What To Do If Bathroom Is Below Septic Tank? (Solved)

  • If your existing septic tank is performing well and is well below its maximum capacity for usage, it is possible to add additional input lines to the system. In order to accomplish this you will need to tie in the new addition to the existing system without disrupting or altering the existing system in any manner.

Can we build bathroom above septic tank?

The outlet of the tank should either be in the east or west direction. It should never be in the south. Avoid construction of any bedroom, Pooja room or kitchen above the septic tank. As staircases aremostly found outside the houses, you can place a septic tank under the staircase as per Vastu Shastra guidelines.

How do you put a bathroom in a basement without breaking concrete?

The best way to install the shower in a basement bathroom without damaging your floors is to look into an upflush toilet system. While traditional basement showers require you to drill into shower base and concrete to add a drain, a Saniflo system sits on top of concrete floors.

Is it worth putting a bathroom in the basement?

Adding a bathroom to your basement makes it livable space, which increases the overall market value of your home. A bathroom in your basement can also be a huge selling point for buyers if you are ever looking to sell. When a basement is unfinished with no bathroom, buyers look at the basement as wasted space.

Do Upflush toilets work?

Does it work?” The answer is yes! For all intents and purposes, an upflush toilet is exactly the same as any standard toilet. Waste goes in and flushes out the bowl with the help of strong water pressure. The only difference is what happens to that waste after you flush.

Can you build a deck over a septic tank?

You should never build a deck over a septic field; doing so will prevent the natural draining and dissipation of the effluent. This can ruin the septic system, not to mention releasing foul smells into the air all around your deck. The dissipating effluent can also rot the deck from underneath.

How do you waterproof a septic tank?

Apply the waterproofing base coat at the recommended thickness. For cement-based waterproof coatings, the first coat should be at least 1/16-inch thick. Spray on the coating, filling all pores, then brush it into the surface with the tampico brush, using horizontal strokes.

How close can you build to a septic tank?

“Septic tanks should be sited at least 7m from any habitable parts of buildings, and preferably downslope.”

Can you install a shower below sewer line?

The SaniSHOWER is a system used to install a bathroom shower and sink up to 12 feet below the sewer line, such as in a basement, or even up to 100 feet away from a soil stack. The SaniSHOWER basement bathroom shower system is designed to connect with the following: This SaniSHOWER gray water pump.

Can a toilet and sink share the same drain?

In the US, with modern regulations, in most municipalities, yes, they do. The water and solids from your toilet waste line and the water from your drains end up in the same sewer line, if you have access to a municipal sewer system.

Can a shower drain be connected to a toilet drain?

Your shower drain can connect to the toilet drain, but it cannot connect to the toilet trap arm. This means that the shower connection will need to be made downstream from the toilet vent.

How do I install a shower drain with no access from below?

How to install shower drain without access below:

  1. Remove the existing shower drain.
  2. Measure and cut the assembly parts.
  3. Clean the area and pipes.
  4. Assemble and install the new drain.
  5. Apply a sealant and tighten the shower drain.
  6. Clean excessive sealant.
  7. Install strainer cover.
  8. Conduct a leak test.

How much does it cost to rough-in a bathroom in the basement?

Adding a bathroom in a basement costs $8,000 to $15,000 on average. You’ll save $500 to $1,000 if you have a rough-in drain already in place – typical in newer homes and usually near the main drain line.

How do macerator toilets work?

The term “macerate” means to soften or break up. The macerator pump uses a stainless steel fast-rotating cutting blade to convert solids and fluids into a fine slurry that is discharged under pressure through small-diameter piping (¾-inch or 1-inch) and expelled into the sewage line or septic tank.

Adding a Bathroom to Your Basement: Design & Drainage Considerations

The addition of a bathroom to basement quarters not only makes life a bit simpler, but it also increases the value of your home in the long run. If you’ve converted your finished basement into a second bedroom, game room, or gym area, a basement bathroom allows you to take advantage of that space without having to trek upstairs when the urge to pee strikes. Building a bathroom in the basement may appear to be a logical home renovation project, but it is not something that should be undertaken lightly.

If you take care of those concerns before you begin, your project should go off well.

Nonetheless, becoming familiar with the project’s specifications will make it simpler to collaborate with your contractor in order to get the bathroom design you desire.

Design considerations

The first thing you should do is get in touch with your local building authority. You should be aware that with any construction project, particularly one in a basement, zoning rules and deed limitations will need to be taken into consideration. Aim to position the new bathroom as near to the existing plumbing and electrical wiring as feasible in the best case scenario. Often, placing your basement bathroom exactly below the bathroom on the floor above is the most effective solution. Utility hookups will be easier and less expensive as a result of this.

  • Alternatively, would you want a half-bathroom with only a toilet and a sink, or would you prefer an entire bathroom with a bathtub or standing shower?
  • For those who do need a place to clean up, try an economicalcornershowerinstead of a bathtub.
  • It is vitally necessary to have a high-capacity ventilation fan to suck off moisture.
  • In order to handle overflows, a floor drain and access to an outside wall for the dryer vent will be required.

Drainage considerations

When it comes to adding a bathroom to basement rooms, drainage is the most important factor to consider. Gravity is used to drain away sewage and wastewater from standard aboveground bathroom plumbing installations. When waste is moved down the pipes, it is assisted by gravity, which is referred to as a “fall” or “slope.” In order for the toilet, sink, tub, or shower to drain properly in a basement bathroom, there must be a sufficient drop.

When surveying your basement for the purpose of installing a new bathroom, your contractor will pay close attention to two major considerations.

  1. Plumbing depth—If your current plumbing drain is deep enough to allow for adequate drainage, bathroom building will be very straightforward. If this is the case, you’ll need to investigate some alternatives to traditional gravity-fed toilets
  2. If this is not the case, Measurement of pipe size— If your present pipes are too tiny, your plumber will need to install larger pipes in order to accommodate the basement drains.

Depending on the depth of your sewage line, your basement bathroom plumbing may be able to operate on gravity in the same way that your aboveground plumbing works. Obtaining information on the depth of your sewer pipe can be accomplished through your local public works agency. If you have a septic tank, you’ll need to determine whether or not your home’s septic lines are deep enough using the information you’ll most likely already possess. There may even be plumbing stubs accessible already if your property was constructed with the aim of adding a basement bathroom.

  • Even if your drain lines are sufficiently deep, there are certain additional concerns to keep in mind.
  • To prevent sewage from backing up into your toilet when connected to a public sewer line, you’ll need to install a backwater valve.
  • There will be more work to be done if your drainage lines are not deep enough to generate adequate fall in your yard.
  • However, for some homes, this will not be enough to generate adequate fall, but this does not imply that you should abandon your idea.

Basement toilet options

You have a variety of options for commodes for your new bathroom, depending on the plumbing that is already in place. Toilets with pressure-assistance— Despite the fact that your drainage pipes are theoretically too deep for gravity-fed plumbing, the fall in the basement is still not as great as it is on the higher levels of your home. Instead of putting yourself at danger of clogging your pipes with regular plumbing, invest in a pressure-assisted toilet, which employs air pressure to move waste through your pipes.

  • A series of pipes runs up through the basement wall and out through the basement ceiling, where they connect to the sewer or septic tank line.
  • There is a macerating feature in some of these types that grinds waste down to prevent blockage.
  • New versions are powered by electricity, which eliminates the need for these issues.
  • They’re similar to miniature septic tanks in that they only store waste for a short period of time.
  • Because aboveground models are installed on the ground surface, there is no need to excavate for them.
  • This tank may also be used to collect water from your sink, bathtub, or shower.
  • These devices consist of a tank and pump that are installed in a hole beneath the basement floor.

Installation is more difficult for underground models than for aboveground ones, owing to the fact that they require excavation.

They use little to no water and convert your waste into compost that can be used to grow ornamental plants.

Bathtubs and showers are being installed.

It is possible that you may need to tear up the floor and excavate in order to install the plumbing.

You may also link your shower to your upflush toilet or sewage-ejector system as an alternative option.

If you’re planning on placing your basement bathroom against an aboveground outside wall, take advantage of the chance to bring natural light into the space.

In addition, pick bright ceiling lighting as well as lights for the vanity area to illuminate the space.

Your basement bathroom may be just as nice as your main bathroom if you choose the correct layout, fixtures, and accessories.

If you overlook any of the characteristics that distinguish belowground bathrooms from aboveground bathrooms, you might end up with a costly disaster on your hands.

However, if you have prior building knowledge, you may be able to do this project on your own.

Hire a professional plumber to do the task as quickly, easily, and reasonably as possible so that you can use your basement bathroom as soon as feasible. For more information on adding a bathroom to your completed basement, please call Black Diamond PlumbingMechanical now.

All You Need to Know About Adding a Basement Bathroom

You have a variety of options for commodes for your new bathroom, depending on your existing plumbing. Toilets with built-in pressure actuation – Despite the fact that your drainage pipes are theoretically deep enough for gravity-fed plumbing, the fall in the basement is not as significant as it is on the upper levels. When using ordinary plumbing, you run the possibility of blockages. A pressure-assisted toilet works by forcing waste down the pipes by applying air pressure. Toilets should be flushed more frequently— Installing an upflushing toilet is simple since it is a self-contained device that lies on the floor, so there is no need to remove any concrete or excavate.

  1. This is one of the most straightforward methods of incorporating a bathroom into a basement or other crawlspace space.
  2. When it comes to grinding, older upflushing macerating machines depended on water pressure, which resulted in odors and overflow problems.
  3. Septic tank systems with sewage ejectors—Septic tank and pump systems with sewage ejectors are designed to pump sewage upward to the main sewer or septic tank line from the sewage collection system.
  4. Aboveground (free-standing) and belowground variants are available for purchase.
  5. The toilet is mounted on top of a tank and pump unit that is completely contained in a tank enclosure.
  6. Sewage-ejector systems that are installed belowground are also available for installation.
  7. This permits the water from your fixtures to drain into the device using gravity.

Toilets that use compost— Composting toilets are one of the most environmentally friendly alternatives available since they use little to no water and convert waste into compost that can be used to grow ornamental plants.

baths and showers are being installed.

To install the plumbing, it is possible that you will need to break up the floor and excavate.

You may also link your shower to your upflush toilet or sewage-ejector system as an alternative solution.

See also:  Septic Tank Field Line Length When Using Chambers? (Question)

Utilize the chance to introduce natural light into the space if you are placing your basement bathroom against an aboveground outside wall.

Aside from that, use brilliant ceiling lighting and vanity area lights to complete the look.

Your basement bathroom may be just as nice as your main bathroom with the appropriate layout, furnishings, and décor.

A failure to consider any of the factors that distinguish belowground bathrooms from aboveground bathrooms might result in a costly disaster.

However, if you have prior building expertise, you may be able to do this project on your own time.

Use the services of a professional plumber to complete the installation of your basement bathroom as quickly, easily, and reasonably as feasible. If you’re ready to finish your finished basement and add a bathroom, call Black Diamond Plumbing and Mechanical.

Belowground Water and Waste Pipes

Moving belowgrade bathroom waste to a sewer, septic, or sanitation line is not a difficult task for some homeowners since their sewer lines are deep enough to accommodate additional fixtures that benefit from gravity-assisted waste disposal. A phone call to the public works department will provide the general depth of the sewage pipe. Owners of residential properties should have easy access to precise information on their septic systems. Contact a plumber or plumbing professional to establish flow rates and if the system will be able to remove waste from basement fixtures properly.

This will avoid sewage backup in the basement.

Aboveground Solutions

There are a variety of methods for transporting bathroom or basement wastewater to sewage or septic systems. The “upflushing toilet,” freestanding sewage-ejector systems, and composting toilets are examples of aboveground alternatives. Aboveground solutions are ones that do not need the homeowner or installer cutting through an existing basement slab, resulting in cheaper installation costs for the homeowner or installer. Upflushing toilets are available in a variety of styles and configurations, but all have a pumping mechanism that is concealed within or behind the toilet.

Although upflushing toilet systems are pricey, the money saved on installation expenses makes them a worthwhile investment.

“Upflushing toilets sit on top of the floor, you don’t have to break the concrete, and servicing them is easy,” he says.

Macerating and Composting Toilets

Some upflushing toilet systems are equipped with a macerating or grinding mechanism that breaks down waste into tiny pieces prior to pumping, hence reducing the likelihood of blockage. An upflushing toilet system consisting of a toilet bowl, toilet tank, and macerating unit, the Saniplus macerating toilet from Sanif is available. Located in the bathroom or behind the wall, the macerating device (which also contains an electrically driven motor and pump) has the capability of pumping waste twelve feet vertically and/or 150 feet horizontally, depending on the configuration chosen.

Composting toilets are also a potential option for below-grade conditions, but they are only intended for the disposal of toilet waste and nothing else.

The MS10 Composting Toilet by Envirolet is powered by electricity, is self-contained, and sits on the floor.

They eliminate water loss and do not require the use of chemicals in the composting process, making them a more ecologically friendly option.

Due to the limited amount of material that may be composted in a day, utilization must be closely monitored and the unit must be emptied on a regular basis. Composting toilets can cost upwards of $1,000 to install.

Sewage-Ejector Systems

A freestanding or aboveground sewage-ejector system is another waste removal alternative that does not necessitate the drilling of holes through concrete foundations. These systems are normally contained within an enclosure, with the toilet (which is typically not included) mounted on top of the enclosure. Mini septic tanks are what these systems are essentially. This collection tank holds waste from the toilet, sink, shower/bath, and washing machine. It also contains the pump that transports the trash up and into the home’s drainage pipes.

It costs roughly $600 to purchase the Up Jon system from Zoeller; however, it does not come with a toilet.

Belowground Options

Belowground sewage-ejector systems are the least expensive alternative, but they are also the most difficult to set up and maintain. It is intended for these tank-and-pump sets to be installed in a hole in a basement floor, allowing floor fixtures to drain into the tank by gravity. The size of these units varies, but they are normally twenty inches in diameter and thirty inches deep on average. According to industry standards, the capacity of a holding tank ranges from thirty to forty gallons.

In the past, you’d have to buy the pieces individually and assemble the whole thing yourself.” Basically, all you have to do now is drop it in the ground and tie it down.” A below-ground system should cost around $400, according to industry estimates.

Cutting through a concrete slab to excavate the unit’s installation hole and any drainage pipes from extra basement fixtures will put the homeowner back a significant amount of money.

If you flush anything down the toilet by mistake, it may be a very messy task to get it back out.

Any risk in adding a bathroom for a below-grade basement? (floor, ejector) – House -remodeling, decorating, construction, energy use, kitchen, bathroom, bedroom, building, rooms

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Even though I have a walk-out basement, the layout is such that because of a sloping back yard, one end of my basement in underground. I have a septic tank in my back yard; no public sewer. So if I add a bathroom in my basement, I will need to pump the waste up and through the pipes into my septic tank.1. Does this dramatically increase the cost of adding a bathroom?2. Is there some warning/back-up if the pump fails?3. Is there any other option?Please advise,K
Location: The Triad (NC)32,217 posts, read74,603,453timesReputation: 39567
Quote:Originally Posted bykutra11I have a walk-out basement.I have a septic tank in my back yard.1) At what level does the EXISTING waste line exit the building?At my house the old septic pipe exited the wall about 13″ ABOVE the cellar floor.When the city later put in septic lines they were laid quite a bit lower.2) How far below the cellar floor is the septic tank?If low enough to allow enough pitch. you’ll be fine.If not. you may need a (major PITA) ejector pump.LINKThe rest is about plumbing codes -including back water valve.


Last edited by MrRational; 03-19-2014 at01:13 PM.

Quote:Originally Posted byMrRational1) At what level does the EXISTING waste line exit the building?At my house the old septic pipe exited the wall about 13″ ABOVE the cellar floor.When the city later put in septic lines they were laid quite a bit lower.2) How far below the cellar floor is the septic tank?If low enough to allow enough pitch. you’ll be fine.If not. you may need a (major PITA) ejector pump.LINKThanks for your reply. I hope I am answering exactly what you are asking.1. Since my basement is not fully finished, I can see the black septic pipe in my basement. It hangs about 4-5 ft from the basement ceiling.2. I don’t understand the question. If you take a rectangle (my outside basement wall) and draw a diagonal from the upper left corner to the opposite lower right corner, then the diagonal represents the sloping ground with the septic tank at the upper corner. The septic tank is probably at the same level as the basement ceiling which explains why the septic pipe hangs about 4-5 ft from the ceiling.Does that help?
Location: The Triad (NC)32,217 posts, read74,603,453timesReputation: 39567
Quote:Originally Posted bykutra11It hangs about 4-5 ft from the basement ceiling.Yep. you’ll need a pump in order to have plumbing down there.And yes; you are right to be worried about that notion.Ask around for a good plumber.Or wait for the County to run sewage lines out thereOr move.
Quote:Originally Posted bykutra111. Does this dramatically increase the cost of adding a bathroom?2. Is there some warning/back-up if the pump fails?3. Is there any other option?K1. Yes, it will increase the cost.Installing an injector pump involves breaking up the concrete floor to run pipe and add a tank/pump system, installing the plumbing, testing it, then pouring new concrete over the hole.You will also need to vent the system.We had one put in our and I think it added $1500-$2000 to the project?Not sure if that number is correct.2.You can buy overfill alarms.3.No, if your plumbing is going to be lower than the septic line out of your house.
Location: Johns Creek, GA15,802 posts, read58,871,837timesReputation: 19920
Quote:Originally Posted bybroadbill3. No, if your plumbing is going to be lower than the septic line out of your house.Wrong- you could do an incinerator toilet- no waste lines, no supply lines. But of course, you’d still need water and waste lines for a sink and tub/shower- but THEY don’t have to go to the septic system; they are considered gray water.
Quote:Originally Posted byK’ledgeBldrWrong- you could do an incinerator toilet- no waste lines, no supply lines. But of course, you’d still need water and waste lines for a sink and tub/shower- but THEY don’t have to go to the septic system; they are considered gray water.Those toilets run $2500-2800 and you still have to find drainage for the grey water.But I’ll amend.There is no PRACTICAL alternative if your plumbing is below the septic line.happy?
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Installation musts for below-grade bathroom fixtures

However, installing belowground sewage-ejector systems is more difficult than it is to establish aboveground systems. Designed to fit in a hole in the basement floor, these tank-and-pump devices allow floor fixtures to gravity-drain into the tank, saving on plumbing costs. They come in a variety of sizes, but the most common dimensions are 20 inches in diameter and 30 inches deep. According to industry standards, the capacity of a holding tank ranges between thirty and forty gallons. According to Sturm, “one of the best things about these systems is that they arrive as a whole bundle.” In the past, you’d have to purchase the pieces individually and assemble the whole thing yourself.” Basically, all you have to do now is put it in the ground and tie it down.” An underground system will cost around $400, according to industry estimates.

Cutting through a concrete slab to excavate the unit’s installation hole and any drainage pipes from extra basement fixtures will put the homeowner back a significant amount of cash.

It may easily cost thousands of dollars to build a system, according to Sturm. If you flush anything down the toilet by mistake, rescuing it might be a time-consuming and unpleasant task.

Need a Small Bath in Detached Garage. Are There Any Self Contained Septic Systems I Could Use and What is Involved?

ewpk has posed the following question: I have a septic system, however I am aware that the expense of installing another septic system or the ability to add to mine is either prohibitively expensive or not authorized. Self-contained devices that can be pumped were something I’d heard about before. I can’t seem to find reliable information or rules. In addition to this building being on two acres, there are forests behind it. It would not be used on a regular basis, but rather as an overflow for guests.

Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

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Generally speaking, in septic-legal areas (which yours may or may not be at this time for new construction, regardless of whether you already have a septic system), you can install a tank-only septic system (with no leach field), which requires an overfill alarm and level gauge, as well as truck emptying.

Similar in idea to a portable toilet, but with the added benefit of flowing water.

As a general rule, septic system sizes are determined by the number of bedrooms (which serves as an approximate proxy for the number of residents), rather than the number of bathrooms – so, in many cases, adding a bathroom does not necessitate upgrading the septic system; instead, you may simply be looking at installing plumbing in the garage, trenching to the septic tank or house (whichever is closer), and connecting to the household septic system.

A word of caution: if this will be used infrequently (i.e., not at least weekly, but preferably more frequently), make sure the inlet of the garage line comes in a foot or more ABOVE the line from the house if it is tying into that, or as close to a foot above the outlet level from the septic tank as possible if it is going straight to the septic tank (see note above).

A higher entry point (coming in from above to the connection rather than at the same level) eliminates this backup danger.

IN THE EVENT that the septic tank/home line is located uphill from the garage, it is customary for a detached house to install a septic lift pump to pump the sewage to the tank from inside.

If there is a power outage, you would still need to make sure that the water is running out there every week or two to keep it from sludging up and clogging the pump – not an ideal condition.

Other options include the use of a cesspool, which is a hole in the ground similar to a shallow well into which sewage is dumped and serves as both a leach pit and a septic tank if permitted in your area (usually only rural areas with no well within 100-300 feet depending on the area), if permitted in your area (generally only rural areas with no well within 100-300 feet depending on the area).

  • A somewhat porous soil condition is required, and the system does not survive as long as a conventional system with an interceptor tank and leach lines, for example.
  • Septic system permits are frequently available on their website if you search for them using your town’s name as a search term (or county if not in a legal town or city).
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Adding a Second Toilet Line to a Septic

When considering the installation of a toilet on your septic system, it is important to check with the local construction authorities to ensure that you are permitted to do so. Depending on your jurisdiction, the size of your septic system is determined by the number of toilets you service, and exceeding this number without updating your tank or leach field is unlawful. Others, on the other hand, base system size on the number of beds and allow for the addition of numerous additional toilets as long as the number of people who use them does not rise.

The septic tank required for a single family house in Clackamas County, Oregon, for example, must have a minimum capacity of 1,000 gallons.

  1. Locate the lateral waste line, which runs from your home to the septic tank and back again. Despite the fact that it is underground, it is typically straightforward to discover after the septic tank has been identified. Finally, if everything else fails, you might go to the septic system schematic that is on file at the county planning office. Identify and plan the quickest path between the placement of your new toilet and the most convenient point of connecting to the lateral waste line. Depending on where you live, this connection point might be in the center of the yard, adjacent to your house, or even in the crawl space. If the pipe is in the yard, use a shovel to dig around it to expose it if it is hidden by vegetation. Never dig without first calling 811, which is the national call-before-you-dig phone number, to determine the location of underground utility lines. Using a drill and hole saw, create a 3-inch hole on the bathroom floor to accommodate the toilet. As mentioned in the toilet installation instructions, make certain that it is installed at the right distance from both the back and side walls. Install a toilet flange in the opening and secure it to the floor with a screwdriver. Plastic pipe cement should be used to attach a fitting to the flange that will allow you to route the waste pipe in the direction that it needs to travel. Extend the waste pipe to its tie-in point along the most convenient route, cutting pipe with a hacksaw and gluing fittings together with plastic pipe cement in many situations. Closet ells are the most common type of 90-degree drainage fitting. Strapping pipes to the floor joists that run horizontally under the house is an excellent way to keep them safe. Installing a 2-inch vent pipe will allow you to vent the toilet. A typical configuration is for it to rise from a T fitting in the waste line and extend upward to connect with the main vent stack. When employing 3-inch waste lines, the venting system must not be more than 6 feet away from the toilet flange to be effective. Under some conditions, it is acceptable to produce a wet vent through a sink drain
  2. Nevertheless, you should speak with your local building authorities and/or a plumber before proceeding. A vent T fitting should be used to connect the vent pipe to the main vent. The primary vent should be cut using a hacksaw, then glued in the T and the new vent pipe glued to the T. Glue in a Y fitting and glue the new waste pipe to the fitting to connect the toilet waste pipe to the lateral main sewer line.

Things You Will Need

  • Shovel, drill, 3-inch hole saw, toilet flange, closet fitting
  • And other tools. Plastic pipe cement, 3-inch plastic pipe and fittings, hacksaw, and other supplies are needed. Pipe straps
  • 2-inch plastic pipe and fittings
  • Vent T fittings
  • Y fittings
  • Pipe straps

Tip

Every point along the waste pipe’s passage to the septic tank must have a minimum 1/4-inch-per-foot slope to ensure proper drainage. Additionally, the vent pipe must retain the same minimum slope toward the toilet drain as it does toward the toilet. If you have access to a neighboring toilet, such as one on the other side of the wall or in an adjoining bathroom, you may be able to connect the waste line from that toilet to your own.

Warning

  1. Septic system modifications have the potential to modify groundwater composition, posing a threat to public health as well as the environment. It is possible that you may want a permission from both the health department and the building department for this job.

Can you have a bathroom in the basement with a septic system?

Asked in the following category: General The most recent update was made on the 13th of March, 2020. Upon reaching the basement ceiling, the plumbing lines travel upward through the wall and connect to the sewer or septic tank line. This is one of the most straightforward methods of incorporating a bathroom into a basement space. This tank may also be used to collect water from your sink, bathtub, or shower. There are various technologies for removing sewage from belowground levels. It is possible to raise the value of a property by upgrading the basement, and by adding a complete bathroom, you can turn it into a really habitable place.

  • In the same vein, how much does it cost to install a bathroom in the cellar?
  • This covers both the supplies and the labor involved.
  • It is also possible to inquire whether a separate toilet is required for the basement.
  • Thesetoilets do not require the use of a floor drain and are simple to install.
  • How do you install a bathroom in a basement without causing damage to the concrete?

Even better, by using a single Saniflo system, it is feasible to connect a toilet, sink, and shower to the same macerator and pump, which makes plumbing a breeze in the future.

Why Does Bathroom Smell Like Sewage

The date is March 8, 2021. It is one of the most delicate areas in the house to have a bathroom. Every homeowner will go to considerable measures to ensure that their bathroom is clean and fresh smelling. But even with the finest care, a shower room may face difficulties that are beyond the control of the homeowner, such as a sewage stench emanating from the bathroom drains, which cannot be fixed. The presence of sewage gases, in addition to the pain created by the odor, poses a serious health danger to your family and should be handled quickly.

The following are the most prevalent reasons of bathroom sewage odor, as well as easy treatments for removing the odor from the bathroom.

1. Dry P-trap

Having a dry P-trap in your bathroom is one of the most prevalent reasons of sewage odor in the room. An undersink or drain P-trap is a U-shaped pipe that is situated beneath the sink or drains. Using this device, you may prevent sewer odors from entering the bathroom by trapping water behind the drain. If you do not use your bathroom sinks on a regular basis, there is a chance that the water in the P-trap will dry out, enabling sewage gases to easily enter your bathroom. If this happens, call a plumber immediately.

Simply pour some water into the sink for a minute or two and the problem will be resolved.

2. Shower Drain Clogs

Shower drain clogs may be caused by a variety of material, including soap particles, shower gel, dead skin, hair, and other types of waste. The presence of sewage smells in your bathroom, along with minor flooding when taking showers might indicate that your shower drain is clogged with debris. The answer to this problem is quite simple, and you may complete it on your own initiative. It can, however, be a tad disorganized. If you don’t want to get your hands filthy, you may hire an expert to take care of the problem.

To begin, remove the shower drain cover by unscrewing it.

This therapy should be sufficient for loosening the deposits in the affected area.

After that, simply screw the drain cap into place and you are finished.

3. Damaged Toilet

Your toilet may get broken over time as a result of normal wear and tear, and this might be the cause of the sewer gas escaping into your bathroom. For example, when the wax sealing at the base of your toilet becomes loose, it can cause small holes to form, which can allow foul-smelling sewage gas to flow into your bathroom. Additionally, minor fractures in your toilet bowl might result in water leaks, which can cause a reduction in the water level in your toilet’s P-trap, if the breach is large enough.

Low water levels in the P-trap may allow sewage gases to enter your bathroom, resulting in an unpleasant odor in your bathroom. If you are suffering such a problem, it would be ideal if you sought the assistance of a professional to get the problem resolved.

4. Broken, Clogged or Poorly Installed Vent Pipes

The wear and use on your toilet over time might lead it to get damaged, and this could be the cause of the sewer gas escaping into your bathroom. Suppose the wax sealing at the base of your toilet becomes loose, resulting in microscopic breaches that allow foul-smelling sewage gas to flow into your bathroom. This is a classic example. Aside from that, minor cracks in your toilet bowl might produce water leaks, which can cause the water level in your toilet’s P-trap to decrease significantly. The presence of low water levels in the P-trap may allow sewage gases to enter your bathroom, resulting in an unpleasant odor in the bathroom.

5. Bacteria Build-up

Because the sewage system is an ideal breeding place for hazardous bacteria, it is possible for these germs to make their way into your bathroom and begin proliferating under the toilet bowl, eventually becoming responsible for bad odors in the bathroom. This is especially prevalent during hot weather, when germs proliferate at an alarming rate. When it comes to preventing bacterial development, bleach may be a very useful tool. You will, however, require more than simply swishing bleach around the toilet bowl to get the desired results.

6. Full Septic Tank

If your drainage system is connected to a septic tank in your compound and you detect a sewage stench in your bathroom, it is possible that your septic tank is overflowing and needs to be drained. When you have a clogged septic tank, the stench of sewage is not the only thing that you will notice. It is possible that you may begin to hear bubbling sounds coming from the toilet and drains, and that your toilet will become slow. The answer to a clogged septic tank is simple: just drain it out completely.

7. Sewer Backups

If your drainage system is connected to a septic tank in your compound and you detect a sewage stench in your bathroom, it is possible that your septic tank is overflowing and has to be pumped out. A sewage stench is not the only thing that you will notice when your septic tank is overflowing. It is possible that you may begin to hear bubbling sounds coming from the toilet and drains, and that your toilet will become slow. The answer to a clogged septic tank is simple: just drain it out completely!

Final Thoughts

The bathroom is considered to be one of the most holy rooms in the house. A sewage stench, on the other hand, might detract from the peacefulness. In addition to being a potential health hazard, a sewage stench in your bathroom may also be a cause of social humiliation. As a result, you must address the situation as soon as possible. If you’ve tried all of the above do-it-yourself solutions and the problem still doesn’t seem to be resolved, it may be necessary to seek professional assistance.

Because our professionals are equipped with the required instruments, technical know-how, and industry expertise to tackle the problem, you won’t have to worry about the tension that comes with sewage odors in your house.

If you live in Sacramento, California, and you are having sewage odors in your bathroom, we would be pleased to help you restore the comfort of your residence. Do you require a different plumbing service? To get started, please contact us right away.

How to Plumb a Basement Bathroom

Time Days Counted Multiple Days ComplexityIntermediateCost$101–250

Introduction

A bathroom in the basement increases the resale value of a finished basement significantly. Following are the steps for piping the bathroom yourself and saving at least $1,000 in plumbing expenditures.

Tools Required

  • Pvc pipe and fittings up to 2 inches in diameter, as well as 2x4s 3-inch plastic and cast iron pipe and fittings
  • 4-inch plastic and cast iron pipe and fittings
  • 3-inch plastic and cast iron pipe and fittings
  • Concrete, pipe adhesive, and band couplings are all examples of materials that can be used.

Adding a bathroom to a basement is a large and difficult undertaking. However, this does not rule out the possibility of success. Every year, thousands of do-it-yourselfers complete the project successfully, and you can too. During this lesson, we will concentrate on building the “DWV” system (drain, waste, and vent), which is the most complex aspect of plumbing a basement bathroom. DWV systems involve some physical effort (breaking up concrete) as well as specialized knowledge to ensure that trash is transported safely and efficiently away from the site.

The supplies for the DWV system seen here cost around $250 in total.

In order to give you a sense of the magnitude of this project, I’ve included an example floorplan and project plan: To complete the rough-in plumbing, connect the basement bathroom plumbing to the existing drain and vent lines in the floor and ceiling, which are already in place.

Project step-by-step (20)

  • Locate the “main stack,” which is a huge vertical pipe with a diameter of 3 or 4 inches that extends into the basement floor
  • Look for a cleanout plug along the street-facing side of the basement.
  • Note: If you come across one, it is most likely the location where the line leaves your house. The line normally travels straight from the main stack to the cleanout, however it may be curved or diagonal in some cases.

Break a hole in the concrete to make sure the main line is indeed where you believe it is to be. Inspect the hole to ensure that it is deep enough to provide appropriate downhill slope in the new drain lines.

Measure for Sufficient Slope

  • To ensure that waste flows easily through the pipes, drain lines must have a downward slope of at least 1/4 inch per linear foot (see note below).

Measure the depth of the center of the main line (at the tie-in point) to determine the length of the main line (A). The future depth of the horizontal pipe beneath the drain should be measured (B). Make a quick calculation. In feet, the maximum length of the drain line is calculated by multiplying (A – B) by four. The drain line is measured from the main to the end of the horizontal pipe under the drain.

  • Note: For example, if A is 13 inches and B is 10 inches, the maximum length of the drain line is 12 feet in this case. (13 minus 10 equals 3
  • 3 times 4 equals 12)
  • Pro tip: If your main line isn’t deep enough, you’ll either have to relocate fixtures closer to the line or add a sewage ejection pump to compensate.

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Plan the System

  • Mark out the whole bathroom on the bottom floor with a pencil, including the walls, the toilet, the sink, the shower, and, lastly, the drain lines.
  • Pro tip: This is a fantastic method to experiment with different bathroom arrangement ideas

Create mock-ups of components of the system and lay them out on the basement floor, using lengths of pipe and a variety of fittings to represent the system. When the entire system has been developed, it should be laid out on the floor.

  • Pro tip: We prefer to draw bold lines on the blueprint using tape or paint to indicate important points. Drain lines, on the other hand, may be painted with a basic spray paint.

Rent a Snapper

When using a cast iron pipe snapper, the pipe is snapped by tightening a cutting chain until it breaks. Rental stores for power tools have them available. It is possible for old cast iron pipe to crush rather than break. Then you’ll have to forsake the snapper and make do with a reciprocating saw, which is more time-consuming but more accurate. Using a reciprocating saw, you may quickly and easily cut through the main line if you are working with plastic pipe. Step number four.

Trench the Floor

  • With a sledgehammer, begin tearing up the basement floor near the main line in the basement.
  • It is important to note that breaking through at the tie-in point may take several dozen whacks.

As you proceed, make a point of picking out the larger fragments of concrete.

Separate the soil from the larger fragments of concrete by putting it in a mound on the ground.

  • Keep in mind that you don’t want large bits of soil in the soil you’ll be using for backfill later.

Break Out a Section of Drain

  • Make a slit in the main line so that you may install a Y-adapter.
  • Advice from the experts: Make sure no one uses the water (or flushes!) while the line is still open.

Tie Into the Drain

  • Rubber couplers should be slipped onto the main line. Insert the Y-fitting into the hole. Couplers should be slid over the joints and the bands should be tightened. Close the inlet and inform your family that it is okay to flush the toilet once more.

Build the Drain System

  • Determine the exact placement of the shower drain after the walls have been framed in order to avoid surprises later on.
  • Observe and double-check your work before you glue the joints together to ensure that the drains and vents are properly placed

Close up any exposed pipes to keep sewage gas from entering your property.

  • One piece of advice: Do not bury the lines until the building inspector has given his approval.

Patch the Floor

  • Backfill the trench with earth, and then screed three inches of concrete over the top of the soil fill.
  • Pro tip: Firmly pack the dirt to prevent it from settling later.

Pour concrete into the trench and smooth it out with a steel trowel to finish the top of the trench.

Tips to Help You Get it Right

  • Purchase twice as many fittings as you anticipate being required, as well as a few varieties that you do not anticipate being required. When the work is completed, the leftovers should be returned. If you don’t already have a torpedo level, go out and get one. It is the most convenient instrument for determining the slope of pipes
  • In order to prevent pipe sections from moving while you construct subsequent sections, pack earth beneath and around them after they are completed. Understand the location of your basement toilet’s “rough-in” (the distance from the wall to the center of the drain, most likely 12 in.). Keep in mind to account for the thickness of the structure and drywall. Carefully backfill the trenches with dirt. Packing the dirt securely will keep it from settling later, but be careful not to move the pipes while you are tamping the earth
  • And

Build the Vent System

  • After constructing the bathroom walls, the vent lines should be installed.
  • It’s worth noting that we ran our vent lines beneath the floor joists and afterwards built a lower ceiling to conceal the pipes:

Connect to an Existing Vent

  • In most basements, you will be able to connect your new vent system to the existing pipe that vents the laundry sink.

T- or Y-fittings are made by gluing small portions of plastic tubing together. Cut a segment of the old vent pipe and join it with rubber couplers to create a new vent pipe.

Position the Shower Drain

  • Place the shower pan in the desired area and take measurements from the walls to identify the exact location of the drain
  • Assemble the drain and trap without the use of adhesive
  • Set the pan back in position to double-check your work before you finish gluing the fittings in place.

Waste Line QA

  • When connecting horizontal pipes to vertical pipes in drain lines, a T-fitting should be used. Vent line connectors can also be used to connect vent lines to horizontal drains or to connect vent lines together.

When Should I Use a Y?

  • When connecting horizontal pipes in the drainage system, a Y-fitting should be used (Photo 3). In addition to a 45-degree “street” fitting, a Y-fitting can be used to connect vertical drainpipes to horizontal pipes, as illustrated in the illustration. In addition, a Y-fitting can be employed in vent systems.

What Type of L Fitting Do I Need?

  • When there is horizontal-to-vertical flow in drain systems, a typical L-fitting is employed. L-fittings that “sweep” or make long turns are acceptable in practically every condition, but they are necessary in two situations: horizontal-to-horizontal turns and vertical-to-horizontal turns (see illustration) (as shown). However, it may be utilized in any circumstance where there is enough room
  • Vent L-fittings should only be used in vents.

What’s a Street Fitting?

  • Hubs on standard fittings are designed to fit over pipes. A street fitting has a “streeted” end that fits into a hub, allowing you to connect it directly to another fitting rather than having to use a segment of pipe in the process of connecting them. Thus, work and space are conserved.

What Size Drainpipe Should I Use?

  • The toilet in the basement must be three inches or greater. 2-in. should be used for the rest. Pipes less than 2 inches in diameter are not permitted beneath a concrete slab.

Venting QA

  • It is possible to employ a vent L-fitting anyplace in the vent system, but only in the vent system—never in the area where waste flows. It is also acceptable to use the other two types of L-fittings for venting

What’s the Vent For?

  • A plumbing vent is similar to the air intake on a gas can in that it allows air to enter. In the absence of venting, the pressure and vacuum created by a rush of sewage racing through a waste line generates air pressure and vacuum in the pipe. That implies drains that gurgle and make a lot of noise. In addition to this, the vacuum may sucking all of the water out of the traps, enabling sewage gas to freely flow into your home. Yuck

Can Vents Run Horizontally?

  • The “spill line,” which is the level where water would overflow the lip of a sink, bathtub, or basement toilet, must be at least 6 in. above the horizontal vent lines.

What Size Vent Pipes Do I Need?

  • A 2-inch vent is required for a conventional bathroom such as the one we show (with a sink, toilet, shower, or tub). Even though you could utilize smaller pipes to get to the sink or shower, it’s typically easier to use a single size for the entire system.

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