What Grade Should A Septic Tank Be Set? (TOP 5 Tips)

The slope on the collection pipe from the stub-out to the tank should be between 1% and 2% (i.e., 1/8- to 1/4-inch drop per foot of run). The elevation of a septic tank outlet is controlled by the elevation of subsequent components that receive effluent by gravity flow; the outlet must be set high enough to allow this.

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  • Connections to the septic tank shall be such that they permit standard solvent welded joints or rubber ring joints and enable the inlet and outlet pipe to be installed at grade, 8. Connections for the inlet, outlet and inspection openings are integrally cast for concrete

How much slope should a septic line have?

A typical septic tank has a 4-inch inlet located at the top. The pipe that connects to it must maintain a 1/4-inch-per-foot slope toward it from the house. This means that for every 10 feet of distance between the tank and the house, the inlet must be 2 1/2 inches below the point at which the pipe exits the house.

How high should the level be in a septic tank?

On average, the liquid should be approximately 12 inches from the top of the tank. If the level goes higher than the outlet pipe, then it means the drain field is blocked and immediate action must be taken.

What is the minimum slope at the bottom of a septic tank in percent?

1. The sewer pipe carries the sewage to the septic tank. The line should be at least 15 m away from the source (latrine block, etc.) and down hill from any nearby well or spring, it should be water-tight joints and a uniform slope (minimum 2%).

Can you have too much slope in drain pipe?

The ideal slope of any drain line is ¼ inch per foot of pipe. That’s right, it is possible to have too much slope in your drain lines. According to Redwood Kardon, a former plumbing inspector, “Oversloped pipes (greater than ½ in.

Can I level my leach field?

Yes you can. You just have to ensure that the the surface level of the septic flushes with the ground level so that the storm water doesn’t get in it.

How do you know if septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  1. Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  2. Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  3. Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  4. You Hear Gurgling Water.
  5. You Have A Sewage Backup.
  6. How often should you empty your septic tank?

Can heavy rain affect septic tank?

It is common to have a septic back up after or even during a heavy rain. Significant rainfall can quickly flood the ground around the soil absorption area (drainfield) leaving it saturated, making it impossible for water to flow out of your septic system.

How do I know if my septic tank is failing?

8 Signs of Septic System Failure

  1. Septic System Backup.
  2. Slow Drains.
  3. Gurgling Sounds.
  4. Pool of Water or Dampness Near Drainfield.
  5. Nasty Odors.
  6. Unusual, Bright Green Grass Above Drainfield.
  7. Blooms of Algae in Nearby Water.
  8. High Levels of Coliform in Water Well.

What are the three 3 bacteria that separates by septic tank?

Septic tanks work by allowing waste to separate into three layers: solids, effluent and scum (see illustration above). The solids settle to the bottom, where microorganisms decompose them. The scum, composed of waste that’s lighter than water, floats on top.

What should be the size of septic tank?

Length of septic tank (L) should be taken as 9feet 9 inches or 9.75 feet. Breadth of septic tank (B) should be taken as 6 feet 3 inches or 6.25 feet. The standard height (D) of septic tank should be taken as 5 feet 9 inches or 5.75 feet.

How far do field lines extend from septic tank?

Your septic system site plan is typically drawn right on top of your property survey showing the septic tank ‘setbacks’ with tank 5-10 feet from the house, the leach field at least 20 feet from the house, at least 100 feet away from wells and streams, 25 feet away from dry gulches, and 10 feet away from the property

Are septic tanks set level?

The elevation of a septic tank outlet is controlled by the elevation of subsequent components that receive effluent by gravity flow; the outlet must be set high enough to allow this. All other elevations should be determined according to the elevation of the soil treatment area to ensure it is not installed too deeply.

Should a septic tank be level?

A septic tank should always be “filled” to its normal liquid level, or the bottom of the outlet pipe which carries effluent to the absorption area. This normal liquid level is usually between 8” to 12” from the top of the tank on average (see picture at right).

What size septic tank do I need for a tiny house?

Tiny homes typically require a 500 to 1,000-gallon septic tank. Though, it’s not always possible to implement a tank of this size. In some states, for example, the minimum tank size is 1,000 gallons. There may be exceptions to this rule if your home is on wheels.

Septic Tank Design Depth – how deep should the septic tank be located

  • When establishing a septic tank, you may ask a QUESTION or make a COMMENT regarding how deep the septic tank should be located.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Design depth for a septic tank: What are the most frequent depths to which septic tanks, cesspools, seepage pits, and drywells are buried? Is it necessary to locate the septic tank below the frost line in order to prevent it from freezing? Septic tanks are placed at a certain depth, and there are various elements that impact the actual depth to which a septic tank (or cesspool, drywell, or soak-pit) will be sunk, which are discussed below.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Septic Tank Installation Depth

Table of Contents for the Article Series

  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH- this article
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANKDRAINFIELDFREEZE PROTECTION

How Deep Should WePutthe Septic Tank at Original Installation?

Septic tanks may be built almost anywhere in the soil, regardless of its depth. When operating in a freezing climate, even in uninhabited homes, it is unlikely that the septic tank serving an occupied home or even an unoccupied one will freeze. This is due in part to latent heat received by the septic tank’s bottom from earth, in part to heat generated by bacteria in the septic tank, and in part to warm wastewater entering from a building served by the septic system, and in part to warm wastewater entering from the building served by the septic system.

You’ll kill the bacteria, damage the drainfield, and taint the surrounding ecosystem as a result of this.

Factors Determining Septic Tank Depth

The following are the primary elements that influence the actual depth at which a septic tank is likely to be buried (and, consequently, the depth to which you may have to dig to locate the septic tank) at a specific site:

  • The depth to which the lowest sewage line departs the structure that the septic tank serves is referred to as the sewer line depth. Given that we often rely on gravity to transport sewage from a building to a septic tank, the tank will be lower than the waste line that exits the building that it serves. a spot where the contractor discovered site characteristics suited for burying a septic tank because of its form, rocks, and impediments If a location has bedrock or huge rocks that are near to the surface, the tank may be relocated
  • The greater the distance between the tank and the structure, and the greater the depth of the tank if the system relies on gravity to carry sewage, the deeper the tank will be. We don’t place septic tanks any deeper than they need to be since we are normally transporting effluent from the septic tank to the drainfield by gravity as well as by pumping it out. Plumbers often build sewage lines to slope down from the inlet to the outlet at a rate of 1/8″ per foot to 1/4″ per foot of linear run of the waste pipe, depending on the kind of waste pipe. In order to avoid septic drainfield burial at an excessive depth, we must ensure that there is sufficient air in the soil, since the absence of oxygen deep in the soil will inhibit certain desired bacterial action (the aerobic bacteria) that is required to break down and process sewage. It is certainly possible to locate and position the septic tank anywhere, including uphill from the building, if a sewer ejector pump or grinder pump system is utilized to transport sewage from a structure to an underground storage tank. If a sewage effluent pump is used to transport septic effluent from the septic tank to the drainfield, we may, of course, locate the tank “downhill” from the drainfield as well
  • But, if a sewage effluent pump is not utilized, we cannot. Growing grass: If the septic tank is just 2 or 3 inches below the surface of the earth, you might as well have left the top of the tank visible, because grass will not grow in such thin soil as you would expect. Adding 6″ to 12″ of backfill may be sufficient to allow grass to grow over the septic system
  • However, this is a purely aesthetic issue and does not affect the system’s functionality. See SEPTIC SYSTEMS, OVERHAULED PLANTS
  • Recommendations from the manufacturer: Some modern septic treatment system designs need the use of a skilled system operator to perform highly specified inspection and maintenance intervals. According to the information provided atBAT MEDIA SEPTIC PLANTS, BAT septic systems (biologically accelerated treatment) are maintained or examined at 6-month intervals, among other things. According to the maker of that technology (Jet Inc.), it is extremely critical that the finishing grade slope away from the facility when completed. In addition, the grade must be at least 1″ below the bottom of the access covers to be considered. (Jet retired in 2016)

A service riser should be put in deep septic tanks to provide access to the tank. Plungers are large-diameter “wells” that are installed over the entrance and/or outlet ports of a septic tank in order to provide simple access for tank pumping, inspection, and baffle repair. Plungers are also used for septic tank pumping, inspection, and baffle repair. If the septic tank is sunk more than a few inches below the surface of the earth, good practice calls for the installation of a septic riser, which is a high diameter pipe that allows for easy access to the septic tank for inspection and cleaning.

Continue reading atSEPTIC TANK DEPTH to learn how to determine the depth of a septic tank’s cover, or choose a topic from the closely-related articles listed below, or see the completeARTICLE INDEX for more information.

Alternatively, view the FAQs on SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH – questions and answers that were originally posted on this page. Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Tank Articles

  • The following topics are covered: SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD SIZE
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM INSPECTION LEVELS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN STRENGTH SPECS
  • SEPTIC TANKDRAINFIELDFREEZE PROTECTION
  • SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO FIND
  • SEPTIC
  • THE DISTANCE TO THE SEPTIC TANK
  • FINDING THE MAIN WASTE LINE EXIT
  • POSITIVE SEPTIC TANK LOCATIONS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK LOCATING EQUIPMENT
  • SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • SEPTIC TANK GRASS OR SNOWMELT
  • SEP
  • THE MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • THE SEPTIC TANK PUMPING PROCEDURE
  • THE SEPTIC TANK PUMPING SCHEDULE
  • THE SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • THE U.S. SEPTIC AUTHORITIESDESIGN SPECIFICATIONS
  • THE MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING

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DEPTH AT INSPECTION OF SEPTIC TANK DESIGN An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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See also:  How Long Can Sewer Line Be To Septic Tank? (Solution)

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Citations can be shown or hidden by selecting Show or Hide Citations. InspectApedia.com is a publisher that provides references. Daniel Friedman is an American journalist and author.

How to Run a Septic Tank Line From Your House

A septic system is made up of two lengths of pipe that are connected together. Initially, it runs from the house, where the system services are located, to a tank, where the waste is separated and solids settle out. The second section runs from the tank to the drainage field, where fluids from the tank are dispersed into the earth underneath the tank. The process of installing the first run of pipe is quite similar to that of installing a traditional sewage line. It is necessary to maintain a downhill slope to the storage tank.

Locating the Septic Tank

The tank serves as the nerve center of the septic system. It is required to be situated between the residence and the drainage field. Each and every septic installation must begin with a soil test, and depending on the results, soil conditions may necessitate the placement of the tank in a less-than-ideal site for digging sewer lines. Also required are minimum setback distances from property borders, functioning wells, surface water and other obstructions to provide a safe working environment.

Tank Depth

A standard septic tank has a 4-inch intake at the top, which is positioned towards the bottom. Ideally, a 1/4-inch-per-foot slope toward the pipe from the house should be maintained by the pipe connecting to it. To put it another way, for every 10 feet of distance between a tank and a home, the inlet must be 2 1/2 inches lower than where the pipe departs the house at its lowest point. The pipe usually exits at ground level, although it may need to pass beneath a foundation footing or concrete pad in rare cases.

Digging the Trench

The trench for the septic pipe should be dug before the hole for the tank since you will need a backhoe to complete the work and the tank will get in your way if it is already in the ground. To allow rainfall to drain properly, the pipe should be placed on a 2- or 3-inch bed of drain rock, so remember to account for this extra depth when digging.

It is normal to use a four-inch pipe, and it should be installed far enough down to link with the main soil stack, which is a three-inch pipe that runs vertically past the main bathroom and through the roof of the home.

Precautions

Local building and health agencies will demand permits for a septic tank installation. You will also be required to submit a design plan before the permits will be provided, so prepare ahead of time. This layout should be developed in collaboration with a local builder who is familiar with the unique characteristics of the topography in your neighborhood. Stay away from planting trees or plants near the tank, drainage field, or any of the pipe systems. They will be drawn to the pipes in their hunt for nutrition, and their roots will be able to successfully block them.

Removal may be both expensive and time-consuming.

At-Grade Septic Systems

A septic tank and a soil absorption bed are the components of an at-grade septic system. The soil absorption bed is used to discharge effluent (partially cleared water from a septic tank) into the soil and allow it to absorb nutrients. Approximately 1.5′′ washed stone, a distribution network, synthetic geotextile fabric, and a topsoil cover are all included in the price of each at-grate. An at-grade treatment plant is so named because the treatment of the effluent begins in the first inch of soil, or “at grade,” and progresses from there.

  • In cases when the limiting factor is less than 48 inches but larger than 36 inches, an at-grade installation is appropriate.
  • In order to begin, 6 inches of stone must be laid on the plowed at-grade site first.
  • The distribution network is constructed by drilling holes in tubing that are evenly spaced apart.
  • The stone is covered with a synthetic cloth to keep dirt and roots from getting into the stone.
  • The at-grade surface must retain a 3:1 slope in order to minimize erosion and deflect water away from the mound’s foundation.
  • After going through the initial treatment in the septic tank, the effluent is sent to the at-grade component.
  • A “rest time” occurs after each dosage, resulting in improved pathogen and nutrient clearance.
  • The size of an at-grade system is determined by the number of gallons generated per day by a house or business, as well as the pace at which the soil under the absorption bed is being loaded.
  • Each bedroom uses 150 gallons of water every day.
  • The at-grade is proportional to the soil loading rate; the lower the loading rate, the bigger the at-grade.
  • At-grade components are removed from the soil underneath them, which eliminates pathogens, organic matter, reduces pollutants through aerobic microorganisms, and forms ion bonds with negatively charged clay particles.

Organic debris contained in the waste water is consumed by these organisms, which aid in the elimination of infections. To get in touch with us, please click here.

Tips for Excavating and Setting Septic Tanks

Get articles, news, and videos about Onsite Systems delivered directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Plus, there are Onsite Systems. Receive Notifications Potential tank movement after installation is quantifiable, predictable, and avoidable if proper precautions are taken. The possibility of future difficulties is reduced if the original soil, bedding materials, depth to groundwater, backfill materials, and prospective stress loads are properly evaluated in the first place. When installing a tank, make sure to follow any manufacturer-specific installation instructions that may be included.

  1. Verify that the tank(s) are at the proper height and orientation in relation to the design.
  2. When connecting the stub-out to the tank, the collecting pipe should have a slope of between 1 and 2 percent (or 1/8 to 1/4 inch drop per foot of run) to ensure proper drainage.
  3. Note that in systems that rely solely on gravity flow, the height of the soil treatment area serves as the regulating elevation, which is particularly essential.
  4. If there are any preceding components that send effluent to a dosing tank by gravity flow, the height of the dosing tank intake is determined by the elevation of those components; it must be set deep enough.
  5. Tanks should be kept as shallow as feasible in order to reduce soil pressure, limit potential groundwater intrusion, and make maintenance operations more efficient.
  6. These precautions may only be necessary during the installation process, but they may also be required as a permanent element of the system on rare occasions.
  7. Precautions must be taken, as well as OSHA norms and requirements, to prevent injury.
  • When working on sites with finer-textured soils, a hole at one end of the excavation is ideal since the movement through the soil is slow enough that a pump can keep up with it. Once the backfilling process has begun, the pump must be disconnected. There is a hole with a sump: At the conclusion of the excavation, a slotted pipe filled with washed rock acts as a sump for collecting water. Water is removed from the slotted pipe by a pump that is mounted within the pipe. This technology permits the backfilling procedure to continue while the dewatering process is still in progress. The plan should include suitable management measures if this is a long-term scenario
  • Otherwise, the plan should be revised. These are used to manage the regional water table in sandy soils, and they must be developed and placed far in advance of the excavation to ensure proper operation. In situations where water enters the excavation more quickly than a sump can dewater it, this option is used. This application may or may not be permanent, and it is frequently subject to stringent regulations.

Before installing a level tank, the excavation must be level (with bedding material, if necessary) and clear of any big rocks or debris, which must be removed prior to installing the tank. It is critical that the base of all tanks be stabilized with adequate bedding before the tank may be used. Natural dirt can sometimes be used as a good bedding material in certain circumstances. This is something that the installer should confirm with the local authorities. To ensure that the bottom of the hole remains relatively undisturbed, it is critical to avoid overexcavating native soil while using it as bedding in order to retain relatively undisturbed conditions at the bottom of the hole.

  • It may be essential to add clean granular material to reestablish the proper height when this occurs.
  • It does not matter what type of material was used to build the tank; the bedding material for all tanks should be devoid of clods, big pebbles, frozen materials, and garbage, among other things.
  • Material requirements for bedding nonconcrete tanks should be obtained from the manufacturer in advance of usage.
  • It is possible to regulate the migration of penalties in two ways: either by purposefully allowing vacant areas to fill during the installation process or by using steps to prevent fines from migrating after the installation is complete.
  • Alternatively, washed rock that has been graded so that any vacuum areas are filled with smaller particles can be utilized to fill in the gaps.
  • Indicate the type of bedding material used as well as the depth of bedding.
  • Some scenarios may need the installation of a concrete pad in order to successfully hold the grade and establish a solid foundation.

A concrete tank with a clean bottom can form a bond with wet concrete, reducing the amount of buoyancy it has in the water.

It is possible that putting a tank with a nonlevel bottom on a dry concrete surface will result in pressure points that will cause the tank’s bottom to shatter.

Guarantee that the tank’s structural integrity is not compromised once it has been installed in the excavation to ensure that no damage or movement has taken place.

This is necessary in order to ensure that the inlet and outflow are at the proper relative elevations with respect to one another.

It is vital to adhere to OSHA safety regulations.

She has a master’s degree in civil engineering and a doctorate in environmental engineering.

Her responsibilities include serving as the education chair for the Minnesota Onsite Wastewater Association and the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association, as well as serving on the National Science Foundation’s International Committee on Wastewater Treatment Systems.

Send an email to [email protected] if you have any concerns concerning septic system care and operation. Heger will respond as soon as possible.

Frequently Asked Questions

Before installing a level tank, the excavation must be level (with bedding material, if necessary) and clear of any big rocks or debris, which must be removed prior to installation. Every tank’s base must be properly stabilized with adequate bedding, and this is of critical importance. Occasionally, naturally existing dirt can be used as a bedding material in certain circumstances. Local restrictions on this should be checked by the installation. To ensure that the bottom of the hole remains reasonably undisturbed, it is critical to avoid overexcavating native soil while using it as bedding in order to prevent the soil from becoming too compacted.

  1. It may be essential to add clean granular material to reestablish the proper height when this happens.
  2. It does not matter what type of material was used to create the tank; the bedding material for all tanks should be devoid of clods, big pebbles, frozen materials, and garbage, among other things.
  3. Material requirements for bedding nonconcrete tanks should be obtained from the manufacturer or from the supplier.
  4. It is possible to regulate the migration of penalties in two ways: either by purposefully allowing vacant areas to fill during the installation process or by employing steps to prevent fines from migrating after the installation is complete.
  5. Alternately, graded washed rock that has been filled with finer particles to fill in the voids might be utilized instead.
  6. The bedding material and depth should be specified in this section.
  7. In rare cases, the use of a concrete pad may be required in order to successfully maintain the grade and establish a solid foundation.
See also:  How To Locate Exactly Septic Tank Is? (Solution)

Having a clean bottom on a concrete tank might help it to bond with the wet concrete and reduce its buoyancy to a certain extent Despite the fact that the bottom of concrete tanks is often level, it is not guaranteed to be completely level.

Always double-check to ensure that the tank has been properly positioned in the excavation with respect to the inlet and outflow pipes.

Examine whether or not the tank is horizontal in the excavation using a laser or a level.

It is important to remember that personnel must be in a safe posture when tanks are being filled.

A little about the authorSara Heger, PhD is a research scientist and teacher in the Onsite Sewage Treatment Program at the Water Resources Center at the University of Minnesota.

Many local and national training seminars on the design, installation, and maintenance of septic systems as well as associated research have been held at which she has given presentations.

Send an email to [email protected] with your questions for Heger on septic system care and operation.

  • What exactly is a Septic System as-built
  • What is the best way to locate the position of my septic tank lids and other septic system components
  • What effect would saving water have on my septic system? The following items should not be disposed of in your septic system: Can I use my garbage disposal in conjunction with my septic system? What does it indicate when my drains are slow
  • What should I do if my septic system is backing up
  • And other questions. What should I do if the power goes out and my septic system is dependent on a pump
  • Is it necessary to install a filter in my septic tank? How often should I clean the filter in my septic tank? Can I have the lids of my septic tank placed so that they are flush with the surface of the ground? How do I know what it means when my septic alarm goes off
  • Are you obligated to get your Septic System assessed if you are planning to sell your home? Are there any restrictions on planting over my drain field or reserved drain field? Is it legal for me to drive or park on my drain field? Was the drain field replaced, and how big was the reserve area? Does using additives reduce the frequency with which I have to pump my septic tank
  • The frequency with which I should empty my septic tank and pump tank
  • The expense of a new septic system or drain field
  • And the frequency with which I should empty my pump tank Exactly what is the difference between a drain field and a leach field
  • Where can I locate a Septic designer
  • And other questions.

What exactly is a Septic System as-built? It is a drawing of your Septic System that shows the position of the various septic system components in relation to the various structures on the site. The SepticAsbuilt is normally finished after the Septic System is installed or repaired by the Septic Designer or Installer, which is typically when the Septic System is constructed. return to the top of the page What is the best way to locate the position of my septic tank lids and other septic system components?

  • In most circumstances, your local Health District will have an Asbuilt design available for you to review.
  • Utilize the resources offered to connect with the local Health Department in your county and then proceed as directed by the instructions to locate your Septic Affidavit.
  • If there is a design on file, look through it to see where the lids or other components that you need to identify are located.
  • Then you may use a metal rod to probe the ground in a grid pattern, looking for the tank if you can’t find it immediately.
  • If there are any more components that need to be discovered, we can locate them as well, using methods such as probing, electrical locating, and other approaches.
  • Yes, lowering your water use will aid in extending the life of your septic system and ensuring that it continues to function effectively.
  • This quantity varies depending on the kind of soil and the number of bedrooms in the house being constructed.

Septic systems should never be used to dispose of goods that are toxic or hazardous to the environment.

Please see the link below for a printable document including a detailed list of these products as well as alternative Septic System maintenance procedures.

Although it is not suggested to use your waste disposal, many new houses are equipped with one at the time of construction.

A waste disposal should also be installed, and its filter should be cleaned on a regular basis, as the installation of a garbage disposal will cause the effluent filter to become clogged more frequently.

Slow drains might be one of the first signs that your septic system is having problems, and they can be quite frustrating.

It is advised that you contact us, and we would be happy to assist you with troubleshooting your system.

If your septic system is backing up, you should immediately turn off all water to the house and contact a professional for assistance.

In any case, we can assist you in getting your system back on track.

If your septic system is powered by one or more pumps, you should be cautious about how much water you use whenever the electricity goes out.

For scenarios like as power outages, certain older systems, on the other hand, may only have a limited amount of storage space.

If this is the case, it is usually a good idea to contact someone as soon as the alarm has been hushed.

return to the top of the page Should I put in a filter in my septic tank to keep the odors down?

The use of a filter considerably decreases the amount of sediments that would otherwise block the drain field, hence extending the life of the septic tank.

Most manufacturers recommend that you clean the effluent filter in your Septic Tank once every six months to ensure that it operates properly.

It is usually advisable to perform some regular filter cleaning to keep the septic tank from backing up into the home and causing flooding.

Yes, adding lids that rise to the surface, commonly known as “risers,” is incredibly beneficial in keeping your septic system in good working condition.

They also make cleaning the filter in the Septic Tank (if one is installed) a matter of minutes rather than hours.

return to the top of the page The sound of my Septic Alarm indicates that something is wrong.

If you find yourself in this position, you should get your septic system tested right away.

In any case, it should most likely be evaluated as soon as possible in order to avoid a potential backlog or to avoid incurring further expenses.

return to the top of the page I’m getting ready to put my house on the market; do I need to get my septic system assessed first?

With a few exceptions, King County mandates that every property sale or transfer be subjected to a mandated inspection, which may be found here.

However, virtually all lenders need a home inspection before approving a loan and finalizing the transaction.

return to the top of the page Are there any restrictions on planting over my drain field or reserve drain field?

Generally speaking, if the reserve drain field has never been de-brushed, it is absolutely OK to keep it as is.

Over time, plants and trees will become aware of the nutrient-rich effluent that is being released into your drain field and sprout roots either in the drain field or around the components, preventing the effluent from dispersing correctly.

return to the top of the page Is it legal for me to drive or park on my drain field?

The majority of the time, there is no long-term harm to light automobiles under extremely limited scenarios.

return to the top of the page Was the drain field replaced or was there a backup plan in place?

Although the reserve area is not necessarily the only location where a replacement drain field may be installed, it is the area that was chosen as a result of a variety of considerations at the time of the initial design.

Yes, even if you use additives, you will still need to pump your septic tank on a regular schedule.

In rare cases, additives may be beneficial, but in the majority of Septic Systems, there are enough bacteria present naturally that they are not required.

The frequency with which your Septic Tank has to be pumped might vary based on a number of factors, including the size of your home, the size of your Septic Tank, how often you use your trash disposal, the age of your Septic System, and other considerations.

return to the top of the page How often should I empty the contents of my Pump Tank?

On average, most homeowners using Pump Tanks should pump their septic tanks roughly every third time they do so.

return to the top of the page What is the cost of a new Septic System / drain field installation?

Despite the fact that each system is custom-designed for its specific location, there is a standard range of septic system and drain field expenses.

Prices might vary greatly depending on whether the property is an existing home in need of renovation or a vacant piece of land with no structure on it.

Installation of a new system normally costs between $8,000 and $30,000.

Although there may always be exceptions to these prices, both on the high and low ends of the spectrum, this can at the very least provide a general notion of what the costs might be in a given situation.

The region where a septic system’s waste is disposed of is referred to as a drain field or a leach field, among other names.

The soil is often the final step in the process of cleaning and removing toxins from water before it is returned to the environment as a freshwater source.

We have a number of excellent designers with whom we collaborate on a regular basis.

In certain cases, depending on where you live and the circumstance you are in, there may be a designer who is more appropriate for your needs. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you require a reference depending on your circumstances. return to the top of the page

Septic System Owner’s Guide

What kind of computer system do you have? In North Carolina, there are many distinct types of septic systems in use, but the vast majority of the over 2 million systems in use throughout the state are minor variations of the typical septic system. This system includes a septic tank as well as a drainfield that is filled with gravel (usually two to six trenches). Since the mid- to late-1990s, classic gravel aggregate trenches have been phased out in favor of innovative gravel-less trench designs, which have become increasingly popular.

  1. Some of the most often used gravel-free trenches nowadays are either long and narrow, tunnel-shaped chambers in the trenche, or gravel replacements such as expanded polystyrene aggregate.
  2. A booklet from the Cooperative Extension Service, AG-439-13, Septic Systems and Their Maintenance, outlines the typical system, easy adjustments to it, and the most significant maintenance requirements.
  3. The application of these technologies is now widespread, whether in new housing projects or in the replacement or repair of malfunctioning septic systems in residences and businesses.
  4. In order to address this, state regulations provide specified maintenance requirements for a number of these more advanced technology.
  5. Furthermore, state regulations mandate that the health department examine these systems on a regular basis.
  6. Are you familiar with the location of your septic system and repair area?
  7. If you do not have a copy of your septic system permit or a soil evaluation document, contact your local health department.
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This Septic System Owner’s Guidefile folder should contain the following items: It is normally possible to establish the location of a septic tank and drainfield by looking at a copy of the permit and consulting with a septic contractor, a consultant, or the local health department A “repair area or replacement area,” in which a second drainfield might be constructed if necessary, has been required on nearly all home sites approved since the early 1980s, according to state law.

It should be noted on your septic system permit that this repair area was designated by the health department when the site was allowed.

Some Important Facts to Understand About Your Septic System

  • Are you using any particular kind of system? North Carolina has several distinct types of septic systems, but the majority of its almost 2 million systems, which are slightly modified versions of traditional septic systems, are found throughout the state. Septic tanks and drainfields with gravel-filled ditches are included in this system (usually two to six trenches). Trenches made of gravel aggregate have mostly been phased out since the mid- to late-1990s, and modern gravel-free trench designs have taken their place. Alternative materials are used in lieu of gravel in some trench designs that do not require it. Some of the most often utilized gravel-free trenches nowadays are either long and narrow, tunnel-shaped chambers in the trenched or gravel replacements such as expanded polystyrene aggregate. Another type of alternative trench material that is being utilized in some regions of the state is big diameter pipe, permeable concrete blocks, and even recycled rubber tires that have been cut into chips or bits of a specified size and shape. Septic Systems and Their Maintenance, published by the Cooperative Extension Service as AG-439-13, outlines the standard system, easy changes to it, and key maintenance requirements. The utilization of systems with pumps, mechanical pretreatment units, and biofilters, among other more advanced forms of on-site systems, has increased significantly in the previous 20 to 25 years. Numerous new housing developments, as well as the replacement or repair of failed septic systems in houses and businesses, are increasingly using these technologies. Septic systems that use these innovative technology demand a greater level of upkeep than conventional septic systems that are more traditional. As a result, a few of these more advanced systems are subject to special maintenance obligations under state law. The hiring of a state-certified operator to examine and maintain the system on a regular basis is frequently required by state sewage regulations. The health department is also required to check these systems on a regular basis, according to state regulations. The sort of system you have and the regulatory requirements for long-term maintenance can be determined by contacting your local health authority. Do you know where your septic system and repair area are located? Knowing where your septic tank (and any additional pretreatment units) and drainfield are located is essential to properly maintaining your septic system. For a copy of your septic system permit as well as a soil evaluation document, contact your local health department. The approximate locations of each of the system’s components, as well as the size of the septic tank, are indicated on these forms. This Septic System Owner’s Guidefile folder should have all of the following items: Septic tank and drainfield locations may generally be identified with the use of an original permit as well as an experienced septic contractor, consultant, or representative from the local health authority. A “repair area or replacement area,” in which a second drainfield might be constructed if necessary, is required on nearly all home projects approved since the early 1980s. It should be noted on your septic system permit that this repair area was designated by the health department when the site was approved. This area must also be protected from excavation, the construction of a home extension, garage, or outbuilding on top of it, the installation of a swimming pool, and any other soil disturbance activities, as stipulated by law. Important Information Regarding Your Septic System

On the grid labeledSeptic System Layout, draw a rough sketch of your home, septic system (including both the tank and drainfield), repair area, and any other essential features (such as your driveway). The distance between the home and the access port on the septic tank should be measured and recorded when having your septic tank drained. This will assist you in locating it again. You may also want to indicate the position of your tank as well as the limits of your drainfield in your yard. If you do not have a riser installed over the access port for your septic tank, you may want to consider having one put in.

  1. Even when properly maintained, septic tanks can contain harmful gases and pollutants, as well as bacteria and other germs that can cause major health problems if not addressed.
  2. Is your septic system in proper functioning order?
  3. Many individuals are unaware that untreated sewage that has accumulated on the surface of the ground might be a health threat.
  4. Before fixing a malfunctioning septic system, you must get a permit from the local health authority, according to state regulations.
  5. What kind of upkeep has been carried out?
  6. If you are purchasing an existing house, you should ask the seller a few critical questions, such as the following:
  • What is the age of the system
  • What is the location of the tank and drainfield (they may or may not be on the same property or even on the same parcel of land)
  • When was the last time the tank was pumped
  • What is the frequency with which it has been pushed
  • Is it necessary to clean the “effluent filter” in the septic tank on a regular basis (effluent filters are required for systems established after 1999)
  • Has there been any indication of a likely failure? In what location can I get a copy of the permit and documentation proving how effectively (or poorly) the system has been maintained
  • Do you know whether any improvements have been made to the house that would necessitate expanding the capacity of the system? Is the system still operational, and if so, when and by whom was it repaired?

If the house has only recently been constructed, request that the septic system contractor give you with a “as built” schematic, which may include elements that were not included in the permit. If the house is equipped with a pump, request that the contractor and the local health agency supply specifics on how the pump was initially installed. In order to properly care for your septic system, you must manage it on a day-to-day basis as well as perform periodic maintenance and repairs. Layout of a septic system.

  • If the house has just recently been constructed, request that the septic system contractor give you with a “as built” schematic, which may include information that were not included in the building permit application. Request information from the contractor and the health authorities on the first pump setup if the house has a system that includes a pump. For your septic system to function properly, it has to be managed on a daily basis as well as subjected to regular inspections and maintenance. Schematic representation of an underground sewage treatment system. You should avoid wasting any water.

Keep waste disposal to sewage alone.

  • It is not acceptable to utilize your septic tank as a garbage can for items such as cigarette butts, tissues, feminine hygiene products, cotton swabs, cat litter, coffee grinds, or disposable diapers. Reduce the amount of time you use your garbage disposal. These contribute a significant amount of additional solids. It is not recommended to throw fat or cooking oil down the drain. You should avoid putting toxic chemicals into your system, such as solvents and oils. You should avoid using paint thinners and paint thinners that have been dumped. You should avoid disinfectants and pesticides. Conserve your funds. Most of the time, commercial septic tank additives are not required.

Ensure that the system is protected against physical harm (site maintenance).

  • Maintain a layer of plants on the soil over the drainfield to prevent soil erosion from occurring. Don’t drive your car above the system’s limits. Try to avoid building over the system or in the repair area. The natural shape of the terrain immediately downslope of the system should be preserved, and this region should be protected against excavation (cutting and filling). Neither asphalt nor concrete should be used to cover the tank or drainfield.

All wastewater should be disposed of in a system that has been authorized.

  • You shouldn’t install a separate pipe to transport washwater to a side ditch or into the woods. This is against the law

The house and the yard (site maintenance)

  • Conserve and preserve the area where your septic tank and drainfield are located
  • Trees that thrive in moist environments should be cut down and removed. Willows, elms, sweetgums, and certain maples are examples of such trees. Surface water should be diverted away from the tank and drainfield by landscaping the yard. Inspect the system to make sure that water from the roof, gutter, and foundation drains does not overflow
  • It is recommended that if your system is located at the base of a slope, you build a french drain to channel subterranean water. Ensure that drainage ditches, subsurface tiles, and drainage outlets are kept in good condition so that water may readily flow from them.

Sewage treatment system (Septic tank)

  • Drainage system sewage system sewage disposal system
Preventive Maintenance Record
Date Work Done Firm Cost
Your Septic System Installer
Name:
Address:
Phone:
Date System Installed:
  • Sewage treatment system (sewage treatment system)

Regulations and safeguards are necessary.

  • Any system that includes a pump should be operated by a state-certified subsurface system operator. In the case of low pressure pipe (LPP) systems erected or repaired after July 1, 1992, as well as underground drip irrigation systems, aerobic treatment units (ATUs), peat biofilters, sand biofilters, textile biofilters, and other sophisticated systems, a permit will be required by law. Those interested in obtaining a list of state-certified subsurface system operators should contact the North Carolina Water Pollution Control System Certification Commission at 919-707-9089. Between planned maintenance visits, check to see that the pump and electrical components are still in proper operating order. Germs found in sewage have the potential to cause disease. Never go into a septic tank unless absolutely necessary. Toxic and explosive gases are present in the tank, posing a threat. Tanks that are more than a decade old may collapse. Electrical controls provide a risk of electric shock and sparking. Children should not be able to open the septic tank lid, hence it should be secured. Do not attempt to repair a malfunctioning system on your own time. Obtain a repair permit and employ a contractor with extensive expertise

For any system that includes a pump, you should hire a subsurface system operator who has been qualified by the state of installation. In the case of low pressure pipe (LPP) systems erected or repaired after July 1, 1992, as well as underground drip irrigation systems, aerobic treatment units (ATUs), peat biofilters, sand biofilters, textile biofilters, and other sophisticated systems, a permit will be required by law; By calling the North Carolina Water Pollution Control System Certification Commission at (919) 707-9089, you may get a list of state-certified subsurface system operators.

Between planned maintenance visits, check to see that the pump and electrical components are still in perfect operating condition.

Septic tanks should never be approached.

Tanks that are more than a decade old may fail.

Children should not be able to access the septic tank lid, hence it should be locked.

Hire an expert contractor and obtain a repair permit.

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