How To Install Septic Tank And Drainfield On Slope?

  • Pipe 4″ Sch. 40 going a foot through the wall or under the footing, and to a minimum of five feet outside the building toward the tank. Set it level where it’s going through the wall or under the footing, and from there run with about an 1/8″ per foot of pitch (slope) toward the septic tank. Go further or all the way into the tank if required.

Can septic drain field be on a slope?

The tank will not drain uphill to the drain field. The leach lines themselves, however, should be set level. In a conventional gravity system, the pipe from the house to the septic tank, and the outlet pipe from the tank to the distribution box or leach field, should both slope downward with a minimum slope of 1/4 in.

Does a leach field need to be level?

The water level should always be at the level of the drain line connecting the septic tank to the leaching field. If the water level is higher than the drain line, it means that the leaching field cannot hold any more water and it is backing up into the septic tank.

Do leach lines have to be straight?

The leach field trenches are about 100 feet long, 18 inches wide and go in a straight line with a flat bottom. You should also never place your leach field in an area with standing water or near drinking water sources such as wells, streams, lakes, roads, or other homes.

Can a leach field be higher than septic tank?

Uphill areas, areas that are higher than the elevation of the septic tank are not a first choice to contain the drainfield or leaching beds. Unless a septic pump or effluent pump system are installed (you’d find wiring, and perhaps alarms) the drain field is going to be at or below the elevation of the septic tank.

How much slope should a septic line have?

A typical septic tank has a 4-inch inlet located at the top. The pipe that connects to it must maintain a 1/4-inch-per-foot slope toward it from the house. This means that for every 10 feet of distance between the tank and the house, the inlet must be 2 1/2 inches below the point at which the pipe exits the house.

What is the fall on a 4 inch sewer pipe?

For 4-inch PVC piping and a building sewer less than 50 feet long, the minimum slope is 1 inch in 8 feet, or 1/8-inch per foot, and the maximum is 1/4-inch per foot. For sewers longer than 50 feet, the slope should be 1/4-inch per foot.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

How deep should septic drain field be?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

Can you add dirt on top of leach field?

Never add additional soil over the drain field unless it is a minimal amount used to restore an area that may have been eroded or pulled up by removing another plant. Try not to be overly zealous when tilling the soil for planting. Remember that the drain lines may be as close as 6 inches from the soil surface.

What is the best pipe to use for septic drain field?

Corrugated pipe is typically used for drain fields. Septic systems use drain fields to treat the septic tank effluent for the removal of impurities and contaminants. The field is made up of trenches typically containing washed “drainrock” or gravel.

Can you walk on a leach field?

Your family can walk on a well-maintained drain field without fear of encountering puddles of affluent and dangerous bacteria. Bicycles and tricycles are also acceptable because they are not heavy enough to compress or disturb the soil.

Where should a leach field be placed?

Choose a low elevation area For water to leave the septic tank and travel to the drain field, it has to utilize gravity or pumps. Now, if you can, choose a low elevation area that’s just below the septic tank so that gravity can push the wastewater to the leach field.

What is the difference between a drain field and a leach field?

Septic drain fields (also called leach fields or soil absorption areas) are one part of a household septic system. Drain fields are areas of land, specifically designed to help filter and remove contaminants from wastewater.

How do you vent a leach field?

A candy cane, which is actually a vent pipe, allows for proper air ventilation for the leaching field. Sometimes vent pipes can also be installed to run through the home’s main plumbing ventilation, but other times a candy cane is necessary to properly vent the leaching field.

Guide to Installing Septic Drainfield Piping on steep slopes

  • Send us a question or make a comment about how to construct a septic system on a steeply sloping lot.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Septic systems with steep slopes are known as steep slope drainfield systems. A septic drainfield or leach line is described in this article, which is applicable to tough terrain, such as steep slopes, where a property dispose of wastewater using an aseptic tank and a drainfield. We also have anARTICLE INDEX for this topic, and you can use the SEARCH BOXes at the top and bottom of the page to obtain the information you need quickly and easily.

Guide to Septic Installations on Steep Slopes or Stepped Slopes

Conflicts of interest are not tolerated at InspectAPedia.com. No affiliation exists between us and any sponsors, products, or services mentioned on this website. Septic systems with steep slopes are known as steep slope drainfields. A septic drainfield or leach line is described in this article, which is applicable to tough terrain, such as steep slopes, where a property dispose of wastewater utilizing an aerated well and a drainfield system. We also have anARTICLE INDEX for this topic, and you can use the SEARCH BOXes at the top and bottom of the page to obtain the information you need quickly and efficiently.

  • THE INSTALLATION OF Sewage OR SEPTIC LINES ON STEEP SITES is a term that refers to the installation of sewer or septic line pipes connecting a structure to its septic tank or sewer main on steep sites that slope down substantially between the structure and the septic tank. SYSTEMS DE DOSAGE For hilly sites where the drainfield must be located either uphill or downhill from a septic tank or structure, PRESSURE is a term that refers to pressure dosing systems that may be beneficial for disposing of sewage. GRAVELLESS SEPTIC SYSTEMS – Other gravelless systems are capable of handling mild bends required to follow rolling slope lines
  • However, some gravelless systems are not. Sewage pumps, sewage ejector pumps, grinder pumps, effluent pumps, sump pumps, septic pumping stations, and sewer pump alarms are examples of systems that will be required if the building or septic tank is located below the drainfield or sewer main. Installation of septic drainfields on steep or undulating terrain is described in detail in STEEP SLOPE DESIGNS(text found immediately below)

Guide to Installing Steep Slope Septic Drainfield Systems

The sketch at the top of the page illustrates one strategy for installing septic drainfields on a steep or rolling slope. Septic tank and seepage pit systems are seen in the photo above, which is placed in the flat region below the hillside and connected to a sewer line running down the steep slope. The question becomes, however, what to do when the septic effluent absorption system or soakbed itself must be placed down a steep hillside. Here are some details about the product.

  • Septic systems with a D-box for steep slopes: When septic effluent is clarified, it is discharged from the septic tank (or an effluent pumping station) and directed into a big distribution box. A larger D-box with more connection ports will be required than those used for a standard flat-area drainfield since each effluent line that will be installed across the hillside will need to be connected directly to the D-box. Separate effluent lines for steep slope septics are required: Individual septic effluent drain lines are connected to the distribution box, and each of these drain lines is directed to a separate gravel trench and perforated drainfield. Feeder pipes for effluent lines in steep slope septic systems include the following: It is not perforated, but rather solid pipe that connects the distribution box to the drainfield trench. Effluent lines for hillside or rolling land drainfields are placed along the slope, not uphill or downhill, and sloping gently (1/8″ to 1/4″ per linear foot) from the inlet end of each drainfield trench to the lowest point of the drainfield trenches.

Installing Septic Drainfield Piping on Steep Slopes Located Downhill from the Septic Tank – Rolling Land

  • For steep slope septics, flexible distribution pipe or gravelless systems are recommended: Because flexible effluent lines may be routed in a trench that must be curved in order to remain parallel to the fall line of the slope of rounded hilltops or rolling ground, flexible piping may be more convenient to construct than rigid pipe systems in areas where the land is rolling or contoured. Dosing with high pressure for steep slope septic systems: Septic effluent handling methods, such as pressure distribution systems, may be more forgiving of installation on steep or uneven sloping ground, and they may use rigid or flexible perforated pipe, depending on the application. Pressurized Septic Systems (also known as Pressure Dosing Septic Systems)
  • For septic system effluent dispersal, drip lines—which employ flexible distribution piping—might also be effective on some steep locations. Some aerobic systems that dispose of effluent using drip systems or spray systems, or that feed drip irrigation systems, can solve the problem of steep slope septic effluent disposal, according to the manufacturer. AEROBIC SEPTIC SYSTEMS, ATUs, ATUs-home Alternatively, see DESIGN AND INSTALLATION GUIDE FOR HOOT AEROBIC SYSTEMS DRIP DISPOSAL Alternatively, see “Guidance for the Design, Installation, and Operation of Subsurface Drip Distribution Systems as a Replacement for Conventional Title 5 Soil Absorption Systems for the Disposal of Septic Tank Effluent,” published by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection in 2006, which rewrites the state’s 310 CMR 15.240, 15.242, 15.247, and 15.280-15.289 regulations. Graywater disposal systems also include designs that can assist with effluent of graywater GREYWATER SYSTEMS are discussed more below.

Why Drainfield Effluent lines need to be properly sloped

Septic drainfields that use gravity to treat and dispose of cleared wastewater effluent must be correctly pitched and never slope too steeply to ensure effective operation. If this is not done, effluent will flow too fast to the low end of the drainfield line and gravel trench, where it is likely to simply break out onto the surface of the land. If you need to build a traditional perforated pipe and gravel trench drainfield on a steep slope, you’ll need to run the trenches parallel to the fall line or down the slope itself, descending down the slope from trench to trench as you go.

Steep Slope Septic Design Research

  • Gustafson, David M., James L. Anderson, Sara F. Heger, and Barbara W. Liukkonen published a paper in which they discussed their findings. Making the decision to install an alternative septic system on a home site with a steep incline (2000). Retrieved on March 30, 2021, from the University of Minnesota Extension. the original source is:

Reader CommentsQ A

On the 25th of May in the year 2020, by (mod) – Is it possible to have the leach lines for a septic tank go uphill from the tank? Although it is possible to place the drainfield above the septic tank, an effluent pumping system will be required. This is an excerpt from the previous remark. This is where the leach line will be put, as opposed to the lower level, where the septic system is buried. When you see the house, it will be on top of this embankment, on the right side of the house, as you approach.

  • Yes.
  • Do you think there will be any issues with this setup, and how long will a pump survive for this system, given that it is not built at the same level as an ordinary septic system?
  • When installing a septic system, may the leach area be constructed on an embankment behind the home?
  • The height of the embankment is equal to the top of the roof of the single-story home that is being constructed.
  • Because the leach area is located on a steep slope away from the septic system, how often will the pump need to be replaced and how expensive will this process be in the long run of owning your home be?
  • Essentially, you must maintain a slope of 1/8 to 1/4 inch every foot of horizontal flow in order to prevent all effluent from instantly rushing to the end of the system and overloading it.
  • Steve We are therefore discharging sewage into the environment throughout the winter; I agree that diverting surface runoff away from the drainfield could be a good idea.

If none of these options work, we (and by we, I mean you) may have to resort to a raised bed or mound septic system.

The drain field is located on a level part of a hill with a width of around 60 feet.

Should a french drain be installed in the flat area uphill from a drain field in order to sort of isolate the drain field and make it more or less operate as a mound at that point in time?

Thank you, Kelly.

This will ensure that the bottom of your drain field or effluent disposal system has enough soil beneath it that the affluent does not simply hit rock and flow down The Rock and into the lake.

A septic system is being considered for installation on an island that is largely solidrock (Canadian Shield) and slopes into a body of water (Lake Superior) (5 percent to 25 percent gradient in places).

See also:  What Is The Expectancy Of A Septic Tank? (Solution found)

How dependable would a septic system be under these circumstances and what are the difficulties I should be aware of?

How long do you think this system will be able to work before it breaks down?

What is the highest topographic slope that may be accommodated in a septic field servicing a single family property in Frederick County, Maryland?

Thank you so much for your rapid response.

Your solution requires me to install six drop boxes across a 100-foot distance!

A sewage pipe that is excessively steep may cause water to flow too quickly, leaving particles behind.

When using a stepped line method, it is preferable to make each turn through a D box to allow for easier cleaning access.

This is my problem: I’m putting a bathroom and kitchenette in my remote 2400 square foot woodworking shop, which I’m now in the midst of constructing.

I work as a carpenter, mason, and builder.

For the pre-existing septic tank, I have around 20′ of fall and approximately 100′ of run.

The house has been put on hold (waiting for more money).

I don’t live on the construction site, and it appears that it will be several years before I can begin construction on the house.

“the sewage line down to the septic tank should be laid out in a step-wise fashion?

Besides being built on granite bedrock, the septic tank and effluent pump to a drain field are situated on the property to fulfill both perc test criteria and to maintain a minimum distance of 100 feet from a river.

When not attached directly to bedrock, frost footings must have a minimum depth of 5′ to be considered.

Another concern is the presence of black water.

There will be a cleanout installed at the point where the pipe breaks through the foundation wall.

Steve, It’s amazing to read of drainfields that are more than 50 years old and are still in good working order, but I’ve seen a few myself, including a sophisticated system erected on an estate about 1920.

When a system is “functioning,” it implies that it appears to be effectively disposing of effluent – that is, there are no damp spots on the ground.

Nevertheless, in the absence of any failure data, almost no one would dig up and interfere with a drainfield.

It would be beneficial to include more specifics in this section.

Many of these were placed as long as 50 years ago and are still in good working order.

Diverse considerations, including the existence of impermeable strata, seasonal ground water, and slope stability, must be given careful attention.

This was quite beneficial.

It was, without a doubt, pricey.

I figured I’d best include this: Because the drainfield location will be well down-slope from the construction site and tank, a gravity-fed system or a syphon system may be employed.

Standard drain fields are not permitted on slopes more than 25 percent in my area.

This is excellent information.

I have a building site that is on a 24 percent to 30 percent slope. STEEP SITE INSTALLATION OF A SEWER OR SEPTIC LINE CONTINUES READING Alternatively, choose a topic from the closely related articles listed below, or browse the entireARTICLE INDEX. Alternatively, consider the following:

Steep Slope Septic System Articles

  • SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, ENGINEERS
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN ALTERNATIVES-home
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN BASICS-home
  • SEWER / SEPTIC LINES at STEEP SITES
  • STEEP SLOPE SEPTIC DESIGNS
  • SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, ENGINEERS
  • SEPTIC CONSULT

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SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, AND ENGINEERS; SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN ALTERNATIVES-home; SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN BASICS-home; SEWER / SEPTIC LINES on STEEP SITES; STEEP SLOPE SEPTIC DESIGNS; SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, AND ENGINEERS; SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, AND ENGINEERS; SEPTIC

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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installing drain piping on steep slopes

  • In this section, you can ask questions and express your opinions regarding sewage or septic pipe lines on steeply sloping premises.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Installing or replacing sewer lines on steep hills is a challenging task. This article discusses the construction of drain lines on steep slopes between a house and a septic tank, as well as the maintenance of drain lines. For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page. Use the SEARCH BOX to discover the information you’re looking for quickly.

Guide to installing the replacement sewer pipe line at Steep Sites

Using real-world examples and photographs, we demonstrate how to diagnose and replace a clogged sewage line in an actual case study. Septic or sewage line blockage and backups may be prevented by having the proper drain line slope installed. In this section, we will talk about

  • Septic pipe installed in a zig-zag pattern on steep hillsides
  • Septic pipes with a U-turn on steep hillsides
  • Septic pipework running parallel to the fall line of a slope Designing steep septic systems for sewer or septic pipe repair or new installations

When it comes to a drain waste pipe, what is the right slope or pitch to use? When wastewater travels at the proper pace via a drainpipe, the water transports solid waste, such as feces and toilet paper, as well as water, to a septic tank or sewage mains for disposal. Generally speaking, plumbing rules and wastewater piping guidelines state that building drains should be pitched at a rate of 1/8” to 1/4” of slope for every foot of linear length or distance. Problems associated with steep dips between the home and the septic tank include: A steep building site, such as the one depicted in our page top photograph, can result in a significant drop in elevation between a building main drain and the septic tank inlet opening (or sewer main connection), resulting in waste piping slopes that exceed the recommended limits for slope in the waste piping.

If waste passes through the sewage line at a rate more than 2 fps, there is a possibility that water will leave sediments behind in the pipe, resulting in recurring obstructions.

If waste runs through a septic or sewage drain line at a slower rate than the required rate, there is a risk that the listless flow will deposit sewage in the pipe, causing it to get clogged.

ZigZagging Drain Line Piping Down a Slope

When it comes to a drain waste pipe, what is the right slope or pitch? When wastewater travels at the proper pace via a drainpipe, the water transports solid waste, such as feces and toilet paper, as well as water, to a septic tank or sewage mains for treatment. Building drains should be pitched at a rate of 1/8″ to 1/4″ of slope per foot of linear run or distance, according to plumbing rules and wastewater piping recommendations. Difficulties with steep dips between the home and the septic tank include the following: However, on a steep building site such as the one depicted in the top photograph of this page, the elevation difference between a building main drain and the septic tank inlet opening (or sewer main connection) may be so great that the slope of the waste piping will exceed the recommended limits for the slope.

A wastewater flow rate of 2 feet per second is desired when establishing a building drain line for wastewater.

Through the event that waste flows in a septic or sewage drain line at a slower rate than the required rate, there is a possibility that the listless flow will deposit sewage in the pipe, causing it to get clogged.

Straight-run Drain Line Piping Down a Steep Drop Slope between House and Septic Tank or Sewer Main

According to my observations, many waste line contractors simply establish a straight sewer line from the home to the septic tank or from the house to the sewage main, regardless of the building slope, as long as we have at least 1/8″ per foot, ideally 1/4″ per foot, or more, of water pressure. Drain lines with a lower slope or those are practically flat are more likely to clog. On a related note, if you’re building a drain line that may be too steeply sloped and you won’t be able to readily correct the problem, make sure to include extra cleanout access ports.

Experience in Installing Steep Sewer Drain Line Piping

It is my opinion that if the whole pipe run is steeper than what is generally specified, it is possible that you will never see a clog occur. The sewage line dips on a slope between 2″ and 3″ per foot over a 40-foot run between the home exit line and the septic tank entrance baffle at the property depicted in these images and in the other photos in this series on sewer line replacement, as seen in the other photos in this series. In order to avoid leaving particles behind while flushing the toilet, this house-to-septic tank drain pipe should be placed in the “risk zone.” However, after managing this property for more than two decades, we can confidently state that we have never had an issue with too-rapid drainage clogging the waste line.

Since we replaced the old clay plumbing with plastic piping, we have not experienced any sewage obstructions.

The black line on the right-hand pipe portion indicates to the installer when the pipe sections have been completely connected together.

The only issue we experienced with the line was when the previous clay line was smashed and subsequently became clogged with mud and other debris. SO If you use plastic piping, run it in straight lines, and make nice couplings, you should be able to get by.

Other Steps to Avoid Problems with Septic or Sewer Drain Lines on Steep Sites

  • Cleanouts of septic tanks or sewer drain lines: I’d put external cleanout access ports on the sewage line every 20 feet or so for the sake of ease. Proper septic pipe hookups include the following: Ensure that the new pipe connections are made correctly, that they are lubricated, and that they are completely seated during the assembly process. The following are the proper sewage pipe directions: The receiving pipe hub, often known as the “female” end of the pipe, is located at the bottom of the following downhill segment. Make sure you don’t do this in reverse or you’ll attract leaks and blockage in your sewage system.
  • Pipe Cleaning for Septic and Sewer Drain Lines I’d install external cleanout access ports on the sewer line every 20′ or so feet for the sake of ease. Connexions of septic pipes in the proper manner: When assembling new pipe connections, make certain that they are properly installed, greased, and completely seated. Follow these guidelines for installing a sewage pipe properly: After that, there is a downhill segment that leads to the receiving pipe hub, also known as the “female” end of the pipe. This should never be done backwards since it will result in leaks or clogs in your sewage system.

Installing SepticDrainfieldPiping on Steep Slopes is a Different Matter Entirely

Please understand that we have examined the installation of solid plumbing between a building and its septic tank or sewage main in this articleand that higher slopes may be acceptable in some circumstances. However, the possibility of a “OK” for steep drain pipe does not apply in any manner to the perforated piping put in a septic drainfield gravel trench, which is a different story. Those looking for help on installing a septic system on a steeply sloping or rolling site should check out the following articles:

  • For further information, see AEROBIC SEPTIC SYSTEMS, ATUs, and HOME – some of these systems can be used on steep slope locations. Or SeeHOOT Aerobic Systems Drip Disposal Design and Installation Guide for more information. Alternatively, see “Guidance for the Design, Installation, and Operation of Subsurface Drip Distribution Systems as a Replacement for Conventional Title 5 Soil Absorption Systems for the Disposal of Septic Tank Effluent,” published by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection in 2006 and refining Massachusetts regulations 310 CMR 15.240, 15.242, 15.247, and 15.280-15.289
  • Or “Guidance for the Design, Installation, and Operation of Subsurface Drip Distribution Systems as SYSTEMS DE DOSAGE For hilly sites where the drainfield must be located either uphill or downhill from a septic tank or structure, PRESSURE is a term that refers to pressure dosing systems that may be beneficial for disposing of sewage. GRAVELLESS SEPTIC SYSTEMS – Other gravelless systems are capable of handling mild bends required to follow rolling slope lines
  • However, some gravelless systems are not. A system that will be required when the elevation of a structure or a septic tank is lower than the elevation of the drainfield or sewer main is Septic pumps, sewage ejector pumps, grinder pumps, effluent pumps, sump pumps, septic pumping stations, and septic pump alarms Installation of septic drainfields on steep or rolling terrain is described in STEEP SLOPE SEPTIC DESIGNS, which is part of the SEPTIC DESIGNS section.
See also:  What Happens To Waste In Septic Tank Once It Is Pumped? (Question)

Reader Q A – also see the FAQs series linked-to below

@hello there, dude. Sweep turns with a wider radius (e.g., 2 45s) will often flow better than sharper turns. On a corner where the toilet waste flow is present. If trenching provides for 4″ deeper depth, is it preferable to construct the 90° corner with a 1° drop rate as normal, or is it preferable to make the corner with two 45° corners while lowering the 4″? [email protected], Start by consulting with your local building or health department to see what type of design would be considered suitable in your nation and neighborhood.

  1. We have a shortage of service personnel for upkeep, and I believe that a sprinkler system would be more beneficial to our grounds.
  2. [email protected] That doesn’t appear to be a concern in my opinion.
  3. @inspectapedia.com.moderator, Yes, without a doubt, that is not hygienic.
  4. [email protected], In a situation when you are just transferring a cleared fluid, there should be no particulates left behind in the wastewater stream.
  5. That is a very other issue.
  6. What if it’s been sitting in a septic tank for a while, breaking down as if it were going to a leach field instead?
  7. That would be the material that would be sent to the aerobic tank.

You may be required to utilize a grinder sewage pump and force main; we are in the process of establishing a traditional tank close to our home.

What is the maximum percent drop per foot for the effluent line in terms of percent drop?

@Ted.

Thank you very much.

It goes without saying that such lines must have the proper pitch in order to reach the final position of the septic tank.

You should verify with your local building authority to find out exactly what is required to be placed at a 4 foot depth in your area.

My issue is, can I dig a smaller trench and then descend vertically to the requisite four-foot depth before finishing?

Thank you for the information, it was really useful.

What would be the best configuration for the septic tank and pipes when the designated drain field area is 500 feet away from the house?

The slope before and after the hill is rather level, descending very gradually in the direction of the drain field before becoming steeper.

A construction site located in a swale below the city sewer lateral service point has been identified as a potential concern.

(Let’s pretend it’s 8 feet below the surface) Is there an alternative to the brute force strategy of bringing in hundreds of cubit yards of fill and compacting it to raise the elevation of the construction site?

A septic tank is just 18 inches away from the building foundation, which is a little near.

Solids dropping vertically have the potential to adhere to and clog the pipe; however, employing 45-degree elbows instead of 90-degree elbows can help to mitigate this danger.

I would begin by having the tank examined to identify which items are most important in this order of significance.

A sound septic tank, as opposed to one built of brick or rusted steel; how well the baffles and protection from groundwater leaks are maintained; and how well the baffles and protection from groundwater leaks are maintained.

The quality and capacity of the drainfield are important considerations.

Is this a reasonable drop?

This is an ancient septic tank that I was allowed to utilize because of a grandfather clause.

What is the length of the pipe drop when the septic tank is 120 feet away?

How steep do the pipes have to be from one drop box to the next?

Does the length of the pipe, in addition to its angle of incline, have a limit in terms of length?

Please let us know if this is the case!

Verne, you have an issue with a septic or wastewater system that has too much downslope.

The difficulty with longer segments of excessive slope sewer plumbing is that the liquid waste will occasionally overtake the solid waste in the line, causing the system to back up.

One of the most valuable aphorisms I can share, at least in the context of the building construction and mechanicals fields, is that it is extremely uncommon to come into a situation that has never been experienced before.

According to one of the solutions described on this page, the sewage line is made even longer by zig-zagging across the steeply inclined areas of the land.

I’ll leave the graphic specifics to your imagination, so go ahead and go creative.

Let’s put the question to your septic installer and see what she has to say about it.

STATIONS FOR PULLING OUT SEWAGE Hello, I have a question concerning the installation of a toilet in a cabin that is around 300 feet from the main home, septic tank, and field.

Is too much slope a concern in this circumstance, given the considerable distance that the effluent must travel to reach the tank?

Do you think that building a sewage pump would make any difference in this circumstance, considering that the septic tank is located downhill from the toilet?

There should be a thorough inspection of the whole sewage line (perhaps using a sewer camera), and any slope issues should be addressed.

It’s always filled, no matter how long you wait.

Is it necessary to have the angle coming out of the home re-done?

What type of valve is used to connect the pump to the drain field?

Alternatively, seeSEWER / SEPTIC LINES for STEEP SITES FAQs- questions and answers that were originally placed at the bottom of this page. Alternatively, consider the following:

Steep Slope Septic System Articles

  • Septic consultants, designers, and engineers
  • Septic system design alternatives-home
  • Septic system design basics-home
  • Septic system design alternatives
  • Septic system design basics
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN BASICS
  • S

Suggested citation for this web page

INSPECTION OF SEWER AND SEPTIC LINES AT STEEP SITES An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to DRAIN SEPTIC SEWER PIPES

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Citations can be shown or hidden by selecting Show or Hide Citations. InspectApedia.com is a publisher that provides references. Daniel Friedman is an American journalist and author.

How Much Slope for Septic Line?

This page contains information on sitework, including how much slop for a septic line to have. Peter inquires: My builder has recently completed the installation of our septic system, and I’m afraid that he did something incorrectly. The drain field looks to be at a greater height than the tank’s exit, which is consistent with this. My brain doesn’t comprehend how the tank may empty upwards. Is there something I’m overlooking? Answer: Except if you have a mound system, or another pumping system with a dosing chamber and lift pump, you are accurate in assuming that you will require a downhill slope in your sewage pipes, which is not the case.

  1. The leach lines themselves, on the other hand, should be leveled out.
  2. Sewage lines should be sloped downhill to the septic tank and drain field at a rate of at least 1/4 inch per foot of length.
  3. To avoid clogging, steer clear of sags and sudden curves.
  4. The fear is that the water would flow too quickly and leave sediments behind, causing the pipe to clog.
  5. In situations when it is important to carry wastewater uphill, there are several different pumping system types that may be employed.
  6. I would consider getting in touch with the person who created your system to discuss the problem and, if feasible, have them come out and assess the location.
  7. It’s ideal if you can put your complaints in writing and send them to the contractor.
  8. An upward line such as the one you describe will never function effectively.
  9. Also read this article.

When Is the Best Time to Take a Perc Test? How much does a perc test cost? Who Should Be Hired for the Perc Test? After a failed perc test, should you retest? Should I use a Sand Filter with my existing septic system? Examining the condition of the wellSEPTIC SYSTEMView all articles Q and A Index

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It is not enough to just install a septic drainage system; a professional must first design the system in order to avoid the need for a significant overhaul or replacement in the near future. Here are the four most important considerations for a successful septic system design.

1. Tank Size

The size of the tank influences the cost of installation, the frequency with which you must top up the tank, and even the lifespan of the tank itself. Although septic tank sizing is an exact science, the criteria listed below might help you get a general idea of the size of the tank you should place on your property. The total number of people The amount of sewage effluent generated by a household is determined by the size of the household. As a result, a larger tank is required for a home with a high number of occupants than for a home with a smaller family.

Active bacteria digest and treat the effluent in the tank, therefore a tank that has less bacteria activity will take longer to treat its wastes than a tank that has greater bacteria activity.

Regulations promulgated by the government In some areas, the local authority is also able to influence the size of the tank that will be installed.

2. Drainfield Size

This is the region where the actual absorption of treated wastes takes place in a septic drainfield (also known as a leach field). After the bacteria have digested the wastes in the tank and sorted the solids from the liquids, the solids sink to the bottom of the tank and the liquid drains from the tank into the surrounding environment. The treated liquid then percolates through the soil in the septic drainfield at a gradual and steady rate. The composition of the soil is one of the most important factors in determining the size of a septic drainfield.

The size of the tank is also important since a large tank produces more waste than a small tank, necessitating the usage of a large drainfield to accommodate the large tank.

3. Drainfield Location

Because the position of the drainfield is critical to the effectiveness and durability of the system, it is important to make an informed decision when selecting a location. The following are some of the elements that influence the location of drainfields:

  • The whole area of the land. You must provide appropriate area for the drainfield
  • Otherwise, the wastes would take a long time to be absorbed by the drainfield, causing pollution of the surrounding environment. It’s all about the dirt. The drainfield should be located on soil that has adequate drainage
  • The soil should filter out effluent while yet allowing liquid waste to soak deep into the earth. The physical environment. In order to prevent effluent from flowing down the slope and into the soil, the drainfield should not be located on a steep slope
  • Otherwise, the drainfield would be ineffective.

The elements listed above are only a few instances of what you should take into consideration. Your septic professional will assist you in determining the most appropriate location for your drainfield on your property.

4. Tank Material

Septic tanks are available in a variety of materials, each with their own set of advantages and disadvantages.

The following are some examples of standard tank materials:

  • Concrete. These tanks are quite inexpensive and simple to build, however they are subject to cracking due to the fact that they are made of steel. The tanks are not subject to cracking, but they are susceptible to rust damage
  • They are made of fiberglass. Unlike concrete and steel, the tanks do not break or corrode, as is the case with these materials. The unfortunate fact is that they are more vulnerable to harm as a result of soil movements.

Last but not least, consider your own tastes as well as the cost, the nature of the soil in your house, and any recommendations given by the specialist when making your decision on which material is ideal for you. Septic system design and installation necessitates the involvement of qualified septic professionals. If you do not, your septic system may collapse before its time. For assistance in designing and installing an effective septic drainage system, contactEconomy Septic Tank Service.

How to Install a Septic System

Documentation Download Documentation Download Documentation In rural regions of the nation where waste water treatment is not accessible, private on-site wastewater treatment systems (POWTS), also known as septic systems, are utilized largely to treat waste water. Gravity fed/conventional systems are divided into two broad categories: 1. gravity fed/conventional systems and 2. alternative (pump) systems, which include aerobic treatment units (ATUs.) In most cases, electric pumps are used in alternative systems.

However, in many health jurisdictions across the United States, it is still feasible for an individual property owner with heavy equipment operation skills to utilize a backhoe to establish a septic system on their land.

Steps

  1. 1 Make a plan and design for your system. Performing a site survey and conducting a percolation (soil) test on the area where the POWTS is to be placed are both required initial steps in any septic system installation. In order to create a system, it is necessary to first gather information from surveyors and conduct a soil test. Afterwards, the relevant permissions and approvals can be sought by submitting the necessary paperwork.
  • 1 Organize and plan your system’s components. Performing a site assessment and conducting a percolation (soil) test on the area where the POWTS system is to be placed are two of the initial steps in any septic installation. In order to develop a system, it is necessary to first gather information through surveys and soil tests. Afterwards, the proper permissions and approvals can be sought by submitting the necessary applications.
  • Available space
  • Terrain
  • Intended purpose and projected water demand depending on the size of the residence or building that the system will serve
  • Location of the well and/or nearby wells
  • And other factors.
See also:  How To Tell If A Septic Tank Is Underground Four Feet Down? (Perfect answer)

The following are examples of soil test findings that have an impact on the design:

  • The soil type and layering (sand, clay, rock, and where it is placed in relation to depth)
  • The soil’s ability to drain and filter wastewater
  • And the soil’s ability to drain and filter wastewater

2Wait for clearance before proceeding. The system may be deployed once all of the relevant permissions and approvals have been obtained. Make certain that all of the steps listed below are carried out in accordance with all applicable laws, plumbing rules, and building codes. Advertisement Please keep in mind that the following procedure assumes that the system is being installed for the first time and not as a replacement.

  1. 1 Assemble all of the equipment and tools that will be used in the dig. You will require the following materials:
  • Backhoe, laser transit, and grade pole are all included. A 4″ Sch. 40 PVC pipe (and fittings, if necessary)
  • A 4″ ASTM D2729 perforated pipe
  • A 4″ASTM D3034 pipe and fittings
  • A 4″ Sch. 40 vent cap and test cap
  • PVC primer and adhesive
  • A 4″ Sch. 40 vent cap and test cap The following tools will be required: Saw (either hand saw or cordless reciprocating saw)
  • Hammer drill and bits (for drilling through walls if necessary)
  • The following items are required: hydraulic cement (to seal surrounding pipe if pipe is going through wall)
  • Shovel
  • Stone measuring an inch and a half and cleaned (amount varies depending on system size)
  • Tape measurements (both ordinary and at least a 100-foot-long tape)
  • Septic fabric (cut to 3′ length or less from a roll)
  • Septic tank and risers (concrete or plastic if allowed)
  • Riser sealant such as Con-Seal (for concrete) or silicone caulk (for plastic)
  • A septic filter (such as a Zoeller 170 or similar) if one is necessary
  • A distribution box (either concrete or plastic, if more than two laterals are being run)
  • And a septic tank.

2 Determine the location of where you want to enter the building in relation to where you want to install the septic tank. Make an excavation at least 2 feet deep and drill a hole through the wall, or go deeper and drill a hole beneath the footing, depending on your preference or the need. Because this is precisely what a gravity-fed system is designed to accomplish, expect the flow to continue to flow downhill from here. When transferring waste from the tank to the drain field, it does not employ any mechanical methods other than gravity.

  • The pipe should be 4″ Sch. 40 and should extend at least five feet outside the structure toward the tank, either through the wall or beneath it. Set it level where it will pass through a wall or under a footing, and from there, run it with approximately 1/8″ of pitch (slope) every foot of length toward the septic tank until it reaches the tank. If necessary, go even farther into the tank or all the way into the tank. If this is the case, switch to 4″ 3034 with the necessary adaptor and pipe toward the tank with 3034 instead.
  • Make sure you use a test cap on the end that will be entering the building. It is recommended that if you are going through a wall, you seal the area around the hole with hydraulic cement both inside and outside
  • Do not run too much pitch out to the tank. If there is an excessive amount, the water will run away quicker than the sediments, resulting in the solids remaining in the pipe. Additionally, depending on the depth of your drain field and how close it will be to the tank’s outflow, there may not be enough pitch to get to the drain field.

3 Dig a hole large enough to accommodate the installation of the concrete aerobic tank below ground. Make use of the laser transit to “shoot” the top of the pipe that leads out to the tank with the laser. The distance between the top of the intake and the bottom of the tank is measured in feet and inches.

To the number you fired off the top of the pipe, add this (go up on the grade pole) + 1 1/2″ to get the total. The depth of the grade pole has now been adjusted to the desired depth. Using this, dig the hole to the desired depth.

  • Prepare your leech field by laying it out and excavating it according to the results of the test performed during the permit application procedure. Maintaining a good flow between the tank and the drain field should be considered when planning out and digging the tank.

4Use “inch-and-a-half cleaned drain rock” from a neighboring gravel dump to surround the pipe, which is required in most areas. This is necessary in order to keep the pipe stable. For further information on the size of embedment and gravel required, check with your local health department. There is no slope from one end of the perforated pipe to the other in a gravity drain field, and the pipe has capped ends. 5 Once you have received a green sticker from the health inspector, you must cover the pipe and tank.

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  1. A pump chamber after the septic tank should be installed The pump chamber, also known as a pressure tank, dosing tank, or dosing tank, is where the electric pump is housed, which is responsible for transporting effluent from one location to another and finally into the drain field for disposal.
  • Set up the pump chamber in the same manner as you would a septic tank. The effluent pump and floats are housed in the pump chamber, and they are responsible for pumping the effluent out to the drain field at predetermined or scheduled intervals. This is a hermetically sealed system. To ensure that the electrical installation complies with state standards, it is frequently necessary to hire a qualified electrician. It is important to remember that in places with high groundwater, the pump chamber or additional ATUs may remain essentially empty for long periods of time, and that these tanks may need to be safeguarded from floating by the installation of additional weight or other protective features.

All construction details, including the layout of all sewers outside the home, the location and depth of all tanks, the routing and depth of pressurized effluent lines, and other system components such as the drain field and any additional ATUs, must be consistent with the septic system plans approved by the county health department. 3 Once the inspector has given his final permission and the system has been started, cover the tank and pressurized lines with plastic sheeting. Advertisement Create a new question

  • Question I had a tank put, but it isn’t level with the ground. What will be the ramifications of this, and should it be leveled? It is necessary to keep the tank level. It is difficult to predict what it will have an impact on because we do not know which direction it is off level. Question Is it necessary to be concerned about tree roots growing into the drainage area when using a gravity flow kind of tank? Whether or whether you have lateral lines is dependent on the kind of trees that are growing close or above them. Tree species that tend to extend roots into the lateral lines and obstruct them are known as ramifications. Due to the fact that they are buried deep in the ground and surrounded by a pocket of gravel that allows waste water to drain out, they are rarely affected by grass, weeds, and shrubs. Question What is the maximum depth that a pipe may be lowered into the leech bed? The majority of systems require 12 volts “in the form of rock The perforated pipe should be suspended in the top area of the rock
  • It should not be touching the rock. Question Maintaining a lush green grass on or above your pitch is it safe, or is it a good practice? According to what I’ve heard, brown or dead grass is preferred so that your field can breathe more easily. It is necessary for your field to take a breath. The presence of green grass across your field indicates that it is functioning well. With lush grass covering your field, it will be able to breathe. There should be no planting of woody shrubs or trees over the leach field. Question What is the recommended distance between the septic tank and the house/boundary? A minimum of fifty feet is required. States have different laws, but this is the most common distance
  • Nonetheless, other states have stricter laws. Question What is the average amount of soil that goes into a residential leach field? It is dependent on how chilly it becomes. There are no less than 12 in the northern United States “in the leach field’s surface
  • Question Is it possible to build a septic system during the cold months? What you should do will depend on whether or not you reside in a place where the ground freezes. Question What amount of water should I put in the tank to get it going? None. A typical tank holds 1,000 gallons and will fill up quite quickly if used on a regular basis. When liquid effluent is discharged to the drain field, the goal is to catch and pre-treat particles that have accumulated. It is possible that a pump system will require water to prime the pump. Question There is a misalignment between my septic field’s underground line and the pipe on the tank. Is it OK to utilize a 90-degree elbow on my septic tank? As long as you have decent downhill flow, you should be fine. Instead of using a 90, I would use two 45s. Question If I’m installing a septic system, when should I contact an inspector? Immediately following system installation but before earth is used to cover the system in place Always check with the inspector ahead of time to verify that they can satisfy your inspection needs

More information on the replies Inquire about something There are 200 characters remaining. Include your email address so that you may be notified when this question has been resolved. SubmitAdvertisement

  • The use of aerobic bacterial additions (which are available at most DIY stores) to maintain a healthy and well functioning system, as suggested by producers on a periodic basis, is contentious. The septic tank is an anaerobic (wet) environment in which the majority of yeasts and other additions will have little or no effect on the sewage being processed. When it comes to installing septic tanks, some old school installers believe that placing an additive, a shovel of muck, or even a dead cat in an empty tank will “start” the process. What naturally enters the tank serves as the only thing that is necessary. The aerobic (wet or dry) component of the system consists of hundreds of square feet of drain field, where additives will do little help even if they make it all the way to the end of the system. The use of chemicals in septic systems has not been the subject of an independent research that has been published in a respectable scientific publication anywhere in the world, including this nation. This will mostly certainly be confirmed by your local health department. Each phase of the building process will almost certainly include an examination by a health inspector before the work can be completed or covered up. On pressurized lines, the use of a sand embedment is recommended in order to reduce the amount of damage caused by moving soil that has a high concentration of clay. When pumps are turned on and off, pressurized lines might move as well. Four inches (10.2 cm) of sand bedding on all four sides of the lines will prevent sharp pebbles from the ground or backfill from wearing holes in the pipe over time
  • And

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  • Keep the perforated pipe for the leech field in a vertical position while installing it to avoid having the holes in the pipe turn downward. It is necessary to lay the perforated drain field pipe ASTM 2729 dead level, so that the printed line on the pipe is facing up. The perforations on both sides of the pipe are on both sides of the pipe. All of the sections of perforated pipe are cemented together, and the ends of each leach line are capped to complete the installation. So, when waste water enters the pipe, it will fill the pipe to the height of the perforations and overflow from ALL of the holes, utilising the whole leach field as a means of treatment. In certain health authorities, you can utilize waste water to water grass or decorative plants, trees, vegetable gardens, and fruit trees if you place the perforated pipe on a slope. However, the water must first be cleaned by the system (tertiary treatment includes disinfection) in order to prevent pathogens (germs) from the septic system from being discharged into the environment throughout the process. Make sure to check with your local health authority to verify if the practice known as “reuse” is permitted in your community.

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Things You’ll Need

  • The following tools are required: backhoe tractor, trencher, shovel, contractor’s laser level and rod, or a surveyor’s transit. Septic tanks
  • PVC pipe with perforations
  • Material for embedding
  • PVC adhesive, PVC fittings, and a septic tank outlet filter are all included. Hand saw
  • Course file
  • Sandpaper If necessary, effluent pumps and floats are installed. If an alternate system is used, a control panel is installed.

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