What Kind Of Septic Tank Should You Get? (Best solution)

Minimum Septic Tank Capacity Table

Number of Bedrooms Minimum Septic Tank Size Drainfield Size
2 or less 1000 – 1500 Gallons 800 – 2500 Sq. Ft.
3 1000 – 2000 Gallons 1000 – 2880 Sq. Ft.
4 1250 – 2500 Gallons 1200 – 3200 Sq. Ft.
5 1500 – 3000 Gallons 1600 – 3400 Sq. Ft.

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How do I choose the best septic tank design?

  • Determine your size requirements. Before looking at septic systems,figure out what size of septic tank is right for your home.
  • Decide what type of septic tank design is best. Don’t think in terms of brand name,but what type of soil your septic tank will be installed into.
  • Select the pump type you will use.

What kind of septic tank lasts the longest?

Concrete septic tanks have the longest lifespan out of any septic tank material. While they are more expensive and sometimes difficult to install, it is for a good reason. A properly designed and installed concrete septic tank can last for anywhere from 40 years and beyond.

Which type of septic tank is best?

The best choice is a precast concrete septic tank. Precast septic tanks hold many advantages over plastic, steel, or fiberglass tanks. This is why so many cities and towns actually require the use of concrete septic tanks.

How do I choose a septic tank?

Size. There are many differently-sized septic tanks to choose from. The right tank size should be determined by the amount of water your family uses each day. If your family uses minimal water, less than 500 gallons, a septic tank with a 900-gallon capacity is needed to ensure that the sewage is properly processed.

What are the 3 types of septic systems?

Types of Septic Systems

  • Septic Tank.
  • Conventional System.
  • Chamber System.
  • Drip Distribution System.
  • Aerobic Treatment Unit.
  • Mound Systems.
  • Recirculating Sand Filter System.
  • Evapotranspiration System.

What will ruin a septic system?

Any paper products like tissues, paper towels, tampons, or sanitary products, even some heavier toilet paper, will clog your system if you flush enough of it. Wet wipes are another product that you should never flush into a septic system.

What is the average life of a septic system?

Age of the System It’s pretty common for a septic system to last 40 years or longer, which means if you buy a new home, you might never need to replace it. However, you might have an older home whose septic system has been in place for nearly half a century.

How often does a 1000 gallon septic tank need to be pumped?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

How big of a septic tank do I need?

The larger your home, the larger the septic tank you’re going to need. For instance, a house smaller than 1,500 square feet usually requires a 750 to 1,000-gallon tank. On the other hand, a bigger home of approximately 2,500 square feet will need a bigger tank, more than the 1,000-gallon range.

Which septic tank is better concrete or plastic?

Cement Septic tanks are very durable than plastic tanks and, if kept properly, can have extended longevity. With regular draining and proper maintenance, a cement septic tank can last for up to 40 years. Cement septic tanks are resistant to environmental changes such as tree roots or changing soil conditions.

Can heavy rain affect septic tank?

It is common to have a septic back up after or even during a heavy rain. Significant rainfall can quickly flood the ground around the soil absorption area (drainfield) leaving it saturated, making it impossible for water to flow out of your septic system.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

What are the different types of septic tanks?

Septic Tank Types

  • Concrete. Concrete septic tanks. These durable tanks will usually last for several decades.
  • Steel. Steel septic tanks.
  • Fiberglass. Fiberglass septic tanks.
  • Plastic. Plastic septic tanks.
  • Aerobic. Aerobic septic tanks.

What is a Class 5 septic system?

Class 5. A sewage system using a holding tank for the retention of on-site sewage and must be emptied by a licensed sewage hauler. A permit is required to install this type of septic system.

What is the difference between a septic tank and a septic field?

The septic tank is a buried, water-tight container usually made of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene. The liquid wastewater (effluent) then exits the tank into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered, excavation made in unsaturated soil.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

Types of Septic Systems

Septic system design and size can differ significantly from one neighborhood to the next, as well as throughout the country, due to a variety of variables. Household size, soil type, slope of the site, lot size, closeness to sensitive water bodies, weather conditions, and even municipal ordinances are all considerations to take into consideration. The following are 10 of the most often encountered septic system configurations. It should be noted that this is not an exhaustive list; there are several additional types of septic systems.

  • Septic Tank, Conventional System, Chamber System, Drip Distribution System, Aerobic Treatment Unit, Mound Systems, Recirculating Sand Filter System, Evapotranspiration System, Constructed Wetland System, Cluster / Community System, etc.

Septic Tank

This tank is underground and waterproof, and it was designed and built specifically for receiving and partially treating raw home sanitary wastewater. Generally speaking, heavy materials settle at or near the bottom of the tank, whereas greases and lighter solids float to the surface. The sediments are retained in the tank, while the wastewater is sent to the drainfield for further treatment and dispersion once it has been treated.

Conventional System

This tank is subterranean and waterproof, and it was designed and built specifically for the purpose of receiving and treating raw home sanitary wastewater. Generally speaking, heavy materials settle at or near the bottom of the tank, whilst greases and lighter solids float to the top. In contrast, the wastewater is released to a drainfield for additional treatment and dispersion, while the sediments remain in the tank.

Chamber System

Gravelless drainfields have been regularly utilized in various states for more than 30 years and have evolved into a standard technology that has mostly replaced gravel systems. Various configurations are possible, including open-bottom chambers, pipe that has been clothed, and synthetic materials such as expanded polystyrene media. Gravelless systems can be constructed entirely of recycled materials, resulting in considerable reductions in carbon dioxide emissions during their lifetime. The chamber system is a type of gravelless system that can be used as an example.

  1. The key advantage of the chamber system is the enhanced simplicity with which it can be delivered and built.
  2. This sort of system is made up of a number of chambers that are connected to one another.
  3. Wastewater is transported from the septic tank to the chambers through pipes.
  4. The wastewater is treated by microbes that live on or near the soil.

Drip Distribution System

An effluent dispersal system such as the drip distribution system may be employed in a variety of drainfield configurations and is very versatile. In comparison to other distribution systems, the drip distribution system does not require a vast mound of dirt because the drip laterals are only placed into the top 6 to 12 inches of soil. In addition to requiring a big dosage tank after the sewage treatment plant to handle scheduled dose delivery of wastewater to drip absorption areas, the drip distribution system has one major disadvantage: it is more expensive.

This method necessitates the use of additional components, such as electrical power, which results in a rise in costs as well as higher maintenance.

Aerobic Treatment Unit

Aerobic Treatment Units (ATUs) are small-scale wastewater treatment facilities that employ many of the same procedures as a municipal sewage plant. An aerobic system adds oxygen to the treatment tank using a pump. When there is an increase in oxygen in the system, there is an increase in natural bacterial activity, which then offers extra treatment for nutrients in the effluent. It is possible that certain aerobic systems may additionally include a pretreatment tank as well as a final treatment tank that will include disinfection in order to further lower pathogen levels.

ATUs should be maintained on a regular basis during their service life.

Mound Systems

Using mound systems in regions with short soil depth, high groundwater levels, or shallow bedrock might be a good alternative. A drainfield trench has been dug through the sand mound that was erected. The effluent from the septic tank runs into a pump chamber, where it is pumped to the mound in the amounts recommended. During its release to the trench, the effluent filters through the sand and is dispersed into the native soil, where it continues to be treated. However, while mound systems can be an effective solution for some soil conditions, they demand a significant amount of land and require regular care.

Recirculating Sand Filter System

Sand filter systems can be built either above or below ground, depending on the use. The effluent is discharged from the septic tank into a pump compartment. Afterwards, it is pushed into the sand filter. The sand filter is often made of PVC or a concrete box that is filled with a sand-like substance. The effluent is pushed through the pipes at the top of the filter under low pressure to the drain. As the effluent exits the pipelines, it is treated as it passes through the sand filtering system.

However, sand filters are more costly than a standard septic system because they provide a higher level of nutrient treatment and are thus better suited for areas with high water tables or that are adjacent to bodies of water.

Evapotranspiration System

Evaporative cooling systems feature drainfields that are one-of-a-kind. It is necessary to line the drainfield at the base of the evapotranspiration system with a waterproof material. Following the entry of the effluent into the drainfield, it evaporates into the atmosphere. At the same time, the sewage never filters into the soil and never enters groundwater, unlike other septic system designs. It is only in particular climatic circumstances that evapotranspiration systems are effective.

The environment must be desert, with plenty of heat and sunshine, and no precipitation. These systems perform effectively in shallow soil; but, if it rains or snows excessively, they are at risk of failing completely.

Constructed Wetland System

Construction of a manufactured wetland is intended to simulate the treatment processes that occur in natural wetland areas. Wastewater goes from the septic tank and into the wetland cell, where it is treated. Afterwards, the wastewater goes into the media, where it is cleaned by microorganisms, plants, and other media that eliminate pathogens and nutrients. Typically, a wetland cell is constructed with an impermeable liner, gravel and sand fill, and the necessary wetland plants, all of which must be capable of withstanding the constant saturation of the surrounding environment.

As wastewater travels through the wetland, it may escape the wetland and flow onto a drainfield, where it will undergo more wastewater treatment before being absorbed into the soil by bacteria.

Cluster / Community System

In certain cases, a decentralized wastewater treatment system is owned by a group of people and is responsible for collecting wastewater from two or more residences or buildings and transporting it to a treatment and dispersal system placed on a suitable location near the dwellings or buildings. Cluster systems are widespread in settings like rural subdivisions, where they may be found in large numbers.

How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. All of the water that leaves your home drains down a single main drainage pipe and into a septic tank. An underground, water-tight container, often composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, serves as a septic system’s holding tank. Its function is to retain wastewater for a long enough period of time to allow particles to sink to the bottom and form sludge, while oil and grease float to the surface and produce scum. Sludge and scum are prevented from exiting the tank and moving into the drainfield region by compartments and a T-shaped outlet. After that, the liquid wastewater (effluent) exits the tank and flows into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered hole dug in unsaturated soil that serves as a drainage system. Porous surfaces are used to release pretreated wastewater because they allow the wastewater to pass through the soil and into the groundwater. In the process of percolating through the soil, wastewater is accepted, treated, and dispersed by the soil, finally discharging into groundwater. Finally, if the drainfield becomes overburdened with too much liquid, it can flood, causing sewage to flow to the ground surface or resulting in toilet backups and sink backups. Finally, wastewater percolates into the soil, where it is naturally removed of harmful coliform bacteria, viruses, and nutrients. Coliform bacteria are a kind of bacteria that may be found in the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals, with humans being the most common host. As a result of human fecal contamination, it is a sign of this.
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The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has built an animated, interactive model of how a residential septic system works, which you can view here.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • You make use of well water. In your home, the water pipe that brings water into the house does not have a meter. In the case of a water bill or a property tax bill, you will see “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” It is possible that your neighbors have a septic system

How to find your septic system

You can locate your septic system once you have confirmed that you have one by following these steps:

  • The following are some methods for determining whether or not your home has a septic system.

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly.

Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

What Size Septic Tank Do I Need

The size of an underground septic tank is referred to as its total volume handling capacity in this article, and it will be discussed in further detail later in this article. For additional information on above-ground septic tanks and systems, see our page on above-ground septic tanks. The minimum septic tank capacity requirements are determined by a variety of variables. State, county, and/or city regulations may specify permitted tank sizes, as well as tank materials and installation.

The size of the septic tank will vary depending on whether it is intended for domestic or commercial usage; in this section, we will cover residential use.

Shortly stated, the required size of a septic tank will be determined by the following factors: (1) the specific septic system type; (2) local government requirements; (3) the compatibility of the ground geology; and (4) the anticipated volume of wastewater depending on the size of the residence.

However, this is not true.

Furthermore, plastic septic tanks will not corrode, are weatherproof, are waterproof, are less expensive, are lighter, and are easier to build.

1) The Specific Septic System Type

There are seven different types of septic tank systems, and the size of the tank required will vary depending on the system you choose. The scope of this article does not allow for a comprehensive discussion of each system type and its associated size requirements. We are referring to traditional gravity-fed anaerobic septic systems in this context when we say “system type.” The anaerobic septic system is the most prevalent type of septic system, and it is the one that most people think of when they imagine a septic tank.

  1. The following systems are available: conventional, gravity-fed, anaerobic systems
  2. Above-ground septic systems
  3. Pressure systems
  4. Anaerobic systems
  5. Mound systems
  6. Recirculating sand or gravel filters systems
  7. Bottomless sand filters systems

If your septic tank system is anything other than a traditional, anaerobic system, the instructions in this page may not be applicable in their entirety to your situation.

2) Local Government Regulations

The laws for septic tanks imposed by local governments vary greatly across the United States. In part, this is due to the significantly diverse soil geography and water features that exist from state to state and can even differ by a few miles in some cases. In order to determine the appropriate septic tank size and the best position on the land for installation, it is essential to consult with local government rules first. Take, for example, theWastewater Treatment Standards – Residential Onsite Systemsdocument from the New York State Department of Health, which provides a comprehensive informational overview of codes, rules, and regulations frequently promulgated by governing bodies, as well as common terminology and definitions in the industry.

3) Suitability of the Ground Geology

The laws for septic tanks imposed by local governments differ significantly across the country. Due to the significantly diverse soil geography and water features found in each state, and sometimes even within a few miles of one another, this is the case In order to determine the appropriate septic tank size and the best placement on the land for installation, it is critical to consult with local government officials first. Review theWastewater Treatment Standards – Residential Onsite Systemsdocument from the New York State Department of Health for an example, as well as an informative discussion of codes, rules, and regulations frequently put forward by regulatory departments, as well as common terminology and meanings.

4) The Expected Volume of Wastewater

The typical amount of wastewater that will be generated and that the septic tank will be able to manage is the most essential factor in determining the size of the septic tank that is required. In a home with simply a septic system, all wastewater is disposed of in the septic tank unless a separate system for managing greywater is in place to handle the waste. In order to calculate and approximate these values for residential dwellings, business structures, and facilities, extensive study has been carried out.

Starting with a 1000-gallon septic tank for residential usage, the advice is to go from there.

Some experts propose adding an additional 250 gallons of septic tank capacity for each additional bedroom over three bedrooms.

This is frequently the case when considering the situation collectively for the entire household rather than individually.

Minimum Septic Tank Capacity Table

For further information on the minimum septic tank capacity dependent on the number of residential bedrooms, please see the following table:

Number of Bedrooms Minimum Septic Tank Size Minimum Liquid Surface Area Drainfield Size
2 or less 1000 – 1500 Gallons 27 Sq. Ft. 800 – 2500 Sq. Ft.
3 1000 – 2000 Gallons 27 Sq. Ft. 1000 – 2880 Sq. Ft.
4 1250 – 2500 Gallons 34 Sq. Ft. 1200 – 3200 Sq. Ft.
5 1500 – 3000 Gallons 40 Sq. Ft. 1600 – 3400 Sq. Ft.
6 1750 – 3500 Gallons 47 Sq. Ft. 2000 – 3800 Sq. Ft.

Take note of the following in relation to the table above:

  • As defined by the State of New York, the Minimum Liquid Surface Area is the surface area given for the liquid by the tank’s width and length measurements. The range of Drainfield Sizes is depending on the kind of groundwater present. The State of Michigan provides the above-mentioned drainfield recommendations, which might vary greatly depending on local standards and terrain.

Additional Thought: Can a Septic Tank Be Too Big?

In the absence of consideration for cost, it is reasonable to ask: “Can a septic tank be too large?” The answer is a resounding nay. As long as the septic tank is placed appropriately, it is impossible for a septic tank to be too large; the only thing that can happen is that it is too little.

According to the majority of suggestions, constructing a larger-capacity septic tank is frequently the safer and more preferable solution. The following are the reasons behind this:

  1. With a bigger septic tank, you can adapt for changes in household consumption, such as those caused by parties or long-term guests. In the event that your family grows in size or you want to make improvements to your house, such as adding more bedrooms and bathrooms or installing new plumbing fixtures, having a bigger septic tank can save you the expense of installing a new tank.

Takeaways | What Size Septic Tank Do I Need

The septic tank size recommendations offered here are merely that: suggestions. They are built on a foundation of information gathered from government and academic sources. The actual size of the septic tank you require will vary depending on the factors discussed in this article. There is no “one-size-fits-all” solution when it comes to determining the appropriate septic tank size for your property. There is a great deal of variation depending on where you reside. With addition to providing a basic insight into the septic tank and system size that may be most suited to your application, the providedMinimum Septic Tank Capacity Tablecan also assist in cost estimations.

Before beginning any septic tank installation project, check and double-check with the state, city, or local county’s agency that is in charge of septic tanks, soil testing, and permissions.

If you’re searching for a chart of tank sizes, have a look at our page on the many sizes and quantities of septic tanks available.

They are available in both single chamber and double chamber designs.

4 Types of Septic Tanks – HomeAdvisor

The characteristics of each type of septic tank are crucial to understand whether you’re deciding which type of tank to use in conjunction with your septic system or solving a problem with your existing tank. Each installation option has its own set of pros and limitations, just like any other installation. Knowing the relative advantages and disadvantages of each option will assist you in making the right selection while establishing, repairing, or replacing your septic tank. Please keep in mind that most of these issues are the consequence of improper septic maintenance or installation.

The cost of an inspection might vary significantly based on a variety of criteria.

  • If you’re attempting to figure out what sort of septic tank to put in with your septic system or if you’re troubleshooting your present tank, it’s crucial to understand the differences between the various types of tanks. The pros and cons of each installation method are the same as for any other. When it comes to installing, repairing, or replacing your septic tank, being aware of the respective advantages and disadvantages will help you make the best decision possible. Keep in mind that most of these issues are the consequence of improper septic maintenance or installation practices. To avoid or identify these problems before they become tragedies, you should get your tank examined on a regular basis. Depending on a variety of criteria, the cost of an inspection might vary. Consult with a professional to obtain an exact estimate of the cost of a sewage tank check.
  • In spite of the fact that plastic septic tanks are more resistant to the chemical processes that occur naturally in a septic system, their lower weight makes them more prone to structural damage. It is necessary to install the tank with care in order to avoid damage to the tank. It is important to take careful notice of the land above the tank. Avoid driving any vehicles over the tank’s filling station. During periods of wet soil, the lighter can also cause the tank to shift in its position in the ground. Occasionally, a plastic septic tank may emerge from the earth, destroying pipes along the way.
  • Using oxygen to help in the degradation of the effluent is what aerobic septic tanks are all about, according to the manufacturer. They also necessitate the use of power. When a septic system fails, aerobic septic tanks are most frequently utilized to replace it. They can also, on occasion, minimize the amount of space necessary for their drain field. Aerobic septic tanks are generally two to three times more expensive than conventional septic tanks, but their high efficiency can result in significant savings in terms of reclaimed land in the drain field and a longer tank life. The capacity of an aerobic septic tank to function has nothing to do with its long-term dependability. A more regular and more thorough maintenance schedule is required for an aerobic septic system. Because of its more intricate breakdown structure, there is a greater possibility that something may go wrong. However, if the system is properly maintained, its effectiveness will allow you to keep your effluent under control for an almost unlimited period of time.
  • Using oxygen to help in the breakdown of the effluent is what aerobic septic tanks are all about, according to the name. Aside from that, they require power. When a septic system fails, aerobic septic tanks are most typically utilized to replace it. Occasionally, they are able to minimize the amount of space necessary for their drainage system. Aerobic septic tanks are generally two to three times more expensive than conventional septic tanks, but their high efficiency can result in significant savings in terms of reclaimed area in the drain field and life expectancy. When it comes to durability, the ability of an aerobic septic tank is irrelevant. Regular and significant maintenance are required for an aerobic septic system, which is more expensive. As a result of its more sophisticated breakdown mechanism, there is a greater likelihood that something may go wrong. But if the system is kept in good working order, it will be able to keep your effluent under control for an almost limitless period of time.
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Aerobic Septic Tank—Aerobic septic tanks work by increasing the breakdown of the effluent with the help of oxygen. In addition, they demand power. Aerobic septic tanks are most commonly utilized to replace failing septic systems. They can also lower the amount of space required for their drain field on occasion. Aerobic septic tanks are generally two to three times more expensive than conventional septic tanks, but their high efficiency can result in significant savings in terms of reclaimed land in the drain field as well as a longer tank life.

It is more difficult and time-consuming to maintain an aerobic septic system.

The fact that it has a more sophisticated system of breakdown raises the likelihood that something may go wrong. However, if the system is properly maintained, its effectiveness will allow you to keep your effluent under control for an almost unlimited period of time.

What size of septic tank do I need?

Probably one of the last things on your mind when you are constructing a new house is the location of your septic system. After all, shopping for tanks isn’t nearly as entertaining as shopping for cabinetry, appliances, and floor coverings. Although you would never brag about it, your guests will be aware if you do not have the proper septic tank placed in your home or business.

septic tanks for new home construction

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size. Of course, all of this is dependent on the number of people who live in the house as well as the amount of water and waste that will be disposed of through the plumbing system.

For the most accurate assessment of your septic tank needs, you should speak with an experienced and trustworthy sewer business representative.

planning your drainfield

Here are some helpful hints for deciding where to locate your drainfield when you’re designing it.

  • Vehicles should not be allowed on or around the drainfield. Planting trees or anything else with deep roots along the bed of the drain field is not recommended. The roots jam the pipes on a regular basis. Downspouts and sump pumps should not be discharged into the septic system. Do not tamper with or change natural drainage features without first researching and evaluating the consequences of your actions on the drainage field. Do not construct extensions on top of the drain field or cover it with concrete, asphalt, or other materials. Create easy access to your septic tank cover by placing it near the entrance. Easy maintenance and inspection are made possible as a result. To aid with evaporation and erosion prevention, plant grass in the area.

a home addition may mean a new septic tank

Do not make any big additions or renovations to your house or company until you have had the size of your septic system assessed. If you want to build a house addition that is more than 10% of your total floor space, increases the number of rooms, or necessitates the installation of new plumbing, you will almost certainly need to expand your septic tank.

  • For a home addition that will result in increased use of your septic system, your local health department will require a letter from you that has been signed and authorized by a representative of your local health department confirming that your new septic system is capable of accommodating the increase in wastewater. It is not recommended that you replace your septic system without the assistance of a certified and competent contractor.

how to maintain your new septic system

Septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services are provided by Norway Septic Inc., a service-oriented company devoted to delivering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to households and business owners throughout the Michiana area. “We take great delight in finishing the task that others have left unfinished.” “They pump, we clean!” says our company’s motto. Septic systems are something we are familiar with from our 40 years of expertise, and we propose the following:

  • Make use of the services of a qualified specialist to develop a maintenance strategy. Make an appointment for an annual examination of your septic system. Utilize the services of an effluent filter to limit the amount of particles that exit the tank, so extending the life of your septic system. Waste items should be disposed of properly, and energy-efficient appliances should be used. Make sure you get your septic system professionally cleaned every 2 to 3 years, or more frequently if necessary, by an experienced and qualified expert
  • If you have any reason to believe that there is an issue with your system, contact a professional. It is far preferable to catch anything early than than pay the price later. Maintain a record of all septic system repairs, inspections, and other activities

common septic questions

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions by our septic customers.

How do I determine the size of my septic tank?

If you have a rectangular tank, multiply the inner height by the length to get the overall height of the tank. In order to find out how many gallons your septic tank contains, divide the number by.1337.1337

How many bedrooms does a 500-gallon septic tank support?

Calculate the internal height of a rectangular tank by multiplying it by its length. To find out how many gallons your septic tank can contain, multiply the figure by.1337.

How deep in the ground is a septic tank?

Your septic system is normally buried between four inches and four feet underground, depending on the climate.

Buying a Home With a Septic Tank? What You Need to Know

Published in February of this year A septic tank is one of those property features that might make prospective purchasers feel uneasy. A septic tank is a component of a home’s wastewater system that is often found in homes that are not served by municipal sewers. Instead, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, these stand-alone systems are meant to dispose of and treat the wastewater generated by a residence on their own (EPA).

For anyone contemplating purchasing a property with a septic system, here are some often asked questions and answers to consider:

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How Does a Septic System Work?

A pipe gathers all of the wastewater from the residence and transports it to an underground septic tank that is completely waterproof. As explained by the Environmental Protection Agency, solids settle to the bottom of the pond while floatable items (known as “scum”) float to the top. Both are confined within the tank, which is emptied on a regular basis by a professional pumper. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the middle layer includes liquid wastewater (also known as “effluent”) that exits the tank into a buried drainfield in the yard, where the wastewater disperses into the soil.

Is the Septic System Related to the Drinking Water System?

No. Many homes that have septic systems also have a private well to provide water. The septic system, on the other hand, is completely separate from the well. Rather of treating wastewater so that it may be consumed, its objective is to safely distribute it in a manner that prevents pollution.

What Differentiates One Septic System from Another?

According to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the size of the drainfield and the quality of the soil are the primary factors that distinguish one septic system from another. In addition, the drainfield must be large enough to accommodate the volume of liquid generated by a family. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, do not use a home’s toilet, sink, or disposal as a wastebasket for dental floss, coffee grinds, kitty litter, paint, or chemicals to avoid the chance of blocking the system.

How Often Should You Get Your Septic Tank Emptied?

To remove the sludge and scum from the septic tank, it is necessary to hire a professional to pump it. The frequency is decided by the size of the tank and the degree of activity in the home (how much wastewater is generated). According to the Environmental Protection Agency, most septic tanks should be emptied every three to five years. However, certain systems may require more frequent pumping – perhaps once a year if necessary.

What Are the Signs of a Failing Septic Tank?

In order to remove the sludge and scum from the septic tank, a professional must pump it. This is influenced by the size of the tank and the amount of activity in the house (how much wastewater is generated). The Environmental Protection Agency recommends that most septic tanks be drained every three to five years. It is possible that certain systems will require more frequent pumping than others, possibly as frequently as every 12 months.

What About Maintenance Costs?

The size of the tank and drainfield, the accessibility of the tank, and the distance that waste must be taken for disposal all influence the cost of septic system upkeep. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, pumping a tank might cost between $250 and $500.

What Should I Do Before Buying a Home With a Septic System?

Learn about the laws in your state. Some states demand a septic system examination prior to transferring ownership. However, even if your state does not need an inspection, your lender may require one anyhow. As a rule, conventional house inspections do not involve an examination of the septic system. Zillow reports that an inspection may provide a detailed assessment of the system’s integrity, identify whether it is located at an appropriate distance from a well (to minimize contamination), and check the absence of invasive tree roots in the drainfield, which could cause damage to the system.

If you do need to replace your system, the cost might vary significantly.

Owning a property with a septic tank does not have to be a frightening experience. You will be able to enjoy your home for many years to come if you do regular maintenance and upkeep.

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When it comes to treating residential wastewater, a regular wastewater system combined with a soil absorption system is the most cost-effective technique currently available. However, in order for it to function correctly, you must select the appropriate septic system for your home size and soil type, and you must keep it in good working order on a regular basis.

What size septic tank do I need?

Septic tank size requirements are determined by the number of bedrooms in a house, the number of people who live there, the square footage of a house, and whether or not water-saving gadgets are installed. If you want to obtain a general sense of what size septic tank your home requires, look at the table below.

Bedrooms Home Square Footage Tank Capacity
1 or 2 Less than 1,500 750
3 Less than 2,500 1,000
4 Less than 3,500 1,250
5 Less than 4,500 1,250
6 Less than 5,500 1,315

How often should my tank be pumped?

A regular pumping of the tank is required to maintain your system operating properly and treating sewage efficiently. Sludge collects at the bottom of the septic tank as a result of the usage of the septic system. Because of the rise in sludge level, wastewater spends less time in the tank and solids have a greater chance of escaping into the absorption region. If sludge collects for an excessive amount of time, there is no settling and the sewage is directed directly to the soil absorption region, with no treatment.

  1. You can find out how often you should get your tank pumped by looking at the table below.
  2. If you fail to maintain the tank for an extended period of time, you may be forced to replace the soil absorption field.
  3. Solids can enter the field if the tank is not pumped on a regular basis.
  4. Wet soils that have been saturated by rains are incapable of receiving wastewater.
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Other maintenance

Another maintenance activity that must be completed on a regular basis to protect the system from backing up is to clean the effluent filter, which is located in the tank’s outflow tee and is responsible for additional wastewater filtration. This filter eliminates extra particulates from the wastewater and prevents them from being clogged in the absorption field, which would cause the absorption field to fail prematurely. You may clean the filter yourself by spraying it with a hose, or you can have your maintenance provider clean the filter for you if necessary.

Two critical components

A septic tank and a soil absorption system are the two primary components of a standard treatment system.

Tank

The septic tank is an enclosed, waterproof container that collects and treats wastewater, separating the particles from the liquid. It is used for primary treatment of wastewater. It works by retaining wastewater in the tank and letting the heavier particles (such as oil and greases) to settle to the bottom of the tank while the floatable solids (such as water and sewage) rise to the surface. The tank should be able to store the wastewater for at least 24 hours in order to provide time for the sediments to settle.

Up to 50% of the particles stored in the tank decompose, with the remainder accumulating as sludge at the tank bottom, which must be cleaned on a regular basis by pumping the tank out.

Drainfield

Solids are separated from wastewater in a septic tank, which is an enclosed, waterproof container that collects and treats wastewater once it has been collected. By retaining wastewater in the tank and enabling heavier particles (oil and grease, for example), as well as floatable solids (water), to descend to the bottom of the tank, it effectively eliminates solids from wastewater. The wastewater should be held in the tank for at least 24 hours in order to give the solids time to settle. In the tank, some particles are removed from the water, some are digested, and some are just left there.

Septic tank types

There are three primary types of septic tanks used for on-site wastewater treatment: cisterns, septic tanks, and septic tanks with a pump.

  • Concrete septic tanks are the most popular type of septic tank. Fiberglass tanks – Because they are lightweight and portable, they are frequently used in remote or difficult-to-reach sites. Lightweight polyethylene/plastic tanks, similar to fiberglass tanks, may be transported to “difficult-to-reach” sites since they are one-piece constructions.

It is necessary for all tanks to be waterproof in order to prevent water from entering as well as exiting the system.

Factors in septic maintenance

All tanks must be waterproof in order to prevent water from entering as well as exiting the system during operation.

Soil types

There are three types of soil textures: sand, silt, and clay, and each has an impact on how quickly wastewater filters into the soil (a property known as hydraulic conductivity) and how large an absorption field is required. Sand transports water more quickly than silt, which transfers water more quickly than clay. According to Texas laws, these three soil textures are subdivided into five soil kinds (Ia, Ib, II, III, IV). Sandy soils are classified as soil type I, whereas clay soils are classified as soil type IV.

The Hydraulic Loading, which is the quantity of effluent applied per square foot of trench surface, is also significant in the design.

For this reason, only nonstandard drain fields are suitable for use in clay soils due to the poor conductivity of clay soils.

Bruce Lesikar is cited as an example. The Texas A&M University System’s Agricultural Communications department. Septic tank with soil absorption field combination. L-5227 was published on April 10, 2000.

The 6 Septic Systems You Must Know — Build With a Bang

Unacquainted with the many types of septic systems available? If this is the case, you are not alone. Unless your property is directly linked to the sewer system, you most certainly have a septic system in place. Sewage treatment on site is accomplished by the use of natural processes in a septic system, which is a linked system of components residing under ground. Typically, a septic system is located in the yard of a homeowner. The most typical location for septic systems is in rural locations, where there is no access to a centralized town or city waste treatment facility or sewage treatment system.

Why Concrete Septic Tanks May Be Your Best Option

First and foremost, the septic system collects and dumps the waste generated by the home in the septic tank. The septic tank then separates and pre-treats the solid waste and oils from the wastewater before releasing them into the environment. Following that, most systems direct liquid wastewater from the septic tank onto a distribution network of porous pipes that branch out from the residence and septic tank and gradually discharge the wastewater into the soil. Some septic systems, rather than just discharging wastewater into the soil, employ pumps, disinfection products, an evaporation mechanism, or simply rely on gravity to funnel wastewater through sand or other organic material before releasing the effluent into the soil.

  • The total square feet of drain field area required is determined by the number of bedrooms in the house and the soil type (arid or saturated), among other factors.
  • Septic tanks are intended to serve as the initial stop in the wastewater treatment process, and they are constructed to do so.
  • The sediments remain in the tank, while the wastewater is sent to the drain field for further treatment and dispersal when it has been treated.
  • Concrete, plastic (polyethylene), and fiberglass are the three most common materials used in construction.
  • Drain fields are plots of land that have been particularly engineered to assist in the filtering and removal of pollutants from wastewater.

Perforated pipes, which are buried within the trenches, are used to disseminate the wastewater from the home in a methodical manner. A standard septic system is comprised of a septic drain field, its associated pipe system, and a septic tank.

Conventional System

The majority of traditional septic systems are situated in single-family residences or small commercial establishments. A high number of individuals in a single area is not often served by traditional systems, which are not normally designed for this purpose. A typical system consists of the following components: Sewage treatment system (Septic tank) An underground wastewater infiltration system or a gravel-filled drain field can both be used to collect wastewater. Protects the clean drain field from additional possible impurities with a strong geofabric covering.

The wastewater (also known as effluent) is routed from the septic tank to the drain field in this location.

As soon as the wastewater passes through the clean drain field, it flows into the soil where it is continuously cleaned by naturally existing bacteria as it gently trickles its way through the soil layer and into groundwater.

The disadvantage is that it is difficult to install in homes with small lots.

Chamber System

As a viable alternative to the more frequent gravel field technique, chamber systems have been in use since the 1970s. It is common to employ chamber systems in places where the water table is high, as they reduce the likelihood of poor drainage and messy back-ups. Another need for this system is a sequence of linked pipelines and chambers, with the chambers being completely enclosed by soil. The septic pipes transport wastewater from the home to the septic tank, which subsequently transports the wastewater to the chambers.

During the last stages of wastewater treatment before it is discharged into a storm drain, bacteria in the soil release the treated wastewater into the soil as it flows downward toward the groundwater table.

The disadvantage of using an extra chamber instead of a more standard drain field is that there is an increased risk of additional maintenance.

Aerobic Treatment System

Aeration of wastewater in a septic treatment tank is accomplished by the use of aerobic treatment equipment. The infused oxygen in the wastewater aids in the addition of nutrients to the wastewater as well as the efficient start of the treatment process itself. Aerobic systems are available with tanks that may be used for both pretreatment and final treatment, as well as systems with two distinct tanks for pretreatment and final treatment, among other options. The ultimate objective is to treat and disinfect in a safe and efficient manner, without causing harm.

Advantage: This is particularly useful in locations with high water tables or in areas where there is insufficient land to construct a good drain field. The disadvantage of using an aerobic system is that, like the drip distribution system, it requires regular maintenance.

Drip Distribution System

It is not necessary to install a standard gravel-based drain field since the Drip Distribution system makes use of an underground snaking system of distribution pipes that are installed near the surface of the soil. Pipe laterals for the drip distribution system are buried in shallow ground soil, generally 6 to 12 inches below the surface of the ground. Because it eliminates the requirement for a standard drain field, this technique reduces the amount of digging required and makes it easier to reach plumbing within the drain field.

A second tank, referred to as a dosage tank, is required to take wastewater after it has passed through the septic tank in order to handle this technique.

However, in order for this to happen, the dosage tank must be connected to power.

Sand Filter System

Sand filter systems allow waste water to travel from a septic tank to a pump chamber, and then from the pump chamber to the sand filtering system. Sand filter systems are used in conjunction with septic tanks. The sand filtration system is essentially a big concrete box that is filled with sand to filter out contaminants. Following a leisurely pumping operation to the top of the box, the waste water is filtered through the sand, which treats the water prior to its discharge into the soil absorption region (see illustration).

Cons: Frequent maintenance is required.

Evapotranspiration System

In contrast to septic tanks, sand filter systems enable waste water to travel from the septic tank to a pump chamber and then from the pump chamber to the sand filtering system (or vice versa). It is essentially a big concrete box that is filled with sand that serves as the filtering system. Following a leisurely pumping operation to the top of the box, the waste water is filtered by the sand, which purifies the water before releasing it into the soil absorption region. Good for places with high water tables, as a result of the aforementioned benefit Maintenance is required on a regular basis.

Mound System

The mound system consists of the construction of a big sand mound that serves as a drain field. A controlled flow of wastewater is maintained throughout its journey from the septic tank to a chamber where it is pushed through to the mound. After flowing through a mound trench and percolating through the sand, the wastewater eventually trickles into the ground. Among those who live in rural locations where there is a lot of land but little absorbent soil, the mound system is a popular alternative.

Cons: It takes up a lot of room and requires a lot of upkeep.

In any case, count on having your septic tank examined once per year and pumping it at least once every six months, regardless of the system you have in place. Solid waste matter can block the pump and cause damage to the drain field if it is not pumped on a regular basis.

Garbage Disposal With Septic

Unless you reside in a septic-equipped home, it is better not to have a trash disposal. The increased volume of solid waste material will necessitate more frequent septic tank pumping and may erode the drain field, resulting in sewage back-ups in the future. Those who live in homes with septic systems may find that they must be extra cautious about what they flush down the toilet. Certain common home objects, when flushed down a toilet connected to a septic system, can create clogs, backups, and even damage to the system, resulting in not only discomfort and aggravation, but also a significant financial burden.

Chemicals may cause significant damage to and contamination of surface and groundwater, which can result in disease or even death in animals and people who consume the water.

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