How To Find The Buried Top To Clean Out Your Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

  • In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter. If you do not find the lid by probing, shallow excavation with a shovel along the tank’s perimeter should reveal the lid.

How do I find a buried septic tank lid?

You can locate the lid of your septic tank by poking the ground every few feet with a metal probe. Lids can be buried up to a foot deep on average, so be sure to investigate any bumps that may indicate something is buried underneath.

Should septic tank lids be buried?

In most cases, all components of the septic tank including the lid are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. Unless the septic tank has special risers that position the lid at ground level, you’ll have to dig for it.

How far down is a septic tank lid?

Often, septic tank lids are at ground level. In most cases, they have buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

Will metal detector find septic tank?

If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector. Based on your conclusions in Step 3, if your septic tank is likely made from concrete or steel, a metal detector can make the task of locating it much easier. But not just any metal detector will do.

How do you test a septic drain field?

In order to test the overall health and liquid capacity for your leach field, it is necessary to perform a hydraulic load test. This is done by running water at a certain rate over an allotted period of time. A failure occurs when water back-drains to the source before that allotted time period is up.

How deep is a drain field?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

How do septic tanks look?

Septic tanks are typically rectangular in shape and measure approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter.

Do septic lids need to be sealed?

Like wells, septic systems have problems if they are not sealed from outside surface water. Most septic systems rely on buried pipes to get rid of the fluids. The lid covers should fit tightly — if they don’t, a company that specializes in septic repairs should be called to fix them.

Do septic tanks need to be airtight?

Septic tanks need to be watertight. The riser should be sealed to the top of the tank and the riser cover should be sealed to the riser with butyl rubber or some other flexible sealant. No liquid should enter or leave the tank.

Can a septic tank never be pumped?

What Are the Consequences of Not Pumping Your Tank? If the tank is not pumped, the solids will build up in the tank and the holding capacity of the tank will be diminished. Eventually, the solids will reach the pipe that feeds into the drain field, causing a clog. Waste water backing up into the house.

How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

All septic tanks eventually fill with sediments and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain in excellent functioning order. If the tank’s lid is not on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located. A typical septic tank is 4 inches to 4 feet underground, with all of its components, including the cover, buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underneath. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the surface of the ground.

Consult A Map

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank. If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your efforts.

Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land. After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if it is there. Locate the same spot outside and make a note of it. Insert a thin metal probe into the earth, identify the 4-inch sewage line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the property. Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet apart from the home in all states except Alaska.

Whenever the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene it indicates that the tank has been located.

Locate The Lid

The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 5 feet by 8 feet. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its boundaries and outline the rectangle’s boundary using a pencil. A septic tank that was built before 1975 will have a single concrete lid that is 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. If the tank was built after 1975, it will have two covers made of fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at the ends of the rectangle and centered at the ends of the rectangle.

It should be possible to uncover the lid or lids by digging with a spade in specific spots, depending on when year the tank was constructed.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

Mark The Spot

Septic tank lid opening is best left to the pros after you’ve discovered where it may be found. Several lifting tools are required to remove concrete septic tank lids, which are very heavy in some cases. An open tank may release toxic vapors into the atmosphere. Anyone roaming about on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be seriously injured or perhaps killed. In addition to the noxious vapors, falling into an open tank can be lethal.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid

Previous PostNext PostWhether you realize it or not, it is critical that you be aware of the position of your septic tank lid and the septic tank itself. Despite the fact that septic tanks are fairly huge, they can be difficult to identify, particularly if they have not been properly maintained over time. Continue reading to find out how to locate your septic tank lid.

Why It’s Good to Know Where to Find Your Septic Tank Lid

Knowing the location of your septic tank is a fantastic approach to spot septic tank problems as soon as they occur. Consider the following scenario: If you saw water near your septic tank lid, you would know right away that you could have a problem with your system being overloaded with waste. Furthermore, by understanding where your septic tank is located, you may avoid parking cars on top of it, which might cause the tank to collapse and create flooding. You’ll also be able to point service personnel in the right direction for septic tank services, which will eventually save them time and money while also saving you money.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Opening

Knowing how critical it is to know where your septic tank lid is located, it’s time to go out and find one for yourself. Keep an eye out for a circular lid that is roughly two feet in diameter during your quest. Septic tank lids are normally constructed of green or black plastic, however they can occasionally be made of concrete. It is not always simple to locate the septic tank lid, however, because untidy vegetation, mud, or debris might obscure the lid’s location. If you live in a snowy climate, seek for a spot of lawn where the snow melts more quickly than it does anywhere else on the property.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid as a New Homeowner

During the process of purchasing your house, you should have been provided with a map of your property that showed the location of your septic tank. This is normally included as a part of your home inspection service package. All you have to do from there is compare the diagram to your land, find the septic tank location, and potentially dig around it to check whether the lid has been hidden by vegetation or other obstructions.

People have been known to place an object such as a huge rock on top of the septic lid, so be sure to look beneath landscaping stones as well.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid as an Existing Homeowner

Still having trouble locating your septic tank lid? There’s a significant probability it’ll end up in the ground. The pipes coming from your basement should be followed, as they will take you in the direction of your septic system, which is what we propose. Then, once you’ve determined the correct direction, check for any high or low points in the yard that might reveal the location of your septic tank. You can find the lid of your septic tank by probing the ground with a metal probe every few feet with the probe.

Because most lids have a metal handle or fastener on them to hold the lid closed, you may also use a metal detector to find them.

The majority of lids are buried up to a foot deep, but some lids might be buried as deep as four feet in extreme cases!

How to Maintain Your Septic Tank Lid

Following the discovery of your septic tank lid, keep it in good condition to avoid damage and ensure simple access for future septic tank maintenance, such as pumping your septic tank every three- to five-year period. Here are some pointers for keeping your septic tank lid in good working order:

  • Keeping the grass around the septic tank lid regularly mowed is important. Remove any dirt or debris that may have accumulated on your septic tank lid
  • Mark the area to ensure that no one parks or constructs structures there. It is possible to do this using a flag, garden décor, or ornamental pebbles.

Professional Septic Tank Services

Is it difficult to find trustworthy septic tank services or septic tank installation? If you are looking for septic tank installation, inspection, and cleaning services, check with your local Mr. Rooter ® Plumbing franchise. Mr. Rooter charges a set amount up front, with no overtime fees or additional expenses. To get started, call us at (855) 982-2028 or fill out our online estimate request form. Is the lid of your septic tank obscured by grass? Inquire with The Grounds Guys about routine lawn care and upkeep.

Rooter, is a member of Neighborly’s network of dependable home service experts, which includes Mr.

By hiring The Grounds Guys to provide trustworthy grass mowing and landscape care services, you can be assured that your septic tank lid will always be simple to locate.

How To Find Septic Tank Location: A Guide for Property Owners

The majority of individuals prefer to relax on their back patio or porch and take in the scenery rather than worrying about where their septic tank could be. When you know exactly where your septic tank is, it will be much easier to schedule routine sewer line cleanouts and repair appointments. Continue reading to find out more about how to locate your septic tank.

Follow the Main Sewer Line

Purchase a soil probe that you may use to probe into the earth in order to locate the underground sewage line and septic tank in your property. Find the main sewage line that leads to your septic tank by going to your basement or crawl space and digging about down there. Look for a pipe with a diameter of around four inches that is leading away from your home or building. Keep a note of the position of the sewer pipe and the point at which the line exits your home so that you can locate it outdoors.

If you have a drain snake, you may use it to try to follow the approximate course of the pipes in your home.

Since the majority of states require at least five feet between a home’s septic tank and its foundation, with many tanks located between 10 and 25 feet away, you may have to probe a bit further out before striking the tank.

Inspect Your Property

Purchase a soil probe that you may use to probe into the earth in order to locate the underground sewage line and septic tank in your yard. Find the main sewage line that leads to your septic tank by going to your basement or crawl space and digging about in it. Look for a pipe with a diameter of around four inches that is leading away from your home or business. Recall where your sewer pipe is located, as well as where it exits your home, in order to locate it while you are out in the field.

If you have a drain snake, you may use it to try to follow the approximate course of the pipes in your house.

Since the majority of states require at least five feet between a home’s septic tank and its foundation, with many tanks located between 10 and 25 feet away, you may need to probe a bit further out before striking the tank.

  • Paved surfaces
  • Unique landscaping
  • Your water well, if you have one
  • And other features.
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If you are still having trouble locating your septic system, you might inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tank on their land. Finding out how far away their septic systems are will help you figure out where yours might be hidden in your yard or garden.

Check the Property Records

Are you unsure about how to obtain this? Simply contact your county’s health department for further information. Check with your local health agency to see if they have a property survey map and a septic tank map that you can borrow. Perhaps you will be shocked to learn that there are a variety of options to obtain information about your property without ever leaving the comfort of your own residence. Building permits, for example, are frequently found in county records, and they may provide schematics with specifications on how far away from a septic tank a home should be, as well as other important information such as the size of the tank.

Most counties, on the other hand, keep records of septic tank installations for every address.

Don’t Try to Fix Septic Tank Issues Yourself

Septic tank problems should be left to the specialists. The Original Plumber can do routine maintenance on your septic tank and examine any problems you may have once you’ve located the tank. It is not recommended to open the septic tank lid since poisonous vapors might cause major health problems. Getting trapped in an open septic tank might result in serious injury or death. While it is beneficial to know where your septic tank is located, it is also beneficial to be aware of the potential health dangers associated with opening the tank.

Schedule Septic Tank Maintenance

The maintenance of your septic tank on a regular basis helps to avoid sewer backups and costly repairs to your sewer system. You should plan to have your septic tank pumped out every three to five years, depending on the size of your tank and the number of people that reside in your home. The Original Plumber offers skilled septic tank and drain field maintenance and repair services at competitive prices. While it is useful to know where the septic tank is located, it is not required. Our team of skilled plumbers is equipped with all of the tools and equipment necessary to locate your tank, even if you have a vast property.

Metropolitan Atlanta and the neighboring areas receive high-quality service from us. We are open seven days a week, twenty-four hours a day. When you require emergency sewer services, we are here to assist you.

Frequently Asked Questions

A septic system is a system for the management of wastewater. Simply said, wastewater will exit your home through pipes until it reaches your septic tank, which is located outside your home. Septic tanks are normally located beneath the surface of the earth. Solids and liquids will separate in the septic tank as a result of the separation process. Eventually, the solids will fall to the bottom of the tank and the liquids will run out onto your leach field.

How do I know if I have a septic tank?

Even if there are no obvious signs of a septic tank in your yard – such as uneven landscaping – there are a few techniques to assess whether or not your home is equipped with an onsite sewage system. Checking your property records is the most reliable technique to ensure that you are utilizing the correct system. When you acquired your house, you should have received a copy of the septic system map with the property documents as well. Checking your electricity statement is another way to determine this.

If you’re also using well water, it’s possible that you won’t receive one at all.

What do I do once I locate my septic tank?

Once you’ve discovered where your septic tank is, there are a few things you should do. It is critical to clearly mark the position of your septic tank. With our inspection, pumping, and repair services, you can save time whether you need a sewer line cleanout or a septic tank maintenance job completed quickly. Make a note of the location of your tank so that you can find it again if necessary. It should be heavy enough so that it does not fly away in windy conditions. A creative approach to accomplish this without having an unattractive flag or marking in your yard is to use garden décor or a potted plant.

This way, you’ll have it for future reference and will be able to quickly locate the exact position if necessary.

Then contact The Original Plumber to have your septic system maintained on a regular basis.

All of the heavy lifting has been delegated to our team of professionals.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

It may seem impossible to imagine that one of the largest and most visible elements of your whole plumbing system is also one of the most difficult to locate, but when your property is served by a septic system, this is perfectly true. A strong explanation for this is because septic tanks are huge, unattractive, stink horrible and give off an unwarranted impression of dirt. Not only does burying them underground assist to prevent them from harm, but it also provides you with additional useable space on your property and conceals what would otherwise be a blight on your landscape.

This site is dedicated to assisting you in locating your septic system without the need for any time-consuming digging.

How To Find A Septic Tank: Step By Step

It is critical to maintain the health of your septic tank since it is responsible for securely storing and handling the wastewater that drains from your house. It is necessary to pump your septic tank once every 1-3 years, depending on the number of people living in your household and the size of your tank, in order to avoid septic tank repairs or early failure, which means you must be familiar with the location of your tank. It’s not often simple to identify your septic tank, and many plumbers charge extra for this service, which is especially true if your tank’s lid is buried beneath.

1. Gather Some Helpful Tools

Septic tank location may be made much easier with the use of several simple instruments and techniques. To locate your septic tank, you only need to know the following information: A soil probe is one of the most useful instruments for locating a septic tank. It is a tiny piece of metal that is used to puncture through the earth and detect anything that could be buried underneath. Start at the point where your sewage line exits your home and work your way straight out, inserting your soil probe every two feet along the way.

Using this method, you may also locate the cover for your septic tank.

While we highly advise keeping your cover clean and exposed in the event that you require emergency septic service, we recognize that this is not always the case.

2. Use a Septic Tank Map

If you are a new homeowner who is trying to figure out where your septic tank is, a septic tank map should be included in your inspection documentation. You can use this information to assist you in pinpointing the exact position of your storage tank. If you don’t have access to this map, there are a few of additional strategies you might employ.

3. Start Ruling Areas Out

The location of a septic tank cannot be constructed in specific areas due to the risk of causing major damage to your property or tank, as specified by local rules. Your septic tank will not be affected by the following:

  • There are some restrictions that state exactly where a septic tank cannot be built in order to prevent major harm to your property or tank from taking place. The following will not be true of your septic tank:

4. Inspect Your Property

If you take a hard look around your land, there’s a high possibility you’ll be able to locate your septic tank without having to do any probing whatsoever. In many circumstances, a septic tank may be identified by a slight dip or slope on your land that cannot be explained by any other means. Due to the fact that the hole that your contractors excavated for your septic tank may not have been exactly the proper size, they proceeded to install the tank anyhow. This is a rather regular occurrence.

When there is a minor divot or depression, it indicates that the hole was too large and that your contractors simply did not fill the depression to level the hole.

The likelihood of your septic tank being discovered in a few specific locations is quite high. Because of code issues or just because it doesn’t make sense, it’s highly unlikely that your septic tank will be located near any of the following locations:

  • Your water well, if you have one (for a variety of reasons that are rather clear)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a driveway, sidewalk, or patio unless they were added after the home was built and no one conducted a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built If there is any particular landscaping

5. Inspect Your Yard

A comprehensive investigation of your yard may be necessary to discover your septic tank considerably more quickly in some cases. The following are important items to check for in your yard:

  • If your septic tank is overfilled, sewage can leak out into the ground and function as fertilizer for your lawn, resulting in lush green grass. A area of grass that is very lush and green is a good sign that your septic tank is just beneath it
  • Puddles that don’t make sense: If your septic tank is seriously overfilled, it is possible that water will pool on your grass. Another telltale indicator that your septic tank is below ground level is an unexplainable pool of water. Ground that is uneven: When installing septic tanks, it is possible that the contractors will mistakenly create high or low patches on your grass. If you come across any uneven terrain, it’s possible that your septic tank is right there.

The metal soil probe can let you find out for certain whether or not your septic tank is located in a certain area of your yard or not. As soon as your metal soil probe makes contact with the tank, you may use your shovel to dig out the grass surrounding it and discover the septic tank lid.

6. Follow Your Sewer Main/Sewer Pipes

Following your sewage lines is one of the most straightforward methods of locating your septic tank. These pipes have a diameter of roughly 4 inches and are commonly found in the basement or crawlspace of your house. They are not dangerous. Following the pipes from your house out into your yard, using your metal soil probe every 2 feet or so until you reach the tank, is a simple process once they are located. Aside from that, every drain in your home is connected to your sewage main, which in turn is connected to your septic tank.

The likelihood that one of your major sewer lines is located in your basement or crawlspace is high if you have exposed plumbing lines in your basement or crawlspace.

If the line is labeled, it is usually made of plastic or rubber.

7. Check Your Property Records

Lastly, if all else fails, a search of your property’s public records will almost certainly reveal the location of the tank you’re looking for. Your builders most likely secured a permit for your property because septic systems are required to be installed by law in every state. In order to do so, they had to develop a thorough plan that depicted your property as well as the exact location where they intended to construct the tank. This is done to ensure that the local health department is aware of the tank and is prepared to deal with any issues that may arise as a result of its presence.

If you look hard enough, you may be able to locate the original building records for your home without ever having to get in your car or visit your local records center.

What to Do Once You Find Your Septic Tank

Upon discovering the position of your septic tank, you should mark its location on a map of your property. Use something to indicate the location of your lid, such as an attractive garden item that can’t be changed, to help you locate it. A birdbath, a rock, or a potted plant are just a few of the possibilities.

You are now ready to arrange your septic tank inspection and pumping service. Contact us now! If you have any more concerns regarding how to locate your septic tank, or if you want septic tank servicing, please contact The Plumbing Experts at (864) 210-3127 right now!

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Over time, all septic tanks become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to continue functioning properly. Septic tank lids are frequently located at ground level. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. In the event that you have recently purchased a property and are unsure as to where your septic tank is located, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank. Noteworthy: While every property is unique, septic tanks are usually typically huge and difficult to build.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

All septic tanks eventually become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to function properly. Most of the time, septic tank lids are located below the surface of the earth. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. If you’ve recently purchased a property and are unsure of the location of your septic tank, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank and pump it. Helpful Hint: While every property is different, septic tanks are usually typically enormous and difficult to build.

A QUICK GUIDE TO SEPTIC TANK TROUBLES

Septic tanks are excellent options for disposing of waste generated by a household. However, in order for your septic system to function properly, it must be maintained on a regular basis. Having your septic system pumped may be all that’s needed if your system has been performing well for a few years but is no longer performing correctly for any reason. Septic tank pumping is part of the normal septic-system maintenance process. Using a septic-pumping service, sludge is removed from your septic tank, allowing waste material to flow and be treated effectively once again.

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YOU CAN SEE, HEAR, AND SMELL SEPTIC TROUBLE

When you are standing close to your leach field, which is the vast area where your septic tank is buried, you will be able to tell whether there is a problem with your septic tank. Septic-treated waste from your septic tank trickles onto the leach field, where it is spread into the surrounding soil. If the area around your drain field seems to be significantly greener than the rest of your yard, you may be experiencing septic tank troubles. Whenever the soil in and around the septic tank becomes mushy, pooled, or muddy, stay away from the area and contact your plumber immediately.

The gurgling sound indicates that there is a problem with your drainage system.

Homes with sluggish or non-functioning septic systems will begin to smell like rotten eggs or sewage gas as a result of the scent. When the tank, inlets, or outlets are broken or blocked, a foul stench may begin to emanate from the area surrounding the underground tank on the outside.

YOU MAY HAVE A PROBLEM SEPTIC TANK

Your family takes a lot of showers, does a lot of laundry, and runs many dishwasher loads every day, is this the case? It’s possible that your septic tank isn’t big enough for your wastewater capacity. Although the Louisiana Department of Health authorizes 500-gallon, single-chamber septic tanks for smaller residences, the department advises that double-chamber or successive single-chamber tanks be installed wherever practical. If your leach field is capable of supporting the additional tank flow, you may be able to increase the amount of waste your septic system can handle.

Tanks can also be shifted, resulting in them not being level or not working in the proper direction.

Ideally, air should fill up the top 15 percent of the septic tank’s entire inner height, while the bottom liquid should not reach over 85 percent of the tank’s total inner height.

Sluggish septic system performance can eventually result in backup into your home’s internal water supply lines and plumbing fixtures.

YOU NEED PATIENCE WITH SEPTIC FLOODING

If your septic tank has been flooded as a result of storm-related flooding, you must wait for the water to drain before proceeding with any work surrounding your leach field. A soft leach field will not provide enough protection for buried septic equipment. It is possible that pumping a flood-submerged tank will break the pipe connections, resulting in the tank popping out of the earth. Reduce your family’s water use until your septic system is back up and running, and then plug the septic system.

It is against the law to throw waste water into any creek, stream, or other waterway.

In many circumstances, removing roots, blockages, and debris from your septic lines will be sufficient to rehabilitate your septic system after floods.

Septic Tank Clean-Out 101

Septic tanks of various shapes and sizes are pumped out by John Kline Septic Services. From residential to commercial to municipal work, there is something for everyone. Maintaining your septic tank is essential, whether you’re in need of a clean-out or you simply want to understand more about the procedure. To learn more, continue reading or contact us now to arrange service. We provide same-day service for emergencies, and our technicians are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Always In order to ensure that your septic tank gets cleaned out through the largest available opening, Your septic tank or system may have more than one entry point, depending on the type of tank or system you have installed.

  1. This is normally covered with a cement lid or manhole cover that is 18-24 inches in diameter and is often raised to grade with an extension.
  2. It also makes it difficult to completely clean out the tank, therefore it’s critical to ensure that your tank is well cleaned from the primary entry.
  3. In spite of the fact that we recommend that you have your tank pumped out every two to three years, depending on the size of your tank and the number of people living in your home, you may be able to extend the period between clean-outs without suffering any difficulties.
  4. When it comes to septic tank cleaning, we recommend that you never go more than FIVE years between cleanings to ensure everything is operating correctly and that your tank is filtering out waste in the appropriate manner.
  5. Ensure that your septic tank is easily accessible before scheduling your septic clean-out.
  6. Make a notation on your manhole cover or access port if it is hidden by your landscaping so that your technician can easily locate the cleanout when he or she arrives on site.
  7. Simply inquire or contact us in advance to inquire about the possibility of installing a riser at the time of your septic pumping.

Are you prepared to get your septic tank cleaned? We provide business and residential septic pumping services in Lancaster, Pennsylvania and the adjacent areas, including York, Lebanon, Berks, Chester, and Dauphin counties, as well as the surrounding areas. Make a call right now at 717-898-2333.

Maine Septic Services

The following are some of the most frequently asked questions about septic tanks. If you don’t find your question answered on this page, please contact us and we’ll be happy to assist you further.

Q. How often should I have my septic tank serviced?

It is recommended that you replace your A/C system once every two to five years, depending on how often you use it and how many people are utilizing the system.

Q. Do you have to drive on my lawn to service my septic tank?

A. No, it is not our policy. We carry roughly two hundred feet of hose, which is generally more than enough for most residential applications. We may bring additional hose if necessary if we are given advance notice.

Q. Is it O.K. to use drain cleaners with a septic system?

A. Avoid using drain cleaners and other chemicals whenever possible. They have the potential to disrupt the naturally existing biological processes in the septic tank and leaching region of the property. One gallon of some hazardous compounds can damage twenty-two million gallons of ground water, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Q. Do I need to use additives in my septic system?

In order to maintain a healthy pH balance in your system and to encourage better sewage digestion, we recommend that you flush one cup of baking soda down the toilet once a week.

Q. What do you do with my septage once it is removed from my tank?

It is transported to a Maine DEP-licensed disposal facility, such as a Wastewater Treatment Facility, where it is disposed.

Q. How do I find my septic tank?

A. Here are a few options for you to consider. Septic tanks are typically rectangular in design, measuring around 4 by 8 feet.

  • You’ve probably come across a rectangular stretch of ground where the snow melts first in the winter and the grass burns first in the summer. An underground septic tank can be submerged to any depth between flush with the surface of the earth and more than 6 feet. When you look down in your basement, you can see where the sewer pipe exits through a hole in the wall. Take note of how far the pipe extends below the top of the foundation and whether or not it exits through the wall directly. When looking from the outside of the house, this will provide you with an approximate orientation for the pipe leading to the tank. To determine how far the tank is below grade, measure down from the top of the foundation wall to the ground’s surface and subtract that measurement from the inside measurement (also subtract another 6 because the top of the sewer pipe is usually 6 down on either side or end of the tank) to get a rough estimate of how far the tank is below grade. You can probe for the tank top using a steel bar or rod that you push into the earth. Keep in mind that you are searching for a flat rectangular space around 4 x 8 inches below the surface of the earth
  • Many septic systems are not gravity systems and require pumping to function properly. Excavation around your septic tank and/or pump tank should always be done with extreme caution since electrical lines can be hidden underground and are not usually marked, posing a possible electrical danger. Never fear if you can’t identify your septic tank
  • We have specialized equipment that can help us locate the tank if necessary
  • Just give us a call.

Q. Can my septic tank baffles be repaired?

A. Yes, we replace a large number of deteriorating concrete baffles with PVC baffles each year.

Q. Are septic tank filters any good, don�t they plug up frequently?

An absolutely necessary addition to your septic tank is the installation of a Zabel filter by our team. These filters help to keep particles down to one-sixteenth of an inch in the septic tank by trapping about 80% more solids. Over the years, we’ve discovered that the Zabel filters appear to be the most effective. It is just necessary to remove the clogged filter, wash it well and replace it when the problem arises. In most cases, filter maintenance is performed at the same time as septic tank maintenance.

Q. I hate digging up my septic tank and having the mess in my lawn every three years or so.What can we do to save all that mess?

An absolutely necessary addition to your septic tank is the installation of a Zabel filter, which we highly suggest. In the septic tank, these filters are able to retain around 80% more sediments down to a sixteenth of an inch. Our research has revealed that the Zabel filters appear to be the most effective over time. It is just necessary to remove the clogged filter, wash it well and replace it when it becomes clogged again. It is most often done in conjunction with the septic tank service to ensure proper filter functioning.

Q. Do you have any other tips you can give me?

A. Without a doubt! View the State of Maine’s Ten Tips for Maintaining Your Septic System for more information.

Solved! How to Find Your Septic Tank

A yes, without a doubt.

View the State of Maine’s Ten Tips for Maintaining Your Septic System for more information.

Q: When I bought my home, I was told the house’s septic system needs to be cleaned out every three to five years. I recently tried to locate my septic tank, but I can’t remember where the previous homeowner said it was buried. Is there a way to find my septic tank without knowing its general location?

A:A septic tank should be pumped on a regular basis, otherwise it can create backups throughout your entire home’s wastewater system. Identifying and repairing leaks or floods might be tough if you don’t know where your septic tank is located. This can lead to more expensive problems down the road. It is possible to locate your septic tank utilizing one or more of these probable options, even if you do not know the exact location of your septic tank.

Inspect your yard for signs of the septic tank.

Going on a stroll around your property is one of the most straightforward methods of locating a septic tank. In most cases, septic tanks may be identified by checking for traces of a huge hidden item in the ground in your yard. A significant divot or hill, which frequently appears when the first hole drilled for a septic tank is either too large or too little, would be a likely clue. Examine the lawn in general, looking for areas that are spotty and difficult to grow grass or plants on. Because of the lack of a considerable amount of earth covering the tank, it is probable that the region will have minimal plant growth in the near future.

There are a few places where you don’t have to look for anything.

You can also exclude locations near any large landscaping or yard elements, such as a pool, from consideration.

Look for the septic tank lid using a soil probe.

There are either one or two lids on a septic tank, depending on whether it has a single compartment or two compartments for filtering and decomposing wastewater particles. Because these lids tend to protrude from the main tank, they may frequently be located using a soil probe (which makes for a highly effective septic tank locator tool). You may also use a piece of rebar or any other long, thin item that is firm enough to break up the dirt without exerting too much effort to break up the soil.

While probing, take careful not to drive the probe too far into the earth, since this might cause damage to the septic tank lid.

Septic tank installation companies do not all bury tanks at the same depth, so your septic tank might be put as little as a foot underground or as much as 4 feet underground, depending on the company you use.

Ametal detectors may also be used to discover septic tanks, and they may also detect the metal handles on the lids of the tanks, which can help you limit down your probing options even more.

When you have found the position of your tank, mark it with a lawn ornament, a tiny sign, or measure the distance between the two nearest corners of your property and maintain a note of this information for future reference. Associated: How Much Does a Septic Tank Cost in the U.S.?

Follow the main sewer line from your home to your septic tank.

Because septic tanks are connected to the main sewer line or waste pipe of a property, you may use the direction of the pipe to assist you locate where your tank is buried in order to locate it. Look down your basement, cellar, or crawl space to locate the main sewer line that comes into your property from the street. This pipe will typically be around 4 inches in diameter and built of cast iron or strong PVC pipe, depending on the use. When you’ve located the pipe, make a note of the location where it exits your residence.

The majority of drain pipes are built in a straight line, so you can be certain that the septic tank is buried someplace around where the main waste pipe exits the house.

A probe can assist you in confirming that you have located the tank’s position, and it is also a good idea to use a shovel to lift the lid of the tank.

See also:  How Far Is Lid From Inspection Port On Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

Make a note of this information and put it somewhere secure so you can refer to it in the future.

Consult local county records for your home’s septic system permit.

If your septic tank is linked to the main sewer line or waste pipe of your house, following the path of the pipe will assist you locate exactly where it has been dumped. The main sewer line going into your property can be found by searching through your basement, cellar, or crawl space. In most cases, this pipe will be around 4 inches in diameter and constructed of cast iron or strong PVC pipe. Make a note of where the pipe leaves your home after you’ve found it. To get away from the house, choose the appropriate space outside and walk straight away from it.

Keep following the projected course of the drain line and keeping an eye out for any indicators that a septic tank has been buried anywhere in the vicinity.

You can mark the spot with a lawn ornament, a tiny sign, spray paint, or by measuring the distance between the two nearest corners of the house.

istockphoto.com

Check with local septic maintenance companies.

If your local government does not have any records of your septic tank, it’s conceivable that it was erected without a permit or that it is an older system that predates the necessity for a permit. If you have any questions, contact your local government. However, any septic system would have required pumping at least once every three to five years to keep it in proper operating condition.

You might reach out to local plumbing firms that provide septic maintenance services to determine if the tank has been previously pumped by them and if they are aware of where the tank is located. istockphoto.com

Ask your neighbors or contact a professional.

While septic tank placement varies from neighborhood to neighborhood, it’s likely that your property’s septic tank was buried in a spot that was comparable to the location of your neighbor’s tank on their property. By just asking them, you may be able to find out where your septic tank is located. Even if the septic tanks of adjacent systems were not installed in the same locations in respect to their homes, your neighbors may still be aware of the location of your septic tank and its location.

You might be able to find out whether they have seen your septic tank getting serviced in the recent five years, in which case they could be able to send you in the proper way.

Related:Solved!

FAQs — JT’s SEPTIC

Make sure to contact JT’s Septic as soon as possible! It is possible for us to assist you in diagnosing the problem and determining if it is a plumbing issue or a problem directly connected to your septic system. Wastewater backing up into more than one household fixture (even during dry weather), pooling water or muddy soil around your septic system or in your basement are all signs that your system needs to be checked. If you notice any of the following, contact us to have it checked: a strong odor around the septic tank and/or drainfield

Should I Use Septic Tank Additives?

According to current research, there is no clear proof that these items can prevent septic system failure or that they will improve system function. The addition of compounds to a septic tank will not eliminate the necessity for routine tank cleaning. Septic tank cleansers, rejuvenators, and primers that are promoted as such will not hurt your system, but they will not benefit it either. However, there is already a large amount of bacteria in the tank that will break down waste products, so using enzymes or yeast would not hurt your system at all.

Septic system additives should be avoided, according to the North Dakota State University Agriculture Communication.

-Tank Refueling Station

what are the PVC pipes sticking up in my yard?

Septic tank cleanouts are often located between the home and the septic tank, and they are used to snake the input line from the house to the tank. If the PVC markers are labeled with “JT’s Septic,” they indicate that they are marking the access lids to your septic tank (buried directly under the labels). Alternatively, if the pipes are further away and appear to be arbitrarily arranged in relation to the house or tank, it is possible that they are inspection ports used to check the amount of liquid in the disposal area.

Visit ourCOMPONENTSpage for additional information on the various components of a sewage treatment system.

will household cleaning products harm my system?

The majority of specialists believe that the usual use of household cleaning solutions will not harm the system since it will not prevent the activity of bacteria in the tank from taking place as intended. A large amount of some chemicals, on the other hand, may interfere with the breakdown of wastes in the tank or cause the soil treatment area to get clogged. Please remember that the goods you use may ultimately make their way into the groundwater systems in your community.

How Often Should I Pump My Septic Tank?

Most tanks require pumping every 3-5 years, depending on the size of the tank, the amount of wastewater that flows into the tank on a daily basis, and whether or not the tank is equipped with a trash disposal. The state of Arizona currently does not have any laws requiring maintenance and inspection (with the exception of those pertaining to the sale of a home), but the Environmental Protection Agency and local health departments strongly recommend routine maintenance to help prevent groundwater contamination due to nitrogen, phosphorus, and disease-causing bacteria that can be found in wastewater.

I just had my tank pumped and it already looks full!?!

According to the size of the tank, the amount of wastewater that is discharged into it each day, and whether or not a trash disposal is used, most tanks need to be pumped every 3 to 5 years. The state of Arizona currently does not have any laws requiring maintenance and inspection (with the exception of those pertaining to the sale of a home), but the Environmental Protection Agency and local health departments strongly recommend routine maintenance to help prevent groundwater contamination due to nitrogen, phosphorus, and disease-causing bacteria that can be found in waste water.

Does anyone have to be home to have jt’s pump my septic tank?

We usually advise people to have someone at their house for our service, but it is not mandatory. Our service technicians are quick and fast when it comes to finding and pumping out a problem. We enjoy having a homeowner and/or a Realtor on site for our inspections so that they may discuss any concerns that we may discover. If we happen to miss you during our service, we are more than pleased to accept a credit card payment over the phone.

Does JT’s Septic do leach line work?

At this time, JT’s does not install or do any work on leach lines or disposal locations. We do minor repairs on septic tanks, as well as on the inlet and outlet sewer lines. Not sure if we can assist you? Just give us a call!

Why can’t you pump my septic tank out of the sewer cleanouts?

We have found that a tank cannot be efficiently pumped through sewage cleanouts because the pumps on our trucks are just too powerful, and there is no way to get all of the scum and debris out of the tank through a cleanout. It is advised that the tank access lids be used in order to remove all liquid and particles from the tank and to examine the baffles. To empty the tank completely, we unlock all compartments and use a pump to remove the full contents of it. The fact that you do not pump via the primary access holes in the tank itself is a disservice to yourself and your system.

how do you know the size of my tank?

Our experts and inspectors can identify the size of the tank based on the form of the tank; tanks for a normal residence are generally 1,000 or 1,250 gallons in capacity, respectively (tanks may be smaller or larger depending on bedroom count, style of tank, etc).

Our trucks are outfitted with clear sight glasses, allowing our specialists to keep track of the number of gallons they are extracting from your tank. Our specialists are also trained to measure the tank measurements on the job site in order to establish the approximate gallon capacity.

why do you recommend routine maintenance and frequent pump outs when I’ve not a had a problem in the last 10 years and I’ve never had my tank pumped?

Even while many homeowners are able to go several years over the suggested maintenance time without experiencing any problems, harm is gradually being done. Solids that are insoluble in water and cannot be broken down by natural microbes are stored in the tank. This builds up over time until the tank no longer has enough space to hold everything. As a result, the solids make their way to the drain field where they fill up the pores in the earth, causing poor drainage and, eventually, the failure of the septic system and drainfield.

How long will my septic system last?

Even while many homeowners are able to go several years above the suggested maintenance time without experiencing any problems, damage is gradually being caused. Natural bacteria are incapable of decomposing materials in the tank, therefore it serves as a storage container for them. This builds up over time until the tank no longer has enough space to hold everything. As a result, the solids make their way to the drain field where they fill up the pores in the earth, causing poor drainage and, eventually, the collapse of the septic system and the drainfield.

if I have a garbage disposal Can i use it?

Yes! It is OK to use the garbage disposal for a limited amount of time, such as for food crumbs that remain after doing the dishes. Pump outs will be more frequent if the disposal is used more frequently, which will result in higher costs. The usage of a trash disposal can have a negative impact on your septic system by increasing the quantity of suspended particles that enter the system. Soil treatment areas can get clogged with suspended particles, which reduces the soil’s ability to remove waste.

CAN I FLUSH WET WIPESFEMININE HYGIENE PRODUCTS?

No! The presence of this problem is one of the most prevalent we see in tanks. Wipes and/or feminine hygiene items block sewer pipes and do not decompose properly in the holding tank, causing backups.

how often can i do laundry?

It is critical not to overburden your computer system. Instead of completing a large number of loads in a single day, try to spread them out over the course of a week. Doing no more than two loads of laundry every day – one in the morning and one in the evening – is advised.

Can I have a water softener system with a septic system?

It is unlikely that a water softener will cause damage to most septic systems, albeit they may necessitate the installation of a somewhat bigger tank disposal area.

Can We Drive Over Our Leach Field?

Neither driving on the leach field nor on the entrance and exit sewer pipes, nor on the septic tank, is suggested by the manufacturer. It is possible to restrict or slow down efficient evaporation by compacting the soil over the leach lines. Evaporation is a critical component of the drainage and disposal process. It is possible to induce settling and even rupture of sewage pipes by driving over them. It is possible to produce cracks in a tank by driving over it, especially if it is made of fiberglass or plastic.

do i have a septic systeM?

Do you utilize well water in your home? Is there no meter on the water main that leads into your home?

Do your water bill or property tax bill display a “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged” or “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged”? What about your next-door neighbors? Do they have a septic system? Your home may have a septic system if any of the following questions were answered affirmatively:

How do I find my septic system?

Once you’ve confirmed that you have a septic system, you may identify it by looking at your home’s “as built” drawing, inspecting your yard for lids and manhole covers, or calling us for assistance.

How Far Does The Tank Have To Be Away From The House?

Once you have confirmed that you have a septic system, you may identify it by looking at your home’s “as built” drawing, inspecting your yard for lids and manhole covers, or calling us for assistance.

An alarm is going off in my tank- what do I do?!

You may identify your septic system by looking at your home’s “as constructed” drawing, inspecting your yard for manhole covers and lids, or contacting us to assist you in locating it.

Can I Plant A Tree Over My Leach Field?

No. Root invasion from trees is one of the most prevalent problems that affect septic systems today. Certain species of trees are extremely harmful to your septic system and should be avoided at all costs. Please check your local nursery for further information.

does jt’s provide portable storage tanks?

No. One of the most prevalent septic system problems is root invasion from trees. Septic systems are severely harmed by some species of trees, which are listed below. Contact your local nursery if you have any further questions.

can jt’s facilitate a pipeline repair?

Yes! We are capable of repairing and replacing sewer inlet and outlet pipes. Our main line sewer camera service may also be used to plan infrastructure maintenance, as well as to aid with any and all forms of repair work. Please contact us if you would like to book a service.

why do you suggest running a sewer camera down my line?

A difficult blockage may necessitate the services of more than one plumber. Pipe obstructions can be caused by a variety of factors, including tree roots, grease, aging pipes, and foreign items. Our power snakes and Ridgid sewer cameras are excellent tools for identifying problems such as the following: Pipes that are broken, cracked, corroded, or collapsed are considered damaged and must be repaired or replaced. A clog is caused by a deposit of grease or a foreign item that prevents the passage of water.

Joints that are leaking—the seals between pipes have failed, enabling liquid to leak through.

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