biodegradable, and as a result, they should be avoided while flushing the toilet. This implies that latex products will not be digested by the bacteria and will only be eliminated at the time of the next pumping session. In certain instances, the latex may even make its way into the drain field, causing the system to become clogged and ineffective. According to popular belief, latex condoms are only constructed from the material of rubber. Truth be told, certain synthetic components are also added to make them stronger and thinner, although this is not well known.

Medicines

Medicines are goods that should not be flushed down the toilet if you have a septic system in your home. Never succumb to the temptation of dumping leftover medications down the toilet. Pharmaceutical goods have the potential to disrupt the bacterial equilibrium in a septic tank, resulting in septic tank failure. The compounds included in medications are also capable of leaking through the drain field and harming the groundwater. This is actually a pretty typical occurrence in today’s society.

Instead of flushing your medications down the toilet, take use of accessible take-back disposal services.

Antibacterial soap

Even from the name, it is clear that antibacterial soap is a product that has been particularly created to fight bacteria. If you pour this sort of soap down your drain, it will accomplish exactly what it says on the label – it will destroy the beneficial bacteria in your septic system.

To avoid this, simply wash your hands with regular soap. Natural disinfectants such as lime juice can also be used in place of antibacterial soaps to keep your home clean.

Cosmetics

Heavy metals such as zinc, chromium, silver, cadmium, and even titanium are included in the majority of cosmetic items. The septic tank becomes contaminated with some of these metals when you wash these cosmetics off in the sink. The fact that these metals are not biodegradable means that they will ultimately exit the septic tank in their original condition and wind up poisoning groundwater sources. Cosmetics, as a result, are among the most crucial goods to avoid while using a septic system.

Drain cleaners

Pipe corrosion is a result of the use of drain cleaners, which not only destroy germs in the septic system, but they also erode the pipes themselves. Therefore, drain cleaners should be avoided at all costs, especially in the case of people who do not utilize a septic system. To be on the safe side, utilize a degreaser that is both enzymatic and bacterial in nature. For anyone interested, Bio-Soli is now offering a really decent one. It comes in the form of a liquid and is really effective.

Bleach

Bleach is extremely poisonous to bacteria and should be avoided or used sparingly in any situation. When it comes to washing clothing, using bleach in modest amounts is OK; but, if you use too much bleach, the bleach may destroy the beneficial bacteria in the septic tank. Furthermore, bleach will exit the septic tank in its original state, resulting in pollution of the groundwater supply system.

Dishwasher and laundry detergent

In most cases, phosphates and surfactants are included in laundry and dishwashing detergents, and these substances can readily enter the drain field. Apart from causing harm to the beneficial bacteria, these phosphates and surfactants have the potential to leach out of the septic tank in a hazardous form, poisoning the surrounding groundwater supply. Always use detergents that are devoid of phosphates to prevent getting into this situation.

Crushed food

It is not recommended to flush food particles down the toilet. Even though they have been crushed, they will not give up. This is due to the fact that food particles decompose at a slower rate than other types of organic waste. As a result, these food particles may find their way into your leach field, where they may cause clogs. All residual food particles should be scraped off the plates and disposed of in the compost bin after they have been used.

Fats, Oils, and Greases (FOG)

In the event that you pour FOG down your sink, you will draw all types of issues. In the first instance, the FOG will cool down and become trapped on the edges of the pipes. In the meanwhile, the collected fog will continue to trap debris, which might eventually result in clogged pipes. Second, bacteria are not easily able to break down fats, oils, and greases, as previously stated. FOG will just float to the surface of the septic tank and contribute to the formation of the scum layer.

As the FOG continues to build up, the septic tank will begin to fill up much more quickly than usual. Before washing greasy utensils, wipe them down with a paper towel to ensure that you are not flushing too much fat down the drain.

Conclusion

Being aware of the items to avoid using in your house can assist you in extending the life of your septic system as well as avoiding avoidable failures in the future. The 10 goods to avoid that we discussed above are some of the most often dangerous products on the market, but the list just scratches the surface of the problem. The number of things that you may be utilizing that are operating your septic system without your knowing is virtually limitless. That’s why we put up a detailed eBook that includes a list of 30 things that you should avoid if you have a septic system.

7 Things You Should Never Flush If You Have a Septic System

Because something fits down your drain, is cut up by your trash disposal, or vanishes down your toilet when you flush it does not always imply that it belongs there. A septic system is extremely important to consider in this situation. If you are careless with the information you put through to your tank, it might come back to bother you later on. In the Phoenix area, Audrey Monell, president of Forrest Anderson Plumbing and Air Conditioning, says, “One of the most common mistakes homeowners make is putting things into their septic system that can cause clogs, damage pipes, and change the balance of the good bacteria that is needed to keep the system running smoothly.” She also happens to be the owner of a septic tank.

1. Nonbiodegradable items

One of the most crucial things to avoid putting into a septic system is the use of household chemicals. Anything that is not biodegradable should be avoided. Among the items included are anything from cigarette butts to feminine hygiene products and disposable diapers, according to Monell. According to the experts, just because something may be flushed down the toilet does not imply it should. There is no easy way to divide down these items. For example, throwaway diapers alone take hundreds of years to decompose.

Replace your current items with biodegradable alternatives, or dump what you already have in the garbage.

2. Food

Food waste will block your septic system and cause it to malfunction. (PhotographyFirm/iStock) There’s no difference between pouring vegan sausage and greens down your garbage disposal and throwing bacon grease and Funyuns down your garbage disposal. When you put any type of food into a septic tank, it might lead to a buildup in your pipes, according to Monell. (This is similar to how cholesterol accumulates in your arteries.) Even the smallest amount of coffee grinds might cause issues.

Once these objects begin to degrade, they combine to produce a viscous substance known as sludge, which causes backups, according to Monell. Instead of throwing away food trash, compost it and use the coffee grinds to fertilize your flower garden.

3. Drain cleaner

In addition to removing sticky hair and other unidentified junk that has clogged your shower or sink drain, the strong chemicals in drain cleaners can cause damage to your septic system in numerous ways, including causing it to fail. In the first place, they can create corrosion in your pipes and tank, according to Monell. They’ll also eliminate the “good” bacteria that’s necessary for decomposition of the waste that’s in your tank. It’s best to use natural products to clear up your drains, but be sure they are septic-safe before you start cleaning.

4. Too much water

As Monell argues, you may believe that a large amount of water would help to keep things flowing through your system, but in reality, you run the danger of your tank filling up too rapidly. As a result, your system will be unable to operate correctly. Wastewater that is drained from the tank and onto the drain field and surrounding land too rapidly may include far more sludge (read: human waste) and scum than it should. You’re probably already familiar with the standard water-saving recommendations, but we’ll go over them again: Preferably, shorten your showers, and avoid running your washer and dishwasher until they’re completely filled.

5. Toys

It is recommended that you get a toilet lock for your kid. (SusanneB/iStock) Almost any parent of a toddler is familiar with the phenomenon of toddlers becoming preoccupied with flushing stuff down the toilet—in this case, toys—as John Parry, owner of South Fork Septic in Southampton, New York, explains. As Parry explains, “this may be quite dangerous to your septic system since toys can become lodged in a pipe and obstruct the waste flow, causing everything to back up.” If you want to be extra cautious, a toilet seat lock can be a good idea.

6. Paper towels

According to Parry, “even though these objects appear to be flushable, they do not decompose in the septic system.” Upon entering your tank, they attach to the concrete and make it extremely difficult for the system to function correctly. Furthermore, if a problem is discovered, it is difficult for the septic business to pump out the system. According to Parry, soggy residues of paper towels might cause the pump to clog, resulting in expensive repairs.

7. Paint or paint thinner

“These materials may appear to be safe since they are liquid, but they do not properly decompose in a septic system,” Parry explains. And, as with drain cleaning, “they’ll destroy any beneficial bacteria in the system, let alone have the potential to seep into water bodies.” Over half of the population of the United States relies on groundwater for drinking water, yet it is readily contaminated by things like a few additional cans of paint or paint thinner or even a few drops of paint thinner.

Make contact with a local non-profit organization such as Habit for Humanity, whose volunteers may be able to make use of any leftover paint. Alternatively, locate a hazardous waste disposal facility in your area.

If it’s too late

After all, no one is flawless. If you’ve already mistakenly flushed one of the items listed above, don’t be too concerned as long as it was a one-time occurrence. One errant paper towel or Hatchimals toy is unlikely to cause a complete breakdown of your septic system. However, if you have a history of dumping prohibited substances into your system, Parry recommends having it repaired in order to avoid a backup or overflow situation. “If these materials are allowed to remain in the tank for an extended period of time, they harden and become impossible to pump out.”

Top 10 Items To Avoid Putting In Your Septic System

Submitted byRobert Robillard on Home Repairs, Plumbing, and Electrical

Caring for Your Septic System

If you have a septic system in your home, you must exercise extreme caution when it comes to the household goods that you use. Septic systems rely on bacteria to break down wastes and sediments, but in order for these bacteria to live, they must be in a certain environment. If you use the incorrect type of detergent in your washing machine or the incorrect drain cleaner, you may wind up destroying the microorganisms in your septic system, leaving it inoperable. Overflows, obstructions, flooded drain fields, and even groundwater pollution can result as a result of this.

Medicines

When you have unused prescriptions on hand, it might be tempting to flush them down the toilet to eliminate them. DON’T. Pharmaceuticals have the potential to disrupt the bacterial equilibrium in your septic system, resulting in septic system failure. They also contribute to the spread of “superbugs,” germs that are resistant to antibiotics and represent a threat to the health of the entire population. Improperly disposed of drugs damage groundwater, putting the environment and, more importantly, your own drinking water at risk of contamination.

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In a countrywide survey conducted in 2000, pharmaceuticals were discovered in 80 percent of the rivers and streams examined.

To safely dispose of medications

Find out if there is a medication disposal program near you. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) organizes National Prescription Drug Take-Back activities, which involve setting up collecting locations in towns around the country to ensure that prescription medicines are properly disposed of. A pharmaceutical take-back program sponsored by your local police department may also be available. If you are unable to locate a pharmaceutical take-back program in your area, you should contact your local waste management authority to learn about drug disposal choices and requirements in your region.

After removing pills out of their original containers and combining them with a “undesirable item” (such as cat litter or old coffee grounds), the FDA suggests placing the combination in a Ziploc bag or a container with a lid and tossing the entire package in the trash.

Non-Septic Safe Toilet Paper

The only item that should be flushed into your septic tank is human waste, and that should be done using a septic safe toilet paper. A toilet paper that is biodegradable and dissolves fast is essential. On the packaging, look for the words “Septic Safe.” After evaluating 21 brands for softness, strength, and ripping ease in March of 2014, two brands stood out: White Cloud 3 Ply Ultra and Charmin Ultra Strong, however the Charmin did not disintegrate as rapidly as the White Cloud.

“Flush-able Wipes” and other Clogging Hazards

Flushable wipes, despite the fact that they are advertised as such, are anything but; they can take up to 10 minutes to break up and provide a significant clog danger.

Laundry Detergents

It is possible that your laundry contributes a significant portion of the volume in your septic system. It is likely that the majority of the laundry detergents available at your local grocery shop include some form of environmental contamination. Look for the following:

Low Suds or Biodegradable:

Surfactants, which are foaming agents, are found in all soaps and detergents, and they are used to create foam. They work by lowering the surface tension of fluids, letting them to flow more freely between solids and so remove dirt from the surface of objects. Unfortunately, they have a negative impact on cell membranes and microorganisms, and they will harm the bacteria colony in your septic system. Fortunately, they decay rapidly and do not constitute a significant hazard to groundwater.

Low or no phosphorous and nitrogen:

We are fortunate in that nutrient pollutants such as phosphates and nitrates are now being phased out of the detergents we use since they encourage the growth of algae and weeds that choke out fish and wildlife in our ponds, lakes, streams, and rivers.

Chlorine free:

Chlorine bleach is extremely hazardous and should be avoided if possible, or used in small amounts when necessary. Unfortunately, chlorine bleach is included in a variety of cleaning and disinfecting products. Alternatives that are more effective include oxygen-based bleaches for laundry and white vinegar for disinfection.

Antibacterial Soaps

Avoid using antibacterial hand soaps and any product that claims to be antibacterial. This is not only due to the obvious harm they could do to your bacterial colony, which is required for your septic system to function, but it is also due to the fact that they are now being linked to the development of antibiotic resistant “superbugs.” The good old-fashioned soap and water will suffice.

Automatic Toilet Cleaners

In addition to killing the germs in your toilet, the antibacterial compounds in automated toilet cleaners destroy the microorganisms in your septic tank as well. These toilet cleansers have the potential to result in a septic tank that is overflowing with blue water and a large amount of dead bacteria. A mixture of baking soda and white vinegar, used to clean the toilet, will provide similarly effective foamy results that are completely safe.

Dishwasher Detergents

Dishwasher detergent is more likely than laundry detergent to include phosphates and surfactants, both of which are toxic to the microorganisms in your septic tank and should be avoided.

They can also move through your septic tank to the drain field, where they can eventually seep into the soil and leak into ground water, putting your family at danger of drinking polluted water. Look for and use detergent that is free of phosphates.

Drain Cleaners

Drain cleaners should not be used by any homeowner, including those who do not have septic systems in their homes. Chemical drain cleaners not only have the potential to harm beneficial bacteria in your septic tank, but they may also eat away at your pipes! The caustic soda or lye employed in them is a potent oxidant and can result in serious burns if ingested or handled improperly. If your drains are blocked, it is far preferable to spend a little extra money to call a plumber to unclog them rather than using a chemical drain cleaner to clear them.

DIY Drain Cleaner:

  1. Add 1/2 cup baking soda to the drain and let it sit for a few minutes before adding 1/2 cup white vinegar mixed with extremely hot water to the drain. Allow for a few minutes of resting. This will trigger a chemical reaction, resulting in a lot of foaming, therefore stop the drain or cover it with a towel. The combination will begin to operate immediately, breaking down any lipids into salt and inert gas. Boiling water should be used to flush

Bath Oils

Bathing with some baby oil may provide you with silky-soft skin when you get out, but it’s not a good idea for your septic tank’s performance. Once the oil has been washed into your septic tank, it produces a layer of scum on top of the floating waste, preventing it from settling. As a result, the bacteria are unable to penetrate the oil, preventing them from decomposing the waste. Additionally, the oil might obstruct your drain field.

Solvents

Don’t flush anything inorganic down the toilet such as paints, solvents, insecticides, oils, or anything else that might kill the bacteria.

Other UnsafeSeptic Items – Things not to flush include

  • Disposable diapers
  • Sanitary napkins or tampons
  • Paper towels or bandages
  • Dental floss
  • Condoms
  • Hair
  • Cigarette butts
  • Disposable diapers
  • Disposable diapers Coffee grinds
  • Kitty litter
  • And so on.

Author’s Bio:Steve McGonagle, proprietor of Septic Genie, assists homeowners in diagnosing and resolving their septic system problems. The Septic Genie method, which was first patented in 1995, has assisted hundreds of households in restoring their damaged septic systems while avoiding the expensive cost of “dig and replace.” is a website dedicated to providing trouble-free septic systems for life. ​

HOW TO SAFELY ABANDON AN OLD SEPTIC TANK ON YOUR PROPERTY

If you’ve recently purchased an older house, it’s possible that a septic tank is located on the property. This is true even if your home is currently linked to the municipal water and sewer systems. A prior owner may have abandoned the ancient septic system and connected to the city sewage system when it became accessible at some time in the past. Despite the fact that there are standards in place today for properly leaving a septic tank, it was typical practice years ago to just leave the tanks in place and forget about them.

  • The old tank may either be demolished or filled with water to solve the problem.
  • It is possible that permits and inspections will be required.
  • They are dangerous because curious children may pry open the lid and fall into the container.
  • Falls into a septic tank can be lethal owing to the toxicity of the contents and the fact that concrete can collapse on top of you while falling into a tank.
  • Eventually, this approach was phased out due to the fact that the steel would corrode and leave the tank susceptible to collapse.
  • When it comes to ancient septic tanks, they are similar to little caves with a lid that might collapse at any time.
  • The old tank is crushed and buried, or it is removed from the site.

If it is built of steel, it will very certainly be crushed and buried in its current location.

After that, the tank can be completely filled with sand, gravel, or any other form of rubble and buried.

Tanks can either be entirely dismantled or destroyed and buried in their original location.

The abandonment has been documented and plotted on a map.

It’s possible that you’ll forget about the tank once it’s been abandoned.

As a result, you might wish to sketch a map of the area where the old tank used to stand.

If you can demonstrate that an old septic tank was properly decommissioned, you may be able to increase the value of your property, and the new owners will enjoy knowing that large chunks of concrete are buried underground before they start digging in the yard to put something in it.

It may take some detective work to discover about the history of your land and what may be lying beneath the surface of the earth.

Upon discovering an old septic tank on your property that is no longer in service, contact Total Enviro Services for propertank abandonment procedures that meet with local standards and protect your family, pets, and farm animals from harm or death.

Septic System Do’s and Don’ts

1. Inspect your septic tank at least once a year. Septic tanks should be drained at least once every three to five years, in most cases. An assessment by you or a professional may reveal that you need to pump more or less frequently than you previously thought. Pumping the septic tank on a regular basis ensures that sediments do not flow from the tank into the drainfield. Solids can cause a drainfield to fail, and once a drainfield has failed, pumping will not be able to put it back into operation.

Reduce the amount of water you use (seeHome Water Savings Makes Sense).

Too much water from the washing machine, dishwasher, toilets, bathtubs, and showers may not provide enough time for sludge and scum to separate, resulting in particles passing out of the tank and into the drainfield, eventually blocking the pipes and causing them to clog.

  • Large water-guzzling equipment such as dishwashers and washing machines should be used sparingly. Bathroom and kitchen fixtures (such as faucets, shower heads, and toilets) that conserve water should be used. Spread out your laundry throughout the course of the week and avoid doing incomplete loads
  • Fix all leaks from faucets and toilets as soon as possible.

Large water-guzzling equipment such as dishwashers and washing machines should be avoided at all costs. Showerheads, faucets, and toilets that conserve water should be used in the bathroom or kitchen. Avoid doing partial loads of laundry and spread them out throughout the full week; Immediately repair any leaks from faucets and toilets;

What Will Ruin a Septic System?

What Can Cause a Septic System to Fail? Many homeowners are not aware of the types of items that can be flushed down the toilet. Septic systems are extremely delicate, and a variety of unexpected ordinary objects might cause them to clog or otherwise harm them. If you have a septic tank in your house, you should be aware of how to keep it in excellent working order in order to avoid costly repairs or replacements in the future. There are several factors that might destabilize the system, and the likelihood is that you are unaware of them.

When you drain things down the system, they can cause clogs and blockages, which can result in the need for costly repairs down the road.

Please remember that everything that goes down the drain in your kitchen, bath, or bathtub will end up in your septic tank.

  • Kitchen Grease: Grease of any kind will contribute to the formation of a scum layer in a septic tank. It is advised that grease traps be installed in order to prevent grease from reaching the tank.
  • Chemical Cleaners: Bacteria are responsible for the breakdown of waste in all septic systems. Avoid flushing chemical cleansers down the toilet or down the drain. They have the ability to eliminate these beneficial microorganisms as well as disturb the breakdown process.
  • Toilet Paper: While toilet paper appears to be flushable, the majority of toilet papers do not break down. The paper might stick to the surfaces, making it harder for the system to function efficiently. It can also make it more difficult to pump out the system as a result of this. In other cases, paper towels might clog the pump and result in costly repairs.
  • Dryer Sheets: Dryer sheets are constructed of a synthetic fabric that does not decompose in the natural environment. Additionally, these sheets might jam the intake baffle.
  • It is not appropriate to treat toilets and sinks like garbage cans. Avoid putting things like cigarette buts, dental floss, prescription packages, hygiene goods, or contraception in them. These solid things do not dissolve and soon accumulate in the tank, filling it.
  • Bath Oils: Avoid flushing any type of oil down the toilet or down the sink drain. Oil will float to the surface and form a protective coating that is resistant to microorganisms. It has the potential to obstruct drain fields and hinder microorganisms from performing their functions
  • Avoid flushing kitty litter down the toilet or into the septic system. It contains particles that contribute to the rise in the volume of solid waste in the tank. Over time, this might result in a buildup of solid waste, which can cause the system to fail.
  • Use of septic tank additives to boost the bacteria level in the system should be avoided at all costs. You should contact Diamond Septic Pumping if you are concerned about the slow bacteria activity in your tank
  • They will do a thorough check.
  • The use of textiles: If you have children in your household, there is a strong risk that fabrics will be tossed down the toilet. Fabrics do not decompose and might clog the septic tank, causing it to get clogged. Other than that, children can toss stuff such as toys and crayons down the drain or into the toilet.
  • LatexProducts: Latex goods are well-known for their inability to degrade in the environment. Only a small number of items are designed to degrade. Others will float to the surface of the water in the tank and will have to be removed during the pumping process. This substance, on the other hand, has the potential to block the drain field or the pump impeller, resulting in costly damage.
  • Avoiding the introduction of any type of food into the system is also critical. It has the potential to cause buildup inside the pipes and potentially cause the system to fail. Foods will break down in the tank, resulting in a thick sludge buildup. This may be used to generate backups.
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Human waste is the only type of waste that may be accepted by the septic system. Please do not include anything else. When it comes to toilet paper, biodegradable paper is the way to go. Diapers, sanitary napkins, and toys are among items that are commonly discovered in septic tank waste. The combination of these elements can result in a situation in which the system is rendered utterly useless. This might result in costly repairs or possibly replacement of the device. It is recommended that you get your septic system tested and pumped out on a regular basis.

It is, however, suggested that you avoid introducing any of the products listed above into the system. Professional pumping services can extend the life of your system by many decades. Pumping Septic Tanks in Diamond, AZ

Key Toxins to Keep Out of Septic Systems

Receive articles, news, and videos about Systems/ATUs sent directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Systems/ATUs+ Receive Notifications In their homes and business buildings, your customers’ customers use a variety of goods, many of which are harmful to the microorganisms in their septic systems. The following are the five most important ones to warn them about in order to preserve the bacterial ecosystem as healthy as possible. 1. Quaternary ammonium nitrate – It is because quat compounds are extraordinarily chemically stable water-soluble organic salts, and because the chemical links between them are difficult to break, they have a lengthy biocidal activity.

  • There are literally hundreds of different quats in existence, all of which are widely used in consumer, commercial, and industrial items.
  • The usage of quats should be avoided if possible.
  • Instead of quaternary ammonia, oxidative sanitizers like as bleach or iodine are advised for use in industrial kitchens.
  • It is not necessary to use antibacterial products.
  • Furthermore, some studies have revealed that triclosan — a component used in a variety of antibacterial products — may promote the development of germ resistance.
  • The use of commercial toilet-bowl cleaners that contain bleach or even hydrochloric acid is not uncommon.
  • Toilet bowl cleansers In addition to dissolving calcium carbonate deposits in water, the acid is a toxic chemical that will destroy the microorganisms in your septic system.

A toilet brush will keep the toilet clean if it is used on a regular basis.

4.

5.

When nothing works, try plunging, using hot water, baking soda, or vinegar.

5.

Small amounts of these chemicals, such as the quantity used to wash a single load of clothes, should not be dangerous in large quantities.

It is best not to run repeated white loads back to back.

Alternately, baking soda is excellent for dissolving stains in clothing and other household items.

When clients are seeking for environmentally friendly cleansers, the Environmental Working Group website is a useful resource since it grades various products from “A” to “F” depending on their influence on public health and the environment.

She has a master’s degree in civil engineering and a doctorate in environmental engineering.

Her responsibilities include serving as the education chair for the Minnesota Onsite Wastewater Association and the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association, as well as serving on the National Science Foundation’s International Committee on Wastewater Treatment Systems.

Send an email to [email protected] if you have any concerns concerning septic system care and operation. Heger will respond as soon as possible.

Why Bleach Is Harmful to Septic Systems – All Pro Septic

For those of you who depend on a private septic system to handle the wastewater generated by your house, you’re probably already aware with some of the oddities that come with owning a septic system. Septic tank care in Cleveland, Texas, necessitates the avoidance of the use of certain chemical chemicals by homeowners. Additionally, if you have an aseptic system, you should avoid using too much washing detergent, and you should check the quantity of water you use on a regular basis to ensure that you aren’t overloading your tank.

  • After all, conserving water, avoiding excessive soap, and avoiding hazardous chemicals are all healthy habits to develop regardless of the kind of wastewater conveyance system used.
  • When it comes to chemical chemicals, bleach is one of the ones that you should make every effort to keep out of your septic system.
  • Disinfectant (bleach) flushed down the drain will destroy all of the bacteria in your septic tank, even the beneficial ones.
  • However, bleach isn’t the only chemical that should be avoided at all costs.
  • In addition to bleach, ammonia is a very strong cleaning agent that may do significant damage to the internal workings of your home’s septic system. A buildup of toxic gases in your tank can eventually lead to the destruction of the good bacteria that dwell there, and the leakage of these gases from your tank is a serious concern. Cleaning detergents and dish detergents are not the same as soap—detergents are meant to froth up and include a variety of potentially dangerous compounds that, if discharged into your drain field, might harm local animals and possibly poison your own drinking water source. Plumbers’ chemicals: Commercial chemical drain cleaners should be fine when used in modest doses. They may, however, have a corrosive impact on some components of your septic system. Also possible is that they will disrupt the normal balance of bacteria and other things that exist in your septic system. Culinary oils: Culinary oils are among the most harmful substances that you may put into your septic system. The fact that oils solidify when cooled increases their likelihood of causing clogs in your septic system, which might result in major difficulties both inside your tank and outside the drain field.

All ProSeptic is a leading provider of septic tank maintenance services in Cleveland, Texas. We’re delighted to be recognized as one of the most dependable septic system maintenance, repair, and installation firms in the region. We provide septic system services for industrial, commercial, and residential sites in the greater Philadelphia area. In any case, you can rely on one of our courteous representatives to give you with high-quality service, regardless of the state of your septic tank. To find out more, get in touch with one of our septic system specialists right now.

Caring for Your Septic System

You wouldn’t ignore routine maintenance on a high-priced automobile. You should also not neglect the maintenance of your septic system. It is possible to spend as much as $20,000 to replace a broken septic system; thus, you have a strong incentive to keep your system in good working order. Septic systems provide the same functions as municipal treatment facilities, but on a smaller scale, and are thus less expensive. Instead of employing experts and specialists to ensure that everything runs properly, you, the homeowner, are responsible for it all.

Protect the Parts

Take a look at the records that came with your home to find out where all of the components of your system are placed so that you or your guests don’t accidentally damage them. Never drive across a drainfield or a ditch. Beyond the possibility of a pipe cracking, the weight of a car compacts the soil, making it less absorbent and less able to absorb water. Maintain a safe distance between plants and trees and the septic tank and the drainfield.

Their roots can slither into pipes and cause them to become clogged. Although grass on the drainfield should be encouraged since it absorbs water and avoids erosion, it should be discouraged because it will sink its roots into the pipework.

Pump Periodically

With a normal system, you may arrange a pump truck to come out on a regular basis (typically every three to five years). By being cautious about what goes down your drains, you may be able to extend the time between service calls. Consult with your pumper for guidance. If you have a maintenance contract (which may be necessary with some systems), you should allow the technician to inform you when pumping is required for your system. Pumping costs $200 to $400, depending on how quickly the lid can be opened.

When the tank is completely empty, have it examined for leaks and have them repaired as soon as possible.

If they are missing or in poor condition, they should be replaced.

Control What Goes In

Perhaps you’ve heard that some materials are beneficial to septic systems while others are detrimental. Here’s the truth about what’s good and terrible to flush down the toilet and what shouldn’t be. Too much water, from any source, can cause your system to become overloaded. Roof water should be diverted away from the drainfield using gutters. Install water-saving toilets and appliances, or at the very least, repair toilet leaks and stagger laundry loads to conserve water. As a precaution, advise guests to refrain from taking long showers or turning on the faucets at full blast while they are at your home.

  • Utilize your trash disposal exclusively to clear up the fine scraps that have accumulated in your drain strainer if you have one.
  • In a septic tank, fats decompose and become scum.
  • Consider creating a compost bin for food waste as well.
  • However, even a small amount of drain cleaning might be harmful.
  • In rare instances, the salty output produced by water softeners can cause significant damage to a septic system.
  • If your health department does not allow it, contact your local health department.
  • Alternatively, a salt-free water softener (costing around $1,000 or more) can be installed.

Instead, use the time to clean the tank. Instead, pump on a regular basis. Others have negative consequences, such as releasing the scum in the tank, which causes it to block the drainfield. Some additives are ineffective, while others have negative impacts.

Other Inspections

During the wet season, take a walk through your drainfield. If you smell sewage or notice that grass is growing particularly quickly and lushly in one location, it’s possible that your drainfield is clogged. Inquire with a septic repair firm for assistance. It is recommended that you have a professional examination (costing around $100) performed at least once a year if you have an alternative system with mechanical parts, filter screens, pumps, or other components that can go out of alignment.

If you’re looking for further information, see Should You Repair or Replace Your Septic System?

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