What Is The Green Stuff Around My Septic Tank? (Solved)

While you may think that lush and green grass around your septic tank is a sign of good things, it is actually an indication that sewage may be seeping into your yard. Because the soil on top of your septic tank isn’t as deep as the rest of your lawn, it’s common for the grass there to dry out.

  • If you have oddly green grass – healthy grass when all other vegetation is dead or dried up, or especially brightly colored grass – it could mean your septic tank has a leak in it or your lateral lines are receiving far too much wastewater downstream from the septic tank and are saturating your yard.

Why is grass green around septic tank?

The grass around your septic system can give you a clue as to the condition of your septic system’s health. Bright green grass in your yard may indicate a leak or early failure of your septic system’s drainfield. This could be the first indication to call FloHawks for a septic system inspection.

What are the signs of a failing septic field?

7 Warning Signs Your Septic System Is Failing

  • Gurgling Pipes. They would occur when you run water in the house (e.g. when using the sink or shower) or flush the toilet.
  • Bad Odours. It’s never a pleasant experience when this occurs.
  • Water At Ground Level.
  • Green Grass.
  • Slow Drainage.
  • Blocked Pipes.

Can I put dirt over my drain field?

Never add additional soil over the drain field unless it is a minimal amount used to restore an area that may have been eroded or pulled up by removing another plant. Try not to be overly zealous when tilling the soil for planting. Remember that the drain lines may be as close as 6 inches from the soil surface.

How do you fix a clogged drain field?

While a clogged drain field cannot be snaked out and cleared like a drain pipe, you can take steps to alleviate the problem.

  1. Shock the System With Bacteria.
  2. Reduce Water Usage.
  3. Avoid Harsh Chemicals.
  4. Change to Gentler Toilet Paper and Soap.
  5. Contact a Septic Professional.

How do you test a septic drain field?

In order to test the overall health and liquid capacity for your leach field, it is necessary to perform a hydraulic load test. This is done by running water at a certain rate over an allotted period of time. A failure occurs when water back-drains to the source before that allotted time period is up.

Can I shower if my septic tank is full?

Only the water would get out into the leach field in a proper system unless you run too much water too fast. The thing to do is to run your shower water outside into it’s own drain area, but it may not be allowed where you are. Used to be called gray water system.

How do you tell if the leach field is clogged?

Stay vigilant for five signs your drainfield does not drain correctly anymore.

  1. Slowing Drainage. Homeowners first notice slower than usual drainage from all the sinks, tubs, and toilets in a home when they have a compromised drainfield.
  2. Rising Water.
  3. Increasing Plant Growth.
  4. Returning Flow.
  5. Developing Odors.

Can a drain field collapse?

An inlet line that is not well-supported by the ground below it won’t be able to resist the pressure from above as the fill material attempts to settle evenly into the ground. Under this pressure, the pipe can buckle and collapse. This damage can also happen to the outlet line that leads to the leach field.

Why is my grass dying over my drain field?

As temperatures increase, grass draws more moisture from the soil beneath it. The soil above leach lines is shallower than the soil in the rest of the lawn, so it holds less water compared to the rest of the lawn, causing grass directly above the lines to dry out and turn yellow.

What is the average life expectancy of a septic system?

Age of the System It’s pretty common for a septic system to last 40 years or longer, which means if you buy a new home, you might never need to replace it. However, you might have an older home whose septic system has been in place for nearly half a century.

How do you clean a septic drain field?

A common approach is to use a high-pressure water jet to clean out drain field pipes. Sewer jet products, like the Clog Hog, attach to a gas or electric power washer and then feed into the pipe to clear away any clogs or buildup.

Can heavy rain affect septic tank?

It is common to have a septic back up after or even during a heavy rain. Significant rainfall can quickly flood the ground around the soil absorption area (drainfield) leaving it saturated, making it impossible for water to flow out of your septic system.

Green Grass over the septic tank, Brown Grass, Snow Melt over the septic tank Indicate Septic System Condition

  • If you notice melting snow or poor quality of grass cover, you can use this space to ask or comment about where to find a septic tank or soak beds.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Condition of the septic tank and drainfield Location indications based on the color of the grass or the amount of snow melt: Greener grass, browner grass, and melting snow are all indicators of the health of the septic system, including the septic tank, the pipe, and the drain field. This page explains what these terms signify and offers ideas and techniques for additional study in order to identify the problems described above as a result.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Snowmelt over the Septic Tank or Drainfield – what do they mean?

We have recently moved into a house with a septic system for the first time. We had the septic tank examined and emptied as part of our home improvement project. We observed that there is a brilliant green patch of grass just above the septic tank that is distinct in color from the rest of the grass in the yard. Now that the snow has melted away over the same septic tank location, the situation has reversed. It appears that the ground beneath the tank is heated and that the tank is defrosting the earth.

Is this a usual occurrence?

– Thank you so much for your assistance.

Reply: your septic system clues sound normal but here is how we can check for developing septic system trouble:

Snow melt and even greener grass over the septic tank may be typical, but it might also indicate a problem with the system. Good news would be the lack of any scents (SEPTIC SYSTEM ODORS) or damp or soggy areas (SEPTIC DRAINFIELD FAILURE DIAGNOSIS), as well as the absence of any sewage backup into the residence (SEPTIC DRAINFIELD FAILURE DIAGNOSIS) (SEWER BACKUP PREVENTION). It is also important to note that snow melt over drainfield trenches (as shown in the top photo of this page) is not always an indicator that the system is failing.

Take some shots of the area over the tank with snow melt (and later with greener grass) and, while you’re at it, take some photos of the region where you believe the drainfield is located so that we can all see whether there are any depressions, snowmelt, damp patches, or other problems.

This is a regular occurrence and is not a cause for concern. Photos of snow melting over septic tanks may be seen atVISUAL CLUES LOCATE THE SEPTIC TANK for more information.

Guide to Diagnosing Snowmelt or Green Grass Over the Septic Tank

Opening the inspection cover over the septic tank outflow end will quickly reveal the presence of this issue. If the sewage level is only as high as the bottom of the tank outlet pipe, where it flows through the tank wall, this is considered regular operation. If the level of sewage rises over the bottom border of the horizontal section of the outlet pipe, this indicates that the outlet pipe or drainfield is clogged with sewage. You may get more information and photographs about this method at SEPTIC TANK BAFFLES.

Explanation of Greener Grass over the Septic Tank

If the tank cover was dug for service, it is possible that someone seeded the area around the tank, resulting in greener grass over the tank. Alternatively, healthier lawns around the septic tank might indicate that the tank is leaking around its cover, which would be an odd occurrence and a warning indication of problems. Backing up pipes to the leachfield (or, in the worst case scenario, a failed leachfield) might result in wastewater draining too slowly out of the septic tank or even backing up into the building.

Explanation of Brown Dead Grass over the Septic Tank

In addition, if the tank top is not too deep below earth, it is possible to find browner grass growing over a septic tank. If you have a shallow septic tank top, this indicates that there will be less soil thickness, which will result in soil dryout during dry weather, which will result in dead grass in that particular region. If you’re interested in learning how deep your septic tank may be, check outSEPTIC TANK DEPTH Finding the location of a septic tank is frequently assisted by visual indicators that begin beyond the region where the main waste line exits the house.

Several visual clues that assist in locating the septic system are discussed in greater depth atVISUAL CLUES LOCATE the SEPTIC TANK.

  • A former building owner may have left stones, slates, stakes, or other markings to indicate the position of a septic tank pumpout access cover
  • However, this is not always the case. Cast iron or white or black plastic pipes sticking out of the ground, perhaps between 10′ and 20′ from the house, and especially if they are 4″ to 6″ in diameter and are cast iron or white or black plastic, may indicate vent or cleanout locations on the waste line between the building and the septic tank, or they may indicate where the tank is located. The installation of a 6″ top 8″ “riser” pipe with a cap near to ground level (which may be painted green by the homeowner) by certain septic pumping firms is used as a rapid access port to pump the septic tank. If one removes the pipe cap and glances inside, maybe with a torch, it is simple to determine whether or not one of these ports is directly above the tank. When there are symptoms of impending collapse, such as soil subsidence, it is not safe to walk over or near septic tanks. Electrical boxes protruding from the ground may indicate the location of electrical connections feeding electrical components that are utilized in some septic systems, according to some reports. Examples include septic tanks that use effluent pumps to transfer effluent to an uphill position, pumping chambers that use sewage grinder pumps to send sewage to an uphill septic tank and drainfield, and drainfields that use effluent pumps to move effluent to an uphill location. A video demonstrating a septic tank with a pumping station and its electrical connections can be seen atSeptic 101 part 1: Septic Tanks and Pumping Stations. How to locate the septic system in this video
  • Rectangular depressions of approximately 4 ft. x 8 ft. On the other hand, it is possible that soils have settled away from the septic tank and created an elevated rectangular area on rare occasions. One of our sites experienced this because the bottom of the septic tank was situated on bedrock, and after backfilling, certain soils around the tank settled and compacted, but the tank itself did not move
  • A rectangular region with less grass growth – this is due to the fact that the tank is not sunk very deeply and so has less dirt above it
  • If the tank is leaking or backing up and spewing effluent around itself, the grass will grow more lushly in the vicinity of the tank. Depressions in the earth, each measuring around 2 sq.ft., that may indicate a past excavation for tank pumping
  • Snow melt: In regions where snow falls, portions of melted snow may be seen at the top of the septic tank’s tank wall (or areas of a failing leach field). Photograph of this clue, which shows drainfield trenches as depressions in the snow, may be found on the websiteVisualClues to Location. Drawings or drawings depicting the position of a septic tank can occasionally be found in a building’s basement or crawl space, scribbled on a surface at the point where the main waste pipe exits the structure, indicating that the tank is in the correct place. Of course, a conscientious previous owner may have left a sketch on a piece of paper for the new owners to find. AtRECORDS to LOCATE the DRAINFIELD, an example of a drawing for finding septic system components can be found. Wet spots on the ground that may indicate a clogged drainfield. Pipes ending in streams, lakes, or swamps, or at the boundary of a property, may indicate an overflow drain that was installed to deal with a malfunctioning septic system. Septic smells may also indicate an overflow drain. This is a shot of one of these that is most likely found in a DRAINFIELD
  • I’d like to express my gratitude to reader (anonymous) for addressing the significance of snowmelt or greener grass above the septic tank (12/2010)
  • Thank you to Donica Benwho, in her letter of November 11, 2007, warns against the dangers of digging into hidden electrical cables, which we will examine further at a later date. Safety Procedures for Septic Tanks and Cesspools
  • Identifying the source of the problem – is there a problem with the septic system or with the building drain system? Septic Tank Safety: Safety Warnings for Septic Inspectors, Septic Pumpers, and Homeowners Regarding Septic Systems, Septic Tanks, and Cesspools
  • Condition of Septic Tanks- How to Inspect Septic Tanks and Evaluate the Septic Tank Condition, including the condition of the baffles and sludge levels, as well as damage and signs of septic failure
  • Form OF SEPTIC DRAINFIELD: factors for the shape and placement of a septic drainfield or leaching bed
  • LOCATION OF THE SEPTIC DRAINFIELD: where to look for the septic drain field or leaching bed
  • Procedural for Drainfield Inspection Leach Fields – how to check and diagnose septic drainfield problems.

. Continue reading atVISUAL CLUES LOCATE THE SEPTIC TANK, or choose a topic from the closely-related topics listed below, or visit the completeARTICLE INDEX for a comprehensive list of articles. Alternatively, see PLANTS OVER SEPTIC SYSTEMS.

See also:  How Much To Drain From Septic Tank Water Should Be In My? (Question)

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INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. All of the water that leaves your home drains down a single main drainage pipe and into a septic tank. An underground, water-tight container, often composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, serves as a septic system’s holding tank. Its function is to retain wastewater for a long enough period of time to allow particles to sink to the bottom and form sludge, while oil and grease float to the surface and produce scum. Sludge and scum are prevented from exiting the tank and moving into the drainfield region by compartments and a T-shaped outlet. After that, the liquid wastewater (effluent) exits the tank and flows into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered hole dug in unsaturated soil that serves as a drainage system. Porous surfaces are used to release pretreated wastewater because they allow the wastewater to pass through the soil and into the groundwater. In the process of percolating through the soil, wastewater is accepted, treated, and dispersed by the soil, finally discharging into groundwater. Finally, if the drainfield becomes overburdened with too much liquid, it can flood, causing sewage to flow to the ground surface or resulting in toilet backups and sink backups. Finally, wastewater percolates into the soil, where it is naturally removed of harmful coliform bacteria, viruses, and nutrients. Coliform bacteria are a kind of bacteria that may be found in the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals, with humans being the most common host. As a result of human fecal contamination, it is a sign of this.

The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has built an animated, interactive model of how a residential septic system works, which you can view here.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • You make use of well water. In your home, the water pipe that brings water into the house does not have a meter. In the case of a water bill or a property tax bill, you will see “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” It is possible that your neighbors have a septic system

How to find your septic system

You can locate your septic system once you have confirmed that you have one by following these steps:

  • Taking a look at the “as constructed” drawing of your house
  • Making a visual inspection of your yard for lids and manhole covers
  • Getting in touch with a septic system service provider for assistance in locating it

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly. Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

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Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses. It is most noticeable in dry times when the drainfield is lush and green. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement. A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield; and

  • Bad odors: If you can smell something rotten, such as rotten eggs, during the summer months, this is a very evident clue that you have an issue with your plumbing. This might indicate that you have raw sewage coming out of the tank, which is causing harmful sulfur odors to be released into the environment. Standby water: Another issue that might provide a health risk is the presence of standing water. If you see pools of standing water near your septic system’s drain field, this indicates that the system is malfunctioning, and the water may contain potentially hazardous raw sewage. Toilet flushing issues: Plungers are typically effective in resolving issues with toilets that flush slowly or not at all. The problem might be that the septic tank is overflowing or that the pipes are clogged farther down in the system, if you’ve done everything, even plunging, and it still doesn’t cure the problem. You could notice something like water backing up when you’re doing your laundry, or you might notice something like sewage backing up into your basement when you’re doing a load of laundry. In the event that you detect this problem, contact for assistance immediately because it generates a tremendous mess and is potentially hazardous to your health
  • Slow drains: While a single slow drain in your kitchen or bathroom sinks, or in the bathtub or shower, may be caused by a simple clog, a large number of slow drains may signal a problem that necessitates the assistance of the plumbing or septic company you trust. Sounds of gurgling: In most cases, if you hear a gurgling sound when flushing your toilet or running water, it’s an indicator that you should get your septic tank professionally cleaned and pumped immediately

Any of the warning indicators listed above should prompt you to seek septic pumping or septic repair services in Prior Lake, Minnesota as soon as possible. Don’t put your house or family at danger of harm or health problems by using a firm that you know will provide excellent service at a reasonable price. Mike’s SepticMcKinley Sewer Services, which has been in business since 1956 and has been serving the local community, should be considered. Our client-centered strategy implies that we strive to give the best services possible while also ensuring that every customer is completely happy with the final product or service.

Additionally, in addition to pumping tanks and repairing systems, we can design and install the most appropriate system for your home or business needs. Make a call today to find out more and to get a free quote.

How to Go Green with Your Septic System

With a green septic system, you can not only extend the life of your system, but you can also minimize the amount of money you pay on service fees and maintenance charges down the road as well. Furthermore, it is ecologically friendly, which means you are doing a good thing for the environment as well as your system. In this article, we will explore the most effective strategies to ensure that your septic system is environmentally friendly. Then we offer you the dirt on the DOs and DON’Ts of septic systems so that you are aware of how to maintain a healthy and long-lasting tank, leach field, and system for you and your family.

Go Green with Your Septic System

Do not flush cleaning goods or chemicals down the toilet or down the sink drain. Bleach, ammonia, chlorine, and other harsh chemicals fall into this category. When chemicals are flushed down the toilet, they have the potential to upset the delicate balance of microorganisms in your tank. When it comes to ensuring that your tank handles and processes waste effectively, it is critical that it has healthy bacteria present at all times. Using strong chemicals to cleanse your septic tank might cause all of the excellent, beneficial bacteria to die off in the process.

This will ensure that the tank’s good bacteria and ability to work will be maintained indefinitely.

Monitor What You Put Down the Drain

Be cautious of the stuff that you flush down the toilet. If you flush objects down the toilet that are not environmentally friendly, you may cause a blockage or harm to your septic system. Furthermore, by placing materials into your septic system that are not biodegradable, you run the risk of causing clogs and shortening the lifespan of your tank. Some of the objects that should not be placed in your tank include: cigarette butts, disposable diapers, tampons, hand wipes, garbage, condoms, and a variety of other items.

Disconnect the Garbage Disposal

The majority of sinks are equipped with a trash disposal, which is a practical way to dispose of food waste. However, if your garbage disposal is linked to your septic system, it is possible that you will cause damage to your septic tank by flushing food down the drain. To make things more environmentally friendly for your tank, you should dispose of your food and leftovers in the trashcan or a compost bin. If it would help you remember to do it more effectively, you may even call a plumber and have them totally unplug your trash disposal.

Septic Guide DOs and DON’Ts

  • DO fix all leaking faucets and toilets as soon as they are discovered. If you have leaks, you might easily waste 700+ gallons of water every year
  • DO utilize the least amount of water possible and install low-flow fixtures. When you consume a lot of water, it might cause your system to get overloaded. This is due to the fact that it does not provide enough time for the sludge and scum in the tank to separate. Consequently, your pipes may get clogged, and your tank and leach fields may have various problems. You should also run your laundry and dishwasher on the shortest time setting possible and only once or twice a week
  • DO maintain the leach field free of debris and trash. For as long as there are no obstructions on the leach field, such as automobiles or other vehicles, plants or trees, structures or other obstructions, you won’t have to worry about the soil being compacted, which might cause your pipes to break. If you have plants or trees near your leach field, their roots may grow into and around the pipes, producing blockages or other problems. Also, make sure your drains from the roof, basement, or other systems are located far enough away from your leach field to prevent this from happening. Using bacteria additions in moderation will prevent the leach field from flooding as a result of too much water being applied to the field. You may use additives to aid in the growth of beneficial bacteria in your septic system, but you should only use them in moderation
  • You should also restrict the length of time you utilize your sprinkler system. To avoid drowning your lawn and leach field when watering it with your sprinkler system, be sure you aren’t over-watering it. You might set a timer on your sprinkler to ensure that you don’t overwater your lawn
  • Nevertheless, you should plan frequent maintenance visits. Maintenance check-ups should be performed on your system on a regular basis if you want it to last as long as possible.

DON’Ts:

  • DON’T let your septic system become contaminated. If you flush any of the items listed below, you run the risk of damaging and contaminating your system: Don’t flush floss, feminine hygiene products (such as tampons or sanitary napkins), cat litter, pieces of plastic, paper towels, diapers, baby/hand wipes, condoms, cotton balls, Q-tips, cigarette butts, coffee grounds, or anything else you shouldn’t flush down the toilet
  • And don’t flush chemicals down the toilet! Paint, paint thinners, solvents, oil, disinfectants, and pesticides are just a few of the chemicals and substances that might be harmful to your system, even if you only flush a little quantity of them. Make sure you aren’t using excessive quantities of cleaner. Drain cleaner, toilet bowl cleanser, soap, laundry detergent, and bleach should all be used in the prescribed amounts
  • DO NOT allow fat or grease to enter the system at any time. In the event that a substantial amount of fat or grease gets into your system, it may produce clogs in the tank
  • Thus, DO NOT use a waste disposal. Putting anything into your septic system that does not come out of your body should be avoided at all costs. In the event that you do use a trash disposal, make sure to have the filter cleaned out at least once a year, since your tank will require double the amount of cleaning as a system that does not include a garbage disposal
  • DO NOT place anything on top of your septic system. Patios, fences, sprinklers, concrete, and other structures will not be able to be built on top of the system. It must be conveniently accessible for maintenance and servicing activities
  • DO NOT make the mistake of supposing that by adding bacteria supplements, you will avoid the need to have your tank pumped. Although additives are utilized to aid in the digestion of particles in the tank, all of the sludge located at the bottom of the tank must be removed on a regular basis.
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Call Front Range Septic Today

We at Front Range Septic can assist you in being more environmentally conscious with your septic system by disposing of septic waste in an ecologically conscious and responsible way. Also available is the option of scheduling regular maintenance visits to guarantee that your system is operating at peak performance.

If you have any problems, we also have emergency services that are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Give us a call now and allow us to assist you in improving the performance of your septic system.

Signs of Septic System Failure

  • Flooding is occurring in the home as a result of backed up water and sewage from toilets, drains, and sinks Bathtubs, showers, and sinks all drain at a snail’s pace
  • The plumbing system is making gurgling sounds. The presence of standing water or moist patches near the septic tank or drainfield
  • Noxious smells emanating from the septic tank or drainfield
  • Even in the midst of a drought, bright green, spongy luxuriant grass should cover the septic tank or drainfield. Algal blooms in the vicinity of ponds or lakes In certain water wells, there are high quantities of nitrates or coliform bacteria.

Septic systems, like the majority of other components of your house, require regular maintenance. As long as it is properly maintained, the septic system should give years of dependable service. If the septic system is not properly maintained, owners face the risk of having a dangerous and expensive failure on their hands. Septic systems, on the other hand, have a limited operating lifespan and will ultimately need to be replaced. Septic systems that have failed or are not working properly pose a threat to human and animal health and can damage the environment.

It is possible that a prompt response will save the property owner money in repair costs, as well as disease and bad influence on the environment in the future.

What happens when a septic system fails?

When a septic system fails, untreated sewage is dumped into the environment and carried to places where it shouldn’t be. This may cause sewage to rise to the surface of the ground around the tank or drainfield, or it may cause sewage to back up in the pipes of the structure. It is also possible that sewage will make its way into groundwater, surface water, or marine water without our knowledge. Pathogens and other potentially harmful substances are carried by the sewage. People and animals can become ill as a result of exposure to certain diseases and pollutants.

What are some common reasons a septic system doesn’t work properly?

The pipe between the home to the tank is obstructed. When this occurs, drains drain very slowly (perhaps much more slowly on lower floors of the structure) or cease draining entirely, depending on the situation. This is frequently a straightforward issue to resolve. The majority of the time, a service provider can “snake the line” and unclog the problem. Keeping your drains clear by flushing only human waste and toilet paper down the drain and having your system examined on an annual basis will help prevent clogs.

  • Plant roots might occasionally obstruct the pipe (particularly on older systems).
  • The inlet baffle to the tank is obstructed.
  • In case you have access to your intake baffle aperture, you may see if there is a blockage by inspecting it.
  • It is essential that you avoid damaging any of the septic system’s components.
  • Avoid clogging your inlet baffle by just flushing human waste and toilet paper, and get your system examined once a year to ensure that it is in good working order.
  • This may result in sewage backing up into the residence or surfacing near the septic tank as a result of the situation.
  • If there is an effluent filter, it has to be cleaned or changed as necessary.

Preventing this sort of problem from occurring is as simple as cleaning your effluent filter (if you have one) and getting your system examined once per year.

It is possible for sewage to back up into the residence when the drainfield collapses or becomes saturated with water.

Additionally, smells may be present around the tank or drainfield.

It is possible that the system was run incorrectly, resulting in an excessive amount of solid material making its way to the drainfield and causing it to fail prematurely.

While it is conceivable that a drainfield will get saturated due to excessive quantities of water (either from enormous volumes of water flowing down the drain or flooding the drainfield), it is not always viable to dry out and restore a drainfield.

A connection to the public sewer system should be explored if the drainfield has failed and it is possible to make the connection.

It will be necessary to replace the existing drainfield if this does not take place. It is possible for a septic system to fail or malfunction for various reasons. Septic professionals should be contacted if your system isn’t functioning correctly.

How can I prevent a failure?

The proper operation of your septic system, together with routine maintenance, can help it last a long and trouble-free life. Assuming that your septic system has been correctly planned, located, and installed, the rest is up to you to take care of. Inspect your system once a year and pump as necessary (usually every 3-5 years). Avoid overusing water, and be mindful of what you flush down the toilet and what you flush down the drain. Learn more about how to properly maintain your septic system.

Can my failing septic system contaminate the water?

Yes, a failed septic system has the potential to pollute well water as well as adjacent water sources. Untreated wastewater is a health problem that has the potential to cause a variety of human ailments. Once this untreated wastewater enters the groundwater, it has the potential to poison your well and the wells of your neighbors. It is possible that oyster beds and recreational swimming sites will be affected if the sewage reaches local streams or water bodies.

Is there financial help for failing systems or repairs?

Yes, there are instances where this is true. Here are a few such alternatives.

  • In addition, Craft3 is a local nonprofit financial organization that provides loans in many counties. Municipal Health Departments- Some local health departments provide low-interest loan and grant programs to qualified applicants. A federal home repair program for people who qualify is offered by the USDA.

More Resources

  • Septic System 101: The Fundamentals of Septic Systems
  • Taking Good Care of Your Septic System
  • A video on how to inspect your septic system yourself
  • Using the Services of a Septic System Professional
  • Safety of the Septic Tank Lid

Signs of Septic System Problems

In this video, you will learn the fundamentals of septic systems. What You Should Know About Maintaining Your Septic System A video on how to inspect your septic system on your own Using the Services of a Septic System Expert; Safety of the Septic Tank Lid

1. Sewage Backup

There are a variety of reasons why you may detect water or an odorous black liquid draining from your home’s drains at different times of the day. Your septic tank or drain field is overflowing, or there is a clog in the system. If your septic tank is functioning properly, waste from your house will separate into three different kinds of materials: sludge (heavier items that sink to the bottom), scum (lighter materials that float to the top), and wastewater (which is released into the drainfield).

Alternatively, if your tank gets a big volume of water in a short period of time, the tank may become overwhelmed and cause a backup within your house.

It is possible to avoid these problems by lowering your water consumption.

Be aware of the contents that you flush as well; for example, do not flush paper towels, diapers, feminine products, grease, or leftover meals down the toilet.

2. Slow Drainage

Slow drainage in your home might also be an indication of a blockage, which is most often seen in the line that leads to the septic tank. Keep in mind that strong chemicals might degrade your pipes and harm the healthy bacteria in your tank that helps to break down waste before you go for the Draino to solve your problem!

Make an effort to stick with natural products that make use of microorganisms and enzymes. As a bonus, not only will this clear your pipes, but it will also assist in breaking down waste in your septic tank.

3. Pooling Water in Yard

A significant rainstorm or a high water table might cause the septic tank to get clogged and prevent it from emptying correctly. As a result, your yard may become flooded in certain parts. This problem, on the other hand, might be caused by a leak in your septic line. If you feel the problem is the result of heavy rainfall, reduce your use of your septic system to give it a chance to catch up with drainage. Any pooling water in your yard, on the other hand, should be investigated by a septic system professional.

4. Greener Grass Around the Septic Tank

While you may believe that the lush and green grass around your septic tank is a harbinger of good things to come, it is really a symptom that sewage may be leaking into your yard from the surrounding area. Because the dirt on top of your septic tank is not as deep as the soil on the rest of your lawn, it is usual for the grass on top of your sewage tank to get dry. As a result, if the grass appears to be flourishing in that region, it might indicate that effluent (liquid wastewater) is leaking from the tank before it has a chance to reach the drainfield.

5. Trees or Shrubs Near Septic System

While many homeowners place a strong focus on their landscaping, you must exercise caution when deciding where trees and bushes should be planted on your property. Tree roots are naturally attracted to water and moisture sources, and this behavior is normal. Nothing will stand in their way of getting there. In order to reach a water supply, roots will wrap around or dig through any impediments in their path. These individuals may cause harm to your septic tank as well as other components of your sewage system as a result of their actions.

Whether you notice any of these signs, look around to see if there are any trees or bushes growing close to the irrigation system.

Knowing how tall they will grow to be when they reach maturity allows you to put them as far away from your septic system as possible.

6. Pungent Smells

It is possible that the stench of septic gas is caused by a variety of conditions, including a dried-out wax seal on your toilet or a dry trap in your floor drain. The first step to taking care of persistent odors in your house is to thoroughly inspect all of your fixtures to rule out any potential internal problems. If all other possibilities have been checked out, it is possible that there is a leak in your septic line. By ensuring that surface drainage, as well as roof runoff, is diverted away from the septic tank and drainfield, you may minimize the likelihood of your septic system leaking.

Be Proactive

By paying close attention to the operation of your septic system, you will be able to detect issues as soon as they arise. One of the most effective ways to avoid significant problems with your septic system is to have it checked once each year, and then pumped out every 3-5 years. This will aid in the detection of issues such as leaks, corrosion, and overflows before they need costly repairs or perhaps the replacement of the entire system.

Peak SewerUnderground Services’ highly skilled septic tank specialists are on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week for all of your septic system needs. To have your system tested or fixed, please contact us immediately! Get in Touch With Us

What do I do if My Septic Alarm is Going Off?

In the event that your septic alarm goes off, it may surely create some anxiety and uncertainty; and if you happen to be experiencing this right now, then you’ve arrived to the correct location! Don’t be concerned; it does not necessitate urgent action. Instead, take your time to go through this full essay so that you will be prepared to act now or in the future if the situation arises. What Septic Systems Are and How They Work The alarm works in conjunction with the septic system to alert you when the water level within the pump tank has increased to an unsafe level or has decreased to an unsafe level.

  • The timer is in charge of regulating the time intervals during which the pump is permitted to pump wastewater into the drainage system.
  • Thus, during periods of excessive water use, the drain field is kept from getting overflowing, which might cause damage to the drainage system.
  • A large amount of water is injected into the system in between pumping cycles for whatever cause, and the water has nowhere else to go but back into the system’s pump tank.
  • Depending on how much water was and continues to be put into the system and how the pump is set up to operate on a timer, it may take many pumping cycles until the water levels are returned to normal.
  1. There is an excessive amount of water being put into the septic system. This is the result of excessive water use, which might be caused by multiple loads of laundry, an excessive quantity of dishwashing, or a disproportionate number of long showers.
  1. Somehow, groundwater is making its way into the system. If there is an excessive amount of standing water surrounding the septic tanks, whether generated by rain or another source, the water may seep into the tanks and cause the internal water level to rise.
  1. It’s possible that one of the components of the septic system is malfunctioning. If anything goes wrong with your system — including the pump and floats — the alarm and timer will go off and the septic system will stop working correctly.
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The Best Thing to Do If Your Alarm Goes Off Alternatively, if you hear an alert, you should press the red button or turn on the alarm box. The alarm will be turned off as a result of this action. There should be a red light and a green light on the alarm box, which should be situated someplace on the unit. The green light indicates that the alarm is operational and should be left on at all times. It is shown by a red light if the alarm is getting a signal from the pump tank indicating that the water level is increasing above or decreasing below what is expected.

  • If the breaker occurs to be tripped, look around the septic tanks to see if there is any standing water.
  • It is possible that the red light on the alarm box will go out on its own after allowing the septic system to operate for a couple of pump cycles (which should take approximately 10-15 hours).
  • If the red light turns off, it signifies that the system is operating properly and that it only needs to catch up with the extra water that has overflowed into the storage tank.
  • To be clear, an alarm signal from the septic system does not always imply that sewage is about to back up into the house right away.
  • Do you require septic system repair on a regular basis or emergency service?

To arrange an appointment, please call (804) 581-0001 or send us an email through our contact page. Want to learn more about septic systems? Explore our septic system web sites by clicking on the “Septic” navigation option in the top navigation bar.

Septic Tank Cleaning Fort Collins: Never Put These Items Down the Drain If You Have a Septic Tank

A septic tank is something that most people are familiar with, and they are generally aware that they should get it cleaned every three to five years at the absolute least. But did you know that even if you get your tank serviced on a regular basis, there are things you might be doing that could be causing significant damage to your system and shortening the life of your tank? At Lion Home Service, we understand a thing or two about septic systems, and we also understand that it is sometimes what you don’t flush down the drain that may help to extend the life of your system and prevent a potentially hazardous sewage backup in your home or business.

Follow the instructions below, and if you have any questions or need help, please contact Lion Home Service in Fort Collins.

How Does a Septic Tank Work?

In your house, if you perform an action that requires the flushing of a toilet or the washing of the garage floor, the water that is generated must be disposed of in some manner. Depending on whether you have a septic system or not, the water will either travel into pipes that will transport it away from your house and over to a central water treatment facility, or it will go directly to your septic tank. This container retains your wastewater and allows any particles to sink to the bottom of the container.

Caring For Your Septic Tank

After all, everything you flush down the toilet goes into a holding tank that is ultimately emptied, so you might ask why it matters so much what you flush down the toilet. There are two important considerations to bear in mind. First and foremost, whatever you flush down the toilet must be biodegradable, which means it must easily decompose in your tank. Items such as flushable wipes, cotton swabs, and even paper towels can not entirely decompose in a septic system, which might result in a major backup.

For the second time, you should never flush or wash anything down the drain that might potentially harm the beneficial bacteria in your septic system or contaminate groundwater.

Also, keep in mind that once the wastewater in your septic tank reaches a particular level, it will begin to run into your drainage system. If your wastewater contains harmful chemicals, there is a strong possibility that it will leak into the groundwater and contaminate it.

List of Items To Never Put Down the Drain

With the two most essential kinds of goods that might affect your septic system now defined, let us offer two lists of common home products that should never be flushed down the toilet or down the sink. Read them carefully and then distribute them to the rest of your family so that everyone is aware of what is and is not acceptable to flush down the toilet.

Hazardous Materials

  • Paint, gasoline, motor oil, weedkiller, solvents such as paint thinner, bleach, insecticide, herbicide, drain cleaner, and medications (particularly antibiotics) are all prohibited.

Non-Biodegradable Items

  • Toilet paper
  • Disinfectant wipes, paper towels, tissues, dental floss, cigarettes butts, coffee grinds, cat litter, condoms, feminine hygiene items, cotton swabs, and so on.

Despite the fact that this is not an exhaustive list, it should provide you with a general notion of the kind of items you should avoid flushing down the toilet. Cleansing products and even toilet paper that has been classified as safe for septic systems should be substituted instead. However, while knowing how to correctly care for your septic system may appear to be a burden, it will save you and the environment from any pollution concerns, and it will no doubt keep your septic system functioning smoothly for many years to come.

Signs Your Septic Tank Is Full

In the event that it has been several years since you last had your septic tank cleaned, or if you aren’t sure whether or not it has ever been done, it is critical that you arrange an appointment as soon as possible. There are times when tanks will fill up; nevertheless, you’ll want to get it emptied out before it becomes an issue. But what if you already have a nagging feeling that something is wrong? The following are some clear symptoms that your septic tank may be overflowing with waste:

Pooling Water

In the event that you discover significant pools of water near your septic system’s drain field, it might be a sign that your tank is overflowing and that the wastewater isn’t being allowed to naturally evaporate.

Odors Coming From Drains

In the event that you notice an irritating odor every time you take a shower or turn on a faucet, it is possible that your tank is full and sewage is beginning to back up in the pipes, resulting in the odor being produced.

Slow Drains

If the water isn’t draining as rapidly as it used to, it might be an indication that your septic tank is overflowing and needs to be cleaned.

Sewage Backup

When a tank is completely filled, sewage will begin to overflow or back up into the pipes. If the situation is severe enough, sewage can even back up into your home’s drains, which is not only distasteful, but it also poses a substantial health danger to you and your family members.

Particularly Green Grass Around Your Drainfield

Sometimes you may detect pools of water around your drain field, but other times you may only notice that the grass around it is exceptionally lush and green. This is frequently another indication that your septic system is about to overflow.

Contact Lion Home Service For Septic Tank Cleaning

Do not allow your septic system to reach the point where it is overflowing with waste. Septic tank cleaning should be performed on a regular basis by Lion Home Service in Fort Collins. We are a family-owned and run business that serves the whole Northern Colorado region, including Loveland, Greeley, Longmont, Windsor, and Fort Collins, among other cities. Call today to receive your no-obligation quote. We look forward to being of service to you!

septic system — Butte County Septic — Magneson Tractor Service Inc.

Welcome to the World Wide Web! This is the location where messages propagate rapidly, regardless of their legitimacy. However, this was occurring long before the advent of the internet, through the basic medium of word of mouth.

With the abundance of information available and flowing, it can be difficult to discern between realities and urban legends. We’ve chosen to put the record straight on a few common misconceptions concerning septic tanks and systems in order to help others from making the same mistakes.

Starting With a New Septic Systems Requires Seeding

What exactly is seeding? It does exactly what it says on the tin: it assists your system and bacteria in growing by providing “seeds,” or in this case organic material. Also, we’ve heard of everything under the sun, including flushing a whole pound of yeast, manure, worms, and other such methods of waste disposal. This is a fallacy! Your septic system does not require your assistance to get up and running. Simply said, the system must be followed. You have enough “seeding” powers in your human waste to get it started.

This takes us to the second myth we’ll look at.

Additives Keep Old Systems Running Great

Seeding refers to the act of planting seeds. The term refers to the process of providing your system and bacteria with “seeds,” or in this case organic material, in order for them to flourish. As for the rest, we’ve heard of everything under the sun, such as dumping one pound of yeast or dung down the toilet, among other things. You have been deceived! Beginning the process of setting up your septic system is completely unnecessary. It is sufficient to follow the procedure. You have enough “seeding” powers in your human waste to get it going.

This is where the truth shines the brightest!

Pump Your Septic Tank every 5-7 years

A typical family may fill a septic tank to operational level in less than a week, without having to make any changes to their ordinary water usage. It is not necessary to pump the septic tank just because it is full or has reached a specific age. Simply let your healthy system to carry out its functions. In reality, as long as your tank is sized adequately for your home and your property is kept in good condition, your system will continue to break down and handle waste for many more years than you may expect.

Prior to booking a pumping appointment, you should always get your system examined.

There are a few situations in which you should refrain from pumping your tank, but we’ll cover those in more detail in a future blog article.

Once Installed, Septic Tanks Take Care of Themselves

Yes, this is correct! In conjunction with their biological processes and gravity flows, septic systems and tanks handle the majority of the job with little assistance from the homeowner.

Because they are buried, they are readily forgotten. Despite the fact that you may not be required to take immediate action, your behaviors will have an impact on the overall health of your septic system.

You’ll Only Need One Septic System

In most cases, septic systems will not survive a lifetime. With adequate care and maintenance, systems can endure for 25 to 30 years on average. If you want your system to last as long as possible, learning how to do regular maintenance is priority number one. However, there are certain fallacies about septic systems that need to be dispelled. Understanding which stories are factual and which are nothing more than old wives’ tales can be difficult. Do you have any questions regarding some of the advice you’ve received?

Do you have a disturbing myth that you would want us to investigate?

6 Things to Know About Landscaping Around Your Septic Tank

You’re undoubtedly already aware that dumping some items into your sewage system, such as paint or grease, can cause harm to your septic tank. However, you may not be aware that certain gardening methods can actually cause harm to your septic system. In order to avoid unwittingly causing difficulties or damage to your septic tank, here are six things you should know regarding landscaping around your septic tank. 1. The location of the access point. It is OK to use landscaping to conceal the entry port to your septic tank; however, you must not totally conceal it.

One option to conceal your access port without totally concealing it is to use a landscaping element such as a birdbath or any other fixed lawn decoration to mark out its position on the property.

Characteristics of Vegetation that is Safe It is possible for some species of vegetation to grow above and around a septic tank without the risk of septic tank damage rising.

You should also limit the vegetation that grows above your tank to plants that do not require a lot of water.

In order to grow anything other than grass over your sewage tank, use perennials that are drought-resistant to the elements.

Characteristics of Trees that Have the Potential to Be Destructive Large bushes or trees should not be planted anywhere near your septic tank under any circumstances.

In the case of a 20-foot-tall tree, it is recommended that it be placed at least 20 feet away from the septic tank.

Trees with actively growing roots can cause damage to septic tanks and pipelines, even if they are located a long distance away.

4.

Grazing animals consume the protective vegetation that covers your drain field, exposing the components of your septic system to the elements.

There are a lot of methods you may use to keep livestock from grazing on your septic tank.

You may also apply animal repellents around your drain field, which deter animals by emitting unpleasant sounds or odors that they find uncomfortable.

Preventing vehicular and pedestrian traffic.

Your landscaping should be planned and your yard should be put out in such a way that cars do not drive over the area where your septic tank is positioned.

Foot traffic, in addition to car traffic, can cause damage to a septic tank.

As an alternative, if possible, direct foot traffic away from the area.

The Positioning of Architectural Elements You could choose to include architectural elements into your landscaping, such as retaining walls, stone paths, or fire pits.

If you plan to incorporate architectural elements into your landscaping, be certain that these elements are located far away from your septic tank. Get in contact with Walters Environmental Services if you want to learn more about maintaining your septic tank in excellent working order.

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