How To Find My Septic Tank Leach Field System? (Solution)

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  • Trace the plumbing drain lines to the septic tank, which is usually installed 10 to 20 feet from the home’s exterior. At the tank’s end opposite the house, the drain line leads to the leach field. Check the natural slope of the land to locate the leach field.

How do I locate my leach field?

Trace the plumbing drain lines to the septic tank, which is usually installed 10 to 20 feet from the home’s exterior. At the tank’s end opposite the house, the drain line leads to the leach field. Check the natural slope of the land to locate the leach field.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

How do I know if my septic tank has a drainage field?

Some of the signs that your property has a septic tank are:

  1. The tank needing to be emptied each year.
  2. 2, 3 or 4 manholes in close proximity to each other above ground.
  3. Possible vent pipes above ground – these take unpleasant smells and gasses from the tank and distribute them into the air.

How far down is a leach field?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

How do you find a buried septic tank?

Tips for locating your septic tank

  1. If the septic tank lid is underground, you can use a metal detector to locate it.
  2. You can use a flushable transmitter that is flushed in the toilet and then the transmitter is tracked with a receiver.

How do you find a metal detector with a septic tank?

6 Steps to Locate a Septic Tank

  1. Find Your Main Sewer Drain Line. Sewage from your toilets, sinks, and showers collects into a main drain line.
  2. Check Permits and Public Records.
  3. Determine Septic Tank Material.
  4. Time to Dig.
  5. Mark the Location for Future Maintenance.

How do I find out if my septic tank is registered?

Check if your septic tank is already registered You can check if your tank has already been registered by contacting your environmental regulator. If you are unsure then it is best to check and avoid making an unnecessary payment. The NIEA and SEPA have records of all registered septic tanks.

How do you measure a leach field?

Effective Leaching Area – The size of the leachfield is determined by the total of the areas of the trench bottom and sidewalls beneath the leach pipe. Example: A trench that is four feet deep, 1 ½ feet wide and 50 feet long with the leach pipe on top of 2 ½ feet of drain rock, has an effective leaching area of 325 sq.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

Can you walk on a leach field?

Your family can walk on a well-maintained drain field without fear of encountering puddles of affluent and dangerous bacteria. Bicycles and tricycles are also acceptable because they are not heavy enough to compress or disturb the soil.

Can a leach field be too deep?

Drain Field Depth The result is a drain field about 3 to 4 feet deep. Sometimes, however, a drain field may need to be a bit shallower and can result in drain pipes as close to the surface as 6 inches. Underground obstacles can cause this situation.

How deep should a septic tank be buried?

In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter. If you do not find the lid by probing, shallow excavation with a shovel along the tank’s perimeter should reveal the lid.

How to locate your septic tank and your drainfield

Septic systems on-site are used for accepting and treating wastewater in homes that are not linked to the municipal wastewater management system. A septic system is comprised of three components: a septic tank, a drain field, and piping. As a homeowner, it is your responsibility to properly operate and maintain your septic system in order to avoid system failure. For example, depending on the legislation in your area, you may be compelled to pump it on a regular basis. It is impossible to perform maintenance operations, however, if you do not know where the tank is located.

Steps to follow to locate your septic tank and drain field

The contractor that designed and constructed the septic tank on your property should have submitted an as-built diagram with the local health authority before starting work on the project. In the event that you have the contractor’s contact information, you can ask them for a schematic, which you can then use to pinpoint the location of your septic tank. If you do not have a copy of the schematic, you can request one from the local authorities. Depending on whether the installed system included electrical components, the schematic may be available at the regional building department offices.

If you are unable to locate the tank using this diagram, you will need to do more research on the land in order to determine its position.

  1. This pipe is commonly found in the basement of a home, and it is a 4″ black pipe with a cleanout at the bottom.
  2. Simply look for possible access coverings or a structure that might be concealing it.
  3. These pumps are used to remove waste from the building.
  4. It is supposed to be connected to the sewage output pipe.
  5. As soon as you’ve discovered the sewer outlet in your basement, you may use it to figure out where the sewer line departs your home through an outside wall.
  6. As a result, it is probable that the tank will be positioned around the corner from the building.

Tips for locating your septic tank

Septic tank lids should be visible from the outside. An underground riser may have been added, which will make it simple to find your septic tank in some instances.

However, it is conceivable that the septic tank cover is buried underground, which is especially true for older homes. Following are some pointers to assist you in locating the septic tank in this and other similar situations.

  • It may be possible to discover the septic tank lid underneath using a metal detector if it is buried. Prevent wearing footwear that contains steel or any other metal in order to avoid interfering with the readings of the detector
  • Instead, you can use a flushable transmitter that is flushed down the toilet and then tracked with a receiver. When it comes to septic tanks, the strongest signal will be seen close to the intake region of the tank.

Depending on whether the septic tank is above or below ground, you may have to dig to get to it. Construction materials for septic tanks include concrete, fiberglass, or plastic, and their shapes can range from oblong to cylindrical to rectangular. The majority of modern septic tanks will have their lids positioned in the center of the tank, and the lid should be within three feet of the ground surface in most cases. However, depending on a variety of conditions, such as farming and other human activities on the property, it is conceivable that it will be significantly deeper.

Additionally, you may use a small steel rod to probe the earth in order to pinpoint exactly where the tank is located as you continue digging.

Inspecting the tank

It is critical to thoroughly inspect and evaluate your septic tank and its contents when it has been identified. First and foremost, you may unscrew the lid to inspect the scum and sludge layer beneath it. In addition, the use of tracer dye tablets allows you to check the septic tank without having to dig it up. If you use tracer dye pills, all you have to do is flush them down the toilet and wait for a maximum of two days. Because of the way the tablets dissolve in water, if there is a problem with the septic system, you will see that the leach field has a glowing green hue surrounding it.

It is possible that someone will fall into the tank, causing significant damage or possibly death.

Conclusion

You can identify your septic tank without assistance from a professional, but it is a good idea to have someone who is properly educated in septic tank maintenance examine and maintain your septic tank on your behalf. The effluent filter in your tank should be washed into the open septic tank rather than on the ground in your yard if your tank has one. It may also be a good idea to make a note of the position of the septic tank when it has been discovered. This will be beneficial to anyone else who may require access to the septic tank in the future.

Septic tanks release combustible and hazardous gases, and as a result, they must be located in an open area.

How to Find My Septic Tank Lines

Credit: Petegar/E+/Getty Images for the image

In This Article

  • Septic System Fundamentals
  • Identifying and Locating a Septic Tank on Your Property
  • Conducting Regular Inspections
  • Checking for Clean-Outs
  • Identifying Natural Indicators
  • Viewing System Diagrams
  • Seek Professional Assistance
  • Check the distribution box
  • Understand the size and scope of the project.

Are you curious about the location of your septic lines? It is critical to know where the septic tank is located on a property in order to properly manage and preserve the system. For example, you don’t want to pave over the ground or grow trees too close together in a forest. It is possible to obtain a copy of the septic tank diagram of the drain field, which will give you a fair sense of where the pipes will go. If this is not the case, you may need to attempt some other methods of locating septic drain lines.

The solids and liquids are separated within the tank by a baffle or wall that is built inside the tank.

When pipes get clogged or when drain fields become too saturated with fluids, problems arise. Other issues might arise as a result of incorrect placement, design defects, or bad installation.

Locating a Septic Tank on Your Property

Begin your search for the septic tank lines at the residence first. Drain lines from the home’s plumbing should be traced to the septic tank, which is typically located 10 to 20 feet from the home’s exterior. The drain line connects the tank’s end, which is located opposite the house, to the leach field. Check the natural slope of the ground to see whether the leach field may be found there. It is never a good idea to look for drain lines using heavy gear, wrecking bars, or jackhammers. Before excavating, contact your local electric utility provider or gas company to determine the location of underground gas or utility lines.

Plunge the long, thin metal probe into the earth until you can feel it strike the tank and feel the tank’s edges.

Perform Regular Inspection

According to industry experts, you should examine your septic tanks and, if required, pump them out once every three years. If you are experiencing gurgling sounds in your house or water backing up after your system has been repaired, a saturated drain field might be the source of the problem. Drain fields that have been clogged or damaged are unable to be rectified. In order for the septic system to function properly again, you’ll need to have a new drain field installed. Find capped clean-outs that are a few inches vertically above the ground in the leach field itself, or check behind a wall or in a closet in the basement for capped clean-outs.

  • You can visually trace the orientation of the pipe from the clean-out if there is no other information available.
  • Credit: Kyryl Gorlov/iStock/Getty Images for the image.
  • When you are looking for the lines, look for grass or vegetation that greens in stripes when the grass surrounding it browns.
  • Putting hot water into your system might cause snow or ice to melt above the drain pipes if the system is not properly insulated.
  • If you have a deep system, as is the case for homes with basements, you will most likely not be able to observe natural signs since the drain field is too deep to be seen from above.
  • Unless the system was built without a permit, the blueprints or designs for septic system installations are kept on file with the local health authority until the system is operational.
  • If your search does not provide any relevant results, you can request a record search based on your street address or the tax account number associated with the property.
  • If the agency has a copy of the record, they will mail it to you.
  • If you don’t have a drawing of the septic system, you need enlist the assistance of a disposal system contractor or a certified liquid waste transporter to find it.

Another option is to purchase a flushable transmitter from a plumbing or rental business, or you may contract with a tank cleaning firm. The signal from the transmitter is picked up by a hand-held receiver after it has been flushed down the toilet.

Check the Distribution Box

There are certain septic tanks that feature an extra distribution box that is located a few feet from the tank on the tank’s downstream side. Water is channeled into the trenches by ports and pipes in the box. It is recommended that, if your system includes a distribution box, the box’s top be designed to expose the orientation of the ports that connect to the drain field lines. It is feasible to locate the box with a probe, but extreme caution should be exercised. Avoid applying excessive force to the probe, since this may result in damage to the box.

In most cases, individual drain lines run perpendicular to the intake line, but they may also branch into an H-pattern or other patterns that are appropriate for the terrain.

Find the location of your septic drain lines so that you can safeguard the area in and around them with a little detective work.

How to Locate Your Drain Field

Homeownership entails a large number of duties. Making repairs to the house, keeping the lawns, caring for the landscaping, paying all kind of bills and taxes, and a slew of other responsibilities are required. But it’s all worth it when you finally get to purchase your own house. Consider the following scenario: you have acquired a home in Modesto, CA that has a septic tank installation. Regardless of whether you are familiar with septic systems or not, you must be aware of the location of the tank and drain field.

In light of this, we would like to provide you with some expert guidance to assist you in locating your drain field.

A few sewage system pipe routes are easy to identify in the yard, while others are more difficult to locate.

  • First, take a look around your yard. It’s typical for you to not notice any indicators of your drain field’s presence at first sight. For starters, go around your yard, checking for lines of green grass, dead grass, and sunk-in regions (front, rear, and sides). If you see any of them, go ahead and investigate since these are indications of a drain field installation. Examine the surrounding region for markers: Ideally, a cement marker the size of a manhole cover should be used to indicate the position of your septic tank. Try to find it between 10 and 20 feet away from your house. As soon as you’ve located the tank, head down the steepest slope and look for an empty downward-sloping field to hide in. It’s possible that you’ve just discovered your drain field. Check your yard for gravel by doing the following: Another option is to probe your yard and feel for gravel, because drain field lines are covered in gravel as a manner of guiding wastewater through the treatment process and are therefore difficult to detect. If you come across gravel, you may have discovered your property’s drain field. Please be aware that probing may be difficult in regions where the soil is hard or rocky
  • Thus, caution is advised. Examine the county’s records: A copy of your property’s septic records may be on file with your county’s permits department or with the business that built the septic system in its first place. Read the notes left by past owners: Another option is to inquire with the former owners about the location of the drain field. Even if this isn’t possible, look in the garage, cupboards, and bathroom areas for notes or instruction manuals that may have been left for you by the previous residents. When people are preparing to move, they may gather all of the owners’ manuals or write out their own notes on how to use and maintain specific appliances or systems in the house, as well as important information about the products (age, maintenance records, and so on). There’s also a chance that they’ve sketched out the location of the drain field. Request information from neighbors:You should make yourself known to your immediate neighbors as soon as possible after moving into your new house. This is an excellent moment to inquire as to whether or not they are aware of the location of your drain field.
See also:  My Septic Tank Backs Up When It Rains? (Question)

Alvarado Pumping Septic Service is the company to call in Modesto, California, for the best septic maintenance, drain field services, and septic tank installation you can find. Our septic system professionals are here to assist you at any time with your house or business’ septic system!

Most likely Locations to Look

  • POSTING a QUESTION OR COMMENT regarding locating the septic drainfield, soakaway bed, or leach field is encouraged.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Finding the seepage beds or leaching field using visual indicators can be accomplished as follows: What exactly should you look for while looking for the septic drainfield or soakaway bed? This article assists you in locating a septic tank, D-box, soakaway bed or drainfield, and other components by identifying sites on a construction site where such components may have been installed and should have been installed.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page. Use the SEARCH BOX to discover the information you’re looking for quickly.

Visual Clues that Indicate Drain Field Location

This article series, as well as our supporting SEPTIC COMPONENT LOCATION VIDEO, are available online. How to locate the leach field or drainfield section of a septic system is covered in detail in this video. We offer drawings and photographs to assist you in learning what to search for, as well as descriptions of numerous ways for locating underground drainfield components that are relevant in this situation. (Septic drain fields are sometimes referred to as soil absorption systems or seepage beds in some circles.) For further information, read How to Locate the Septic Tank.

  1. We come upon an area that, based on its size and lack of trees and rocks, is probably definitely the location of the drainfield – a fact that was subsequently confirmed by the property owner.
  2. Septic pumping systems will be required in this situation.
  3. Consider the scenario in which we have no paperwork and no knowledge where the drainfield is.
  4. The method is demonstrated in our video at the top of this page, which includes a site walkthrough.
  5. It is the septic tank outlet that determines where the effluent drain line that connects the septic tank and leach field will be located once the septic tank has been located in its entirety.
  6. Depending on the quantity of usage and soil qualities, there may or may not be a seepage pit present, but the septic system may appear to be operating properly anyway.
  7. We decided that the filled-in area in the front of our client’s property was the probable drainfield region based on the photo.
  8. In other words, the drain field did not have much of a life before its effluent flowed into groundwater, where it was detected by us as pink-dyed sewage in a nearby stream during our test.
  9. Knowing the most fundamental design factors will help you choose where to look for septic fields on a construction site based on the location of a working field that would be expected to be erected.
  10. A rather big and somewhat level expanse of elevated dirt or filled earth may be found on the land, which you can explore.
  11. A two-level or “tiered” septic mound was erected in the foreground of this photograph around 20 years ago; the bottom mound is visible in the background.

Rather than that, it was cleaning up septic effluent from the drive. If you know what to look for, you might be able to find some useful visual cues that point you in the direction of the drainfield.

Areas Cleared of Rocks and Major Trees Often Marks the Location of an Older Drainfield

Large trees and boulders are absent from this older and more mature grass, despite the fact that these objects may be found in other parts of the construction site. The septic tank and drainfield were intended to be located in this location. Leach field trenches are frequently visible as lengthy parallel depressions that run parallel to the ground. Although they are not visible in this photograph (a tank and seepage pit were discovered later), they are visible in the following portion of this article.

They may be apparent in systems that are hundreds of years old or younger.

They are about 24 to 30″ wide and many feet long, perhaps 20′ to 40′ and spaced perhaps 4′ to 6′ apart.

Areas of Snow Melt may Show Drainfield Layout, Trench Lines, Location

Drain field depressions may be easier to observe in northern regions when there is only a little layer of snow covering the ground for a handful of reasons:

  1. It is easier to see depressions in the snow cover since it is a smooth covering, especially in late afternoon light when the sun is low in the sky and the shadows are more visible. It is possible that trench regions will be somewhat warmer than the surrounding soil due to septic effluent running into an in-use drainfield, allowing snow to melt or to be thinner over the trenches, therefore contributing to the “depression” effect.

Wet Areas may Show a (failing) Drainfield Location

It’s a shame, but when a leaching bed or drainfield is in failure mode, the location of the leaching bed or drainfield becomes visible. If a drainfield is failing and effluent is being forced to the surface, this is a very evident indication of the field’s location. The effluent breakout most frequently happens at the low-end of the failingdrainfield line(s), although it can occur wherever that a pipe is blocked, broken, or leaking, including the sewer line itself. Even with a thick layer of snow covering the ground in this photograph, which we will examine in greater detail below, the septic system failure and, consequently, the position of the septic field were clearly visible.

  • It also offers other clues that indicate where you might expect to find the drainfield for the septic system.
  • The author retains the right to use this content on other websites, in books, or in pamphlets that are available for purchase.
  • Continue reading at this website.
  • Alternatively, read SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO FIND for further information on locating the septic tank, chamber, drywell, or seepage pit.
  • More videos about septic system installation and maintenance may be found at SEPTIC VIDEOSOR have a look at these

Septic Drainfield Location Articles

  • Clearance Disturbances, Septic System
  • Odors, Septic or Sewer
  • Locations of Septic Components
  • Septic Drainfield Inspection Test at Home
  • Septic Drainfield Location
  • Septic Drainfield Inspection Test at Work
  • LOCATION OF THE DRAINFIELD PIPE, EXACT
  • EXCAVATE TO LOCATE THE DRAINFIELD
  • REASONS FOR LOCATION OF THE DRAINFIELD
  • Recordings to LOCATE the DRAINFIELD
  • SURPRISING DRAINFIELD LOCATIONS
  • UNLIKELY DRAINFIELD LOCATIONS
  • VISUAL CLUES LOCATE the DRAINFIELD
  • VISUAL CLUES LOCATE the SEPTIC TANK
  • EXCAVATE TO LOCATE THE DRAINFIELD
  • REASONS FOR FINDING THE DRAINFIELD
  • EXCAVATE TO LOCATE THE DRAINFIELD Recordings to LOCATE the DRAINFIELD
  • SURPRISING DRAINFIELD LOCATIONS
  • UNLIKELY DRAINFIELD LOCATIONS
  • VISUAL CLUES LOCATE the DRAINFIELD
  • VISUAL CLUES LOCATE the SEPTIC TANK

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How to Locate a Septic Tank Drain Field

Home-Diy A septic system is a sort of sewage system that is used to remove wastewater from properties that do not have access to municipal sewage systems. if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.removeChild(sources); then this.onerror = null; this.src = fallback; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace; (//$/, “), (//$/, “), ‘/public/images/logo-fallback.png’) is a fallback logo image. ” loading=”lazy”> ” loading=”lazy”> After passing through the septic tank, water is discharged onto the drain field.

A drain field is made up of a series of perforated pipes that channel the wastewater into the ground and into a drainage system (also known as a leach field).

  1. To find out if your local municipality has the records from the installation of your septic system, you should contact them. This can provide you with accurate information on the location of the drain field. Look for tubes or pipes in your yard that have white caps on the ends of the tubes or pipes. The caps, which are referred to as monitoring ports, allow you to check the amount of liquid in the drain pipes. The caps are positioned at the end of the drain field
  2. They are made of concrete. Take a look at the surface of your lawn to see if there are any locations where the earth has been flattened in parallel rows. This can be used to identify the drain field. Check your yard for indicators of a drain field to see if there is one. During the winter, seek for spots where the frost melts the most quickly to save time. When your lawn begins to turn brown in the summer due to the heat and lack of water, check for green stripes in the grass. The grass is lush and green in these regions as a result of the moisture provided by pipes in the drain field. Engage the services of a competent organization to find the drain field
  3. And

The Drip Cap

  • A septic system is a sort of sewage system that is used to remove wastewater from properties that do not have access to municipal sewage systems. The caps, which are referred to as monitoring ports, allow you to check the amount of liquid in the drain pipes. Find green stripes in the lawn throughout the summer, when your grass begins to turn brown due to the heat and lack of water
  • They are signs of healthy grass. The grass is lush and green in these regions as a result of the moisture provided by pipes in the drain field.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank Field Lines

Your septic tank field lines are undoubtedly present, but where exactly can you find them? They are less difficult to get by than you may assume. In this post, we’ll go through what to look for in order to figure out where to seek for them. After reading this, the vast majority of people should be able to locate their system without the aid of a specialist.

Why Does it Matter?

Getting into problems with the law is easy if you’re conducting household chores and accidently damage your field lines. It is worthwhile to find your field lines if you want to save money and time in the long run. The following types of work can harm your lines: any form of paving, driving and parking heavy equipment, planting shrubs or trees, and landscaping are just a few examples. Even the smallest omission can result in financial losses of hundreds or thousands of dollars.

Who Should Look for the Lines?

Locating the field lines for your septic tank is a very simple procedure. There is no unique training or skill set necessary for this position.

In other circumstances, it may be impossible to locate the lines on your own, and you may need to seek expert assistance. In the majority of circumstances, anybody may search for the lines. You, too, can succeed with a little assistance from this essay. More information may be found at:

  • How to Select and Use the Most Effective Septic Tank Treatment (Top 3 Reviews)
  • 5 Different Types of Residential Septic Systems (and the Advantages and Disadvantages of Each) Home Remedies for a Clogged Septic Tank (Also Including Maintenance Suggestions)

How to Locate Your Septic Tank Field Lines

Here is a list of strategies and procedures you may use to locate the lines that drain into your septic tank’s drain field.

Find the Drawings

Reaching out to your local health agency is the most reliable means of locating your septic tankfield lines. It is their policy to keep a dossier on every septic system that has been installed with a permit. Of course, if your system was not constructed with a permit, you will not be successful in this endeavor. It will be possible to see the layout, position, and every aspect of your drain field thanks to the drawings. Typically, they will mail you the drawings that you have requested. You can also get in touch with the contractor who did the septic system installation or the former owner of the house for further information.

The Grass is Much Greener…

It is expected that your drain field would absorb up nutrients and water from the surrounding soil. In other words, your drain field will be a lot greener and healthier piece of grass than the rest of the surrounding landscape. The type of cues you use to locate your drain field will be determined by your climate.

Cold Climates

If you live in a frigid region, wait until the morning when it is snowing or ice. It’s possible that your drain field will be the first to melt.

Warmer Climates

Because of the warmer environment, it is easy to locate the drain field. For a few days, refrain from watering your yard. With the exception of your drain field, you’ll observe that the majority of the grass begins to wither.

Check for Ports

A large number of septic systems are equipped with monitoring ports and clean-outs. These ports will be white tubes or pipes with a cap on them that will protrude from the ground in your yard. These apertures allow the homeowner to monitor the amount of water in the drain field without having to dig up the drain field. For you, it serves as an indication of the exact location of your drain field! Because these ports are often cut quite near to the ground, it may take some research to locate them.

These ports will direct you to the correct location.

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Check Google Maps

You might be able to locate your septic tank field lines using satellites if you live in certain areas. Consider the following example: when we look at our home from a satellite view on Google Maps, we can clearly see where our drain field is located. Parallel lines, darker grass, and small depressions are all things you could notice. Using this zoomed-out, bird’s eye perspective, you will be able to inspect the area for anomalies.

Consult a Professional

You want to avoid wasting time and money, but there are occasions when consulting with a professional is the best course of action. Identifying your lines will be more difficult if they are hidden between the rocks of a rough terrain.

Echolocators can be brought in by the professionals to pinpoint the exact placement of your field lines. Depending on the reason you’re seeking for your field lines, they may also be able to assist you with other chores.

Check the Distribution Box

Distribution boxes are the parts of the system that come before the drainage lines. That is to say, if you can locate the distribution box, you will be one step closer to locating your field line connections. Begin your search a few feet downstream from where your septic tank is located (assuming you know where that is). Remove a lid if you find one that can be removed. It is through this cover that you may have access to the ports and pipes of the distribution box. This implies that simply lifting the lid, you will be able to see your drain lines in their actual form.

Use Your Septic Tank

Knowing where your septic tank is, you can use a little intuition to locate your drain field if you know where it is. Our post on how to locate your septic tank can be found by clicking here. The most crucial thing to remember about your output port is that it is parallel to your intake port. The output port will, to a greater or lesser extent, orient you in the direction of your field line. At the very least, it will assist you in locating your distribution box, which will direct you to the field lines.

Check for Moisture

In general, your drain field should be swampier and wetter than the grass in the immediate vicinity. It will be a bit easier for you to look around as a result of this. If your lawn’s color is consistent and it’s difficult to distinguish between different areas, it’s time to bring in the heavy guns! Wait until a very challenging day before grabbing a stick or rod. Now, walk around your yard, poking your grass in various locations as you go. Where the earth yields more and is more moist is what you’re searching for.

Caution should be exercised when poking, since this might result in damage to your lines.

Understand the Size of Your Field

The size of your drain field will be determined by the amount of water you use and the size of your property. When you’re searching for anything, it’s frequently beneficial to keep in mind how broad your field is. It’s possible that huge area of green grass in the distance is your drain field.

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It’s not always simple to find your septic system’s drainfield, but there are three things you can do to make the work a little bit easier.

  1. Take a look around your yard. In spite of the fact that it is usual for there to be no indicators of the drainfield’s presence, search for lines of green grass, dead grass, or depressed regions. These might be indicators of the location of your drainfield. Check with the permitting authorities (typically the county), the installer, or the designer to see if they have any septic records. A word of caution: septic system designs are not usually correct. Check your yard for gravel by digging about in it. Because your drainfield’s pipes are buried in gravel, it aids in the wastewater treatment process
  2. Therefore, locating gravel may indicate that you have located your drainfield. Be warned that in locations where the native soil is hard or rocky to probe into, this may be difficult to do.

Why do I need to know where my drainfield is?

However, while we tend to focus on the tank portion of a septic system, it is actually the drainfield that is the most significant component – it is here that the majority of the treatment takes place. If you don’t know where your drainfield is, you won’t be able to textend the life of your drainfield. If you do any of the following, you risk damaging the lines by accident:

  • Drove over them — Driving a car or heavy equipment over the lines has the potential to destroy them. Build over them — House extensions, sheds, pools, driveways, and other structures can cause damage to underground utility wires, making it more difficult to reach them for repairs. Plantings in the vicinity of or above them –Trees and septic systems are not a good combination. Roots that have invaded the line might cause harm.

Interested in learning more about how your septic system works and what you can do to maintain it in good working order? Download our free booklet, Understanding and Maintaining Your Septic System, to learn more about this topic. Over the course of 80 years, Van Delden Wastewater Systems has proven itself to be the premier Wastewater System provider, supplying San Antonio, Boerne, and the surrounding Texas Hill Country with services you can rely on today and in the future.

We can assist you with any of your wastewater system needs, and our specialists can also assist you with your septic installation and maintenance requirements: 210.698.2000 (San Antonio) or 830.249.4000 (Austin) (Boerne).

How To Find Septic Tank Location: A Guide for Property Owners

The majority of individuals prefer to relax on their back patio or porch and take in the scenery rather than worrying about where their septic tank could be. When you know exactly where your septic tank is, it will be much easier to schedule routine sewer line cleanouts and repair appointments. Continue reading to find out more about how to locate your septic tank.

Follow the Main Sewer Line

Purchase a soil probe that you may use to probe into the earth in order to locate the underground sewage line and septic tank in your property. Find the main sewage line that leads to your septic tank by going to your basement or crawl space and digging about down there. Look for a pipe with a diameter of around four inches that is leading away from your home or building. Keep a note of the position of the sewer pipe and the point at which the line exits your home so that you can locate it outdoors.

If you have a drain snake, you may use it to try to follow the approximate course of the pipes in your home.

Since the majority of states require at least five feet between a home’s septic tank and its foundation, with many tanks located between 10 and 25 feet away, you may have to probe a bit further out before striking the tank.

Inspect Your Property

Purchase a soil probe that you may use to probe into the earth in order to locate the underground sewage line and septic tank in your yard. Find the main sewage line that leads to your septic tank by going to your basement or crawl space and digging about in it. Look for a pipe with a diameter of around four inches that is leading away from your home or business. Recall where your sewer pipe is located, as well as where it exits your home, in order to locate it while you are out in the field.

If you have a drain snake, you may use it to try to follow the approximate course of the pipes in your house.

Since the majority of states require at least five feet between a home’s septic tank and its foundation, with many tanks located between 10 and 25 feet away, you may need to probe a bit further out before striking the tank.

  • Paved surfaces
  • Unique landscaping
  • Your water well, if you have one
  • And other features.

If you are still having trouble locating your septic system, you might inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tank on their land. Finding out how far away their septic systems are will help you figure out where yours might be hidden in your yard or garden.

Check the Property Records

It is also possible to question your neighbors about the location of their septic system on their property if you are still having trouble locating yours. Finding out how far away their septic systems are will help you figure out where yours may be hidden in your yard or garden.

Don’t Try to Fix Septic Tank Issues Yourself

Septic tank problems should be left to the specialists. The Original Plumber can do routine maintenance on your septic tank and examine any problems you may have once you’ve located the tank. It is not recommended to open the septic tank lid since poisonous vapors might cause major health problems.

Getting trapped in an open septic tank might result in serious injury or death. While it is beneficial to know where your septic tank is located, it is also beneficial to be aware of the potential health dangers associated with opening the tank.

Schedule Septic Tank Maintenance

The maintenance of your septic tank on a regular basis helps to avoid sewer backups and costly repairs to your sewer system. You should plan to have your septic tank pumped out every three to five years, depending on the size of your tank and the number of people that reside in your home. The Original Plumber offers skilled septic tank and drain field maintenance and repair services at competitive prices. While it is useful to know where the septic tank is located, it is not required. Our team of skilled plumbers is equipped with all of the tools and equipment necessary to locate your tank, even if you have a vast property.

We are open seven days a week, twenty-four hours a day.

Frequently Asked Questions

A septic system is a system for the management of wastewater. Simply said, wastewater will exit your home through pipes until it reaches your septic tank, which is located outside your home. Septic tanks are normally located beneath the surface of the earth. Solids and liquids will separate in the septic tank as a result of the separation process. Eventually, the solids will fall to the bottom of the tank and the liquids will run out onto your leach field.

How do I know if I have a septic tank?

Even if there are no obvious signs of a septic tank in your yard – such as uneven landscaping – there are a few techniques to assess whether or not your home is equipped with an onsite sewage system. Checking your property records is the most reliable technique to ensure that you are utilizing the correct system. When you acquired your house, you should have received a copy of the septic system map with the property documents as well. Checking your electricity statement is another way to determine this.

If you’re also using well water, it’s possible that you won’t receive one at all.

What do I do once I locate my septic tank?

Once you’ve discovered where your septic tank is, there are a few things you should do. It is critical to clearly mark the position of your septic tank. With our inspection, pumping, and repair services, you can save time whether you need a sewer line cleanout or a septic tank maintenance job completed quickly. Make a note of the location of your tank so that you can find it again if necessary. It should be heavy enough so that it does not fly away in windy conditions. A creative approach to accomplish this without having an unattractive flag or marking in your yard is to use garden décor or a potted plant.

This way, you’ll have it for future reference and will be able to quickly locate the exact position if necessary.

Then contact The Original Plumber to have your septic system maintained on a regular basis. Preventing worse problems and the need for costly repairs down the line may be accomplished via proper septic system maintenance. All of the heavy lifting has been delegated to our team of professionals.

Locate Your Drainfield

You know your septic system drainfield is out there� but just where is it? It is important to locate it so you can avoid damaging it by:
  • Building a road over the drainfield
  • Parking or operating heavy equipment on the drainfield
  • Planting trees or bushes in close proximity to a drainfield is prohibited. Creating soil disturbances through a landscaping project or the presence of cattle

In addition, knowing where your drainfield is located allows you to inspect the drainfield for symptoms of trouble, such as damp soil and foul aromas. You should obtain a copy of the record sketch for your particular system. It is a diagram that shows where the various components of your septic system are placed. This diagram was previously referred to as a “as-built” or “record drawing.” You can obtain further information by contacting the Thurston County Permit Assistance Center (PAC) at 360-786-5490 or by downloading the Request for Record Drawing/Permit Information form.

SW in Olympia, Washington (PAC Hoursof Operation-LimitedHours Please Check Before You Leave).

This is the tax identification number that appears on your county tax bills.

(If you do not know your tax parcel number, contact the County Assessor’s office.) The level of detail and quality of the record drawings varies substantially.

a more recent diagram will indicate the tank, drainfield, replacement area (which will be used in the future if a replacement field is required), and any additional components of your system, such as a pump chamber or mound It is also possible to record the dimensions of the tank and the length of the drainfield lines.

  • If you don’t water your grass in the late summer, you may notice green stripes in your yard as a result. These are the regions that are prone to flooding along the drainfield pipes. When it is cold outside, the regions above your pipes may be the first spots where frost melts in your yard. Do you have any ports for monitoring or clean-outs? These are tubes or pipes with a white cap that are cut off at or near the ground level. Drainfield pipes include liquid level indicators that are situated at the ends of the pipes, which allow you to monitor the amount of liquid in the pipes. Examine the regions leading away from the septic tank with great caution. Avoid the use of heavy steel wrecking bars or other probing equipment that might cause damage to the septic tank top or other components of the system. Take note of any signs you see, such as shallow, parallel depressions that may indicate drainfield trenches. The installation of a drainfield among huge trees or in particularly rough terrain is quite unlikely. Examine the area beneath the home where the sewer line emerges from the foundation. The septic tank is typically located within 10 feet of the foundation
  • However, this might vary. Engage the services of a competent business to send down echo-locators
For more information on troubleshooting problems,contact the Septic Help Line at 360-867-2669.

Septic System Frequently Asked Questions

A septic system, sometimes known as a septic tank, is an underground system that processes the sewage that flows from your house before disposing of the treated, cleaner water. Septic systems are typically seen in residential areas. The treated water is subsequently re-introduced into the environment through filtration. This is critical because untreated sewage may harm nearby streams and water systems, as well as the soil around the perimeter of your septic system. Because your septic system is designed to cleanse and filter sewage, it is critical that it is in proper operating order.

What is a Drainfield?

The drainfield, also known as the leach field, is the area where the water from your septic system is sent after it has been cleansed and filtered. It is necessary to construct a drainfield in order to ensure that water is distributed uniformly back into the soil.

How do I find my septic system?

If you’re fortunate enough to have a contemporary septic system in your yard, it may be equipped with an access lid that is visible from the ground floor. If this is the situation at your residence, locating your septic system is as simple as taking a few steps into your backyard. It’s unfortunate that this isn’t true for older septic systems. It’s possible that you may locate an older system in your home by checking for greener, faster-growing grass or even an area with less growth than the rest of your yard if you live in an older home.

This will show you exactly where your septic system is located in your yard, if you have one.

You’ll need to look for the location where your septic system’s sanitary line exits your home and follow that line until you find your septic tank, which will take some time.

If everything else fails, contact a septic installation company. If you are unable to discover your septic system, your yard may need to be dug up by a septic system installation in order to locate your septic tank as a last option.

How long do septic systems last?

Septic systems are not designed to endure for a specific number of years, thus there is no defined time frame. In the event of adequate maintenance, you may expect your septic system to last several decades before it has to be replaced; but, if your system fails or deteriorates as a result of bad care, its lifespan will be drastically diminished. In order to obtain an accurate estimate of how much longer the life of your septic system may be extended, you must first have it checked thoroughly by an experienced septic system installation or repairer.

What’s the advantage of installing a newer septic system rather than an older system?

Although it is not required to install a new system, there are advantages to having a modern septic tank rather than an older one. For starters, when you get a new septic tank, you can be confident that it will serve you for decades if it is properly maintained, and you will not have to worry about it being “too old.” Additionally, newer systems have been modified to reduce the likelihood of your system becoming clogged, and if something does go wrong with a new system or when it comes time to have your septic system pumped, a new system will likely be easier to locate because they are frequently constructed with ground-level lids.

New septic systems also provide a further treatment for your waste water, allowing it to be cleaner before it is released into the surrounding environment.

How much does a new septic system cost?

Installation of new septic systems may be a significant financial commitment, with costs typically reaching tens of thousands of dollars. Whenever you have to replace an outdated septic system, you should look into financing alternatives that will make it simpler for you to pay for a new septic system in the long run. Purchase further information from a septic system installation business on how to obtain septic systems at the most competitive prices while also taking advantage of low-interest financing options.

How big is my septic tank?

Septic tank capacity is determined by the amount of water consumed in your property as well as local codes and requirements. Check with your local health agency to find out how big your tank is before installing it.

Why should my septic system be pumped out?

Without regular pumping, the gases emitted by human waste accumulate in your septic system, increasing the risk of septic tank damage and the need for more frequent pumping. The regular pumping of your septic system will allow you to limit the rate at which your tank deteriorates and save money in the process. It’s crucial to remember, though, that degeneration is unavoidable in the long run.

It is only via regular maintenance, such as pumping your tank, that your septic system will survive longer. It is recommended that you pump your septic system around once every 2-3 years if you want to prevent having to pay for a whole new tank.

Does my tank need to be dug up to know if it needs to be pumped?

Risers are commonly found in newer septic systems, which allow you to access your tank from the ground level through a lid. It is straightforward for any septic system professional to determine whether or not your yard has risers placed, and whether or not it is necessary to pump it. If, on the other hand, your tank cannot be accessible from the ground level, it will need to be dug up in order to determine whether it has to be drained. Instead of inspecting your septic system to see whether it needs to be pumped on a regular basis, set a timetable for having your system pumped every 2-3 years.

Why should I have risers and lids installed on my septic system?

As a result, when it comes time to find, pump, or repair your septic system, risers are the best choice since they provide ground-level access to your system. Having a septic system lid will allow you to mow your grass while still being able to find your system with no difficulty. Lids and risers also have the advantage of being accessible all year round, as opposed to earlier septic systems that could only be accessed by digging a trench through your yard. If your septic system has to be pumped or repaired for any reason during the winter months, getting beneath layers of frozen earth can be difficult, if not impossible, and you may be forced to wait until the spring to have access to your tank again.

How often should my septic system be pumped out?

A typical septic system contains a 1,500-gallon tank, which needs to be pumped around every 2-3 years for a household of four, according to industry standards. If you have less than four people living in your house, you will most likely be able to pump your septic system every five years rather than every three. You should speak with your local health agency to determine the exact size of your tank, and you should consult a septic system business to determine how frequently your tank should be pumped based on the size of your family and the size of your septic tank.

Do I need to have the septic tank pumped if I’m selling my house?

Consult with your local health department to learn about the restrictions that apply to your region of residence. Generally speaking, as long as your septic system has been pumped on a regular basis by a licensed septic system company and recently enough for the new homeowners to be able to live there for a year or two without having to pump the septic system, you should not be required to have it pumped again in the near future.

How do I find someone to pump my septic system?

It is important to be aware that not all septic system businesses are licensed and that not all firms properly dispose of or recycle the waste they pump from your septic system when you are looking for one to pump it. Finding a firm that complies with EPA standards should be your first concern, and then you should look at price, how pricing is split down, and which company is delivering the most honest, economical, and dependable service should be your next consideration. Investigate business evaluations, and when you select a septic system provider to pump your septic tank, be certain that they do the work properly, leaving enough water and waste to keep the sewage decomposing while leaving no visible trace more than a few inches of waste behind.

You may obtain a list of qualified pumpers by contacting your local health department or by searching online for septic pumpers that have websites that clearly show their certificates and qualifications.

How much does it cost to have my septic system pumped?

It is recommended that you call many pumpers before making a selection, and that you ask as many questions as possible to ensure that you are receiving the best service for your money. Pumping may cost upwards of $200, so it is always wise to shop around before making a decision. You should not consider it a waste of money to have your septic system pumped when the time comes. By correctly maintaining your septic system, you may avoid spending tens of thousands of dollars to replace your septic system long before it should have been replaced in the first place.

What happens if I don’t have my septic system pumped?

The sediments will pile up in your septic tank if you don’t pump it out regularly, ultimately overflowing into the drain field and clogging the drain field. Backups can occur, causing damage to your property and even necessitating the replacement of your drain field, which can be a very expensive error.

I just had my septic system pumped. Why is it full already?

Septic systems are designed to refill rapidly since the purpose of pumping is not to remove water but rather to remove non-biodegradable waste, and the water itself is not the aim of pumping. Once your septic system has been pumped and you begin to use the water in your house, your tank will quickly refill in order to maintain good operation of the system. If the water level rises to a point where it is above the outlet line, contact your septic system service provider for assistance immediately.

What do you look for when inspecting my septic system?

When we do an inspection, we make certain that your septic system is in good operating condition and that it satisfies the standards for receiving a Certificate of Compliance. If you’re planning to sell your home, you should have your septic system checked out by a professional who is certified by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. This will allow you to sell your home faster and for more money, if you can prove that your system has been checked out by an accredited professional. The level of liquid in your septic tank will be checked, and we’ll make sure there is no surface-level discharge.

The drains in my home aren’t draining as quickly as they normally do. Does this have to do with my septic system?

Drains that are clogged and that empty slowly are not necessarily a big source of concern. Before presuming that there is an issue with your septic system, check sure that there isn’t anything obstructing your drain first. In the case of one plumbing fixture in your house that is draining slowly, it is likely due to clogging; however, if all of the drains in your home are slow or leave waste backed up, it is probable that your septic system requires inspection and may even require pumping.

What happens when my septic system fails?

Symptoms of a failing septic system may include minor issues such as drain breaks or pipes that have been stopped, which can be caused by tree roots intersecting with the system. Septic system failure, on the other hand, might indicate that your septic tank has degraded to the point that it cannot be repaired and must be replaced. A blocked drainfield will hopefully not become your problem because it is the most expensive component of your system to replace; nevertheless, if it does, you must act quickly to make the necessary repairs or else your waste will continue to back up, perhaps causing damage to your property.

A blocked drainfield is likely the reason of your sluggish draining pipes, damp yard above your tank or drainfield, sewage stench coming from your yard, or tainted well water. You’ll need to replace the drainfield as soon as possible to avoid further pollution of drinking water sources.

How do I prevent my septic system from failing? How can I properly maintain my septic system?

Your septic system should degrade at a normal rate over the course of several decades if you maintain it on a regular basis. Maintenance normally consists of getting your septic system pumped on a regular basis and making certain that you do not flush or wash anything down the drain that might block your septic system.

What shouldn’t I flush down the toilet?

As a general rule, only human waste and toilet paper should be flushed. There are several reasons why flushing medicine down the toilet is not a good idea. First, medication might kill some of the bacteria in your septic tank, which is necessary to break down solid waste. Second, drugs can pollute adjacent well water. In addition, you should avoid flushing feminine hygiene items, paper towels, tissues, hair, cat litter (even if it is flushable), diapers, wipes, condoms, cigarettes, and anything else that seems to be inorganic and shouldn’t be flushed down the toilet.

What shouldn’t I pour down the drain?

Grease from the kitchen, motor oil, anti-freeze, gasoline, paint, and food should not be flushed down the toilet or drain. You should avoid flushing anything down your drain other than soap and water, and you should especially avoid flushing any form of chemical down your drain that should not be recycled back into the environment, such as fertilizer.

Is using a garbage disposal bad for my septic system?

Using a trash disposal will result in the requirement to pump your septic system more frequently than you would otherwise need to do if you avoided flushing food particles down your drains. Too much food collection in your tank might cause your drainfield to clog since the microorganisms in your tank are not capable to digesting it. When using a trash disposal, check with your septic system company to find out how frequently the disposal should be serviced.

Should I add bacteria to my septic system?

Aside from being completely useless, introducing bacteria to your septic tank is also highly discouraged. The bacteria produced by human waste is sufficient to break down the solid sewage in your tank without the need of bacteria supplements or other methods. If, on the other hand, multiple members of your home are using pharmaceuticals, they will enter your septic system through human waste and kill some of the beneficial bacteria in your tank, causing it to malfunction. Please contact the firm who installed your septic system to see whether or not you should be worried about the amount of bacteria-killing compounds entering the system.

There’s a strong sewer odor outside of my house. Could this be my septic tank?

Strong sewage stench coming from your yard might be coming from your septic system, but it could also be coming from someplace else completely. Identifying the source of the smell is important. Check for propane or gas leaks in your home before concluding that your septic system is at fault; however, if your gas or propane lines are not leaking, determine how long it has been since you had your tank pumped, and whether there is any sewage waste in your yard or other signs of septic system failure before making your final decision.

Can my septic system contaminate nearby water?

It is possible for your septic system to pollute surrounding water sources if it is not properly managed or fails completely.

In the event that you suspect that your septic system is failing, make sure that it is routinely pumped and inspected by an expert.

My gutters’ downspouts drain into my yard above my septic system. Is this a bad thing?

The drainage of your gutters into your yard above your septic system, and particularly into your drainfield, can be hazardous to your septic system. All water should be diverted away from your septic system in order to minimize flooding and damage to your septic system’s tank or drain field.

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