How To. Find A Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

Go to your basement or crawl space, and then look for the main sewer line that leads to your septic tank. Look for a pipe that’s roughly four inches in diameter that leads away from your house. Remember the location of the sewer pipe and where the pipe leaves your home so you can find it outside.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

How do you find a septic tank in an old house?

Look for the 4-inch sewer that exits the crawl space or basement, and locate the same spot outside the home. Septic tanks are usually located between ten to 25 feet away from the home. Insert a thin metal probe into the ground every few feet, until you strike polyethylene, fiberglass or flat concrete.

How do you find a buried septic tank?

Tips for locating your septic tank

  1. If the septic tank lid is underground, you can use a metal detector to locate it.
  2. You can use a flushable transmitter that is flushed in the toilet and then the transmitter is tracked with a receiver.

Can a metal detector find a septic tank?

If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector. Based on your conclusions in Step 3, if your septic tank is likely made from concrete or steel, a metal detector can make the task of locating it much easier. But not just any metal detector will do.

How do I find out if my septic tank is registered?

Check if your septic tank is already registered You can check if your tank has already been registered by contacting your environmental regulator. If you are unsure then it is best to check and avoid making an unnecessary payment. The NIEA and SEPA have records of all registered septic tanks.

Do I have to change my septic tank?

Under the new rules, if you have a specific septic tank that discharges to surface water (river, stream, ditch, etc.) you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

Does every house have a septic tank?

A septic tank is a crucial part of a home’s septic system. In the U.S., about 20% of homes use a septic system to manage their wastewater. Septic systems are most commonly found in the Eastern U.S., with homes in rural areas of New England being the most likely to have a septic system present.

How far is septic tank from house?

Requirements vary from one area to another, but the normal minimum distance from the house is 10 feet. If you’ll be using a private well for drinking water, however, note that many state departments of health require a minimum of 50 feet between a new septic tank and a well, according to APEC Water.

How deep is a septic tank in the ground?

Septic tanks are typically rectangular in shape and measure approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

What happens if septic tank not pumped?

What Are the Consequences of Not Pumping Your Tank? If the tank is not pumped, the solids will build up in the tank and the holding capacity of the tank will be diminished. Eventually, the solids will reach the pipe that feeds into the drain field, causing a clog. Waste water backing up into the house.

How far down is a leach field?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

Can you use a metal detector to find sewer lines?

Using a Plumbing Pipe Detector to Locate Underground Pipes. As a property owner there will be times when, for a variety of reasons, you will need to locate underground metal objects. The best and easiest way to find below-ground objects such as these is with a metal detector.

Are septic tanks made of metal?

The majority of septic tanks are constructed out of concrete, fiberglass, polyethylene or coated steel. Typically, septic tanks with a capacity smaller than 6,000 gallons are pre-manufactured. Larger septic tanks are constructed in place or assembled on-site from pre-manufactured sections.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

It may seem impossible to imagine that one of the largest and most visible elements of your whole plumbing system is also one of the most difficult to locate, but when your property is served by a septic system, this is perfectly true. A strong explanation for this is because septic tanks are huge, unattractive, stink horrible and give off an unwarranted impression of dirt. Not only does burying them underground assist to prevent them from harm, but it also provides you with additional useable space on your property and conceals what would otherwise be a blight on your landscape.

This site is dedicated to assisting you in locating your septic system without the need for any time-consuming digging.

How To Find A Septic Tank: Step By Step

It is critical to maintain the health of your septic tank since it is responsible for securely storing and handling the wastewater that drains from your house. It is necessary to pump your septic tank once every 1-3 years, depending on the number of people living in your household and the size of your tank, in order to avoid septic tank repairs or early failure, which means you must be familiar with the location of your tank. It’s not often simple to identify your septic tank, and many plumbers charge extra for this service, which is especially true if your tank’s lid is buried beneath.

1. Gather Some Helpful Tools

Septic tank location may be made much easier with the use of several simple instruments and techniques. To locate your septic tank, you only need to know the following information: A soil probe is one of the most useful instruments for locating a septic tank. It is a tiny piece of metal that is used to puncture through the earth and detect anything that could be buried underneath. Start at the point where your sewage line exits your home and work your way straight out, inserting your soil probe every two feet along the way.

Using this method, you may also locate the cover for your septic tank.

While we highly advise keeping your cover clean and exposed in the event that you require emergency septic service, we recognize that this is not always the case.

2. Use a Septic Tank Map

If you are a new homeowner who is trying to figure out where your septic tank is, a septic tank map should be included in your inspection documentation.

You can use this information to assist you in pinpointing the exact position of your storage tank. If you don’t have access to this map, there are a few of additional strategies you might employ.

3. Start Ruling Areas Out

The location of a septic tank cannot be constructed in specific areas due to the risk of causing major damage to your property or tank, as specified by local rules. Your septic tank will not be affected by the following:

  • Immediately adjacent to your well
  • Beneath your home
  • Directly against your home
  • For example, underneath your driveway
  • Under trees
  • And other locations. Structures like a patio or deck are good examples of this.

4. Inspect Your Property

If you take a hard look around your land, there’s a high possibility you’ll be able to locate your septic tank without having to do any probing whatsoever. In many circumstances, a septic tank may be identified by a slight dip or slope on your land that cannot be explained by any other means. Due to the fact that the hole that your contractors excavated for your septic tank may not have been exactly the proper size, they proceeded to install the tank anyhow. This is a rather regular occurrence.

When there is a minor divot or depression, it indicates that the hole was too large and that your contractors simply did not fill the depression to level the hole.

The likelihood of your septic tank being discovered in a few specific locations is quite high.

  • Your water well, if you have one (for a variety of reasons that are rather clear)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a driveway, sidewalk, or patio unless they were added after the home was built and no one conducted a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built If there is any particular landscaping

5. Inspect Your Yard

A comprehensive investigation of your yard may be necessary to discover your septic tank considerably more quickly in some cases. The following are important items to check for in your yard:

  • If your septic tank is overfilled, sewage can leak out into the ground and function as fertilizer for your lawn, resulting in lush green grass. A area of grass that is very lush and green is a good sign that your septic tank is just beneath it
  • Puddles that don’t make sense: If your septic tank is seriously overfilled, it is possible that water will pool on your grass. Another telltale indicator that your septic tank is below ground level is an unexplainable pool of water. Ground that is uneven: When installing septic tanks, it is possible that the contractors will mistakenly create high or low patches on your grass. If you come across any uneven terrain, it’s possible that your septic tank is right there.

The metal soil probe can let you find out for certain whether or not your septic tank is located in a certain area of your yard or not. As soon as your metal soil probe makes contact with the tank, you may use your shovel to dig out the grass surrounding it and discover the septic tank lid.

6. Follow Your Sewer Main/Sewer Pipes

Following your sewage lines is one of the most straightforward methods of locating your septic tank. These pipes have a diameter of roughly 4 inches and are commonly found in the basement or crawlspace of your house. They are not dangerous. Following the pipes from your house out into your yard, using your metal soil probe every 2 feet or so until you reach the tank, is a simple process once they are located. Aside from that, every drain in your home is connected to your sewage main, which in turn is connected to your septic tank.

The likelihood that one of your major sewer lines is located in your basement or crawlspace is high if you have exposed plumbing lines in your basement or crawlspace.

If the line is labeled, it is usually made of plastic or rubber. It is important to determine where this line exits your property and in which direction it is moving, as it often travels straight out to the septic tank itself.

7. Check Your Property Records

Lastly, if all else fails, a search of your property’s public records will almost certainly reveal the location of the tank you’re looking for. Your builders most likely secured a permit for your property because septic systems are required to be installed by law in every state. In order to do so, they had to develop a thorough plan that depicted your property as well as the exact location where they intended to construct the tank. This is done to ensure that the local health department is aware of the tank and is prepared to deal with any issues that may arise as a result of its presence.

If you look hard enough, you may be able to locate the original building records for your home without ever having to get in your car or visit your local records center.

What to Do Once You Find Your Septic Tank

Upon discovering the position of your septic tank, you should mark its location on a map of your property. Use something to indicate the location of your lid, such as an attractive garden item that can’t be changed, to help you locate it. A birdbath, a rock, or a potted plant are just a few of the possibilities. You are now ready to arrange your septic tank inspection and pumping service. Contact us now! If you have any more concerns regarding how to locate your septic tank, or if you want septic tank servicing, please contact The Plumbing Experts at (864) 210-3127 right now!

How To Find My Septic Tank

  1. What is a septic tank
  2. How do I know if I have a septic tank
  3. And how do I know if I have a septic tank Identifying the location of your septic tank is critical for several reasons. The Best Way to Find a Septic Tank
  4. What to Do Once You’ve Discovered Your Septic Tank

You may have fallen in love with your new house because of its appealing good looks and characteristics, but there is almost certainly more to your new home than meets the eye. In many cases, the characteristics that make your house run more effectively and allow you to live a pleasant, contemporary life are not readily apparent. Septic tanks, for example, are an important part of your home’s infrastructure. A septic system is responsible for regulating and managing the wastewater generated by your home.

See also:  What Size Septic Tank Do I Need For A 3 Bedroom House? (Solution)

“How can I locate my septic tank?” is one of the most often requested inquiries we receive.

When your tank’s lid is difficult to locate – especially if you are not the original homeowner – you may be at a loss for what to do or where to look for the lid when you need it.

The majority of the time, all of the components of the septic tank are buried between four inches and four feet below ground level.

In order to do so, it is necessary to first comprehend the functions of septic tanks and septic systems and why it is important to know where yours is located.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Your septic tank’s location is not a closely guarded secret. There will be a method for you to locate it and make a note of its position for future reference, and below are a few examples of such methods.

What Is a Septic Tank?

Having a functioning septic tank is an important aspect of having an effective septic system. In the United States, around 20% of households utilize a septic system to handle their wastewater. Houses in rural parts of New England are the most likely to have a septic system, with residences in the Eastern United States being the most prevalent location for septic systems. When there are few and far between residences, it is typically more efficient and cost-effective to employ a septic system to manage wastewater rather than relying on a public sewage system to handle waste water.

  1. Typically, a septic tank is a container that is waterproof and composed of a material such as concrete, polyethylene, fiberglass, or a combination of these.
  2. An important function of a septic tank is to hold on to wastewater until any particulates in the water separate themselves from the water.
  3. Any liquid that remains in the tank eventually drains into a leach field or a drainfield, where it is known as “effluent.” The dirt in the leach field aids in the filtering of the water and the removal of bacteria, viruses, and other pollutants that may be present in it.
  4. Septic tanks erected in Onondaga County must contain input and outlet baffles, as well as an effluent filter or sanitary tees, in order to effectively separate particles from liquids during the treatment process.

How Do I Know If I Have a Septic Tank?

What is the best way to tell if your home has a septic tank? There are generally a few of different methods to tell. Examining your water bill might help you identify whether or not your house is served by a septic system or is part of the public sewage system in your neighborhood. If you have a septic system for wastewater management, you are likely to receive a charge from the utility provider for wastewater or sewer services of zero dollars. In the case of those who are fortunate enough to have a septic system, it is likely that they may not receive any water bills at all.

  1. A lack of a meter on the water line that enters your property is typically indicative of the fact that you are utilizing well water rather than public utility water, according to the National Association of Realtors.
  2. A septic system is likely to be installed in your home if you reside in a rather rural location.
  3. Septic systems are likely to be installed in all of these buildings, which means your home is likely to be as well.
  4. When a septic tank is present, it is common to find a mound or tiny hill on the property that is not a natural structure.

Checking your property records is a foolproof method of determining whether or not your home is equipped with a septic system. Your home’s building permit and drawings will almost certainly include details concerning the existence (or absence) of a septic tank on your site.

Why It’s Important to Know the Location of Your Septic Tank

You might wonder why you should bother trying to discover out where your septic tank is. There are several important reasons for this:

1. To Be Able to Care for It Properly

The first reason you should try to locate your septic tank is that knowing where it is will help you to properly repair and care for it in the future. The standard guideline is to avoid erecting structures or placing heavy objects on top of the septic tank. It’s possible that you don’t want to park your car or truck on top of it, and you don’t want visitors to your house to park their cars on top of it, either. Due to the weight of the automobiles, there is a possibility that the tank would collapse due to excessive pressure.

2. If You Want to Landscape or Remodel Your Property

If you want to build an addition to your home or perform some landscaping around your property, you will need to know where your septic tank is located. Nothing with deep or lengthy roots should be planted on top of or in the area of your tank, since this can cause problems. If roots are allowed to grow into the pipes of your septic system, it is conceivable that your system will get clogged. When you know where the tank is going to be, you may arrange your landscaping such that only shallow-rooted plants, such as grass, are in close proximity to the tank.

For starters, the tank’s weight might lead it to collapse due to the weight of the construction.

3. If a Problem With Your Tank Occurs

Knowing where your tank is buried might also assist you in identifying problems as soon as they arise. Consider the following scenario: you wake up one morning and see that there is flooding or ponding water in the region surrounding your septic tank – a sign that your system is overwhelmed and that an excessive amount of water is being utilized all at once.

4. Ease of Getting It Fixed

Once you have determined the location of your sewer system, you can quickly send a plumber to it in the event that something goes wrong with the system, saving everyone both time and money. Get in Touch With A Plumber Right Away

1. Use a Septic Tank Map

First and foremost, make use of a road map. Using a map is frequently the quickest and most convenient alternative. Most counties keep records of the installation of septic tanks at all of their residents’ residences. These maps should include schematics that illustrate the specific placement of the tank on the land, as well as measurements that allow you to measure and locate the tank’s exact location on the property. Never mind that landmarks may shift over time depending on when the tank was built, so if there are a few more shrubs or a tree nearby, don’t rule out that location as a possibility.

  1. If you are unable to locate a map or other paperwork that identifies the location of your septic tank, there are a few locations to try to see if you can obtain a map of the area.
  2. The county health department is responsible for keeping track of septic systems.
  3. A septic tank’s position could be depicted on a survey map, for example.
  4. The creation of your own map and documentation may be worthwhile if you cannot locate a map or blueprint of your property and nothing appears to be on file regarding it at the county health department or another municipal agency.

In this way, if you ever decide to sell your property, you will be able to supply the new owner with everything they will need to locate the tank and properly manage their septic system.

2. Follow the Pipes to Find Your Septic Tank

First and foremost, make use of a map to navigate your way. Using a map is frequently the quickest and most convenient method. Most counties keep records of the installation of septic tanks at all of its constituents’ addresses. They should contain schematics that show you where the tank will be located in relation to the rest of the land, as well as dimensions that allow you to measure and locate the tank. Also, keep in mind that landmarks may shift over time depending on when the tank was built, so even when there are some additional shrubs or a tree close, you shouldn’t rule out that location.

  • If you are unable to locate a map or other paperwork that identifies the location of your septic tank, there are a few locations to try to see if you can obtain a copy of a map for free.
  • A septic system’s records are kept by the county’s health departmentsoften.
  • The position of a septic tank may be included on a survey map for convenience purposes.
  • The creation of your own map and documentation may be worthwhile if you cannot locate a map or blueprint of your property and nothing appears to be on file about it with the county health department or another municipal agency.

3. Inspect Your Yard

Septic tanks are designed to be as unobtrusive as possible when they are erected. With the passage of time, and the growth of the grass, it might be difficult to discern the visual indications that indicated the exact location of your septic tank’s installation. However, this does not rule out the possibility of finding evidence that will take you to the location of your septic tank in the future. First and foremost, you want to rule out any potential locations for your septic tank, such as:

  • Under a road or similar paved surface, for example. Right up against the house (the tank must be at least five feet away)
  • Directly in front of the home Immediately adjacent to your well (if you have one)
  • In close proximity to trees or densely planted regions
  • In the shadow of a patio, deck, or other building

Once you’ve ruled out any potential locations for your tank, it’s time to start hunting for indications as to where it may be hiding in plain sight. Keep your eyes peeled as you go about your property, looking for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground tank. When looking at your property, you could see a hill or mound on the ground, which is frequently an indication that there is a septic tank nearby. One further item to consider while searching for the right septic tank for your home is the amount of grass or other foliage in your yard.

Depending on the quality of your septic system, the grass in the vicinity of the tank may be more lush and vigorously growing. Alternatively, if the tank was not adequately buried, you may observe a “bald patch,” which is an area where the grass is struggling to grow in the vicinity.

4. Talk to Your Neighbors

If your neighbors have septic systems as well, they may be able to assist you in locating your tank. Inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tanks in relation to their residences. Having a polite conversation with your neighbors regarding septic systems not only provides you with a means to figure out where yours is, but it may also serve as a friendly introduction to the other residents of your community.

5. Look for Your Septic Tank Lid

It is only the first step in the process to discover where your septic tank is located. After you’ve located your tank, the following step is to locate the lid. You can locate it with the help of your soil probe. The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around five feet by eight feet. The perimeter of the tank should be marked with a probe once it has been probed around. A shallow excavation with a shovel within the tank’s perimeter and near the center (or broken into halves for a two compartment tank) should show the position of the lid or lids if you are unable to feel them by probing.

The tank itself is likely to be filled with foul-smelling vapors, if not potentially hazardous ones.

What to Do After You Find Your Septic Tank

Once you’ve determined where your tank is, it’s time to bring in the specialists. Trust us when we say that opening a septic tank is not something that just anybody wants to undertake. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy and must be lifted using special lifting gear in order to be removed. Since the vapors are potentially dangerous due to the contents of the tank, please respect our advice and refrain from attempting to open the tank yourself. An exposed septic tank can be hazardous to anybody wandering around your property’s perimeter, and if someone were to fall into it, it might be lethal owing to the toxicity of the sewage in the tank.

1. Mark Its Location

The likelihood is that you will not want to post a large sign in your yard that reads “Septic Tank Here!” but you will want to leave some sort of marking so that you can quickly locate the tank and lid when you need them. In an ideal situation, the marker will be substantial enough that it will not blow away in the wind and will not be readily moved by children who are playing in the yard. A patio paver, a potted plant, or a decorative gnome or rock are just a few of the possibilities.

In addition to putting a physical sign beside the septic tank, you may draw a map or layout of the area around it to illustrate its position. Keep the map or diagram with your other home documents in case you need it in the future.

2. Take Care of Your Septic Tank

Taking proper care of your tank may save you hundreds of dollars over the course of its lifetime. The expense of maintaining your system could be a few hundred dollars every few years, but that’s a lot less than the thousands of dollars it might cost to repair or replace a damaged tank or a malfunctioning septic system. Two strategies to take better care of your septic tank and system are to avoid utilizing your drain pipes or toilets as garbage cans and to use less water overall. Things like paper towels, face wipes, and cat litter should not be flushed down the toilet since they are not designed to be flushed.

See also:  Where Can I Purchase A Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

In addition, installing low-flow faucets and high-efficiency toilets can help you reduce the amount of water used in your home.

For example, you don’t want to be washing load after load of laundry or running your clothes washer at the same time as your dishwasher all at the same time.

Call a Professional Plumber

Maintenance of a septic system is not normally considered a do-it-yourself activity. In the Greater Syracuse region, whether your septic tank requires pumping out or cleaning, or if you want to replace your tank, you should use the services of a reputable plumbing firm to do the job right. If you’ve attempted to locate your septic tank on your own and are still unsure of its position, it may be necessary to enlist the assistance of a professional local plumber. Our team at Mr. Rooter Plumbing of Greater Syracuse can assist you with locating, maintaining, or replacing your home’s sewage tank.

Request an Estimate for the Job

Looking for Your Septic Tank? Here’s How to Find It

“It’s 9 o’clock, do you know where your septic tank is?” says the interrogator. Maybe this is a little over the top, but it’s a question that many of our clients have asked over the years. In particular, new homeowners who are unfamiliar with the inner workings of their home or who haven’t needed septic tank servicing yet should be aware of the risks involved. Knowing where your septic tank is located is essential for routine maintenance and when you wish to add additional landscaping to your property.

Why you need to know where your septic tank is located

If your house does not have access to municipal sewage services, it is almost inevitable that you have a septic tank to redirect and store all of your wastewater someplace on your property’s subterranean drainage system. While a septic system is trustworthy and cost-effective, it does not operate without some kind of upkeep. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, a septic tank should be examined at least once every three years and drained every three to five years at the absolute least.

Another possibility is that there is an issue with the tank or its pipes. In either of these scenarios, you’ll need to know the location of your septic tank so that you can arrange for it to be serviced.

How to find your septic tank

  1. Inquire with your neighbors– If you have a septic tank, it’s possible that your neighbors have, too. Perhaps you’ll be fortunate enough to come across someone who knows where your tank is or who can assist you in narrowing down your search
  2. Obtain information from public records– It is possible that your local county or municipality has an existing septic tank map on file, which contains a schematic and the measurements of your property. Examine the home inspection report you received when you purchased your house to see if there is any mention of the presence of a septic tank and the location of the tank before going to your local records office. Start in the basement and discover the sewer pipe that leaves the house if you have to locate the tank by yourself. Pipe with a diameter of four inches is usual for this application. After that, go outside and around to the opposite side of the wall. Then, using a metal soil probe to poke small holes in various locations around your property, trace the pipe’s course until you reach the tank. When you strike the flat top surface of the tank with the probe, you’ll notice a distinct change. Consider your surroundings– If you have a huge property, locating a needle in a haystack might seem like a daunting task. To make your search more efficient, you can eliminate locations near structures, paved surfaces, the water well, and, ideally, regions with extensive trees or landscaping from consideration. Another possibility is that you may notice a patch of grass that is a little greener or that is growing more quickly around the tank. Locate the septic tank lid– Regardless of how you pinpoint the position of the tank, you may need to perform a little digging in order to expose the lid. You may use the soil probe to determine the perimeter of the tank – most tanks will be around 5 7 feet in length and width. As soon as you’ve outlined the edges, start shoveling in the middle and working your way around the perimeter until you reach the lid. However, unless you’re servicing the tank immediately away, there’s no reason to lift the top and let the noxious odors out into the environment.

After you’ve located your septic tank, make a note of the position on a map or mark it on your GPS device for future reference. This will assist you in avoiding the construction of structures or the planting of deep-rooted plants in the vicinity of the sewage line and septic tank. When it comes to selling your house, a map or handwritten diagram may also be beneficial. If you want plumbing assistance in New Haven or Fairfield County, Rick’s Plumbing is the brand you can rely on. In order to obtain expert assistance, please send us a message or phone us at (203) 874-6629.

  • The post was published on July 16, 2019 under the category Septic Tank System.

How to find your Septic Tank at Home

When was the last time you paused to think about what happens to the things you flush down the toilet? It’s a little disgusting to think about, isn’t it? It’s possible that you’re conjuring up images of cobwebby crawlspaces with a swarm of creepy-crawly unmentionable creatures sliding, slithering, creeping, or crawling over crusty, rusted, ooey-gooey piping that’s oozing slimy goo from every joint. If this sounds like something you’re picturing then you’re not too far off the mark. I sincerely hope you are.

  1. That’s why I’d want to assist you in learning how to locate your septic tank.
  2. Simply dial 911 and ask for assistance in a calm manner.
  3. Most hide-and-seek games are won by septic tanks, which are well-known for their amazing ability to outperform the typical human rival.
  4. The good news is that.
  5. Contrary to common misconception, septic tanks are not often found in attics, basements, or any of the numerous closets that may exist in a house or apartment.
  6. Relax in your favorite place for a few minutes with your favorite beverage in hand.
  7. Yes, you read that correctly: your yard.

Alternatively, you can sink.

Or whatever it is that’s causing the terror to rise in your chest to rise in your chest.

Septic tanks are normally installed in one of your backyards or on your property.

How are you doing?

If your septic tank is in close proximity to your well, this should be avoided.

Septic tanks are often located on the other side of a house from where your home is located.

Tanks are often placed with their tops buried beneath the surface of the ground, usually at least 12 inches below the level of the ground’s surface.

A plastic access tube or a concrete riser structure that runs from the top of the tank to the ground level will often be included to give access for a Septic Pumping firm to empty the tank. Shankster Brothers (also known as Shanksters)

Many septic tank installers will attempt to blend these access risers into the surrounding landscaping so they don’t create an ugly eyesore.

So the next step is to mentally go about your yard, looking for any circular, plastic lids that could be lying around. These can range in size from 10 inches to 24 inches in diameter and can be either black or green. Second, if the answer is no, consider any round, square, or rectangular concrete lids that may be present in your yard or landscaping as a possible source of contamination. Often, they will be practically flat with the surface of the ground, allowing a lawnmower or rake to pass directly over the top of them without causing damage.

  1. Typically, the septic tank access will be no more than 10 feet away from your home, but in the event of an older home or a subsequent addition to the property, they may be closer than that.
  2. Hopefully, you have a basement to store your belongings.
  3. If your home does not have a basement or crawlspace, we will rely on other indications to locate your home.
  4. All of these pipes should converge into a single bigger pipe (usually 4 inches in diameter) that exits the house via one of the home’s walls.
  5. Now it’s time to go outdoors.

Check the area where the pipe comes out of the house. There may be a PVC pipe extending to the surface, with a threaded cleanout cap on it. If you find this, you’re well on the way to victory.

Take a check at the roof if your property is constructed on a slab with no basement or crawlspace beneath it. Check the roof for a vent pipe that is coming out of it. An internal vent that travels straight up, through the roof, and out the top of your home is common. If you can identify that vent, it might be possible to figure out where the pipe is departing the house. Continue walking outside from the house for a few steps, keeping an eye out for that round, square, or rectangular cover. If you can’t discover it, check for a little sunken place in the yard that could be hiding anything.

If you notice one of those, you might want to look underneath it to see if there is an entry point hidden there.

It’s possible that here is where your tank is lurking. If none of these suggestions have resulted in victory, and you begin to observe your neighbors peering through their blinds with those anxious glances that neighbors are so prone to giving.give us a call!

We have foundseptic tanksin many strange and unpredictable places. Here’s hoping you win the game on how to find your septic tank. Here tanky, tanky, tanky! If you need to schedule aseptic tank cleaning, pumping, or inspection, don’t hesitate to call Shankster Bros at(260)-982-7111. any time.

Over time, all septic tanks become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to continue functioning properly. Septic tank lids are frequently located at ground level. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. In the event that you have recently purchased a property and are unsure as to where your septic tank is located, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank. Noteworthy: While every property is unique, septic tanks are usually typically huge and difficult to build.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the municipal records. The most straightforward method of locating your septic tank is to review the building plans for your home that were approved by the local government. You should have received an application from the business that installed the septic tank, which should contain schematics and specifications that will help you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was installed. 2. Look for highs and lows in your data. The majority of septic tanks are constructed in such a way that they are barely noticeable.

  • 3.
  • Almost usually, your septic tank will be constructed near where the main sewage line exits your property.
  • Septic tanks are typically positioned between ten and twenty-five feet away from a home’s foundation.
  • When you do, that’s when your septic tank comes into play!
  • Look for the Lid.
  • You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and installed after 1975.
  • Those areas should be excavated in order to disclose the lids.
  • Get in touch with the pros.
  • Lifting concrete lids will necessitate the use of specialized equipment.
  • A fall into an unprotected septic tank has the potential to be lethal.
  • Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you may file away with your other important house paperwork.

That’s all there is to it! If you’ve been wondering where your septic tank is, you now have five alternatives to choose from, which should make finding it easier than ever. To book a plumbing service in Bastrop County, please contact us now!

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Many folks have contacted me through e-mail (typically from across the nation) to inquire about the location of their septic tank. “I have no idea,” I generally say as a helpful response to the question. I really want to add something like, “It’s just off your driveway, near that bushy thing,” or anything along those lines. But, truly, even for the most experienced searchers, septic tanks are difficult to come by. The following are some strategies you might employ to assist you in locating your tank.

  1. Precaution should be exercised before you get started.
  2. So, proceed with caution!
  3. Please let me know if you have any queries or need assistance.
  4. Get to know the beast!
  5. tanks are normally buried 4 inches to 4 feet below the surface of the ground.
  6. You might be astonished to hear that someone knows exactly where it is hidden in plain sight.
  7. It is against the law to dig or probe in your own yard without first locating and marking the underground services.
See also:  How To Install A Clean Out For A Septic Tank? (Question)

You will receive the following tools to aid you in your search: Measurement tape, tile probe, and a shovel (if you are ambitious) The following tools are required: a metal detector (borrow or rent one since septic tanks often include iron steel rebar in the lids), and a hoagie sandwich (because locating sewage tanks makes you hungry.trust me on this).

  1. Examine the basement wall to see where all of the pipes join together and exit through the basement ceiling.
  2. If you don’t have a basement, walk outdoors and check for the roof vents on your house.
  3. Ordinarily, the sewage line that leads to the septic tank will exit the home right below this ventilation opening.
  4. On sometimes, the ancient proverb “The grass is always greener on the other side of the septic tank” is true.

Your tank may be located by probing or digging for it, and with luck, you will locate it. Keep in mind that not everything that seems to be a septic tank actually is! It’s possible that you came upon one of the following instead:

  • Rubble buried in the ground (not to be confused with Barney Ruble)
  • SepticDrywell
  • An old foundation
  • In case you happen to live in a cemetery (which is spooky), you may use a grave vault to keep your belongings safe.

After a few hours of hopelessly digging about in your yard, it will be time to eat your hoagie and take a little sleep. Following that, it will be necessary to rent or borrow a metal detector. In the event that your next-door neighbor loves Star Wars action figures or has more than three unidentified antennae on his roof, there is a significant probability that you can borrow his metal detector. If you’re lucky, the metal detector will really assist you in finding your septic tank, rather than simply a bunch of old buried automobile parts.

  1. According to local legend, a pumper known as “Zarzar The Incredible” can locate sewage tanks using a metal measuring tape spanning 30 feet in length.
  2. Continue to press your commode (“commode” sounds sophisticated) tape deeper and farther down the pipes until he “feels” the bottom of the tank with his tape.
  3. I recently acquired locate equipment that can be used to locate septic tanks, and I’m excited about it.
  4. For further information, please contact me at 574-533-1470.
  5. After that, you may have a movie of the inside of your sewer pipes created!
  6. Related: Visit our Septic System Maintenance page for more information.
  7. Services provided by Meade Septic Design Inc.
  8. Both Clients and Projects are included.
  9. Send me an email!

How to Find a Septic Tank With a Metal Detector

For sewage treatment in the United States, around 48% of households in rural and outlying regions depend on septic tanks or septic systems. Many of these systems have been operating without regular maintenance for many years. It is necessary to locate your septic tank in the event that sewage is backing up into your home or if your main drain line has become obstructed. Throughout this post, we’ll go over the basics of how septic systems function before showing you how to identify your septic tank in six simple stages.

How do septic systems work?

A septic system is made up of two parts: the septic tank and the drain field (or leach field).

Septic Tank

Waste from toilets, sinks, and showers is sent down a main sewage line and into a holding tank known as the septic tank. A septic tank is a large, subterranean container that acts as the initial stage of a home’s sewage treatment system by collecting and treating sewage. Watertight containers such as concrete, steel, plastic, and fiberglass are used to construct the tank. Until the particles and liquids separate into three different layers, sewage is allowed to remain in the septic tank. This picture shows how sewage from the home drains into a two-compartment underground septic tank.

The liquid wastes are subsequently discharged into the drain field.

The bacteria produce a sludge that is “digested” and stays in the tank until it is drained.

This stratum is referred to as effluent in most circles. The effluent drains out of the septic tank and into the drain field, where it is filtered by gravel and dirt before being discharged.

Drain Field

Drain fields are composed of layers of gravel and dirt that allow liquid sewage to flow down. It eventually becomes part of the groundwater supply. Aerobic bacteria (bacteria that require oxygen to survive) and other microbes decompose the organic debris that remains.

What happens if a septic tank gets too full?

In the event that your septic tank becomes overflowing, sewage may back up into your home. It is more difficult to breakdown sludge than it is to collect it. If the sludge isn’t cleaned, the solids will build up until they overflow into the drain field, causing the drain to back up. This has the potential to clog pipes and produce a backup. The sludge must be cleared on a regular basis in order to avoid this. Many households only get their tanks emptied after the system malfunctions. Waiting until that stage can result in repair expenses in the tens of thousands of dollars.

6 Steps to Locate a Septic Tank

Water from your toilets, sinks, and showers is collected in a main drain pipe and disposed of properly. This line departs your home and enters your septic tank through the basement or crawl area where it was installed. Find the line in question. Afterwards, walk outside and look for the identical location on the opposite side of the wall. Make a note of this spot since you’ll need it in a moment.

2. Check Permits and Public Records

The majority of county health agencies keep public records of septic system installation permits on their websites. These permits must be accompanied by a schematic or design depicting the proposed location of the septic tank and drainage field systems. They also give a description of the tank’s dimensions and construction material. Having this information can be quite beneficial when trying to locate a submerged tank lid. In some cases, depending on the age of your septic system and the digitization efforts of your county’s health department, you may be able to do a public records search online.

If you live in Colorado, we’ve provided links below that will allow you to check septic records in a few different areas.

  • Colorado’s counties of Adams, Arapahoe, and Douglas Colorado Septic Records Search
  • Colorado Permits Search
  • El Paso County Records Search
  • Jefferson County Septic Records Search
  • Jefferson County Records Search
  • Mesa County Septic Systems Search
  • Pueblo County Records Search. Colorado Septic Records Search
  • Pueblo County Records Search

3. Determine Septic Tank Material

If you’ve located your septic permit, you’ll find information about the size, shape, and material of your septic tank there as well. But don’t be concerned if your septic data aren’t readily available. We can perform some basic detective work to determine what material your septic system is built of. Let’s start with a look at the materials.

Types of Septic Tank Materials

Construction of septic tanks is mostly done using four types of materials: concrete, steel, fiberglass, and polyethylene plastic. Until the 1880s, the most extensively used septic tank material was concrete, which was then replaced by steel. These tanks have a lifespan of around 40 years and are built to last. They are susceptible to cracking, however, in locations where temperature variations are strong and frequent. Concrete tanks are frequently required by municipalities that have strict requirements on septic system construction.

  • Steel septic tanks begin to corrode within 20 to 25 years of installation in most regions.
  • If a human or animal walks across the weakened tank, it may collapse under the weight of the person or animal.
  • They will not break or corrode, however, in contrast to concrete or steel tanks.
  • PlasticSeptic tanks made of polyethylene have been in use since the 1980s.

They are not susceptible to rusting and are less prone to break when compared to concrete. They are, however, not quite as long-lasting. Because of the weight of the earth above them, or because a vehicle passes over the area where they are buried, plastic tanks are susceptible to collapse.

How Old is Your House?

Next, let’s determine the approximate age of your home. In some cases, all you need to do is take a glance at the house’s façade to get an idea of how old it really is. However, you may examine the tax assessor’s records in your county to get a more precise assessment. Similarly to searching for septic records, your mileage may vary depending on which county’s digitized documents you are searching for. Let’s go over an example search utilizing Boulder County’s Property Search tool so that you can have a better sense of what you should be looking for.

  1. Look up your home address on the internet. When searching for a home, some programs provide separate areas for your address and street name, while others (such as Boulder County) merge the two into a single search box. Look for information on Deeds and/or Sales Records in the public domain. You’ll find a list of transactions here, with dates showing when the property was purchased and sold. Find the transaction that occurred on the earliest possible date. This is most likely the year in which your home was constructed.

This information allows you to make an informed guess regarding the sort of material that your septic tank is built of.

4A. If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector

After coming to the conclusion that the tank is most likely built of concrete or steel in Step 3, a metal detector may be used to make the work of locating it much simpler. But not just any metal detector will do. It must be the right one. Standard metal detectors have a depth range of 6 – 8″ (15 – 20 cm) below the surface of the ground. As previously stated, the majority of septic tanks are placed 1′ to 3′ (0.3 m to 1 m) underground, putting them outside of the acceptable range. An advanced sort of metal detector known as a Magnetic Locator, which can detect objects as deep as 16′ (4.8 m), is available for purchase.

How to Use a Metal Detector to Search for a Septic Tank

If you have a septic permit record, you may refer to it to figure out how far you need to go to install a septic tank. Start at the point where the drain line meets the home and work your way out to where the septic tank is shown on the diagram. Keep in mind that this graphic depicts the proposed installation area and may not accurately depict the actual ground conditions on the site. We’ll have a look at the illustration below. One inch (2.5 centimeters) is equivalent to fifty feet (50 meters).

By using a ruler to measure the design, we’ve determined that the septic tank should be roughly 13′ (3.96 m) away from the home.

  1. To begin, start at the location you highlighted in Step 1 where the sewage drain line leaves the home. From here, you may switch on the locator and adjust the gain to a high setting. Walking over the search area, sweep the locator from left to right, as if looking for anything. As you go, make a note of the regions with the strongest signal strength. It is most likely that the tank-iron lid’s handles will be located in one of these positions
  2. As soon as you’ve exhausted the search region in one direction, sweep over it perpendicularly and make note of the spots with the strongest signal strength. Continue on to Step 5

4B. If it’s Plastic or Fiberglass, Probe Gently

Septic tanks made of plastic or fiberglass are typically buried one to two feet (0.3 to 0.91 m) below ground level. They feature circular covers made of green or black plastic that are roughly two feet (0.91 m) wide and have a diameter of around two feet (0.91 m). Due to the fact that these tanks are totally made of plastic, a metal detector will not be of use in locating them. In this situation, a soil probe is really useful. An inexpensive soil sampling instrument, soil probes are comprised of a 4′ (1.2 m) metal rod with a pointed tip on one end and are used for soil sample.

Gently poke the earth with a soil probe every 2 to 3 feet, using a light touch (0.61 to 0.91 m).

Make a note of any areas where you encounter resistance and continue exploring around in your search area. The use of a soft touch is essential here, since the metal tip of the probe can cause damage to plastic septic tanks (and sewage lines) if too much force is used.

5. Time to Dig

Following the placement of an amagnetic locator (or the probing of the ground) to record the places with the highest signal strength, you are ready to begin digging. Septic tank lids can be located anywhere from 4″ (10 cm) to 4′ (1.2 m) below the surface of the ground.

6. Mark the Location for Future Maintenance

Having discovered your septic tank, you’ll want to ensure that it can be readily detected and accessed in the event that it has to be repaired or replaced. You may accomplish this by installing a septic tank riser. Sewage Tank Risers are devices that provide for easy access to the septic tank from the ground. They are shafts made of plastic or concrete that link the top of the tank to the surface of the ground below the tank. The tank lid will no longer require you to dig to access it whenever maintenance is required.

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