On Old Septic Tank What Is The Clean Out For? (TOP 5 Tips)

A clean-out is simply a pipe that connects to the septic line on one end and is covered with a removable cap on the other. A home owner or plumber can use a clean-out to easily remove clogs or build-up in the septic line.

  • The sewer clean out provides an access point through which your lateral may be more easily inspected. In the event of a major clog, the clean out acts as an external drain. Uncapping the clean out will allow you to drain the excess water, preventing it from flooding your home.

What is the septic cleanout for?

From there, the sewage runs out of the house and into the county sewage system or a septic tank. Stuff happens, though, such as clogs of a dozen different types stopping a pipe from allowing waste water through. A sewer cleanout allows a snake or a hydrojetting tool to disperse the clog and get things running again.

Can you pump a septic tank from the cleanout?

No. Even if a hose could fit down the cleanout, this still would not provide a thorough cleaning. The tank should be pumped from the actual access lid(s) on the tank, which are usually buried 6-12 inches below the surface of the ground.

How does an old septic tank work?

How does a septic tank work? Septic tanks, whether they are single or multi-chambered, utilise the simple process of gravity to separate the liquid waste from the solid waste that flows into it from your property. The lighter solids in the waste, along with oil and grease, float to the surface and form a “scum” layer.

Should there be water in septic cleanout?

If the water is standing in the pipe or overflows out the cleanout, then you know that the problem is from that point out. At this point you can either call your favorite septic company, or dig up the tank lids yourself and check the water level and solids content in the tank.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

What does a clean out valve look like?

What is a Cleanout Valve? Your clean out valve is the place where your sewer line has a valve that can be opened to facilitate clearing of clogged pipes. It is usually made out of white plastic or steel and looks like a cap. It is usually about 3-4 inches in circumference.

How often should you clean your septic tank?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How often do I need to clean out my septic tank?

How often do I have to clean my septic tank? Ideally, once every two to three years. Though your septic tank has an extremely large capacity, it’s still important that you empty it on a regular basis.

What were old septic tanks made of?

Many of the first septic tanks were concrete tanks that were formed out of wood and poured in place in the ground and covered with a concrete lid or often some type of lumber.

Do all septic tanks discharge?

Septic Tanks Explained… Septic tanks cannot discharge to surface water drains, rivers, canals, ditches, streams or any other type of waterway. All septic tanks that as of today discharge into waterways must be either: Replaced, using sewage treatment plants with full BS EN 12566-3 Documentation, or.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

What happens if you don’t clean your septic tank?

What Are the Consequences of Not Pumping Your Tank? If the tank is not pumped, the solids will build up in the tank and the holding capacity of the tank will be diminished. Eventually, the solids will reach the pipe that feeds into the drain field, causing a clog. Waste water backing up into the house.

What is the white stuff in my septic tank?

The visible white buildup is calcification from the minerals in hard water. Aside from looking ugly, this calcite will start to coat the inside of your pipes, which will restrict water flow and start to raise the pressure within the plumbing until it erupts into leaking.

How do you fix a gurgling toilet on a septic tank?

A gurgling toilet can also be a sign of a partial clog. In some cases, you can simply use a plunger to apply pressure to the drain line to dislodge the clog. This will allow it to go down into the pipe and will eliminate the gurgling noises. Larger clogs may require the use of a toilet snake tool to dislodge the clog.

How to Care for Your Septic System

Septic system maintenance is neither difficult or expensive, and it does not have to be done frequently. The maintenance of a vehicle is comprised of four major components:

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order. Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract.

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

• The total amount of wastewater produced by a household The amount of solids in wastewater is measured in cubic meters. a measure of the size of the septic tank

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Everything that goes down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet, ground up in the trash disposal, or poured down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system, which is where it belongs. What you flush down the toilet has an impact on how effectively your septic system functions.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system. A simple rule of thumb is to never flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Cooking grease or oil
  • Wipes that are not flushable, such as baby wipes or other wet wipes
  • Photographic solutions
  • Feminine hygiene items Condoms
  • Medical supplies such as dental floss and disposable diapers, cigarette butts and coffee grounds, cat litter and paper towels, pharmaceuticals, and household chemicals such as gasoline and oil, insecticides, antifreeze, and paint or paint thinners

Cooking grease or oil; nonflushable wipes, such as baby wipes or other wet wipes; photographic solutions; feminine hygiene products; and other substances. Condoms; Medical supplies such as dental floss and disposable diapers, cigarette butts and coffee grounds, cat litter and paper towels, pharmaceuticals, and household chemicals such as gasoline and oil, insecticides, antifreeze, and paint or paint thinners;

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed. Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.

HOW TO SAFELY ABANDON AN OLD SEPTIC TANK ON YOUR PROPERTY

If you’ve recently purchased an older house, it’s possible that a septic tank is located on the property. This is true even if your home is currently linked to the municipal water and sewer systems. A prior owner may have abandoned the ancient septic system and connected to the city sewage system when it became accessible at some time in the past. Despite the fact that there are standards in place today for properly leaving a septic tank, it was typical practice years ago to just leave the tanks in place and forget about them.

  • The old tank may either be demolished or filled with water to solve the problem.
  • It is possible that permits and inspections will be required.
  • They are dangerous because curious children may pry open the lid and fall into the container.
  • Falls into a septic tank can be lethal owing to the toxicity of the contents and the fact that concrete can collapse on top of you while falling into a tank.
  • Eventually, this approach was phased out due to the fact that the steel would corrode and leave the tank susceptible to collapse.
  • When it comes to ancient septic tanks, they are similar to little caves with a lid that might collapse at any time.
  • The old tank is crushed and buried, or it is removed from the site.

If it is built of steel, it will very certainly be crushed and buried in its current location.

After that, the tank can be completely filled with sand, gravel, or any other form of rubble and buried.

Tanks can either be entirely dismantled or destroyed and buried in their original location.

The abandonment has been documented and plotted on a map.

It’s possible that you’ll forget about the tank once it’s been abandoned.

As a result, you might wish to sketch a map of the area where the old tank used to stand.

If you can demonstrate that an old septic tank was properly decommissioned, you may be able to increase the value of your property, and the new owners will enjoy knowing that large chunks of concrete are buried underground before they start digging in the yard to put something in it.

It may take some detective work to discover about the history of your land and what may be lying beneath the surface of the earth.

Upon discovering an old septic tank on your property that is no longer in service, contact Total Enviro Services for propertank abandonment procedures that meet with local standards and protect your family, pets, and farm animals from harm or death.

Caring For An Older Septic System

The location may be atop a mountainside, viewing a valley below that twists out into hazy distance, or it could be in the middle of a forest. Alternatively, it may be tucked away below a canopy of trees, with leaves spreading over the ancient roof like a comforter. Another possibility is that the house is just a plain-Jane house in the city suburbs (which, let’s face it, is probably more plausible). I’m not the kind to pass judgment. Whatever the situation may be, whatever your future house may be, if it is older, it will require some special loving attention.

See also:  What Is The Minimum Liquid Septic Tank Capacity For Any Installation? (Best solution)

In fact, it is arguably more critical now than it was before.

No way, not at all!

That is, assuming you take the necessary precautions to ensure that your septic system is 1) in good working order to begin with and 2) properly maintained on a daily basis.

Buying A House With An Old Septic System

Perhaps it’s set high on the slope of a mountain, with a panoramic view of the valley below that spirals out into the misty distance in front of them. Alternatively, it may be hidden by a canopy of trees, with leaves spreading over the ancient roof like a blanket. Another possibility is that the house is just a plain-Jane house in the city suburbs (which, let’s face it, is probably more plausible). I’m not one to pass judgment on others, after all! Whatever the situation may be, whatever your new house may be, if it is older, it will require special attention and love.

In fact, it is arguably more critical now than it was previously.

Absolutely not the case!

In other words, if you take the necessary precautions to ensure that your septic system is 1) in good working order to begin with and 2) well-maintained on a daily basis.

Failing System Tip-Offs

When assessing an older septic system, there are a few warning signals you and your professional inspector should be on the lookout for (or on the sniff-out) for:

  1. In the home, there are slow drains and/or difficulty flushing the toilets
  2. Flooding into the house
  3. Pipes that gurgle and groan
  4. Noxious aromas emanating from the septic tank or leach field, or even stagnant water

All of these are warning indications of approaching septic system failure, so if the older house you’re considering purchasing has any of these issues, you might want to consider looking elsewhere. You may also negotiate the remedy into the purchase price of the home if you see any of these problems, reducing the price down sufficiently to compensate for the repairs or replacement of the septic system. Nonetheless, if, following the examination, you are still unclear about the condition of your septic system, there are some more actions you may take.

  1. He or she may be able to reach the leach field of an older septic system by feeding the camera via the distribution box and into the laterals of the laterals of the system.
  2. People who had their lateral lines jetted by a plumber have come forward on rare occasions, and we’ve received reports of this as well.
  3. So, what exactly is the point?
  4. Because, let’s face it, buying an older property and having to immediately rebuild the septic system for upwards of ten thousand dollars would be the very last thing I would want.

If you have your heart set on purchasing a property with septic difficulties, make sure you negotiate the sale price to include enough money to pay the cost of the repairs.

How to Care For an Older System

After getting all of the background information out of the way, we can get down to the meat of the matter: how do you care for an older septic system on a day-to-day basis? This is true even when a system is decades old: your activities may either prolong its life or hasten its eventual extinction. There is no time constraint. Nonetheless, by following the recommended maintenance procedures for your older equipment, you may significantly extend its life. It boils down to this: if you want to extend the life of an older system, you’ll need to take extra excellent care of it.

Because even though a system is ancient, your actions may either prolong its life or hasten its destruction.

Nonetheless, by following the right maintenance procedures for your older system, you may significantly improve its lifespan.

How to go about it is as follows:

  • With all of that background information out of the way, we can get down to the meat of the matter: how do you care for an older septic system on a day-to-day basis? The reality is that, even if a system is ancient, your actions may either extend its life or hasten its destruction. There is no deadline. Nonetheless, by following the right maintenance procedures for your older equipment, you may significantly extend its lifespan. Basically, if you want to extend the life of an older device, you’ll need to be extra careful with it. Listed below is how to go about it:

It is preferable to avoid flooding your system by spreading out your water use and keeping it to a bare minimum in each instance. Some individuals, for example, divert their laundry water onto their grass in order to assist in this effort. Along with other water-saving strategies, this might be an excellent method to keep the system from becoming overloaded! Believe me when I say that I understand how tempting it is to simply flush that piece of floss or plastic wrap down the toilet. In fact, I have to restrain myself from doing so practically all of the time these days.

  1. Take note of the fact that your system operates by utilizing bacteria to break down waste and allow for the discharge of surplus water to the leach field.
  2. Put anything else into your system and you run the risk of causing major problems with backups and backup blockages.
  3. Hence, fight the temptation and add many more years to your system’s life span!
  4. Even if we are a bit prejudiced, we are confident that Septic System Digester is the greatest septic product on the market.
  5. Your system will remain around for a long time if you use a high-quality, bacteria-based septic treatment.
  6. These chemicals can kill off the beneficial microorganisms in your septic tank, thereby putting a halt to waste decomposition inside your tank.
  7. For example, Septic Enhancing Toilet Cleanernot only cleans your toilets but it also adds bacteria to your tank, resulting in a more effective cleaning process.

It’s really the best of both worlds, to be honest. We have many additional goods that are compatible with one another, so if you’re interested, feel free to browse through our collection by touching or clicking here.

  1. Pump your septic tank on a regular basis to keep it from overflowing.

Solids will continue to collect in your tank despite the fact that microorganisms are supposed to decompose the waste contained inside it. As a result, in order to prevent your tank from inflating and collapsing, you’ll need to get it filled on a regular basis. A reasonable rule of thumb is to pump your septic tank every 2-5 years, however if you have an older system, it may be necessary to pump more frequently. More information on how frequently you should pump your tank may be found in our comprehensive post here.

This is especially true in the leach field, where it is more prevalent.

These pipes are readily damaged if they are subjected to a great deal of pressure from above.

  • Transportation of large trucks across your leach field
  • Building big structures or other structures on your leach field is not recommended.

Both of these can cause damage to your lateral line system, which can ultimately result in the failure of the complete system. That is exactly what we have been attempting to prevent all along!

To Wrap It All Up

Just because a septic system is ancient does not always imply that it is ineffective (while, in some cases, thisistrue). Yes, when purchasing an older home, it is absolutely critical to have the septic system inspected extensively; but, it is also extremely possible that an aged septic system has a significant amount of life left in it. In the end, when everything is taken into consideration, the future of your outdated septic system is in your hands. If you treat your system with love and compassion, you will almost certainly be able to extend its lifespan by many years.

In our years of experience dealing with septic systems, we have helped literally hundreds of clients each day to get their sewage systems back on track with little hassle.

Please get in touch with us by tapping or clicking here!

P.S.

Even if your system is over 20 years old and still functions well, Septic Field Rejuvenatoris is the company to call if your system just needs to be unclogged.

How to Clean a Septic Tank

Article in PDF format Article in PDF format Getting your tank filled is something you should prepare for. You may rely on us to assist you with the cleaning procedure! Unless properly maintained, septic tanks can get clogged with solids that are incapable of being broken down by bacteria, which can result in a costly systemic collapse.

In order to maintain your tank clean, it is necessary to have frequent inspections and pumps performed on a regular basis. We’ll teach you how to uncover and clean your tank in this post, however you’ll need to hire a professional to pump the trash out.

  1. 1 Locate your tank. It is best to begin with the sewage pipe at the lowest level of your home if at all feasible. Follow the path it takes out of the house after it’s out of the house. It’s possible that your tank is buried in the ground. Identifying the tank now will save you time and money later on, regardless of whether you or an inspector clean the tank. 2 Remove the tank’s top by digging it out. It’s possible that your tank is buried underground. Take a shovel and clear away the dirt from around the top of the tank before the examination begins. Your tank will have an access port lid, which should be sturdy and well-secured when closed.
  • Risers can be placed on top of the tank for increased stability. These assist you in locating and gaining access to the tank without the need to dig. These can be added by septic system pumpers.
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  • s3 Cracks should be checked on the tank. Damaged areas should be checked all the way around the tank, including the inside. Cracks must be fixed by a professional once the tank has been pumped in order to prevent the system from failing. Keep an eye out for any corroded or damaged sections on the inlet and outlet pipes that are necessary for drainage. If your tank is equipped with a distribution box or a pump chamber, make sure everything is in working order.
  • In order to determine whether or not water from your home, such as from the toilet or washing machine, makes it into your tank and subsequently drains effectively, it is helpful to run some water from your home.
  1. 1Make a slit in a pipe. Begin with a ten foot (3 m) length of PVC pipe. Separate it into two sections: a six inch (15.24 cm) segment and a nine and a half foot (2.9 m) section, using a saw or PVC cutter
  2. 2 Glue the pipes together as a group. PVC cement should be poured into the elbow joint. Using the cement and joint, attach the smaller pipe to the top of the bigger pipe. A straight pipe will protrude straight to the right or left in a “L” configuration
  3. 3cap both ends of the pipe. PVC caps may be purchased at the same hardware shop where you purchased the pipes, cement, and cutters. 4 Attach the caps to the pipes so that they are tight and prevent water from flowing through them. Insert the stick into the hole as far as it will go. Assemble the scum stick by holding it in a “L” form with the smaller pipe at the bottom and facing out to one side. Reduce the pipe’s diameter until it can be held against the top layer of septic tank waste without breaking through
  4. 5 lowering the pipe Make a mark on the stick. Make a mark on the scum’s top point with a marker or a piece of masking tape. When the pipe is resting on top of the scum layer, make a mark at the point where the pipe spans from the ground to the very top of your tank
  5. 6Push through the scum layer until the mark is no longer visible. Push the stick all the way through the muck. Some people find it necessary to twirl the stick so that the pointed end bursts through. When you get to the bottom of the scum layer, you’ll see that the stick is traveling through water rather than through the resistive fat and oil layer. Continue to hold the stick against the bottom of the scum in the same manner as you held it against the top of the scum, keeping the smaller pipe flat and off to the side so that the stick takes on the shape of a “L”
  6. 7 Make a second mark on the stick. Once again, a marker or tape should be used to designate where the scum layer terminates. Make a note at the point where the pipe crosses the ground and enters the tank’s very top
  7. Eight Measure the distance between the markers. Carefully remove the stick and place it on a tarp to catch any drips. Make a note of the distance between the two marks you created and use a tape measure to measure it. This represents the depth of the scum level. When the fat and oil layer reaches barely three inches (7.62 cm) above the bottom of the exit pipe, the tank must be pumped to remove the remaining liquid. Advertisement
  1. 1Make a slit in a pipe. Partition a ten-foot (3-meter) length of PVC pipe into five-foot (1.5-meter) portions. In order to construct a secure two-part stick, glue the pipes together as shown in the diagram. Connect the two pipes together using a straight adaptor or a threaded coupler from the hardware shop, as shown. PVC cement should be used to secure the ends in the connection
  2. 3cap each end. PVC caps are also available at your local hardware shop. Put one on either end of your stick and twist them together. It should be tightened so that no sewage may enter the pipe
  3. 4 Wrap a piece of white cloth around one end of the stick. A white cloth, towel, sock, or Velcro can be used to make a mark on the sludge to indicate the level of the sludge. Wrap the material around one end of the pipe for up to three feet (.91 m) or the whole length of the pipe, whichever is shorter. 5Push the stick through the scum hole after securing the material with the Velcro backing, tape, or string. You can drill a hole in the top layer of the tank with a stick designed for testing its scum depth if you haven’t previously done so. Then drop the sludge stick through the opening until you feel it hit the bottom of the tank
  4. 6remain in position for three minutes while you do this again. Allow for a minimum of three minutes of resting time on the stick. The longer you keep the stick in your hand, the more likely it is that the sludge will stain your white material
  5. 7Remove the stick from your hand. Continue to bring the stick back up, keeping it steady as you pull it up through the hole you formed earlier in the process. You will not discolor the stick as long as you do not move it. Prepare the stain by spreading it out on the ground where it will not be ruined and where you will be able to wipe the stick afterwards
  6. 8Measure the stain. Make a note of the length of the stain starting from the bottom of the stick with a tape measure. In order to prevent the sludge or scum from occupying more than one third of the tank’s depth (approximately 12 inches or 30.48 cm high), the tank must be pumped. It is necessary to pump the tank if the sludge layer is within six inches (15.24 centimeters) of the bottom of the output pipes. Advertisement
  1. 1 Remove the cap from the tank. During your yearly checkup, lift the tank’s lid to have a better look inside. Remove the lid and look for the pipes that lead to the waste tank and the pipes that lead to the water supply. The baffles are contained within them, and they keep scum and sludge in place.
  1. 2Remove the filters from the machine. Put on a pair of rubber gloves for protection. Reach inside the outlet baffle using your hands, a rake, or a hoe to remove the obstruction. Take the filter out of the machine. Even though it may be brightly colored and have a handle on the end, if your tank has one, it will be located inside the outflow baffle. 3Rinse the filter thoroughly. Holding the filter over the intake side of the septic tank and spraying it with a hose or dipping it in a pail of water are both options. Check to see that all of the solids have fallen back into the tank or bucket. Fill the tank with any waste that has accumulated once you have done rinsing
  2. Inspect the filter for signs of wear and tear. Examine the filter for any cracks or particles that may be obstructing it. When the filter is not cleaned on a regular basis, it becomes clogged and ceases to function. It is recommended that you replace the filter if it is not cleanable or looks to be damaged. Looking around the edges of the filter is important whether you are putting the old filter back in or installing a new one. It’s possible that the filter has an arrow on it. Ensure that the filter is correctly installed so that the arrow points downwards into the drainage system. When the filter is securely seated in the baffle, replace the tank’s lid with a firm grip. Advertisement
  1. 1 Pump the tank once every several years or as needed. Many individuals make the mistake of assuming that the tank does not require treatment as long as the piping looks to be in working order. It is possible to save thousands of dollars in costly repairs by doing regular maintenance on your tank before sludge builds up and liquid drains cease to flow. Every one to three years, or whenever the sludge and scum levels have occupied approximately one-third of the tank’s volume or have approached the exit pipe, this should be performed.
  • The smaller the tank or the greater the number of people served by the tank, the more frequently it will need to be cleaned. A 750-gallon tank, which is normal in a two-bedroom home, will sustain two people for around four years if they do not pump it. With just four inhabitants, it will survive less than two years without pumping
  • Annual treatment will maintain the tank clean and allow any issues to be addressed before they become catastrophic septic failures at a cost of a couple hundred dollars
  • And
  1. 2Clean up the garbage. Pumping is accomplished by the use of a cast-iron pump that can be turned on and off. The pump takes out the particles that are unable to be broken down by bacteria and transports them to a holding container, such as the inside of a tanker. If you remove the sludge and scum, there is no need to add bacteria or water into the system. Waste disposal for septic tanks. Even if you attempt to pump out the tank on your own, you must dispose of the trash in accordance with local regulations. The trash must be transferred by tanker to a place determined by the government that is distant from water and locations where people congregate. As a result, it is preferable to leave it in the hands of a specialist. Advertisement
See also:  Why Are There Two Openings On Top Of My Septic Tank?

waste removal 2Pump out the trash An electrically operated cast-iron pump is used in the pumping process. The pump takes out the particles that cannot be broken down by bacteria and transports them to a holding container, such as the interior of a tanker, for further processing. It is not necessary to reintroduce bacteria or water once the sludge and scum have been removed. Septic waste must be disposed of properly. The waste from the tank must be disposed of in a legal manner even if you attempt to pump it out on your own.

Consequently, it is preferable to leave it in the hands of a specialist.

  • Question For what reason is it risky to clean up a septic tank? David Balkan is a licensed professional plumber who also serves as the CEO of Balkan Sewer and Water Main Service and the President of Balkan Sewer and Drain Cleaning, among other positions. With over 40 years of experience as an active owner of these businesses, David is well-versed in the challenges that arise with water service lines, sewers, and drain lines. David has served on the Executive Committee of the Sub Surface Plumbers Association of New York for more than 30 years and is now the Chairman of the Master Plumbers Council’s Committee on Plumbing. As a result of his expertise and solution-oriented approach, Balkan Sewer and Water Main Service has grown to become the biggest and most trusted sewer and water main service in New York City, and the recipient of the 2017 Angie’s List Super Service Award. Answer from a Professional PlumberExpert Sewer gas, which is prevalent in septic systems, has the potential to be lethal. It’s a quiet murderer that kills in a matter of minutes, therefore I strongly warn homeowners never to attempt to repair their own septic system. Employ the services of a professional to ensure your safety.

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  • Every one to three years, have your tank examined and pumped out by a professional. A little amount of money spent on regular maintenance is preferable to dealing with a septic system that isn’t functioning properly. Higher water use, such as when numerous people reside in the house or when you use a hot tub, causes the tank to fill up more quickly. Non-waste items such as baby wipes and grease should not be disposed of. These clog the system and cause it to malfunction.

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  • Children have been seen to fall into tanks. Make certain that the lids are robust and that they are securely fastened. Septic tanks are extremely risky to enter and operate. The wastes in the tank emit very toxic vapors, which fill the tank. Work with a companion and keep a safe distance from the entrance

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Things You’ll Need

  • A shovel, two ten-foot (3-meter) PVC pipes, a PVC cutter or saw, PVC cement, a PVC elbow joint, a PVC connector, and four PVC end caps A white cloth, a sock, or Velcro is recommended. Tarp, measuring tape, hose and bucket, baffle filter, etc.

About This Article

Summary of the ArticleX Maintaining the cleanliness of your septic tank will save you money on costly repairs down the road. Annual filter cleaning and tank pumping are required to keep your septic tank in good working order, but you may save money by doing it yourself. Generally speaking, your filter will be positioned in the tank’s exit baffle and will be brightly colored. Cleaning it is as simple as spraying it with water from the tank or submerging it in a pail of clean water for an hour or so.

The sludge and scum levels in your tank should be pumped out every one to three years, or whenever they reach a third of the total capacity.

Continue reading for additional information, including how to measure the sludge and scum depths in your septic tank.

Thank you to all writers for contributing to this page, which has been read 69,667 times so far.

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However, while it may appear that maintaining a septic system is more difficult than maintaining a sewer system, it is just a little amount of effort to avoid big repair or replacement expenditures in the future. Photograph courtesy of Josh Reynolds Is it possible for you to explain what happens when you flush the toilet? In a metropolis, people seldom give the question much attention because their wastes are normally channeled via a central sewage system and then to a wastewater treatment facility.

  1. Because a breakdown in their system might have serious consequences for their property and possibly contaminate their drinking water, they must pay close attention to what is happening.
  2. As a result, it is completely up to you to ensure that your system is properly cared for and maintained.
  3. Cesspools are enormous vaults made of brick, stone, or concrete in which solids can collect and settle.
  4. A privy is a simple structure built over a hole in the ground that may be relocated once it has been filled.
  5. Anaerobic bacteria break down organic waste in septic tanks, which function as reservoirs for the bacteria.
  6. Plastic is being used in the manufacture of newer tanks (as illustrated above).
  7. Wastes are transported from the toilet, sink, shower, or washer to the septic tank through the indoor plumbing system.
  8. The tank is located underground.
  9. Solid wastes disintegrate over time as a result of anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can survive in the absence of oxygen).
  10. If any liquid leaks out of a tank, it is distributed to the ground via disposal beds, which are perforated or open-jointed pipes buried in shallow, gravel-filled ditches.

Although the liquid has reached this condition, it still includes a huge amount of hazardous bacteria and organic materials. In order for the liquid to reach underground water supplies, it must first pass through the soil and be absorbed.

Why Do Septic Systems Fail?

It is inevitable that solids will accumulate in the septic tank due to the fact that the pace of decomposition is far slower than the rate at which the system is adding new sewage. Some substances, on the other hand, will never disintegrate at all. Furthermore, the fats and oils that build in the scum layer accumulate at a higher pace than the rate of breakdown, resulting in a scum layer. The scum layer is held in place by baffles in the tank. Scum can get into the disposal pipes through broken baffles, blocking them and making the disposal system malfunction.

  • All of these items will not degrade, and they may have the effect of killing the “good bacteria” or just clogging the tank’s drainage system.
  • The main issues with older systems are the degradation of components (especially tank baffles) and the clogging of laterals (pipes in the leach field).
  • These, which are made of ceramic pipes or concrete blocks, are susceptible to cracking or deterioration over time.
  • In the past, pipes were often composed of ceramics or tar paper composites, which had a lifespan of 20 to 30 years if used properly.

Maintaining Your Septic System

The disposal field (also known as the leaching bed) is set out in the shape of a pitchfork on level ground. The leaching bed may zig-zag downwards in areas where the home is situated on a rise. Many homeowners, particularly those who live in older homes, are unsure about the exact location of their tank and field in relation to their home. It is critical that you identify the location of the tank since it will ultimately require service. First, locate the pumpout and observation openings on the equipment.

  1. To gently probe the soil for the tank and distribution box, you can also use a slender steel rod with a 1/8-inch diameter to gently probe the earth.
  2. Once you’ve located the tank, look for the dumping field, which is normally accessible by a distribution box fanning from it.
  3. Please be aware that identifying the laterals can be difficult—in fact, in some situations even septic professionals have problems locating all of the components of the system.
  4. The most important thing to remember is to empty your tank on a regular basis.
  5. Depending on the size of the tank and the number of people that it serves, the frequency will vary.
  6. A septic tank requires cleaning on average every three to five years if it is used and cared for correctly (more if you use a sink-mounted garbage disposal unit).
  7. Expect to spend around $200 for each pumpout, depending on the size of the tank and your geographic location.
See also:  When Septic Tank Smells Outside? (Perfect answer)

In addition, while the tank is open, the technician can inject some water into the distribution box to obtain an idea of how effectively the leach field is performing.

Additionally, even just glancing into the tank, you should use caution.

Depending on the tree, roots can grow up to 30′ to 40′ from the base of the tree and burst or dislodge the distribution box, connecting pipes, and laterals.

Don’t even think of driving cars or heavy equipment over the dumping area.

Because of this, solids will ascend to the top of the tank and block the laterals, overloading the tank.

Installing water-saving toilets and showerheads is one technique to limit the quantity of water that enters the system.

Don’t attach sump pumps to your septic system until you’ve fixed any leaky toilets and faucets.

After being clogged with sediments or having their integrity compromised by tree roots or automobiles, laterals begin to collapse.

Cooking oils, fats, and grease should not be poured down the kitchen sink drain.

Please do not flush non-biodegradable things such as disposable diapers, clumps of cat litter, filtered cigarettes, feminine hygiene products or plastic tampon applicators, paper towels, condoms, or other similar materials.

These chemicals have the potential to harm beneficial microorganisms in the tank and the soil, as well as pollute groundwater supplies.

None of these goods has been shown to be of considerable benefit in terms of enhancing performance or preventing failures.

Many over-the-counter septic system cleaning products include chemicals that are potentially harmful and are not biodegradable, as is the case with many household products.

Experts advise against using cleansers that contain sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, or hydrogen peroxide.

Use of any product containing toxic chemicals in excess of one percent by weight is prohibited, including trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, methylene chloride, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, toluene, napthalene, trichlorophenol, pentachlorophenol, acrolein, acrylonitrile, and benzidine.

How To Tell If Your System Is Failing

While there are no 100-percent accurate ways for spotting a malfunctioning septic system, you should be on the lookout for the following signs of a potential problem: In the event of a toilet backup into the house: To begin, rule out the possibility of a clogged soil line or other interior plumbing issues. Drainage system failure due to sewage or effluent leaking into the structure or basement: The water resulting from this condition will have a distinct odor. In the vicinity of the disposal field, there is a puddle of effluent on the soil surface.

It is not recommended that the grass above the septic field be too green in a healthy system.

It is important to remember that wastewater on the ground is a major health danger and should be addressed as soon as is practical.

What To Do If The System Fails

If you have any reason to believe that your system is failing, contact your local health department. In addition, you should seek the services of a skilled septic system installer. Then collaborate with both of these parties to build a strategy for moving forward. It is not unusual to find a septic system that is either underdesigned for the current level of use required by the residents, incorrectly placed, or at a position that will no longer sustain the sort of system that is already installed in an older home.

While a new septic system installation can be expensive (usually between $4,000 and $10,000), a properly operating septic system is critical to the running of your home as well as the health and safety of you and your loved ones.

As with so many other aspects of an old property, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure when it comes to septic systems.

How Does a Septic Tank Work?

Mr. Fix-It-Up-For-The-Family You may save a lot of money if you understand how a sewage treatment system works—and what can go wrong—so that you can handle your own septic system maintenance.

How does a septic tank work?

Pumping the tank on a regular basis eliminates sludge and scum, which helps to keep a septic system in good working order. It is possible for a well-designed and well built septic system to last for decades, or it might collapse in a matter of years. It is entirely up to you as long as you can answer the question of how do septic tanks function. Healthy septic systems are very inexpensive to maintain, but digging up and replacing a septic system that has completely collapsed may easily cost tens of thousands in labor and material costs.

It’s critical to understand how a septic tank works in order to maintain one.

Let’s take a look below ground and observe what happens in a properly operating septic system, shall we? After that, I’ll explain why things go wrong and offer you some tips on how to keep your system in peak operating condition.

Understand that a septic system is a cafeteria for bacteria

Bacteria are responsible for the proper operation of a septic system. They decompose garbage, resulting in water that is clean enough to safely trickle down into the earth’s surface. The entire system is set up to keep bacteria healthy and busy at all times. Some of them reside in the tank, but the majority of them are found in the drain field. 1. The septic tank is the final destination for all waste. 2. The majority of the tank is filled with watery waste, referred to as “effluent.” Anaerobic bacteria begin to break down the organic matter in the effluent as soon as it enters the system.

  • A layer of sludge settles to the bottom of the container.
  • 4.
  • Scum is mostly constituted of fats, greases, and oils, among other substances.
  • Grease and oils float to the surface of the water.
  • (5) A filter stops the majority of particles from reaching the exit pipe.
  • The effluent is discharged into the drain field.
  • Effluent is allowed to leak into the surrounding gravel because of holes in the drain septic field pipe.
  • The garbage is completely decomposed by aerobic bacteria found in gravel and dirt.
  • Potable water seeps into the groundwater and aquifer system from the surface.

Septic Tank Clean Out: Don’t abuse the system

Septic systems that have been correctly planned and constructed require just occasional ‘pumping’ to remove the sludge and scum that has built up inside the tank. However, if you don’t understand how a septic tank works, you may unintentionally hurt or even destroy the system.

  • Drains are used to dispose of waste that decomposes slowly (or not at all). Cigarette butts, diapers, and coffee grounds are all known to cause issues. Garbage disposers, if utilized excessively, can introduce an excessive amount of solid waste into the system. Lint from synthetic fibers is emitted from washing machine lint traps. This substance is not degraded by bacteria in the tank and drain septic field. Bacteria are killed by chemicals found in the home, such as disinfecting cleansers and antibacterial soaps. The majority of systems are capable of withstanding limited usage of these goods, but the less you use them, the better. When a large amount of wastewater is produced in a short period of time, the tank is flushed away too quickly. When there is too much sludge, bacteria’s capacity to break down waste is reduced. Sludge can also overflow into the drain field if there is too much of it. Sludge or scum obstructs the flow of water via a pipe. It is possible for tree and shrub roots to obstruct and cause harm to a drain field. Compacted soil and gravel prevent wastewater from seeping into the ground and deprive germs of oxygen. Most of the time, this is caused by vehicles driving or parking on the drain field.

Get your tank pumped…

Your tank must be emptied on a regular basis by a professional. Pumping eliminates the accumulation of sludge and scum that has accumulated in the tank, which has caused the bacterial action to be slowed. If you have a large tank, it may be necessary to pump it once a year; but, depending on the size of your tank and the quantity of waste you send through the system, you may go two or three years between pumpings. Inquire with your inspector about an approximate guideline for how frequently your tank should be pumped.

…but don’t hire a pumper until you need it

Inspections and pumping should be performed on a regular basis. However, if you’re not afraid of getting your hands dirty, you may verify the sludge level yourself with a gadget known as The Sludge Judge. It ranges in price from $100 to $125 and is commonly accessible on the internet. Once you’ve verified that your tank is one-third full with sludge, you should contact a professional to come out and pump it out completely.

Install an effluent filter in your septic system

Garbage from your home accumulates into three distinct strata.

The septic filter is responsible for preventing blockage of the drain field pipes.

Septic tank filter close-up

The septic tank filter is responsible for capturing suspended particles that could otherwise clog the drain field pipes. Obtain an effluent filter for your tank from your contractor and install it on the outflow pipe of your tank. (It will most likely cost between $50 and $100, plus labor.) This device, which helps to prevent solids from entering the drain field, will need to be cleaned out on a regular basis by a contractor to maintain its effectiveness.

Solution for a clogged septic system

If your septic system becomes clogged and you find yourself having to clean the filter on a regular basis, you might be tempted to simply remove the filter altogether. Hold on to it. Solids, wastewater, and scum are separated into three levels in septic tanks, which allows them to function properly (see illustration above). Solids sink to the bottom of the container, where microbes breakdown them. The scum, which is made up of trash that is lighter than water, rises to the surface. In the drainage field, the middle layer of effluent leaves the tank and goes through an underground network of perforated pipes to the drainage field.

  1. Keep the effluent filter in place since it is required by your state’s health law.
  2. Waste particles might flow through the filter and clog the perforated pipes if the filter is not used.
  3. Your filter, on the other hand, should not require cleaning every six months.
  4. A good chance is high that you’re flushing filter-clogging things down the toilet, such as grease, fat, or food scraps.
  5. A garbage disposal will not be able to break down food particles sufficiently to allow them to flow through the septic tank filtration system.
  6. Plastic items, disposable diapers, paper towels, nonbiodegradable goods, and tobacco products will clog the system if they are flushed through it.
  7. More information on removing lint from your laundry may be found here.

Get an inspection

Following a comprehensive first check performed by an expert, regular inspections will cost less than $100 each inspection for the next year. Your professional will be able to inform you how often you should get your system inspected as well as how a septic tank functions. As straightforward as a septic system appears, determining its overall condition necessitates the services of a professional. There are a plethora of contractors who would gladly pump the sludge out of your tank, but many, in my experience, are unable to explain how a septic system works or how it should be maintained.

A certification scheme for septic contractors has been established in certain states; check with your state’s Secretary of State’s office to see whether yours is one of them.

Also, a qualified inspector will be able to tell you whether or not your tank is large enough to accommodate your household’s needs, as well as the maximum amount of water that can be passed through it in a single day.

You may be able to boost the performance of your system by using a product such as RID-X to introduce bacteria into the system. As you learn more about how a septic tank works, your professional should be able to tell you whether or not your system will benefit from this treatment.

Alternatives to a new drain field

If an examination or a sewage backup indicate that your drain field is in need of replacement, the only option is to replace it completely. As a result, it’s important to talk with a contractor about other possibilities before proceeding with the project.

  • Pipes should be cleaned. A rotating pressure washer, used by a contractor, may be used to clean out the drain septic field pipes. The cost of “jetting” the pipes is generally around $200. Chemicals should be used to clean the system. A commercial solution (not a home-made one) that enhances the quantity of oxygen in the drain field should be discussed with your contractor before installing your new system. Septic-Scrub is a product that I suggest. A normal treatment will cost between $500 and $1,000. Make the soil more pliable. The practice of “terra-lifting,” which involves pumping high-pressure air into several spots surrounding the drain field, is authorized in some regions. Some contractors use it to shatter compacted dirt around the pipes. Depending on the circumstances, this might cost less than $1,000 or as much as $4,000 or more.

Protect your drain septic field from lint

When this device is in place, it inhibits lint from entering the system, especially synthetic fibers that bacteria are unable to digest. One of these filters, which I’ve designed and termed theSeptic Protector, was invented by me. An additional filter is included in the price of around $150 plus delivery. Learn more about how to filter out laundry lint in this article.

Don’t overload the septic system

Reduce the amount of water you use. The volume of water that flows into your tank, particularly over a short period of time, can be reduced to avoid untreated waste from being flushed into your drain field. Replace outdated toilets with low-flow ones, install low-flow showerheads, and, perhaps most importantly, wash laundry throughout the week rather than just on Saturday mornings to save water.

Meet the Expert

Septic systems, according to Jim vonMeier, are the solution to America’s water deficit because they supply cleaned water to depleted aquifers, according to vonMeier. He travels the country lobbying for septic systems, giving lectures, and giving testimony. For septic system inquiries, as well as information on the operation of the septic tank, contact him by email.

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