How To Get A Septic Tank Permit In Marion County Florida? (TOP 5 Tips)

Applications for septic-system permits can be made at the main office of the Health Department in Marion County, 1801 SE 32nd Ave, Ocala. The Department’s Onsite Sewage permitting page offers application forms and other information about permits and standards for septic-tank systems.

  • To apply for a permit, download and complete an Application Form (DH4015, page 1) and submit it, along with a Site Plan (DH4015, page 2), a building floor plan, and the required application fee to your county’s department of health office.

Do you need a permit to install a septic tank in Florida?

Do I need to be a registered septic tank contractor to pump septic tanks? Registered septic tank contractors (and state-licensed plumbers) may pump septic tanks with an appropriate active service permit from their local county health department.

Can a homeowner install a septic system in Florida?

Before any septic system can be installed on a property, an application must be submitted to the Department of Health. The homeowner must then submit the completed application as well as soil/percolation tests and sit plans to the Health Department in their county.

Do I need permission for a septic tank?

The short answer is yes. You will need planning permission from a local authority in order to have a septic tank installed, no matter if it’s at your own home or on a business site.

How much does it cost to install a septic tank in Florida?

Purchasing and installing a septic systems can cost anywhere from $1,500 – $15,000. The price varies based on the size of the system and the type of soil. Homes with more than two bathrooms will need a larger tank, which increases the material costs.

Are plastic septic tanks legal in Florida?

Florida Septic Tanks Save up to 50% on plastic septic tanks. These septic tanks are state approved for use in the state of Florida.

How long do septic tanks last in Florida?

A septic system can last decades, from 15 years to 20 years for a steel septic tank and up to more than 50 years for a drainfield.

How far away should a septic tank be from the house?

Local codes and regulations that stipulate the distance of the septic tank from the house vary depending on the locale, but the typical minimum distance is 10 feet.

What size septic tank do I need in Florida?

Size of Tanks A septic tank in Florida must have a minimum 900 gallon capacity for up to 300 gallons of sewage flow per day. This gallon capacity increases on a sliding scale by household size and whether or not the building is intended for commercial use.

How close to septic tank can you build?

– A full foundation must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 20 feet from the leaching area. – A slab foundation such as a garage must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 10 feet from the leaching area.

Do I have to replace my septic tank by 2020?

Under the new rules, if you have a specific septic tank that discharges to surface water (river, stream, ditch, etc.) you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

Is planning permission required to replace a septic tank?

Absolutely. However for the replacement system to meet the EPA CoP (and likely the planning conditions) the site must have been deemed suitable for a septic tank based on the Site Suitability Assessment results.

Who is responsible for maintaining a septic tank?

You have a legal and social responsibility to maintain your septic system in good working order. A neglected septic tank is a serious health risk and causes harm to the environment. Your tank will have to be emptied (de-sludged) less often, saving you money. If the system fails it will be expensive to repair.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

What is the cheapest septic system?

Conventional septic system These conventional septic systems are usually the most affordable, with an average cost of around $3,000.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

Permits & inspections

Applications for permits may be submitted using any of the following methods:

  • Growth Services building, 2710 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala
  • E-plans
  • Email
  • In person at the Growth Services facility

Select applications may be submitted to [email protected] by contractors or their authorized agents. Homeowners who are functioning as contractors must submit their applications in person. If you require extra assistance with e-applications, please see our page on how to apply for a permit, which includes step-by-step instructions.

Current standards

the 7th edition of the Florida Building Code

Requirements

Each permit category has its own set of conditions for application acceptance.

  1. The permit checklist that comes with the permit packets might help you evaluate whether your application requires extra paperwork and where to find permit-specific instructions. Fill out the permission application in its entirety. Submit your permission application packet to the appropriate authority. All applications must contain the requisite deposit fee
  2. Otherwise, the application will be rejected.

Fees

Fees may be paid using any of the following options:

  • Cash, escrow account funds, checks (made payable to the Marion County BCC), credit/debit cards are all acceptable forms of payment.

Contractors with escrow accounts

Packets of permit applications that do not contain plans are accepted during regular business hours via email to [email protected] or online through thePlans website.

Onsite Sewage (Septic) Systems Program

The Marion County Public Health Department (MCPHD) strives to prevent the transmission of illness by ensuring that onsite wastewater systems – or, as they’re more frequently known, septic systems – are properly designed, constructed, operated, and closed down as soon as possible. In conjunction with Citizens Energy Group’s Septic Tank Elimination Program (STEP), the program collaborates in bringing sewers to parts of Marion County that are now served by septic tanks. Regulations Chapter 14 of the Code of Ordinances of Marion County The 410IAC 6-8.3 standard covers residential onsite sewage systems.

The system must fulfill the criteria set out in 410 IAC and Chapter 14 of the Code of the Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County.

STEP projects are prioritized in part based on the results of these surveys.

Citizens Energy Group’s FIRST ACTION Resources that aren’t included on this page A Guide for First-Time Homebuyers on Septic Systems The Dos and Don’ts of Septic Systems EPA’s A Guide for Homeowners Regarding Septic Systems The Indiana Onsite Wastewater Professionals Association (IOWPA) and the Indiana State Department of Health both have websites.

On Site Sewage Systems (Septic Systems)

The Marion County Public Health Department avoids the transmission of illness by ensuring that onsite wastewater systems, also known as septic systems, are designed, constructed, operated, and properly closed. Using a collaborative approach with Citizen Energy Group’s Septic Tank Elimination Initiative (STEP), the program is bringing sewers to parts of Marion County that are now served by septic tanks. An On Site Sewage Disposal System permit is necessary for new and repaired On Site Sewage Disposal Systems, and they must fulfill the criteria set out in 410 IAC and Chapter 14 of the HealthHospital Corporation of Marion County.

Sewage Disposal Systems are covered in detail in Chapter 14.

Residential Onsite Sewage Systems (IAC 6-8.3) – Indiana State Department of Health410 IAC 6-8.3 Residential Onsite Sewage Systems (Effective November 19, 2012) In accordance with IAC 6-10.1, commercial on-site wastewater disposal is permitted (Effective November 19, 2012) RESOURCES

Indiana Waste Water Professionals Association, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of waste water professionals in Indiana.

State of Florida.com

Auto Tags and Titles (Motor Vehicles)Florida Department of Highway SafetyMotor VehiclesOnline ServicesRenewals|Registration Questions»Office Locations (by County)Driver LicensesDrivers License, Vehicle Registration, Change of Address, DMV Office Locations, Online RenewalAddress ChangeAir Related PermitsPermit InformationBeachesCoastal PermittingBoat RegistrationTitles| MoreBuilding PermitsBurning PermitsBusiness Licens

Additional Local Permits:

  • Construction Permits: Visit the Florida Building Code website, or search for building permits issued by your local city or county building or planning department if you live in an unincorporated region. Other activities related to local permission include: Get in touch with your local Florida cities and counties if you need information or support.
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Septic Tank Ocala, FL

SEPTIC SYSTEM PROFESSIONAL ARE YOU? If you discover that your toilet is gurgling or backing up, that your bathtub is filled with sewage, that your washing machine is overflowing, or that you have stinky standing water in your yard, you most likely have an issue with your septic tank. An issue with a septic system is something that no one wants to encounter. It’s a repulsive sensation that may have a significant impact on your capacity to enjoy basic comforts in your home or place of work. When you have a septic problem, you can rely on Mills Septic Tank Service Inc to get the job done right.

Using our services, we can properly build and operate on-site septic wastewater systems at your home or company, giving an efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly method of disposing of your household garbage and other trash.

DRAIN FIELDLEACH FIELD REPAIRSMORE

Preserving the health of your septic system is similar to maintaining the health of your automobile. Both require frequent maintenance in order to function properly. Often, septic system repairs are as simple as pumping the septic tank and adding more water to the drain field to remedy the situation (also called a leach field). Our comprehensive range of services includes the following: Repairs to the drainage field Installation of a septic tank Repairs to the leach field Septic tank repairs are necessary.

  • Working with local health departments will also ensure that you have the most efficient and cost-effective system feasible for your health care needs.
  • The office is open from 8 a.m.
  • Monday through Friday.
  • Contact Mills Septic Tank Service for prompt and competent service if you live in or around Marion County, FL or the surrounding counties of Sumter, Citrus, Levy, or Lake counties.

Please leave a message on the answering machine if you manage to reach it by accident. We’ll get back to you as soon as we can with further information. LOCATION2021 NE 20th StreetOcala, FL 34470PHONE(352) 732-3956 DESCRIPTION

Permits, Licenses and Reports

If you pick an accelerated alternative, please tell the office with your selection of options as soon as possible. Fee for application: $150

  • Step 1: Read and completely complete the Onsite Wastewater System Applicationand send it to your local Environmental Affairs Office. Step 2: An original plat or deed of the land will also be required to be submitted. If you do not have a copy of the plat or deed, you may learn more about how to get one by clicking here. The office will contact you as soon as your application has been received to confirm receipt of your application and to discuss electronic payment alternatives with you. We do not take cash as a form of payment. Please see this sample application, Onsite Wastewater System Application, for a reference guide on how to complete the application. Step 2: Your application will be examined to ensure that all required material has been submitted and is in order. If everything is in order, your application fee will be accepted
  • Otherwise, it will be rejected. Step 3:If a site visit is necessary, the inspector will assess the appropriateness of the property for the installation of a septic system. If the inspector finds that your site is suitable for a typical septic system, he or she will give you with a Permit to Construct document. The inspector will discuss possible solutions with you if the permit is not approved by the inspection team. A request for test pits may be made by the Department in circumstances where the evaluator meets a barrier during the first site evaluation or in cases where it is recognized that an area would require test pits owing to the soil characteristics of the region. The midlands and upstate parts of the state are the most typical locations where soil characteristics necessitate the use of test pits. It is important to note that test pits may not be an option in coastal and sandy locations around the state. Consult with your local office staff for more detailed information on your individual situation. As soon as you have received your Permit to Construct, you should call a professional onsite wastewater system contractor to complete the installation of your septic tank. In Step 5, the installer must call DHEC in order to schedule a time for the septic system to be inspected before it is covered, before completing the septic system installation. After waiting 30 minutes over the scheduled time for a DHEC inspector, a licensed installer has the option to conduct a self-inspection of the installation to ensure that everything is in working order. The installation is required to provide documentation to the Department on the DHEC-approved formD-3978, Contractor Approval to Operate

Expires and modifications to permits: Permits to Construct are valid for five years. If you want to renew your permission after five years, or if you want to make modifications to it after it has been authorized, you must submit a new application and pay the price once again. These regulations authorize the charge and permission in the following ways:

  • Regulation 61-56, Onsite Wastewater Systems
  • Regulation 61-55, Septic Tank Site Evaluation Fees
  • And Regulation 61-56, Onsite Wastewater Systems

Onsite wastewater systems are governed by Regulation 61-56, while septic tank site evaluation fees are governed by Regulation 61-55.

Application Form

Complete the application for a License to Construct or Clean Onsite Wastewater Systems and Self-Contained Toilets by downloading and completing the form. Please contact your local Department of Health and Human Services Environmental Affairs office to make preparations for testing if you are interested in becoming a septic system installation.

License Fees

The following costs are required for onsite wastewater system installations, pumpers/haulers, and pumpers/haulers are required for yearly renewal:

  • Licensing fees for construction are $100, cleaning fees are $100, and a combined construction and cleaning fee is $150
  • A Master Contractor license is $200.

You must pay these costs on an annual basis in order to keep your license active. An additional late fee will be levied if we do not receive payment by the due date on your invoice. Unless you pay your renewal costs and late fees within 90 days of the due date for your license to operate on septic systems or truck sewage, your license to do so will automatically expire.

Installer and Master Contractor Exams

In order to be approved to construct work with septic systems and/or wastewater disposal, as well as for a Master Contractor license, you must first pass an exam that assesses your knowledge of Regulation 61-56, which is available online. To pass, you must have an 80 percent or higher score. If you do not pass this test on the first try, you can repeat it within 30 days of failing. If you fail the test a second time, you can repeat it after 60 days if you have not passed the first time. You will not be required to repeat the exam once you have been granted a license, provided that you continue to pay the yearly license renewal costs and submit all required paperwork.

Other License Requirements

  • Inspection of Vehicles: The Department of Health and Human Services has the authority to examine any vehicles used to pump and convey sewage. You must keep your vehicle inventory list up to current and on file with the Department of Health and Human Services
  • List of Disposal Facilities Is Required : This includes a list of sewage disposal facilities that you intend to use, together with documented approval from the facilities themselves. It is necessary to keep a record of your activities: You must keep a log (record) of each pumping and disposal load that is transported by each truck. You must make this record of actions accessible to the Department of Health and Human Services upon request.

The following regulations permit the issuance of septic system contractor licenses:

  • Regulation 61-56, Onsite Wastewater Systems
  • Regulation 61-56.1, Permit to Construct or Clean Onsite Sewage Treatment and Disposal Systems and Self-Contained Toilets
  • And Regulation 61-56, Onsite Wastewater Systems Licensing of Onsite Wastewater Systems Master Contractors (Regulation 61-56.2)

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Septic Tank Alerts Septic Tank Alerts

Environmental Health

Investigative services:Environmental Health reacts to and investigates complaints and concerns about nuisances that have an impact on the environment and public health. This includes the following:

  • Animal bites and rabies investigations
  • General nuisance complaints
  • Animal bites and rabies investigations Illegal dumping
  • Groundwater pollution
  • Hazardous environmental circumstances
  • Natural calamities
  • Etc.
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Septic Systems: The Iowa Administrative Code, Chapter 69, has been enacted and is being enforced in Marion County. The Department of Environmental Health is in charge of examining and issuing permits for all private septic systems in the county. Well Water: The Department of Environmental Health is responsible for ensuring that wells are properly installed and tested, as well as for blocking abandoned wells. With grant money collected from the State of Iowa, our department may be able to provide financial help for testing and plugging projects.

Radon: In the United States, radon is the second greatest cause of lung cancer.

Food: Restaurant inspections are now provided by the Iowa Department of Inspection and Appeals in Marion County. Marion County gets complaints and forwards them to the IDIA field workers that are assigned to the area.

MARION COUNTY, SC

Roy Nealy is a Building Inspector and Code Enforcement Officer. Phone: (843) 423 8238Fax: (843) 423 [email protected] Email: [email protected] Call (843) 423-3904ext. 147 to reach Johnathin Rogers, Business License and Building Permits Coordinator at 2523 East Highway 76P.O. Box 1091 in Marion, SC 29571. fax: (843) 423-8191 [email protected] e-mail: [email protected] Office hours are Monday through Friday. 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The Marion County Building Inspections Office is responsible for enforcing all county ordinances and state laws pertaining to the International Building Code(s), building permits, business licenses, and code enforcement of local ordinances, including: plan review of new building construction and additions/remodeling jobs, plan review of new building construction and additions/remodeling jobs, plan review of new building construction and additions/remodeling jobs, plan review of new building construction and additions/remodeling jobs, plan review of new During construction projects, on-site inspection is performed.

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) was enforced in 2009 by the IECC (Energy Code) Please note that we only take cash or checks as forms of payment at our office.

Permits are required for any project on commercial or residential structures that has a value greater than $1000 and/or occupies more than 200 square feet.

  • Obtain a zoning compliance permit (available only on Tuesday and Thursday)
  • A receipt demonstrating that the water or sewer tap has been paid (where applicable)
  • Two (2) sets of plans (if necessary) must be submitted. Fill out an application for a building permit
  • The Homeowner must sign and record an affidavit with the Clerk of Court Office if he or she intends to complete the work themself. Contractor’s license or identification card issued by the State of South Carolina (only for contractors)
  • Obtain a Marion County business license (applicable only to contractors)
  • There must be a written Contract Agreement between the contractor and the homeowner in order for the project to proceed. (No permission will be provided unless and until a SIGNED contract with BOTH signatures is shown.)

Licensed architects or registered engineers must prepare all plans for assembly halls, educational facilities, institutional buildings, and hazardous locations of any size, as well as all plans for commercial buildings larger than five thousand (5000) square feet or located in a high wind zone with winds exceeding 130 miles per hour. Plans for ConstructionDetails of the Plan Review: Construction plans (if any) will be identified as having been examined by the County of Marion Building Official and will include the signature of the person who reviewed the plans (if applicable).

Inspections will only be performed on drawings that have been authorized.

We are presently using the International Codes of Conduct 2018 version (IBC, IRC, IFC, IPC, IMC, IFGC).

The state government mandates the exact date of code edition changes in order to ensure that all jurisdictions in South Carolina are consistent with the editions they are enforcing at any given time.

  • Permit
  • Receipt of permit
  • Contractor, subcontractor, vendor, and supplier listing (where applicable)
  • And other documents.

It is the Contractor’s and Subcontractors’ obligation to ensure that their Marion County business licenses are up to date. If an unlicensed contractor is found to be working on the site without a valid Marion County business license, his or her employment will be terminated immediately. It is also possible that the contractor could be punished and that the permit will be revoked unless the contractor (or contractors) comply with the Building and License Department. It is the permit holders’ obligation to notify the Building Department at the proper time throughout the building process in order to schedule mandatory inspections.

Building Inspections: The Building Official will conduct the following inspections, at the request of the permit holder or his or her authorized agent, and will notify the permit holder of any code violations that must be addressed prior to moving on to the next stage of the building project.

  • Inspection of the foundation, piers, and curtain wall The slab on the ground and the framework of the floor
  • Prior to plastering the exterior wall
  • If the brick veneer is present, the wall tie examination should be performed. Inspection of the frame: To be completed when the roof has been installed, all framing, fire blocking, and bracing has been installed, all concealed wiring has been installed, and all pipes, chimneys, ducts, and vents have been installed
  • Final inspection: To be carried out once the building has been finished and is ready for occupancy.
  • Underground inspection: This examination should be performed after trenches have been excavated, conduit or cable has been installed, and before any backfill is placed
  • Inspection of the rough-in: The determination should be made after the roof, frame, fire blocking, and bracing have been installed, but before the installation of wall or ceiling membranes. After the building has been completed, all essential electrical fixtures have been installed and are correctly connected or protected, and the structure is ready for occupancy, a final inspection should be performed.
  • Underground inspection: This should be performed after trenches or ditches have been excavated and pipe has been installed, but before any backfill is placed. Construction inspection: To be performed after the roof, frame, fire blocking and bracing are in place, and after all soil, waste, and vent piping has been installed, but before the installation of wall or ceiling membranes. Construction inspection: Finally, a final inspection will be carried out when the building has been completed, all plumbing fittings have been installed and are correctly linked, and the structure is ready for occupation.
  • After trenches or ditches have been excavated and underground duct and fuel piping have been installed, but before any backfill has been placed, an underground inspection should be carried out. Rough-in inspection: This examination should be performed after the roof, frame, fire blocking, and bracing have been installed, and after all ducting and other concealed components have been completed, but before the installation of wall or ceiling membranes. Building completion, mechanical system installation and appropriate connection, and readiness for occupancy are all factors that must be considered during the final inspection.
  • Rough plumbing inspection: This inspection should be performed after all new pipe approved by the permit has been installed, but before any such piping has been covered or disguised, or before any fixtures or gas appliances have been installed. Final pipe inspection: This inspection should be performed after all of the piping approved by the permit has been installed and after any parts that are to be covered by plastering or other means have been so concealed, but before any fixtures or gas appliances are connected. A pressure test should be performed as part of this examination. Final inspection: To be performed on all new gas work authorized by the permit as well as any portions of existing systems that may be affected by the new work or any changes, in order to ensure compliance with all of the requirements of this code and to ensure that the installation and construction of the gas system are carried out in accordance with the plans that have been reviewed

Frequently Asked Questions

No, you must apply for the permit through a Florida registered water well constructor.

I need to construct a well. Is a permit required?

The building of a well necessitates the acquisition of a well construction permit. In order to start construction, aFlorida licensed water well contractor must apply for the permit in advance of beginning work and should give the owner with a copy of the permit.

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I need to repair an existing well. Is a permit required?

The building of a well necessitates the acquisition of a permit. In order to start construction, aFlorida licensed water well contractor must apply for the permit in advance of beginning work and must give the owner with a copy of the permit.

Do I need a permit to install or repair the pump and/or electrical controls used for my well?

Pumps, as well as accompanying pipe and electrical service, are not considered to be part of the well, and therefore, a permit from the District is not necessary to build or repair a pump and its associated piping and electrical service. You should, however, check with your local code enforcement to determine whether you require a plumbing or electrical permission before proceeding.

Do I need a permit to install, repair, or replace the water tank associated with my well?

No, water tanks and related plumbing are not considered to be part of the well, and a permit from the District is not required for the installation, maintenance, or replacement of a water tank. You should, however, check with your local code enforcement to determine whether you require a plumbing or electrical permission before proceeding.

Do soil borings require a permit from the District?

Any boring that is erected only for the purpose of collecting soil samples is exempt from obtaining a permission from the District.

How do I submit a complaint regarding construction, repair or abandonment of wells?

You can reach out to the Regulatory Services Division by phone at (850) 539-5999 or by email at [email protected] To file a formal complaint, please visit the following website: Complaints should be sent.

Do soil borings used to collect water samples require a permit from the District?

Yes, any boring built with the goal to collect a water sample will be deemed a monitor well or a temporary monitor well, and will require a construction permit from the District, as well as an abandonment permit in the case of temporary points.

I need to plug and abandon a well. Is a permit required?

Yes. All abandoned wells must be properly plugged in order to prevent contamination. A permit from the District must be obtained, and the work must be executed by a Florida registered water well contractor, according to the rules of the state.

How can I find out about the well on my property?

Water well contractors are obliged to produce a well completion report for each and every well they construct. The District can provide you with copies of these reports.

My well was drilled before 1980. How do I find out how deep it is?

The District maintains limited records of well constructions from 1976 to 1980, and it is possible that the District possesses information about your well. The District does not have any permit records for wells that were completed before to 1976, according to its records.

Do I need a water use permit to withdraw water from my well?

It is dependent on the situation. All wells, with the exception of domestic use wells, are needed to be licensed as water use facilities. Depending on the size and quantity of water utilized, a well may be eligible for a general water use permit by rule provided it is registered or licensed with the District and falls within specific parameters. Wells with water yields in excess of specified limits will require an individual water usage permit.

It is necessary for District officials to approve the water usage permit before the District may issue the building permit for a new well. For further information, please see the Water Use Permitting webpage maintained by the District.

I want to put in an irrigation well at my business. What kind of permits do I need?

You will require a Well Construction Permit in order to proceed. Additionally, you may be required to get an Individual Water Use Permit. While reviewing the well construction permit application, the District will determine whether or not to grant the permit. A permit for the building of a well must be acquired by aFlorida certified water well contractor before construction can begin, and the contractor must deliver a copy of the permission to the property owner before work can begin.

Where do I get a water use permit?

For further information, please see the Water Use Permitting webpage maintained by the District.

What is the cost of a Well Construction Permit?

Please review the cost schedule for further information.

What are Institutional Control Areas?

By visiting the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s (DEP) website at, you may find out more about institutional control areas and where they are located in relation to the Northwest Florida Water Management District.

What are PFOS and PFOA?

To find out more about PFOS and PFOA, go to the Florida Department of Health (DOH) website at or the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) website at (insert link here).

Does the presence of PFOS/PFOA in an area mean I cannot get a water well?

This is not always the case. A water well initiative coordinated by the District with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) (DOH). When PFOS/PFOA are detected in the vicinity of a well construction permit application, the District consults with the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) about the site and construction of the well. Because of a possible hazard to public health, the well building permission may be rejected; however, the conditions for the well construction permit may be changed in order to reduce the potential impact of PFOS/PFOA on the well.

Preventing the construction of a well and, if an alternative water source is available, connecting the region’s water supply to that alternative water supply is the most effective preventative approach for eliminating PFOS/PFOA exposure in an area.

Is a permit required for the construction, repair, modification (change of use), or abandonment of an injection well?

An approval from the District is necessary before any work on or near a Class V, Group 1 thermal exchange process well may begin. This approval is required before any work on or near a Class V, Group 1 thermal exchange process well can begin. Wells used for thermal exchange processes include air conditioning return flow wells that return water that has been used for heating or cooling to any aquifer, and wells used for cooling water return flow wells that inject water that has been used for cooling in the past (including industrial and commercial wells use for the purpose of cooling equipment).

These wells are monitored by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Bureau of Waste Cleanup and Underground Injection Control Program, which is part of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

Injection wells must be created by individuals who have secured a license according to Section 373.323, Florida Statutes, or by those who meet the other requirements of the law.

Do air sparge wells and wells used to introduce nutrients or other substances into groundwater at cleanup sites require permits for construction, repair, or abandonment?

Injection wells classified as Class V, Group 4 are those used to deliver fertilizers or other compounds into groundwater at cleaning sites, as well as air sparge wells. Although these wells are controlled by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Bureau of Waste Cleanup and Underground Injection Control Program, the District of Columbia does not regulate or enforce their use.

Is there Radon gas in my well water?

In the event that you have questions or concerns regarding Radon gas, please contact your local county health department and ask to talk with someone from the Environmental Program. For further information about Radon gas, please see the following website:.

I think the water from my well may be contaminated. Who do I call with concerns and questions about contamination?

The Drinking Water Section of the Florida Department of Health should be contacted with any questions or concerns concerning polluted well water from home potable wells or small water systems. For further information, call 850-245-4240, which is the phone number for the Drinking Water Section. You can also send an email to [email protected] with any questions or concerns. You can go to this website for general information. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection and/or your water system are the best places to turn if you have questions or concerns regarding the water quality of a significant water system in your area.

If you have any concerns about polluted water in a non-potable well, you should contact the Florida Department of Environmental Protection at 850-595-8300 for more assistance.

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