Septic Tank Field Line Length When Using Chambers? (Question)

Best practice is to limit trench lengths to about 50 foot (12 to 13 four foot long chambers) for full trench saturation and best treatment of effluent. Always vent the ends of each chamber run to ensure healthy air flow through system. Inspection port at end of each run must be drilled with holes to provide venting.

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  • Best practice is to limit trench lengths to about 50 foot (12 to 13 four foot long chambers) for full trench saturation and best treatment of septic effluent. Secondly, how deep does a leach field need to be? 6 inches Beside above, how do infiltrator septic systems work?

How long should septic lines be?

A typical septic drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36″; or per the USDA, 2 feet to 5 feet in depth.

How far do field lines extend from septic tank?

Your septic system site plan is typically drawn right on top of your property survey showing the septic tank ‘setbacks’ with tank 5-10 feet from the house, the leach field at least 20 feet from the house, at least 100 feet away from wells and streams, 25 feet away from dry gulches, and 10 feet away from the property

How long should leach lines be?

A standard leach line is considered to be three (3) feet wide and three (3) feet deep with a length as required. A non-standard leach line is wider, narrower, and/or deeper than three (3) feet with a length as required.

How many feet of leaching chamber do I need?

The minimum linear footage of the leaching chamber system should be determined by dividing the total trench bottom area by 1.2 meters (4 feet), when used in a conventional drainfield trench. No reduction area is allowed for leaching chamber systems installed in bed or fill systems.

How far apart are leach field lines?

The minimum separation between the bottom of any leaching device and seasonally high groundwater shall be: 5 feet where the leaching device is between 50 and 100 feet from a stream, spring, or other waterbody.

How far should drain field be from septic tank?

Common guidelines require at least 50′ clearance distance between a well and a septic system tank or 150′ between a well and a septic drainfield or leaching bed but you will see that different authorities may recommend different distances. Local soil and rock conditions can make these “rules of thumb” unreliable.

How close can you build next to a drain field?

– A full foundation must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 20 feet from the leaching area. – A slab foundation such as a garage must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 10 feet from the leaching area. – Concrete columns for a deck must be 5 feet from the leaching area and not disturb the septic system.

How do I calculate the size of my septic drain field?

Drainfield Size

  1. The size of the drainfield is based on the number of bedrooms and soil characteristics, and is given as square feet.
  2. For example, the minimum required for a three bedroom house with a mid range percolation rate of 25 minutes per inch is 750 square feet.

How many Infiltrator chambers do I need?

As a general rule, trenches ‘fingers’ should be no longer than fifty feet ( 12 or 13 Infiltrators long ) for best function and most even effluent distribution. Unless you are installing as a “bed” system (where the chambers are right next to each other), leave at least six feet of undisturbed soil between fingers.

Can a leach field be too deep?

Drain Field Depth The result is a drain field about 3 to 4 feet deep. Sometimes, however, a drain field may need to be a bit shallower and can result in drain pipes as close to the surface as 6 inches. Underground obstacles can cause this situation.

Can you add dirt on top of leach field?

Never add additional soil over the drain field unless it is a minimal amount used to restore an area that may have been eroded or pulled up by removing another plant. Try not to be overly zealous when tilling the soil for planting. Remember that the drain lines may be as close as 6 inches from the soil surface.

Can you drive over leach field chambers?

In sum, driving over the leach field in any vehicle larger than a child’s bicycle is a bad idea. Heavy vehicles may actually crush buried leach field lines, or they may compress the soils around the leach field, either of which leads to failure. Driving on or parking on leach fields will destroy them.

Does a leach field need to be level?

The water level should always be at the level of the drain line connecting the septic tank to the leaching field. If the water level is higher than the drain line, it means that the leaching field cannot hold any more water and it is backing up into the septic tank.

How long does a leach field last?

It’s important to consider the life expectancy of a drain-field, too. Under normal conditions and good care, a leach-field will last for 50 years or more. Concrete septic tanks are sturdy and reliable but not indestructible.

Septic Components – Leach Lines

Components of a septic system – leach lines

Leach Lines with Perforated Pipe:

Leach lines are trenches that are filled with washed rock/gravel until the water level reaches the desired level. On top of the rock, a perforated pipe is laid out at a level grade. More rock is placed to the pipe’s cover, and paper or other acceptable filter material is used to prevent soil from filtering down into the rock below the surface. It is true that the paper degrades, but by the time it does, the soil has been compacted sufficiently to prevent it from falling into the rock below. Perforated leach lines are typically the first option considered when designing a normal individual sewage disposal system.

There is also enough evapo-transpiration and aerobic bacteria breakdown in the lines (12″ to grade) to allow for some aerobic bacteria breakdown.

The size of a sewage disposal system’s disposal field is determined by the amount of sewage that will be discharged and the pace at which the soil will absorb water.

In general, a conventional leach line is three (3) feet wide and three (3) feet deep, with a length that is determined by the situation.

Some El Dorado County requirements for standard leach line installation:

  • The maximum length of each line is 100 feet
  • The minimum spacing between lines, measured center-to-center, is ten feet. Natural earth depth over all lines, calculated from the lowest point of natural grade 12 in, must be at least 12 inches deep. The maximum “drop” in the leach line (between the bottom of the trench and the drain pipe) is 3 inches every 100 feet. It is necessary to plug the ends of drain line pipes, and all holes in the pipe must be directed downward
  • It is required to build a minimum of one observation/inspection riser (see Septic Components: Inspection Riser) at the end of each trench. Drain rock/gravel should be clean, sound gravel or crushed rock with a diameter ranging from 3/4 to 1 1/2 inches, with no more than 5% of the total weight of the material outside of this range

Gravel-less Leach Lines:

The use of gravel-less trench construction (for example, Infiltrator® systems) in place of drain rock in the disposal trench may be appropriate. The Department requires that the design, manufacture, and materials utilized be long-lasting and of high quality.

A single Infiltrator chamber with an end cap.

  • The maximum length of each line is 100 feet
  • The minimum spacing between lines, measured center-to-center, is ten feet. Natural earth depth over all lines, calculated from the lowest point of natural grade 12 in, must be at least 12 inches deep. Drop in leach line (bottom of trench and chambers) should be as level as feasible – no more than 3 in. per 100 feet of leach line
  • It is required to build a minimum of one observation/inspection riser (see Septic Components: Inspection Riser) at the end of each trench. Prepare the trench sidewalls by scarifying (scratching) them to avoid spreading prior to installing the chamber
  • Put up a splash guard under the pipe entrance to keep the trench floor from being divetted.
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Installation of leach line chambers that do not include gravel.

Drainfield Size & Design

  • Installation of leach line chambers that are not filled with gravel
  • In sandy soil, 1 inch can be achieved in 3 minutes
  • In clay soil, 1 inch may be achieved in 48 minutes.
  • If it takes less than 5 minutes for water to drop 1 inch in a saturated hole, the effluent will flow too quickly for it to be adequately treated, as is the case with sandy soil. If it takes more than 60 minutes for the water to drop one inch, the effluent will not be able to travel as quickly as it should, and effluent may rise to the top of the water table. This is something that may happen in clay soil.

Drainfield Size

  • According to the number of bedrooms and soil qualities, the drainfield is measured in square feet, and its size is reported in square feet. It has been determined by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) how many square feet of drainfield trench will be required. Title 124 of the North Dakota Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) contains the design, operation, and maintenance requirements for on-site wastewater treatment systems
  • The table below is an excerpt from that title. A three-bedroom house with a mid-range percolation rate of 25 minutes per inch, for example, requires a minimum of 750 square feet of space to function properly.

Square Feet of Drain Field Trench Required for Single Family Dwelling

Number of Bedrooms 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Perc Rate in Minutes Per Inch 200 gpd 300 gpd 400 gpd 500 gpd 600 gpd 700 gpd 800 gpd 900 gpd 1000 gpd

5Systems must be constructed with a 12 inch loamy sand liner that has a percolation rate of 15 to 20 minutes per inch and should be developed at a percolation rate of 11-20 minutes per inch, with a percolation rate of 15 to 20 minutes per inch.

5-10 165 330 495 660 825 990 1155 1320 1485
11-20 210 420 630 840 1050 1260 1470 1680 1890
21-30 250 500 750 1000 1250 1500 1750 2000 2250
31-40 275 550 825 1100 1375 1650 1925 2200 2475
41-50 330 660 990 1320 1650 1980 2310 2640 2970
51-60 350 700 1050 1400 1750 2100 2450 2800 3150

60Systems must be developed by a licensed professional engineer or architect. A building permit is required. 017.02 In order to determine the needed square footage for enterprises, the following equation should be used: The daily design flow divided by the number of hours in the day (Five divided by the square root of the percolation rate). 017.03 In order to calculate the absorption area for a bed, first determine the needed square footage for a trench and then multiply the required square footage by the factor from Table 14.2.

Your Go-To Guide for Absorption Field Sizing

A thorough consideration of minimum setback requirements should be included in the design of every system. Check the distance between the crawl space foundation and the intake of the septic system.

Interested in Septic Tanks?

Receive articles, stories, and videos about septic tanks delivered directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Septic Tanks and More Receive Notifications When designing a new septic system or repairing an existing one, the size of the absorption field should always be considered one of the most critical design considerations. There are several aspects to consider when sizing an absorption field, including setbacks from wells and property lines, soil and other geological features, as well as the general appropriateness and accessibility of a given location.

  • Minimum statewide laws are in place in my home state of Missouri, and these are occasionally supplemented by extra local regulations.
  • The procedure is subject to the requirements of the local governing body.
  • State guidelines, or a mix of state and county or local rules, may be used to accomplish this.
  • In rare cases, some agencies may demand both in order to be compliant.
  • The findings of a perc test are based on how long it takes for the soil to absorb a certain amount of water in a sample hole with a specific diameter and depth (see figure).
  • When it comes to soil analysis, there are a number of extremely precise parameters and standards that must be met.
  • Factors affecting soil assessment It may also be necessary to do a soil study in order to determine the proper size of the field.
  • Only qualified personnel are permitted to conduct these sorts of exams in accordance with the requirements of the governing authorities.
  • The pace at which soil is loaded Perc tests and soil assessments both give information that may be used to calculate the soil loading rate.
  • You have the single most essential element in the equation of sizing an absorption field after the results of the chosen test (percolation, soil evaluation, or both) have been obtained.

An illustration of a conventional system is as follows:

  • Number of bedrooms: 3
  • Soil loading rate: 0.4
  • Number of gallons required per bedroom: 120
  • Soil loading rate: 0.4

To calculate this, the following formula might be used:

  • 450 lineal feet of 2-foot-wide conventionalaltrenches utilizing 4-inch perforated PVC and gravel
  • 3×120 = 360 gallons per day
  • 360/0.4 = 900 square feet of conventionaltrench bottom

Alternatives for determining the size of the absorption field You should keep in mind that there are different possibilities accessible when evaluating the size of the absorption field. For example, your local regulatory body may permit the use of an alternate absorption trench material in lieu of 4-inch pipe and gravel in certain circumstances. This alternate medium may be able to fit into your 24-inch-wide trench and qualify as the equivalent of a 36-inch-wide trench (approximate width varies by authority), reducing the needed field to merely 300 lineal feet of trench (approximate width varies by authority).

  1. Maintain your focus on the fact that the stats we’ve examined thus far are exclusively for the trenches.
  2. The regulatory body will impose a minimum spacing distance between the structures.
  3. It is important to remember to give enough space for the pipes that go from distribution devices to laterals.
  4. I, on the other hand, feel that the absorption field is of critical importance.
  5. It also serves as a garbage place.
  6. Jon Hancock is the owner of Envirotek Systems, which is based in Kimberling City, Missouri.
  7. Pay him a visit at

Septic Solutions – Installation

There are four primary types of septic systems to consider. The availability of all four types may not be available to every homeowner due to the fact that municipal rules may prohibit the installation of traditional systems in areas where soil absorbtion or drainfield space is restricted. Furthermore, each has its own set of benefits and drawbacks to consider. The majority of municipalities need an engineer to do a site review. The outcomes of this examination will decide the alternatives available to the homeowners.

Installation prices also differ depending on the system type, so there is a lot to consider when deciding which system is ideal for you.

Conventional Systems

Traditional septic systems may be divided into two categories: those that employ gravel in the drainfield and those that use some sort of chamber system. The earlier stylegravelled system, as the name implies, comprises a layer of gravel in the drainfield. In the course of the building, a drainfield ditch is dug that is 1 to 3 feet below ground level. Its length is decided by the amount of effluent that will be discharged into the system from the house or rural office, as well as the soil’s ability to absorb water during the winter months.

  1. In order to prevent backfill dirt from filtering between the rocks and decreasing the field’s ability to absorb water, more gravel is poured around and over the pipe.
  2. Despite the fact that some waste is treated in septic tanks by bacteria that live within the tank, the majority of waste treatment happens when wastewater discharged from the tank enters the drainfield and is filtered through the gravel and soil below.
  3. These organisms grow and produce a layer known as a biomat, which sits on top of the soil layer and protects it.
  4. The presence of these organisms helps to maintain the biomat from getting so thick that it prevents wastewater from reaching the soil below while the drainfield is in equilibrium.
  5. Because gravel is used to filter the effluent, it instantly reduces the capacity of the effluent to reach soil, which is where the majority of the filtation takes place.
  6. Apart from that, even when competent contractors utilize solely cleaned gravel, a certain quantity of particles is certain to stay and eventually reach the soil level, further lowering the possibility of filtering.
  7. This can happen when the water table rises over the drain pipe, essentially cutting off the drainfield’s capacity to release water completely.
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After that, there’s the chance of drainfield overflow, which can occur when there are more visitors in the house for extended periods of time or when taps or toilets are left running for extended periods of time.

Some of the disadvantages of gravelled systems are alleviated by gravelless conventional systems.

Typically, these chambers are made of molded high-density plastic and are available in lengths ranging from 10′ to 12′ feet.

Because we have discovered that the Infiltrator chamber system is the most successful when used in North Texas soils, Septic Solutions of Texas solely employs the Infiltrator chamber system.

When the system is put into service, waste water is transported via pipe from the septic tank to the chamber run, where it flows directly against the earth.

This is particularly effective in areas where the water table might rise near to the surface, as well as in situations where there is a brief rush in demand as a consequence of additional visitors.

Obviously, shock loading for extended periods of time will have a negative impact on the biomat since oxygen will not be accessible to parasites during these durations.

Low-Pressure Dose Systems

Low-pressure dosing systems (also known as low-pressure pipe systems) may be a viable option in situations when soil and topographical factors do not allow for the installation of a typical septic system, such as urban areas. Particularly relevant in situations where geography dictates that the drainfield be positioned up-hill from the septic tanks or where there is uneven terrain that would otherwise prevent the installation of a traditional system. Low-Pressure Dose Systems (LPDs) are designed to function in the following ways: A pumping chamber is placed in addition to the typical septic tank, which is a type of holding tank.

  1. The drainfield for an LPD application is made up of tiny perforated pipes laid in shallow, gravel-lined trenches that range in depth from 10″ to 18″ and in width from 12″ to 18″.
  2. After then, the field is allowed to drain.
  3. Shallow placement also encourages evapo-transpiration, which is the process by which evaporation and grass and other shallow-rooted vegetation serve to remove waste.
  4. Alarms will be activated if there is a significant increase in flow.
  5. Whenever a drainfield is not placed on a slope, the system will be constructed in such a manner that effluent does not exit the pumping chamber after the pump has been switched off.
  6. Furthermore, because of the employment of a low-pressure pump, the whole drainfield will be utilized in a consistent manner.
  7. However, there are several disadvantages to LPDs, including the possibility of root penetration and the blockage of drain holes by particles that leave the pumping chamber.

Finally, LPDs must be serviced on a regular basis. Electricity, a pump, and a smaller drainfield all raise the likelihood of system failure. As a result, most regulatory agencies now mandate septic system inspections by qualified septic specialists on a yearly or semi-annual basis.

Evapotranspiration Systems

The use of Evapotraspiration Systems (ETs) is often only practicable in arid and semi-arid environments. To put it simply, we are interested in climates where evaporation surpasses rainfall by at least 24 inches per year. The EP system is based on the natural evaporation of wastewater through a sand barrier, as well as the simultaneous transpiration of water through the leaves of plants and grasses planted above the drainfield, to remove pollutants. In contrast to the systems described above, an ET system consists of a trench lined with an impervious barrier that drains to a collection basin below ground.

  • Above the gravel is a layer of sand that is raised above the level of the surrounding ground.
  • Naturally, this type of system performs best during the spring, summer, and fall seasons, when heat and sunlight combine to provide the most effective wastewater treatment.
  • Applications in places with short soil depths and impermeable rock or hardpanlayers beneath the surface are recommended.
  • Additionally, when the system has been in operation for an extended period of time, there is the possibility of salt buildup at the surface.
  • This is essentially the same system as an ET system, with the exception that the drainfield is not sealed in this configuration.
  • Generally speaking, wastewater must be able to travel through at least 2 to 4 feet of unsaturated soil before reaching the ground water table in order to be effective.
  • In North Texas, most permitting agencies require the construction of two fields, with the owner manually switching the wastewater flow between the fields once a month, as well as the construction of two fields.

Aerobic Wastewater Treatment Systems

At this point, aerobic septic systems stand out as the only system that can be used in virtually all case where septic systems are needed. In essence, when you own an aerobic system, you are the owner of a miniature version of a municipal sewage treatment facility. As a result, your aerobic system closely resembles many of the stages and operations carried out by a municipal solid waste treatment facility. Aerobic systems and septic systems are similar in that they both treat wastewater via the use of natural processes.

  • The increase in oxygen promotes the natural bacterial consumption of waste inside the system as a result of the increase in oxygen.
  • Upon completion of this process, the resultant discharge water is clean and pure enough to be released directly over the absorption field using sprinklers.
  • The installation of aerobic systems is currently mandated by many regulatory authorities, including those in North Texas, for both new house construction and the replacement of failing conventional, LPD, and Evapotranspiration systems.
  • A low-cost maintenance contract will lessen the need for intervention and care on the part of the homeowner.
  • There is less solid waste entering the aerobic chamber as a result of this method.
  • Following that, the wastewater enters the aerobic chamber, where air is compressed and pumped into the wastewater in order to promote the development of good bacteria that eat the particles in the wastewater.
  • After that, the treated water is pumped into a pumping chamber, where it undergoes a last treatment with unstabilized chlorine before being discharged.
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The pump will discharge the water into the absorption field when a float valve within the pump chamber detects the presence of water.

In most cases, aerobic systems are not significantly more expensive to build and operate than traditional septic systems.

Typically, they are less expensive to build than LPDs or Evapotranspiration systems since they do not require the use of sand and/or gravel to prepare a drainfield prior to installation.

This maintenance contract will provide you with the assurance that your plant will operate in accordance with specifications at all times.

If your maintenance contract expires before the end of this period, you will be required to either renew it or seek a new one from another waste water treatment specialist.

For further information, please see this link.

You will not be able to acquire a building permit till this study is completed. Septic Solutions of Texas retains ownership of the copyright and reserves all rights.

Identify My Septic System

Identify the Septic System in My Home wpadmin2016-12-26T 12:15:08-08:00 Septic systems are generally classified into four categories. Not all homeowners have the option of selecting from all four types since municipal rules may prohibit the installation of traditional systems in areas where soil absorption or drain field space is restricted, for example. Furthermore, each has its own set of benefits and drawbacks to consider. The majority of municipalities need a designer to do a site review.

There are several types of systems, each requiring a different level of attention from the property owner; some need more frequent maintenance from septic system specialists.

Conventional Systems

My Septic System Identification wpadmin2016-12-26T 12:15:08-08:00 Septic systems may be divided into four categories: The availability of all four types may not be available to all households, since municipal rules may prohibit the installation of conventional systems in areas with limited soil absorption or drain field space. Furthermore, each has its own set of benefits and drawbacks to offer. The majority of municipalities need a designer to do a site assessment. In accordance with the findings of this examination, the homeowner’s alternatives will be determined.

In addition, installation prices differ depending on the system type, so there is a lot to consider when deciding which system is ideal for you and your family.

Low-Pressure Dose Systems

Low-pressure dosing systems (also known as low-pressure pipe systems) may be a viable option in situations when soil and topographical factors do not allow for the installation of a typical septic system, such as urban areas. This is especially true in cases where the geography necessitates the installation of a drain field uphill from the septic tanks or when there is uneven terrain that would otherwise impede the installation of an ordinary system. Low-Pressure Dose Systems (LPDs) are designed to function in the following ways: A pumping chamber is placed in addition to the typical septic tank, which is a type of holding tank.

  1. When using an LPD application, the drain field is made up of small perforated pipes that are placed in shallow, gravel-lined trenches that are 6 to 24 inches deep and 36 inches wide.
  2. After then, the field is allowed to drain.
  3. Low-lying placement also encourages evapo-transpiration, in which evaporation, as well as grass and other shallow-rooted plants, aid in the removal of wastewater from the soil.
  4. Alarms will be activated if there is a significant increase in flow.
  5. In addition to the previously noted topographical site benefits of LPDs, there is a considerable reduction in the amount of land area required by the absorption field when compared to traditional systems.
  6. Furthermore, narrow, shallow ditches help to mitigate some of the unavoidable soil compaction that occurs during the building of typical drain fields.
  7. The risk of wastewater accumulating in the trenches should also be considered.

Finally, LPDs must be serviced on a regular basis. The inclusion of power, a pump, and a narrower drain field all raise the likelihood of system failure. As a result, most regulatory agencies now require qualified septic specialists to evaluate septic systems on a yearly or semi-annual basis.

Aerobic Wastewater Treatment Systems

It is possible that low-pressure dosing systems (also called as low-pressure pipe systems) will be a viable option in situations when soil and topographical circumstances do not allow for the installation of a traditional septic system. Particularly relevant in situations where geography dictates that the drain field be positioned uphill from the septic tanks or when there is uneven terrain that would otherwise impede the installation of a traditional system. It is essentially the following how Low-Pressure Dose Systems (LPDS) work: Additionally, a pumping chamber is added to the regular septic tank to serve as a backup system.

  1. When using an LPD application, the drain field is made up of small perforated pipes that are placed in shallow, gravel-lined trenches that range in depth from 6 to 24 inches and in width from 36 inches.
  2. It is then permitted to drain for a period of time.
  3. Low-lying placement also encourages evapo-transpiration, in which evaporation, as well as grass and other shallow-rooted plants, aid in the removal of wastewater from the environment.
  4. Alarms will be activated if there is a large amount of flow.
  5. The absorption field requires far less land area than traditional systems, in addition to the topographical benefits of LPDs noted above.
  6. Furthermore, because of the employment of a low-pressure pump, the whole drain field will be utilized in a consistent manner.
  7. However, there are several disadvantages to LPDs, including the possibility of root penetration and the blockage of drain holes by materials that exit the pumping chamber during the pumping operation.
  8. Last but not least, LPDs require frequent upkeep.
  9. Therefore, most regulatory agencies now require qualified septic specialists to check a property on an annual or semi-annual basis.

Drip System

Under the majority of circumstances, conventional septic systems are sufficient for treating and disposing of domestic wastewater. However, when soil conditions or the surrounding region are not suitable for handling the volume of effluent generated by a standard septic system, an alternate system, such as a drip system, may be the best solution. A typical system relies on gravity to carry wastewater, and as a result, the effluent is not distributed uniformly over the drain field as effectively as it may be.

It is possible for the soil in the drain field to become saturated during periods of excessive water consumption by the home, reducing the ability of the drain field to process the wastewater produced.

The use of a drip system eliminates these two disadvantages of the traditional gravity-fed system.

The dosing chamber is a separate tank that accepts wastewater from the septic tank and processes it.

A pressure dosage system is what this is referred to as.

When effluent is applied consistently and at predetermined intervals, the soil is less likely to get saturated, which allows the soil to perform more efficiently while also lasting for a longer duration of time.

Homeowners should not wait until the alarm system detects a problem; instead, they should routinely follow suggested maintenance methods to ensure that the system continues to function properly for the longest period of time feasible.

Having a drip system installed instead of a standard septic system might be more complicated and expensive to fix when something goes wrong with it. It is in the best interests of the homeowner to ensure that the septic system is properly maintained.

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