In Hawaii How Many Gallon Septic Tank For 4 Bedrooms? (Question)

(11) Effluent from a septic tank shall be discharged into a soil absorption system, sand filter, subsurface irrigation system as approved by the director, or other treatment unit approved for use by the director.

Haw. Code R. § 11-62-33.1.

No. of Bedrooms Minimum Capacity (Gallons)
4 or less 1000
5 1250
  • A 1-2 bedroom house requires 750 gallons septic tank A 3 bedroom house requires 1000 gallons septic tank A 4 bedroom house requires 1200 gallons septic tank

How often should a septic tank be pumped for a family of 5?

Using a septic tank pumping frequency chart, you can get a good idea of how often you should have your septic tank pumped out. For instance, if your home has a 1000-gallon septic tank that’s used by a family of five, the pumping frequency chart recommends having your tank cleaned out every two years.

How do you calculate septic tank per person?

Septic Tank Size Calculation based Per User Consumption

  1. Cooking – 5 Liters.
  2. Bathing & Toilet – 85 Liters/Person, So for 5 person – 425 liters/Day.
  3. Washing cloths & Utensils – 30 Liters.
  4. Cleaning House – 10 Liters.
  5. Other – 5 Litres.

How often does a 1000 gallon septic tank need to be pumped?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

Is a 1000 gallon septic tank big enough?

Most residential septic tanks range in size from 750 gallons to 1,250 gallons. An average 3-bedroom home, less than 2500 square feet will probably require a 1000 gallon tank. A properly sized septic tank should hold waste for 3-years before needing to be pumped and cleaned.

What size should my septic tank be?

The larger your home, the larger the septic tank you’re going to need. For instance, a house smaller than 1,500 square feet usually requires a 750 to 1,000-gallon tank. On the other hand, a bigger home of approximately 2,500 square feet will need a bigger tank, more than the 1,000-gallon range.

Is a 500 gallon septic tank big enough?

The minimum tank size for a three bedroom house is 1200 gallons. 500 or 750 gallon tanks used to be quite common in old houses, but they are not large enough for modern households, and are from a time without automatic washers, large spa tub, dishwashers, or multiple daily showers.

How many gallons are most septic tanks?

Most residential tanks have a capacity ranging from 750 gallons to 1,250 gallons and the average person uses 60 gallons to 70 gallons of water a day.

How often should a 2000 gallon septic tank be pumped?

The size of the tank is one determining element regarding how often it ought to be pumped. For a household of 4 with a 1,000-gallon tank, it’s advised that it be pumped every 2.6 years, but for a 1,500-gallon tank, the time can be extended to 4.2 years and up to 5 years for a 2,000-gallon tank.

How do you know your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  1. Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  2. Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  3. Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  4. You Hear Gurgling Water.
  5. You Have A Sewage Backup.
  6. How often should you empty your septic tank?

How often should a septic tank be pumped?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

What is the average size of a home septic tank?

Common residential septic tanks range in size from 750 gallons to 1,250 gallons. A septic tank is a self-contained unit designed to hold residential wastewater. The system is comprised of two main components: the tank and the drain, or soil absorption field.

The Guide To Septic Tanks For Hawaii

As an alternative to hooking up your home to a municipal sewer system, you may install a septic system on your own, which is composed of a container buried underground on your land that retains and processes the water and waste that exits your home through plumbing pipes. A septic system should only be constructed by qualified experts, whether you’re building a new house or replacing an existing one. Septic tanks should never be installed by amateurs. Because of the project’s intricacy and size, heavy machinery, precise excavating, and plumbing hookups are required, all of which might be devastating if not completed correctly.

In areas where the earth floods often, for example, septic issues are likely to occur.

It is next necessary for a contractor to excavate in the area of the tank and drain field in preparation for installation, which includes plumbing connections to the residence.

The installation of a septic system involves meticulous design, the knowledge of a professional, and at the very least a few thousand dollars to be completed correctly.

  • Do Septic Tanks Have a Fixed Price?
  • You will incur additional costs when replacing your septic tank or system, on top of whatever repairs you may have already attempted.
  • When issues progress to the point where a whole septic system must be rebuilt, expenses can vary from $3,000 to $10,000, according to Glenn Gallas, vice president of operations for Mr.
  • It is possible that you will spend even more depending on the size and location of your property, as well as the size and substance of your tank and the kind of septic system you choose.
  • Generally speaking, there are four different types of materials that may be used for septic tanks: —Concrete.
  • It has a long lifespan and is resistant to cracking, however it is prone to cracking.
  • The lightweight nature of plastic, which is less expensive than steel, can cause structural damage to buildings.

Because of its low weight, fiberglass is susceptible to structural damage and can shift from its original location, although it is less prone to break than other materials like concrete.

Over time, steel can rust and the cover can corrode, creating a danger in your yard that is unsafe to use.

Also necessary is the knowledge of how large your septic tank should be in relation to the size of your home: One or two bedrooms in a home with less than 1,500 square feet with a 750-gallon tank is sufficient.

An approximately 3,500 to 4,500 square foot home with four or five bedrooms will require a 1,250-gallon septic tank.

It requires a variety of criteria, including the weather, soil type, and other considerations, to establish a septic tank.

Due to the difficulty of the terrain, the process might take up to a week or longer to complete.

” Finding Out How Much It Will Cost to Install a New Appliance It is necessary to check with your local government, such as the city or county, to see what is required to secure a permit for the construction of a septic system before you contact a septic system installation professional.

It will then be up to the local governing body to decide whether or not to approve the engineer’s designs, which will take into account the water table, underground water lines, wells, and mandatory setbacks from neighboring properties.

“Once the drawings have been authorized, you can take them and provide them to different septic installers,” he adds.

An estimate will be required in order to determine the exact cost of your installation.

Obtain a couple quotations from many different local septic installation or replacement firms based on the specifics of your property.

Complementary Components of a Septic System If you’re establishing a new septic system or updating an existing one, you may need to consider other components of the system.

Pump for the tank – The top of the tank.

Risers.

In the event that only one or two components of the system appear to be causing the problem, Gallas notes that the sewage line, septic tank, distribution box, and field lines can be replaced independently.

In the case of a residential septic system, according to Gallas, it can survive as long as 25 or 30 years with adequate care.

The regularity with which your septic tank will require pumping, in addition to other maintenance, may vary depending on the size of your home, according to Gallas.

Gallas estimates that the cost of a basic septic pump by a professional will be between $100 and $300.

The issue may just be a clogged pipe, but it might also be a problem with your drain field, a broken or damaged septic tank, excessive water in the tank, or things and chemicals in your septic tank that should not have been flushed down the toilet.

Added information from the United States News & World Report The Smell in My House: What’s the Deal? Designing a Mudroom in Your House Choose Energy-Efficient Windows for Your Home Using These Guidelines Do Septic Tanks Have a Fixed Price? It first posted on the website usnews.com

Septic Tanks Are Hawaii’s New Wastewater Cleanser

Every day in 2017, 53 million gallons of untreated sewage was dumped onto the ground in Hawaii – 3) Since then, the state of Hawaii has approved Act 125 to address the issue. To put it simply, cesspools will be phased out and replaced with septic systems or linked to a sewage system by 2050. A septic tank is one of the most effective choices. This septic tank guide can provide you with solutions to the following questions:

  • What is a septic tank and how does it work? how does it function
  • Can you tell me about the many kinds of them? In what ways are septic tanks and cesspool systems different from one another
  • What are the expenses? What methods do you use to clean and maintain septic tanks? What are some of the most prevalent potential issues
  • What are the requirements for septic tanks in Hawaii

Let’s have a look at the septic tank rules in the state of Hawaii.

What Is A Septic TankHow Does It Work?

Septic tanks are similar to Brita filters in that they assist in the purification of water. Most of the time, they are composed of concrete or fiberglass. Septic tanks are typically composed of three components:

  • It consists of a tank that holds, separates, and begins to treat waste. A distribution system that disperses the cleaned wastewater into the surrounding soil is required. The soil in the absorption area surrounding it, which is responsible for the final treatment of the wastewater

All of these components work together to help keep your surroundings, as well as your drinking water, clean. It accomplishes this by separating the solid and floatable waste from the water in the following ways:

  1. Wastewater is channeled into the septic tank, which holds it. In the long run, lighter garbage floats and heavier waste sinks. Biological breakdown takes place in the tank, resulting in the formation of nutrients, gasses, and water. The wastewater is discharged from the tank into the distribution system. Contaminants are removed from the surrounding soil (drainage field). an expert removes the solids using a vacuum pump

Well-drained, medium-textured soils, such as loam, are the best types of soils for growing crops. Let’s take a look at how cesspools stack up against septic tanks in terms of environmental protection. For starters, there are aerobic and anaerobic septic tank systems to consider. In the end, it all boils down to whether or not the bacteria that are treating your waste utilize oxygen. Aerobic bacteria septic systems outperform anaerobic bacteria septic systems in the following areas:

  • The decomposition of human waste
  • The treatment of wastewater Not taking up any physical space
  • Providing failure notifications
  • It can be utilized anyplace
  • It is versatile.
  • Near the seashore and in places with high groundwater levels, anaerobic systems are necessary.

Although more energy efficient, aerobic systems require more care and money because they clog more easily, and they might fail more frequently. Now we’ll look at the various materials that may be used to construct it. When it comes to systems built in Hawaii, you have a few options: On page 5-3233, you can find more information about these systems in detail.

Septic Tanks vs. Cesspools

For a reason, a cesspool is also referred to as “a disgusting place” in some circles. Cesspools are subterranean receptacles for liquid waste and sewage collection. It’s simply a hole in the earth that has been dug by humans and allows waste to flow out of it. Septic tanks, in contrast to cesspools, have the following advantages:

  • Remove sediments from wastewater
  • sUse microorganisms to start purifying the water
  • sHelp break down contaminates
  • Water should be released higher up for greater disinfection. Are better overall for the environment

We are well aware that installing a new wastewater treatment system might be a hassle. However, you will be contributing to the cleanliness of the water for yourself and your family. Let us take a look at the prices associated with septic tanks while we’re on the subject of discomfort. Septic tank installation on the Big Island begins at about $10k and costs an average of $14k-$15k. Of course, an average varies tremendously based on where you are, what sort of installation you have, and other variables.

  • One thousand gallon tank for a three-bedroom house costs around $2000
  • One thousand two hundred gallon tank for a five or six-bedroom house costs approximately $2500.

Fortunately, the expense of draining out a septic tank is less expensive than the cost of establishing one. Pumping costs can vary based on the magnitude and severity of the problem, but they might range from $300 to $500 per hour.

CleaningMaintenance Of Septic Tanks

Pumping out the sludge on a regular and timely basis is the foundation of cleaning and maintenance. Septic tank maintenance includes draining out your tank every two to three years. The price for this treatment might range between $300 and $400.

Providing everything continues to function properly, you should have few to no problems. You may clean your septic tank using a garden hose, which is something you can do yourself! It is necessary to clean the effluent filter every 1-3 years.

3 Common Problems Possible With Septic Tanks

These are a major source of concern when it comes to septic tanks. Waste will begin to accumulate, and soon there will be no more space available in the tank. It is possible that this will result in backups into the home and sluggish draining. This problem may be resolved by having a professional clean your tank for you.

Tree Roots

These wicked boys have the ability to wrap around and drill right through nearly anything that gets in their way. This can cause them to work more slowly or perhaps cease to function altogether. This problem can be resolved by removing trees or putting them in regions where there are no roots.

Broken Drain Lines Or Baffle

If these fail, the garbage will be able to travel everywhere and everywhere. This problem can be resolved by having the broken part replaced.

Hawaii’s Septic Tank Regulations

The following items are included in Hawaii’s list of septic tank regulations:

  • The following are among the septic tank rules in Hawaii:
  • Meeting the requirements of the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials
  • A qualified septic engineer must approve and install the system, which must be approved and allowed by the Department of Health. A waste disposal system that includes soil absorption systems, sand filters, subsurface irrigation systems (with director approval), or another type of treatment system is employed. A screen is installed at the effluent end of the septic tank to prevent clogging.
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You may learn more about the rules and regulations by clicking here.

Provide Cleaner Water With A Better System

Septic tanks can help you save money on water and prevent pollution in the environment. It may be a little more expensive, but at the very least you won’t have to worry about contracting infections from swimming or drinking in public water supplies.

WAC 246-272A-0232:

Septic tanks must meet the following requirements:(1) have at least two compartments, with the first compartment liquid volume equal to one-half to two-thirds of the total liquid volume; and(2) have at least two compartments with the first compartment liquid volume equal to one-half to two-thirds of the total liquid volume. It is possible to meet this specification with a single tank with two compartments or by connecting two single compartment tanks together in sequence. (2) Have the following minimum liquid volume requirements in place: (a) For the purpose of a single-family house Required Minimum Liquid Volumes of Septic Tanks, as shown in Table VII: TABLE VII: Minimum Liquid Volumes of Septic Tanks Required by Law

Number of Bedrooms Required MinimumLiquid Tank Volume in Gallons
≤3 900
4 1000
Each additional bedroom 250

Two hundred fifty gallons per bedroom for any residential source other than a single-family residence, with a minimum of one thousand gallons for any nonresidential source; three times the design flow for any nonresidential source; and three times the design flow for any residential source other than a single-family residence

Cesspools in Hawaii

On this page you will find: Contact Region 9 Large-Capacity Cesspool CoordinatorKate Rao([email protected])(415) 972-3533EPA Region 9 WTR-4-275 Hawthorne StreetSan Francisco, CA 94105Toll-free at (800) 672-3533EPA Region 9 WTR-4-275 Hawthorne StreetSan Francisco, CA 94105EPA Region 9 WTR-4-275 Hawthorne StreetSan Francisco, CA (866) Phone: (866) 372-9378, EPA-WEST Suggestions and Complaints If you have a tip or complaint about a large-capacity cesspool, you can contact the Tip and Complaint Hotline at (415) 947-4510 or the Environmental Violations Reporting Center.

  • This page contains the following information: Contact KATE RAO ([email protected])EPA Region 9 WTR-4-275 Hawthorne StreetSan Francisco, CA 94105(415) 972-3533EPA Region 9 WTR-4-275 Hawthorne StreetSan Francisco, CA 94105(415) 972-3533Toll-free at (800) 427-7272EPA Region 9 WTR-4-275 Hawthorne StreetSan Francisco, CA 94 (866) (866) 372-9378, EPA-WEST Complaints and suggestions are welcomed. Tip & Complaint Hotline at (415) 947-4510 or Report Environmental Violations are also excellent resources for reporting large-capacity cesspool-related issues.

Background

Cesspools are utilized for the disposal of untreated sanitary waste across the state of Hawaii. Using a cesspool to dispose of raw, untreated sewage has the potential to pollute oceans, streams, and groundwater by releasing bacteria that cause illness and nitrates. If pathogens detected in untreated sewage end up polluting drinking water or swimming pools, they can have a negative influence on human health. Nitrates have the potential to harm both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, including coral reefs.

The majority of cesspools in Hawaii serve only single-family dwellings and are not regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

There is no provision in the regulations for a waiver or extension of the deadline. You can find out if you own or run a large-capacity cesspool by going to the Large-Capacity Cesspools website, which has further information.

Region 9 UIC Inventory Form

Cesspools with a big capacity are called Underground Injection Control (UIC) wells, and the owners and operators of cesspools with a significant capacity are required to provide inventory information to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This online form or downloadForm 7520-16: Inventory of Injection Wellsand mail it to the R9 LCC Coordinator are both acceptable options. Please do not hesitate to contact the R9 LCC Coordinator if you require assistance in submitting inventory information.

Properly Abandon and Close a Large-Capacity Cesspool

All owners and operators of large-capacity cesspools must appropriately abandon and shut these facilities (s). It is recommended that you contact the Hawaii State Department of Health (HDOH) Wastewater Branch (see’State Resources ‘, above) for information on how to replace your large-capacity cesspool with a State-approved wastewater system. You must submit a Backfilling Final Completion Report that has been completed and signed in order to confirm the correct closure of a large-capacity cesspool that receives 1,000 gallons per day (gpd) or less.

All paperwork proving the abandonment and closure of large-capacity cesspools should be provided to the EPA Region 9’s Large-Capacity Cesspool Coordinator at the same time.

Hawaii State Department of Health (HDOH) Wastewater Branch

To ensure that their large-capacity cesspool is properly abandoned and closed, all owners and operators must follow these steps: (s). It is recommended that anybody who owns or operates a large-capacity cesspool contact the Hawaii State Department of Health (HDOH) Wastewater Branch (see “State Resources” above) for help in replacing the large-capacity cesspool with a State-approved wastewater system. You must provide a Backfilling Final Completion Report that has been completed and signed to demonstrate appropriate closure of a large-capacity cesspool that receives 1,000 gallons per day (gpd) or less.

Large-capacity cesspool abandonment and closure documents should be sent to the EPA Region 9 Large-Capacity Cesspool Coordinator, as well as to the EPA Region 9 Cesspool Coordinator.

Enforcement and Compliance

In accordance with the Safe Drinking Water Act’s UIC requirements, the Environmental Protection Agency’s enforcement actions are meant to investigate and prosecute charges against persons or facilities who are found to be in breach of the laws. If a regulated entity is determined to be in violation, it may be subject to an enforcement action as well as fines. When an owner or operator of a large-capacity cesspool fails to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the authority to issue administrative orders requiring compliance and assessing an administrative civil penalty of up to $23,607 for each day of violation, with a maximum penalty of $295,088, against the owner or operator of the cesspool.

These enforcement measures have resulted in the imposition of fines and the closure of about 1,138 large-capacity cesspools around the state.

Under the Self-Disclosed Violations Policies of the Environmental Protection Agency, the agency is ready to defer enforcement proceedings and fines in order to encourage owners and operators to voluntarily identify, quickly disclose, and swiftly close large-capacity cesspools.

Information on how to self-disclose possible large-capacity cesspool violations may be found at the Environmental Protection Agency’s eDisclosure website.

Understanding Septic Systems

On-site (unsewered) systems are used to dispose of domestic wastewater in more than 25 million houses, accounting for about a quarter of the population of the United States. According to the American Housing Survey for the United States, in 1993, 1.5 (million) out of every 4 (million) new owner-occupied home starts relied on some sort of onsite sewage disposal, according to the American Housing Survey. When comparing the ownership of an unsewered vs a sewered house, one of the most significant distinctions is that unsewered wastewater treatment and disposal systems must be maintained by the homeowner.

Using an onsite disposal system is the most prevalent method of treating and disposing of wastewater in rural residences.

Septic systems account for the vast majority of onsite waste disposal systems in the United States.

Typical Septic System

  1. Perforated pipe of 4 inches in diameter
  2. Absorption field
  3. Crushed rock or gravel-lined trench
  4. Access ports
  5. Distribution box

How It Works

Access ports; distribution box; 4″ perforated pipe; absorption field; crushed rock or gravel lined trench; septic tank;

Cross-section of a two-compartment septic tank

A sewage tank’s capacity is normally built to contain 750 to 1,800 gallons of sewage, although it may be customized based on the number of bedrooms in the house and state and local regulatory regulations. In its most basic form, the septic tank serves to filter solids from liquids while also encouraging partial breakdown of pollutants by microbes that are naturally present in the wastewater to achieve the desired results. The particles, which are referred to as sludge, settle in the bottom of the tank, while the scum floats on top of the liquid at the top of the tank.

  1. Solids that are permitted to flow through the septic tank and into the absorption field might block the absorption field.
  2. Because of this, the installation of effluent filters at the septic tank outflow provides an extra layer of protection in the effort to keep particles out of the absorption area.
  3. The effluent is sent to the absorption field through a connecting pipe or distribution box, depending on the configuration.
  4. Typically, the absorption field is composed of a network of underground perforated pipes or some other proprietary distribution system.
  5. The absorption field, which is located in the unsaturated zone of the soil, treats the wastewater by utilizing physical, chemical, and biological processes to treat the waste water.

As an added benefit, the soil serves as a natural buffer, removing many hazardous bacteria, viruses, and excessive nutrients from the wastewater as it flows through the unsaturated zone before it reaches the groundwater supply.

  1. Well for drinking water
  2. Septic tank
  3. Distribution box
  4. Absorption field
  5. Soil absorption (unsaturated zone)
  6. Groundwater (saturated zone)
  7. And other structures.

Wastewater treatment and disposal in soil

In excess, wastewater includes nutrients such as nitrates and phosphates, which can contaminate neighboring streams and groundwater sources, as well as the environment. Extra nutrients in drinking water sources may be damaging to human health and can damage lakes and streams by encouraging weed growth and algal blooms, both of which are detrimental to the environment. But many of these nutrients can be retained in the soil, where they are eventually taken up by the surrounding flora.

What to put in, what to keep out

  • All wastewater from your house should be sent into the septic tank. Alternatively, graywater might be channeled to a mulch basin irrigation system or a disposal field. Maintain a safe distance between the absorption field and roof drains, basement sump pump drains, and any rainfall or surface water drainage systems. Increased flooding of the absorption field will inhibit the soil’s ability to naturally cleanse the wastewater, which will result in groundwater and/or surrounding surface water contamination. Conserve water to keep the septic system from being overloaded. Make careful to fix any dripping faucets or leaking toilets. Make use of low-flow plumbing fittings. When dealing with a clogged drain, avoid using caustic drain openers. Clogs should be unclogged instead with hot water or a drain snake. Avoid the use of septic tank additives, commercial septic tank cleaners, yeast, sugar, and other similar substances. Several of these items are not required, and some may even be damaging to your health. Commercial bathroom cleansers and laundry detergents should only be used in small amounts. Many individuals choose to clean their toilets, sinks, showers, and tubs using a gentle detergent or baking soda rather than harsh chemicals. If you have a trash disposal unit, check with the Humboldt County Division of Environmental Health (DEH) to ensure that your septic system is capable of handling the increased waste. Do not allow backwash from your water softener to enter your septic tank. Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system. Grease, disposable diapers, sanitary napkins, tampons, condoms, paper towels, plastics, cat litter, latex paint, pesticides, and other potentially dangerous substances should not be introduced into your system. Records should be kept of all system maintenance operations including repairs, pumping, inspections, permits granted, and other activities. Find out where your septic system is located in your home. Keep a sketch of it with your maintenance record in case you need to bring it in for servicing. Schedule an inspection and pumping of your septic system every three to five years by a professional inspector or contractor
  • Only grass should be planted over and near your septic system. A blockage or damage to the absorption field may be caused by roots from surrounding plants or bushes. No portion of your septic system should be driven over or parked over. This might cause the dirt to contract and your system to be crushed.

Inspect your septic tank regularly and dispose of any wastewater that accumulates in it. Alternatively, graywater can be channeled to a mulch basin irrigation system or a disposal field. Roof drains, basement sump pump drains, and other rainfall or surface water drainage systems should be kept away from the absorption field to prevent contamination of the absorption field. Increased flooding of the absorption field will inhibit the soil’s ability to naturally cleanse the wastewater, which might result in groundwater and/or surrounding surface water contamination.

  • Repair any dripping faucets or clogged toilets immediately.
  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using caustic drain openers.
  • These goods are not required, and some of them may even be damaging to your health; yet, Bathroom cleansers and laundry detergents sold over the counter should be used sparingly.
  • Ensure that your septic system is capable of handling the additional trash generated by your garbage disposal unit by contacting the Humboldt County Division of Environmental Health (DEH).
  • Septic systems are not meant to be used as garbage disposal systems.
  • Records should be kept of all system maintenance operations including repairs, pumping, inspections, permits granted, and other activities; Find out where your septic system is located in your house.
  • Have your septic system tested every 3-5 years and pumped on a regular basis (typically every 5-7 years) by a professional inspector or contractor.
  • A blockage or damage to the absorption field may be caused by roots from surrounding plants or bushes; No portion of your septic system should be driven over or parked on.

Because of this, the dirt will get compacted and your system will be crushed.

Dept of Health – Carroll County Health Department

Detailed profiles for each On-site Sewage Discharge System (OSDS). There are no public sewer systems in many parts of Carroll County, which means that domestic garbage must be hauled away by the homeowner. Individual septic systems are placed on each homeowner’s property in order to dispose of the waterborne waste generated by the residence in these types of neighborhoods. The use of a publicly accessible sewer system is ideal, but a septic system that is well-designed, appropriately constructed, and regularly maintained can provide a period of good service within its constraints.

  • This article does not include any guidelines for the design or construction of a septic system.
  • Once an individual on-site sewage disposal system (septic system) has been approved by the Health Department, it is possible to construct one.
  • Despite this, issues might arise.
  • If the number of people serviced by the system fluctuates significantly, as does the soil or the flow of sewage, the system may fail to function as intended.
  • It is possible for a well-designed system to fail just due to a lack of maintenance.
  • Proper maintenance, on the other hand, may assist the homeowner in extending the usable life of their septic system and get the greatest possible service from it.
  • This should include the location of the home, the septic tank, the distribution box (if there is one), the pump pit (if there is one), the effluent disposal area, and the well that provides water for the house.

It is necessary to understand the following things about a septic system: (1) what it is, (2) where it is, (3) how it works, and (4) when it should be maintained.

It is located beneath the ground on the land of the residence it serves.

In order to accommodate this, some residences require larger tanks than others.

A bigger tank allows for more comprehensive decomposition and, as a result, provides superior service in most cases.

Older septic tank installations were frequently totally buried, despite the fact that a clean-out hole with a cover was constructed into the top of the tank.

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Sewage is channeled via the home sewage system and into the tank.

A layer of scum forms on the surface of the liquid as lighter particles, greases, and fats rise to the top of the liquid’s surface.

Through an outlet pipe, it is discharged into a tile field, deep trench, sand mound, or seepage pit, depending on the situation.

The second component of the system is comprised of a tile field, deep trench, sand mound, or seepage pit.

Suggestions for Performing Proper Septic Maintenance The level of both the scum layer above the liquid and the sludge layer below the liquid increases when the septic tank is used more frequently.

A problem can also emerge if there is more liquid running through the system than the surrounding ground is capable of absorbing. In many cases, the only option is to replace the entire system. THE FOLLOWING PRECAUTIONS ARE RECOMMENDED FOR THE BEST SERVICE:

  1. Learn where all of the components of your septic system are located and how to use them. Please double-check your diagram. Allowing motor vehicles to drive over any component of your subterranean system is strictly prohibited. It is possible that the subsurface pipes may be crushed or fractured, which will result in the system ceasing to function. Planting plants or bushes on or near the system is not permitted. Roots from these plants may find their way into fields and obstruct them. Don’t put too much strain on your septic system. This includes wastewater from dishwashers, washing machines, and trash grinders
  2. However, it should also accept all other wastewater from your home. Rainwater from downspouts, sump pumps, water from foundation drains, and other generally clean water should not be fed into your septic tank or disposal field, since it might contaminate the system. This might overflow the tank, mix up the contents, and transport some of the sediments or grease to the disposal fields, sand mound, or seepage pit
  3. However, this is not recommended. Cooking greases and fats should be emptied into a disposable container that can be thrown away with the trash or rubbish in order to provide the finest service possible. In the event that these compounds are dumped into a kitchen sink, they are likely to cause problems since they solidify in the sewage pipes and build the scum layer in the septic tank. Once a year, check the level of sediments in your tank to decide whether or not it need cleaning. This can be accomplished by following the procedures outlined at the end of this booklet in the section titled “Checking Your Septic Tank.” For further information about licensed septage haulers, contact your local Health Department, which may be found in the yellow pages of your phone book under “Septic Tanks and Systems.” They are well-equipped to remove the sediments and scum that have built up in your septic tank. The failure to clean the septic tank when it is necessary permits sediments and scum to flow through to the disposal field or seepage pit, resulting in costly repairs. The seepage region may then get blocked, causing sewage to rise to the surface of the ground or to flow back into the home through the drain. This causes a risk to the health of your family and neighbors as well as yourself. In addition, if your septic system fails, your sinks and toilets will not drain properly. It is possible that the correction will be costly. Some fixes need ongoing financial investments
  4. For example, flushing yeast or chemicals into the system will not lessen the amount of sediments in the tank
  5. This is not a substitute for regular tank maintenance. If such products were beneficial, the Department of Health and Human Services would be the first to recommend their usage. The indigenous bacteria in the tank serve as the most efficient cleaning method on the planet. When compared to the capacity of the septic tank, the amounts of bleaches, cleaners, and drain cleaning chemicals commonly used are so small that they have no effect on the system’s performance. When the tank is cleaned, a small amount of sludge should be left in it to ensure that the system continues to operate efficiently. This contributes to the breakdown process by providing microorganisms. If you have any inquiries or have any difficulties, CALL YOUR LOCAL HEALTH OFFICE. Their employees will provide you with advice and assistance in every manner they can
  6. PLEASE REMEMBER THE FOLLOWING TWO IMPORTANT POINTS: It is your obligation to look after and maintain your private sewage disposal system. Septic system overflow is comprised of human waste, which has the potential to spread illness, emit foul scents, and attract flies. Your family and neighbors’ safety depends on your ability to avoid or remedy malfunctions. When a private sewage disposal system overflows and poses a threat to the health of the community, the Health Department must intervene – and in many cases, this means taking legal action against you. Second, keep in mind that systems that have been ignored may be quite expensive to fix. When a system fails, the money saved by not doing routine maintenance is swiftly recouped when the system is replaced. It might be advisable to get your system tested if it has not been done within the last two years.

How to Perform a Septic Tank Inspection This may be accomplished with improvised tools, one for assessing the depth of sludge and another for checking the amount of scum. To determine the depth of sludge, use a pole or a 22-inch stud that is approximately eight feet long. Bind three feet of rough Turkish toweling around the pole starting at one end and working your way around. Remove the manhole cover or clean-out hole cover that is closest to the outflow pipe and set it aside. With the pole, make a slit in the scum layer to allow for drainage.

  • a.
  • Push the pole all the way down through the sludge until it reaches the bottom of the container.
  • Some authorities advocate cleaning when the muck has accumulated to a depth of one foot.
  • A flat board about four inches square should be nailed to one end.
  • Lift the pole carefully until you feel resistance from the square board touching the scum at the bottom of the scum pile.
  • After that, move the pole until you can see the bottom of the outflow pipe or baffle on the other side.
  • Mark the pole so that it is level with the top of the access hole once more.
  • Cleaning is required before the scum accumulates to a depth that allows it to pass beneath the exit pipe or baffle.

Department of Environmental Quality : About Septic Systems : Residential Resources : State of Oregon

In areas where houses and businesses are not linked to a municipal sewage system, a septic system is the most popular type of sewage treatment for those areas. When simplified to its most basic form, a septic system is comprised of two parts: a septic tank in which solids settle and decay and a drainfield in which liquid drained from the tank is treated by bacteria in the soil. Septic systems that are more sophisticated are constructed in places with high groundwater levels and/or poor soils.

Septic systems that are properly operating treat sewage in order to reduce groundwater and surface water contamination.

Failure to maintain your system poses a health risk to your family and your neighbors, as well as a threat to natural resources. Learn more about how septic systems function by reading this article.

Before you buy

In areas where houses and businesses are not linked to a municipal sewage system, a septic system is the most popular method of sewage treatment. Essentially, a septic system is comprised of two parts: an inlet tank, where solids settle and degrade, and a drainfield, where liquid released from the tank is treated by bacteria in the soil. When groundwater is high and/or the soil is poor, more sophisticated septic systems are built. As an example, and filteroralternative treatment technology systems, which treat wastewater to a greater extent before discharging it into a drainfield, are available.

Having a dysfunctional system puts your family and neighbors’ health at risk while also causing environmental damage.

  • Well construction, fill, roads, and other modifications can all have an impact on appropriateness. Is the land suitable for your development needs, taking into account the kind of system stated as acceptable on the report and the placement of the septic system that has been approved?

If the property has not yet been examined, you may choose to request that the present owner arrange for an evaluation to be done. Application for a site review can be made through either the Department of Environmental Quality or a local government contract agent. Before deciding to acquire the land, you must determine what sort of septic system will be necessary, as well as whether or not the permitted system site will fit your development requirements. Existing sewage treatment systems- If you are considering acquiring a home with an existing septic system, you should engage a trained inspector to assess the system before making the purchase.

  • Is it true that the system was implemented without a permit? If not, it is possible that the system is very old (permits have been necessary since 1972, and in certain counties even earlier), or that it was unlawfully built. Systems that have been illegally developed may pose a threat to public health or produce pollution. In the future, you may be forced to upgrade or replace the system, and you may be held accountable and penalized if the system malfunctions or poses a concern to public health and safety. If your family or business has a large number of members, is the system the correct size to meet their needs? Permit documents often include information on the system’s capacity in gallons per day. Typical household water use is 450 gallons per day for a four-bedroom home. How old is the system, and has it been adequately maintained over its lifetime? Is there documentation demonstrating that the septic tank was pumped on a regular basis? Have there been any difficulties or complaints that have been brought to your attention in the past? It is possible that your local permitting agency has records of complaints or infractions that have not been addressed yet. Before you moved here, how many people lived in the house? Perhaps the approach works well with a single person but not so well with four individuals. Is the septic tank connected to all of the plumbing fittings
  • And Is there evidence of a septic system failure, such as puddles over the septic tank or flooded drainfields? If the property is next to surface waterways, check to see that there are no direct discharges from the property. When it comes to septic system replacement, is there a suitable location if the existing system fails? In the event that there are any septic permit documents, they will show the replacement area that should still be “laid aside” for this purpose. What is the role of a qualified inspector? Some septic installers and pumpers have received training in the inspection of existing systems, while others specialize in the installation of new septic systems or pump tanks, as appropriate. Certified maintenance providers may also have the qualifications of a qualified inspector. The goal is to find out what their credentials are in septic system assessments (as opposed to only septic tank evaluations), as well as to obtain some recommendations. Verify the credentials of the references before hiring a contractor.

Signs of septic system failure

  • Pools of water or wet places, unpleasant aromas, and/or dark gray or black soils in the vicinity of your drainfield are all signs that something is wrong. Water from the sewer overflows into the lowest drains in the home. The sound of drains gurgling and poor draining (first check for obstructions)
  • Soapy flows onto the ground surface, into ditches, or into surface waterways It is impossible to mow over the drainfield because the earth is too soft.

Installing a new system

In order to have a new septic system installed, a two-step procedure must be followed. 1. Submit an application for a site review. The tests pits you give on your property will be evaluated by a DEQ or county agent, who will decide the size and kind of septic system that will be required, as well as the placement. 2. Submit an application for a building permit. For application forms, contact your local DEQ office or county agent, or you can obtain DEQ application forms from this website. There is a cost for both the site appraisal and the issuance of the building permit.

Maintaining septic systems

In order to have a new septic system installed, a two-step procedure must first be completed. 1. Request an examination of the site. The tests pits you give on your property will be evaluated by a DEQ or county agent, who will determine the size and kind of septic system that will be needed, as well as the placement. 2. Submit an application for a building permit. 3. For application forms, contact your local DEQ office or county agent, or you can obtain DEQ application forms from this web page.

Maintaining the condition of your septic tank on a regular basis (every 5 to 7 years) and checking for solids accumulation will save you money on costly repairs.

When the solids buildup in your septic tank exceeds 40%, you should have it pumped by a pumper who is licensed by the DEQ. If you follow the basic septic system DO’s and DON’Ts, a properly designed and maintained system may survive for a very long period.

Guide for Septic Tank Replacement

As an integral part of your home’s wastewater treatment system, your septic tank cannot be overlooked. Its principal function is to collect and hold all of the wastewater created in your home for a period of at least 24 hours, according to the manufacturer: If the particles contained in the wastewater are heavier than water, they will settle to the tank bottom (forming the sludge layer), or they will rise to the top of the tank if they are lighter than water (forming the scum layer), during the retention period (the scum layer).

It is the liquid in the clear zone (the space between the sludge and scum layers) that is released from the septic tank to other components of system and eventually to the drainfield.

It is necessary to pump the tank at regular intervals in order to remove the particles before they are released from the tank and cause damage to the drainfield or other important system components.

When the septic tank has reached the end of its useful life, it must be removed and replaced.

Septic tank selection

  • When serving a single family house, a septic tank with a minimum volume of 1,000 gallons is required
  • A home with more than 4 bedrooms must utilize a tank with a minimum volume of 1,500 gallons is required. The tank must be on the Department of Environmental Quality’s list of approved tanks and distribution units. You should be aware that some DEQ-approved tanks may not be acceptable for your location due to the quality of the groundwater

Septic tank placement for systems that were built after June of 1977

Each tank manufacturer has created an installation guide that contains step-by-step instructions for assembling the tank of that particular manufacturer. It is critical that the manufacturer’s instructions are strictly followed in order to ensure that the tank stays structurally sound and watertight once it has been installed in the ground. The tank’s site must be excavated to a depth that is sufficient to hold the tank.

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Setting the Tank

To ensure a firm leveling basis, bedding material (for example, pea gravel) is placed in the bottom of the excavation before it is filled in with dirt. The tank must be level from side to side and from end to end before it can be used. Once the tank has been installed, it is necessary to estimate the depth of excavation in order to ensure that the building sewage pipe can retain the minimum and maximum grade specified by the plumbing code once it is linked to the tank inlet fitting.

Gravity or Pump

Additionally, the effluent sewage pipe that connects to the tank outlet fitting must have a minimum fall of 2 inches and a minimum gradient of 4 inches per 100 feet in order to meet the requirements. Please keep in mind that the tank outlet must also be at least 2 inches higher above the top of the gravel in the first or tallest dispersal trench in order to function properly. If the minimum fall and grade criteria for the effluent sewer line cannot be satisfied, a pump will be necessary to elevate the sewage to the drainfield.

Septic tank placemement for systems that were built before July of 1977

If it is practically practicable, the tank placement must conform to the same rules for installation as those stated above for systems constructed after June 1977, unless an exception is made. Clackamas County has discovered that certain septic systems constructed prior to July 1977 do not have adequate fall between the septic tank and the drainfield to fulfill the current Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) requirements. When this minimum elevation difference cannot be attained, it is feasible to comply with the DEQ regulation by employing a pump to elevate septic tank effluent to the drainfield; however, this would result in a large increase in the cost of the drainfield installation.

  1. If it is reasonably practicable, the tank placement must conform to the same rules for installation as those indicated above for systems constructed after June 1977, unless a reasonable alternative exists. Clackamas County has discovered that certain septic systems constructed prior to July 1977 do not have adequate fall between the septic tank and the drainfield to fulfill the current Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) regulation. When this minimal elevation difference cannot be fulfilled, it is feasible to comply with the DEQ regulation by employing a pump to elevate septic tank effluent to the drainfield
  2. However, this would result in a large increase in the cost of the drainfield construction. Although several factors, including the age of the system and its expected useful life, as well as the cost of installing a pump and its associated components, may be taken into consideration, the County may issue a minor repair permit for a septic tank replacement without requiring the installation of a pump if all of the following conditions are met:

Maintain Setbacks

If it is practically practicable, the tank placement must conform to the same rules for installation as those indicated above for systems constructed after June 1977, unless an exemption applies. Clackamas County has discovered that certain septic systems constructed prior to July 1977 do not have adequate fall between the septic tank and the drainfield to fulfill the current DEQ requirements. When this minimal elevation difference cannot be attained, it is feasible to comply with the DEQ regulation by utilizing a pump to elevate septic tank effluent to the drainfield; however, this may incur a substantial extra expense.

Service Access Riser and Cover Requirement

There must be at least one service access riser assembly and cover that reaches to completed grade or higher on the septic tank’s perimeter. The riser must be firmly fastened to the septic tank and must be watertight in order to function properly. When the soil cover over the tank does not exceed 36 inches in depth, the tank must have a minimum diameter of at least 20 inches. If the backfill depth is greater than 36 inches, the minimum diameter of the riser must be at least 30 inches in diameter.

The riser cover must be equipped with a gasket for odor control, and it must be securely connected to the riser to prevent illegal entry.

Septic Tank Anti-Flotation Requirement

A septic tank that is installed in a site where there is a groundwater table present at any time of the year may be needed to have anti-flotation devices installed in order to prevent flooding. It is possible that the requirement for anti-flotation will not become obvious until after the tank has been installed and examined by the County. If anti-flotation measures are necessary, the tank maker has developed a set of instructions to be followed. Please be advised that certain septic tanks cannot be utilized in situations where the groundwater level rises over the level of the septic tank’s bottom, for safety reasons.

Connection to Existing System

In some cases, anti-flotation measures may be necessary in the case of a septic tank that is installed in a site where there is a groundwater table present at any time of year. Even after a tank has been installed and examined by the County, the necessity for anti-flotation may not become obvious. If anti-flotation measures are necessary, the tank maker has produced a set of instructions to follow. Please be advised that certain septic tanks cannot be utilized in situations where the groundwater level rises over the level of the septic tank’s foundation.

Testing the tank for leakage

After the septic tank has been installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions, it must be inspected to ensure that it is watertight in accordance with the test protocol set by the Department of Environmental Quality.

  1. The tank must be filled with water to a level that is 2 inches higher than the point at which the riser connects to the top of the tank in order for it to function properly. CAUTION: If the TANK is filled with water to a level greater than 2 inches over the RISER/TANK TOP JOINT, the TANK may get damaged. Make a permanent mark on the water lever, the time, the date, and your initials with a permanent marker
  2. After 24 hours, check the level of the water in the tank. The reason of the loss must be identified and corrected if it has lost more than one inch throughout the course of the testing period. Before summoning the County for an inspection, the tank must successfully pass the water test. Please do not remove or add any water to the tank during or after the 24 hour test to allow the inspector to assess the tank properly.

Tank Decommissioning

The tank must be filled with water to a level that is 2 inches higher than the point at which the riser connects to the top of the tank, otherwise the tank will overflow. PRECAUTIONS: If the water level in the tank rises more than 2 inches above the RISER/TANK TOP JOINT, the tank may be damaged. Permanent marker should be used to indicate the water lever, the time, the date, and your initials. Observe the water level after 24 hours. The source of the loss must be identified and corrected if it has dropped more than one inch during the course of the test period.

Keep any water out of the tank or add any water to it during or after the 24 hour test to allow the inspector to view the tank; and

What Size Septic Tank Do I Need

The size of an underground septic tank is referred to as its total volume handling capacity in this article, and it will be discussed in further detail later in this article. For additional information on above-ground septic tanks and systems, see our page on above-ground septic tanks. The minimum septic tank capacity requirements are determined by a variety of variables. State, county, and/or city regulations may specify permitted tank sizes, as well as tank materials and installation.

The size of the septic tank will vary depending on whether it is intended for domestic or commercial usage; in this section, we will cover residential use.

Shortly stated, the required size of a septic tank will be determined by the following factors: (1) the specific septic system type; (2) local government requirements; (3) the compatibility of the ground geology; and (4) the anticipated volume of wastewater depending on the size of the residence.

However, this is not true.

Furthermore, plastic septic tanks will not corrode, are weatherproof, are waterproof, are less expensive, are lighter, and are easier to build.

1) The Specific Septic System Type

There are seven different types of septic tank systems, and the size of the tank required will vary depending on the system you choose. The scope of this article does not allow for a comprehensive discussion of each system type and its associated size requirements. We are referring to traditional gravity-fed anaerobic septic systems in this context when we say “system type.” The anaerobic septic system is the most prevalent type of septic system, and it is the one that most people think of when they imagine a septic tank.

The following are the seven most popular types of septic systems, and modern polyethylene septic tanks may be used in nearly all of these systems that require a tank, if not all of them:

  1. The following systems are available: conventional, gravity-fed, anaerobic systems
  2. Above-ground septic systems
  3. Pressure systems
  4. Anaerobic systems
  5. Mound systems
  6. Recirculating sand or gravel filters systems
  7. Bottomless sand filters systems

If your septic tank system is anything other than a traditional, anaerobic system, the instructions in this page may not be applicable in their entirety to your situation.

2) Local Government Regulations

The laws for septic tanks imposed by local governments vary greatly across the United States. In part, this is due to the significantly diverse soil geography and water features that exist from state to state and can even differ by a few miles in some cases. In order to determine the appropriate septic tank size and the best position on the land for installation, it is essential to consult with local government rules first. Take, for example, theWastewater Treatment Standards – Residential Onsite Systemsdocument from the New York State Department of Health, which provides a comprehensive informational overview of codes, rules, and regulations frequently promulgated by governing bodies, as well as common terminology and definitions in the industry.

3) Suitability of the Ground Geology

The subterranean soil type has a significant impact on the efficacy of the system and, consequently, the size of the septic tank. This topic is highly tied to the rules of the local government. In most cases, it is related to the standards and recommendations of a designated authority that regulates septic tank installations, which is typically the department of health. In order to determine whether or not the ground is suitable for a septic tank system, a trained specialist must come out to the prospective installation site and conduct a series of tests.

A perc test will assess whether or not the subterranean soil is capable of handling and filtering septic tank effluent in an appropriate manner.

Whether you are hiring an experienced professional or doing it yourself, it is your obligation to contact your local oversight agency and arrange for perc tests and/or ground area evaluations to be performed.

4) The Expected Volume of Wastewater

The typical amount of wastewater that will be generated and that the septic tank will be able to manage is the most essential factor in determining the size of the septic tank that is required. In a home with simply a septic system, all wastewater is disposed of in the septic tank unless a separate system for managing greywater is in place to handle the waste. In order to calculate and approximate these values for residential dwellings, business structures, and facilities, extensive study has been carried out.

Starting with a 1000-gallon septic tank for residential usage, the advice is to go from there.

Some experts propose adding an additional 250 gallons of septic tank capacity for each additional bedroom over three bedrooms.

This is frequently the case when considering the situation collectively for the entire household rather than individually.

This article has demonstrated that septic tank recommendations are extremely diverse and depend on a variety of factors like where you reside, local government rules, subterranean soil type, house size, and the amount of wastewater that your unique home is predicted to produce.

Minimum Septic Tank Capacity Table

For further information on the minimum septic tank capacity dependent on the number of residential bedrooms, please see the following table:

Number of Bedrooms Minimum Septic Tank Size Minimum Liquid Surface Area Drainfield Size
2 or less 1000 – 1500 Gallons 27 Sq. Ft. 800 – 2500 Sq. Ft.
3 1000 – 2000 Gallons 27 Sq. Ft. 1000 – 2880 Sq. Ft.
4 1250 – 2500 Gallons 34 Sq. Ft. 1200 – 3200 Sq. Ft.
5 1500 – 3000 Gallons 40 Sq. Ft. 1600 – 3400 Sq. Ft.
6 1750 – 3500 Gallons 47 Sq. Ft. 2000 – 3800 Sq. Ft.

Take note of the following in relation to the table above:

  • As defined by the State of New York, the Minimum Liquid Surface Area is the surface area given for the liquid by the tank’s width and length measurements. The range of Drainfield Sizes is depending on the kind of groundwater present. The State of Michigan provides the above-mentioned drainfield recommendations, which might vary greatly depending on local standards and terrain.

Additional Thought: Can a Septic Tank Be Too Big?

In the absence of consideration for cost, it is reasonable to ask: “Can a septic tank be too large?” The answer is a resounding nay. As long as the septic tank is placed appropriately, it is impossible for a septic tank to be too large; the only thing that can happen is that it is too little. According to the majority of suggestions, constructing a larger-capacity septic tank is frequently the safer and more preferable solution. The following are the reasons behind this:

  1. With a bigger septic tank, you can adapt for changes in household consumption, such as those caused by parties or long-term guests. In the event that your family grows in size or you want to make improvements to your house, such as adding more bedrooms and bathrooms or installing new plumbing fixtures, having a bigger septic tank can save you the expense of installing a new tank.

Takeaways | What Size Septic Tank Do I Need

The septic tank size recommendations offered here are merely that: suggestions. They are built on a foundation of information gathered from government and academic sources. The actual size of the septic tank you require will vary depending on the factors discussed in this article. There is no “one-size-fits-all” solution when it comes to determining the appropriate septic tank size for your property. There is a great deal of variation depending on where you reside. With addition to providing a basic insight into the septic tank and system size that may be most suited to your application, the providedMinimum Septic Tank Capacity Tablecan also assist in cost estimations.

Before beginning any septic tank installation project, check and double-check with the state, city, or local county’s agency that is in charge of septic tanks, soil testing, and permissions.

If you’re searching for a chart of tank sizes, have a look at our page on the many sizes and quantities of septic tanks available.

They are available in both single chamber and double chamber designs.

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