How To Close And Old Septic Tank In Michigan? (Best solution)

  • Septic tank, drywell, or cesspool abandonment or tank closure may involve complete tank removal, tank crushing (steel septic tanks), or most common with site-built tanks/cesspools/drywells, and with concrete tanks, the cover is opened and the tank is filled-in with rubble and soil.

How do you cap off a septic tank?

Expend the hole once you have located the septic tank to expose more of the tank. Continue digging until you locate a seam in the tank lid, then remove enough dirt to expose the entire seam. This will be the tank cap.

Should old septic tanks be removed?

It is important to properly abandon un-used septic tanks, cesspools, or drywells. If an old septic tank, cesspool, or drywell is simply “left alone” there may be very serious cave-in or fall-in safety hazards.

Can you sell a house with an old septic tank?

If you’re selling a property with a septic tank, then you must be transparent with buyers about the fact the property uses a one and provide a detailed specification of the system. In fact, You are required by law to inform a buyer in writing about the presence of a septic tank.

How do you fill an old collapsed septic tank?

How to Fill in Old Septic Tanks

  1. Ask your local health department to see whether you need a permit to fill the septic tank.
  2. Pump out any water in the septic tank with a water pump.
  3. Remove the lid and destroy it.
  4. Drill holes in all of the side walls and bottom of the septic tank.
  5. Fill the septic tank with dirt or gravel.

What does the cap on a septic tank look like?

Septic tank lids are typically green or black plastic; sometimes they are made of concrete. It’s not always easy to find the lid, though, as unkempt grass, dirt, or debris can conceal the septic tank lid.

How were old septic tanks built?

Many of the first septic tanks were concrete tanks that were formed out of wood and poured in place in the ground and covered with a concrete lid or often some type of lumber. In the 1960s, precast concrete tanks became more prevalent as the standard of practice improved.

Can you leave an old septic tank in the ground?

Tanks can be completely removed or they can be destroyed and buried in place. The decision depends on if you plan to use the land for something else, such as a home addition or pool, and need the remains of the tank out of the way.

How do I get rid of an old leach field?

Abandoning Septic Tanks and Soil Treatment Areas

  1. Remove and dispose of the tank at an approved site (normally a landfill).
  2. Crush the tank completely and backfill. The bottom must be broken to ensure it will drain water.
  3. Fill the tank with granular material or some other inert, flowable material such as concrete.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

Do septic tanks lower property value?

The research shows that having a septic system as opposed to a standard sewage system does not increase or decrease the value of your home, although there are some things about that septic system that can affect resale.

Does a septic tank affect mortgage?

How a septic tank could affect your negotiations. In most cases, a correctly installed well-maintained system, is unlikely to cause any issues. Even where a property has an older septic tank, provided it does not discharge directly into surface water, then it may still meet the relevant standards.

How do I find out if my septic tank is compliant?

If you are unsure whether your septic tank has a new or existing discharge, contact Homeseptic or the Environment Agency who will be able to inform you if your system is compliant.

Can you build over an abandoned leach field?

Overall, it is not recommended to build over your leach filed and you should also not put anything heavy on top of it, such as parking a vehicle.

What are old septic tanks made of?

Septic tanks are made from steel, concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene. Steel tanks tend to rust, have a shorter service life, and are only found in older systems. Concrete tanks are durable, but occasionally can crack and leak wastewater.

How do old septic tanks work?

Septic tanks work by allowing waste to separate into three layers: solids, effluent and scum (see illustration above). The solids settle to the bottom, where microorganisms decompose them. The middle layer of effluent exits the tank and travels through underground perforated pipes into the drainage field.

HOW TO SAFELY ABANDON AN OLD SEPTIC TANK ON YOUR PROPERTY

1. Check with the local government. To locate your septic tank, it is most likely the most straightforward method of looking through the building blueprints for your home that were prepared by the town. This application, which should include schematics and dimensions that will assist you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was built, should have been filed by the business that installed the septic tank in question. Find the highs and lows of your experience. In order to be unobtrusive, the majority of septic tanks are placed in a discreet manner.

Follow the rules.

Be a good sport.

Track down and mark the location of the 4-inch sewer that exits the crawl space or basement, and the same location outside the house.

  • Every few feet, insert a tiny metal probe into the earth, continuing until you reach polyethylene, fiberglass, or flat concrete.
  • The Lid may be found in Step 4.
  • You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and is older than that.
  • In order to disclose the lids, you must excavate in specific areas.
  • Get in touch with the professionals.
  • Using special lifting gear to lift heavy concrete lids will be necessary.
  • It is possible to die after falling into an open septic tank.
  • Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you can file away with your other important house documentation.
  • That’s it!
  • The good news is that you now have five alternatives for locating your septic tank, making it easier than ever to discover your tank.

Septic System Ordinances

Septic inspection and pumping are required at the point of sale (POS) or at the time of sale/transfer (TOST). Michigan is the only state that does not have a statewide sanitary code, which means that requirements are imposed by individual counties or townships. According to Michigan’s public health code, municipal health departments are in responsibility of drafting and enforcing regulations governing water wells and sewage treatment facilities. The adoption of Time of Sale/Transfer (TOST) septic regulations is becoming more common in local municipalities across the state (also called Point of Sale, or POS).

Such inspections are intended to detect well and septic systems that are no longer operating as intended (or that were installed in violation of the code), and to take corrective action if necessary.

Nevertheless, if it is discovered that a system is deteriorating, it will be necessary to fix or replace it. Some alternative policy solutions that might be examined include a mandated inspection program or a mandatory pumping regulation to name a few examples.

Additional References

Organization County Resource Description Resource Link
Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council Charlevoix County Article: “The Septic Question” Click here

Additional Ordinance Examples

Municipality County Resource Description Resource Link
Milton Township Antrim County Septic Inspection and Property Transfer Ordinance Click here
Barry County Barry County Sanitary Code Click here
Benzie County Benzie County Sewage and Well Evaluation Form Click here
Eaton County Eaton County Sanitary Code Click here
Long Lake Township Grand Traverse County Ordinance 107: Inspection of on Site Sewage Disposal Systems Click here
Kalkaska County Kalkaska County Sanitary Code Chapter 5: Wastewater and Sewage Disposal Click here
Village of Empire Leelanau County Ordinance 135: Septic Inspection at Time of Sale Click here
Manistee County Manistee Sanitary Code Chapter 5: Wastewater and Sewage Disposal Click here
Springfield Township Oakland County Section 40-639 (b): Lots abutting waterbodies- septic tankminimum setback regulation Click here
Shiawassee County Shiawassee County Click here
Washenaw County Washtenaw County Time of Sale Inspection Requirements Program Click here

Aging septic systems fouling Michigan waters

Septic inspection or pumping is required at the point of sale (POS) or at the time of sale or transfer (TOST). As the only state without a statewide sanitation code, Michigan is left to the discretion of individual counties or townships when it comes to establishing regulations. Developing and implementing rules for water wells and septic systems is the responsibility of municipal health departments in Michigan, according to the public health law. The adoption of Time of Sale/Transfer (TOST) septic regulations is becoming more common in towns across the state (also called Point of Sale, or POS).

Well and septic systems that are no longer performing as intended (or that were installed in violation of the code) will be identified and, if required, will require remedial action to be taken.

Nonetheless, if it is discovered that a system is deteriorating, it will be necessary to fix or replace it.

Do’s and don’ts of septic system maintenance

  • Every two to three years, hire a qualified operator to pump out the septic tank at your home or business. Do:Ask the operator to confirm that the septic tank’s exit is fitted with a tee or a baffle before closing the lid. This prevents scum from drifting into the disposal field and plugging it with debris. If you suspect that you may be experiencing septic system issues, contact your local health department for assistance. The health department can provide assistance with questions regarding operation, maintenance, and design. Prepare by learning where your septic tank, drain field and well are located. This is something that your local health agency may be able to assist you with. Keep a sketch of their positions on hand, along with your maintenance records, in case service visits are required in the future. Do: Divert other types of water, such as roof drains and sump pumps, to grass areas where they will not interfere with the septic system’s operation. A saturating drain field will be unable to provide proper waste water treatment. What to Do: Take any remaining hazardous home chemicals to a hazardous waste collection location that has been certified for disposal. What to Do: Trim the grass around the dumping field. Evaporative transpiration (plant activity) is increased when grass is kept at a height of around 2-3 inches. During this process, nutrients from the disposal field are removed by the root system, while evaporation is increased. Don’t: Go down into a septic tank, or even spend an excessive amount of time looking over the open lid. Toxic gases are created by natural treatment processes, and they have the potential to kill a human in minutes. Allowing large trucks to drive over or park on a drain field is strictly prohibited. Don’t: Planting trees or bushes on a drain field is not recommended. Their roots have the potential to cause harm to septic system infrastructure. Using a hard surface such as concrete, asphalt, or a wooden deck to cover the drain field is not recommended. The only vegetation that should be present is grass. Don’t: Make any repairs to your system without first consulting your local health agency to determine whether a permit is required. Don’t: Excessively utilize a waste disposal device in the kitchen. Massive amounts of sediments are produced by heavy use, which shortens the interval between septic tank pumpings. Don’t: Add commercial septic tank additives to your system. These products are ineffective, and some may even be harmful to your system in the long term. Don’t: Treat your toilet as if it were a garbage can. Chemicals and cleaners that are harmful to the environment should not be flushed down the toilet. Coffee grinds, disposable diapers, sanitary napkins, cigarette butts, paper towels, dental floss, grease, or oil should not be used in the production of biodiesel. The Rouge River National Wet Weather Demonstration Project is the source of this information.
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How to Care for Your Septic System

Every two to three years, hire a qualified operator to pump out the septic tank at your home. Do: Do:Ask the operator to verify that the septic tank’s output is fitted with a tee or baffle. Scum is prevented from drifting into the disposal field and obstructing it. If you suspect you may be experiencing septic system issues, contact your local health department. Questions on operation, maintenance, and design can be directed to the health department for guidance. Find out where your septic tank, drain field and well are located.

  • To facilitate service visits, save a sketch of their positions in your maintenance records.
  • Waste water will not be effectively treated if the drain field becomes saturated.
  • Grass cuttings should be made across the disposal field.
  • During this process, nutrients from the disposal field are removed through the root system, and evaporation is increased.
  • It is possible to die from toxic fumes created by natural treatment procedures within minutes of exposure.
  • It is not permissible to plant trees or plants near a drain field.
  • Using a hard surface such as concrete, asphalt, or a wooden deck to cover the drain field is not advised.
  • Attempt to fix your system without first confirming whether or not a permit is required with your local health department first.
  • Intensive use increases both the amount of solids produced and the duration between pumpings in the sewage system.
  • These products are ineffective, and some may even be harmful to your system over time.
  • The flushing of hazardous chemicals and cleaners is discouraged.

Coffee grinds, disposable diapers, sanitary napkins, cigarette butts, paper towels, dental floss, grease, or oil should not be used in the production of biofuels either. Rouge River National Wet Weather Demonstration Project is the source of this information.

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order. Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract.

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Approximately 70 gallons of indoor water are consumed by each individual in a normal single-family house on a daily basis. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on how often it occurs. Septic systems collect and treat all of the water that a household sends down its pipes. When a family conserves water, less water is discharged into a storm drain or into the septic tank. Improved septic system performance and reduced failure risk are two benefits of water conservation. With the Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense program, you may conserve water in a variety of ways and buy goods that are more water-efficient.

Properly Dispose of Waste

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day. A single leaking or running toilet may waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, and this is just one example. The septic system collects all of the water that a household sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the septic system.

A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failing. The Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense program offers several simple techniques to save water as well as water-efficient goods.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system. A simple rule of thumb is to never flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Cooking grease or oil
  • Wipes that are not flushable, such as baby wipes or other wet wipes
  • Photographic solutions
  • Feminine hygiene items Condoms
  • Medical supplies such as dental floss and disposable diapers, cigarette butts and coffee grounds, cat litter and paper towels, pharmaceuticals, and household chemicals such as gasoline and oil, insecticides, antifreeze, and paint or paint thinners

Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed! Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed. Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.

Septic/ Health, Human & Veterans Services

On-site sewage disposal is a general word that refers to a system that processes biological or chemical effluent in the same location where it was generated or collected. For the uninitiated, it is your septic system, which includes a tank that sorts, stores, and processes solids, as well as a leach field that disperses the fluid across a sand and gravel bed. Your septic system is an extremely important component of your property. It should be handled with care in order to guarantee that it is successful in treating the wastewater that we generate in our households.

When it comes to onsite sewage disposal, Wayne County reviews the circumstances for acceptability, as well as complaints of poor operation and maintenance of onsite sewage disposal facilities, as well as the building of Fee systems.

All finished sewage systems must be examined and authorized by the Wayne County Department of Health, Human, and Veterans Services before they can be put into service.

Wayne County Onsite Sewage System Program Process (single/duplex site)
  1. In the case of new house construction, site and soil studies are performed. Site and soil evaluations for the purpose of repairing or replacing existing septic systems
  2. Installation of septic systems requires the issuance of new or repair permits. Examines and reports on the installation of onsite sewage systems, including both new and repaired systems

Application for Perc TestingRepair/Replacement Application2020 Fee Schedule onsite sewage systems (also known as septic systems) on their property in order to treat wastewater that is generated by their residence in places where public sewer is not readily available. sewage systems are required to be linked to all facilities that create sewage, such as toilet bowls, sinks, bathtubs, showers, washing machines, dishwashers, and anything else that generates sewage. Water softening waste, roof drains, and footing drains should not be linked to sewage systems since they might cause clogging of the system.

  1. Additionally, effluent from water softeners should not be discharged near wells or surface water.
  2. A licensed environmentalist must assess and approve on-site sewage systems that are developed in accordance with Wayne County requirements (health inspector).
  3. Pipe coming from the house: All of your household wastewater is expelled from your home through a pipe that leads to a septic tank or septic tank system.
  4. Solid things begin to degrade, and anaerobic microorganisms begin to break down in the presence of oxygen.
  5. Every 3-5 years, the septic tank should be drained to eliminate the scum and sludge that has built up.
  6. If the drainfield becomes overburdened with a large amount of liquid, it will overflow.
  7. It is possible to have a reserve drainfield installed on your property in the event that your present drainage system fails or becomes inadequate.
  8. Prior to the wastewater reaching the groundwater, natural processes eliminate the majority of the pollutants in the wastewater.

Bacterial degradation happens both aerobically and anaerobically. Successful wastewater treatment requires soil that enables for percolation, or drainage, to occur. When a sewage system fails, there are visible evidence that it has failed:

  • Toilets are backing up, and drains are not draining. When there is an excessive amount of moisture or waste water on the surface of the drainfield
  • The drainfield or septic tank is responsible for the foul odors.
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Your family’s health and the health of your neighbors are at risk if your sewage system fails. Call the Environmental Health Section of the Wayne County Department of Health, Human and Veterans Services at (734) 727-7400 as soon as you see indicators of failure, and we will support you in your attempts to correct the condition as soon as possible. This evaluation assesses if a site is suitable for the installation of a new onsite sewage system. For further information about municipal sewage treatment, check with your local municipality or government agency.

  • If the drainfield is to work successfully, it is vital to have adequate soil.
  • Within Wayne County, however, there is a tremendous deal of variance in the types of soils.
  • Due to the fact that the sewage system drainfield must be constructed in well-drained soil in order to work correctly, the presence of saturated soil, or ground water, is a significant consideration.
  • For a Site/Soil Evaluation to be completed, you must first submit the Application for Site Evaluation for Sewage Disposal System (available online).
  • The owner’s name, address, and phone number should be included as well. 10-digit parcel identification number (tax identification number)
  • Land survey shows the intended placement of the house and septic system (active and reserve)
  • A legal description or an investigation Any intended alterations to the property, such as a potential land split, should be disclosed. You should have a draft map of the potential land divide on hand.

Make contact with an excavation contractor and set a few approximate dates for the examination to take place. Test holes will be dug by the excavation contractor in order to conduct the evaluation. Construction companies that specialize in excavation may be located in the yellow pages under the headings “Excavating Contractors” and “Septic TankSystems – ContractorsDealers.” Make an appointment with the Sanitarian to have the soil evaluated. A Very Important Note: It is your or the excavators’ obligation to establish the location of any subsurface utilities and utility easements on your property before beginning any excavation.

  1. Be aware that it may take several days for MISS DIG to designate your utility lines.
  2. You should phone the Environmentalist a couple of days later to make an appointment if you are unable to do so at the time of the application.
  3. In many circumstances, you may even request that the soil evaluation appointment be scheduled by the digging contractor on your behalf.
  4. In some cases, particularly during high building seasons, it may take up to ten business days to schedule a soil evaluation.

The Environmentalist examines the excavation site in search of the following items:

  • Evidence of a high water table at certain seasons
  • Distances between wells, surface water, structures, easements, and property lines in the surrounding region
  • Topography, vegetation, and drainage patterns are all important considerations. Other site factors may be taken into consideration at the discretion of the Sanitarian

Ideally, you should have a general notion of where you want the sewage system to be installed before the soil study is conducted. However, if the environmentalist or excavation contractor believes that the initial site selection is undesirable, they may advise an other location. Keep in mind that the Environmentalist’s function on the job site is to give knowledge and direction to the homeowner or builder in order to assist them with these selections. IMPORTANT: The onsite system must be installed at the permitted test locations (active and reserved areas).

  1. It will be necessary to make important decisions, and it is recommended that the property owner be present.
  2. You can file an appeal by completing and submitting the following form.
  3. It is necessary to have a valid permission, which is issued by this Department.
  4. Submit a completed permit application to this Department, together with the appropriate application and processing fee.
  • Completed application form
  • Documentation of permanent street address, if new construction (tax bill, township address form, etc.)
  • And payment of application fee. 10-digit parcel identification number (tax identification number)
  • (Only for new construction) A verified survey and legal description (only for new construction)
  • Fees that are reasonable

Completing the application form; providing documentation of the permanent street address if the building is a new construction (tax bill, township address form, etc.); Tax identification number (tax ID) is a 10-digit number. (Only for new building) A copy of a verified survey and legal description; Fees in accordance with the circumstances

Name Geographic Area Phone Number
Dave Wilson, Environmentalist Wayne County South and Southwest (734) 727- 7417
Andrzej Borek, EnvironmentalistWayne County North and Northwest (734) 727- 7465
Michelle Lenhart Varran, R.S., Department Manager (734) 727-7448

*Please keep in mind that field personnel are typically in the office from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Monday through Friday. If you have any questions, you can send an email to [email protected]

Septic Systems – Traverse City, MI – Belanger Septic & Security Sanitation

When it comes to septic systems, many individuals are typically perplexed by what they are. Septic systems are typically thought of as something that is out of sight, out of mind. However, keeping your septic system in good working order is essential to maintaining a healthy house. A neglected septic system can result in major health problems for you and your family, as well as for the surrounding environment. The operation of a septic system is as follows. As you add water to the tank, it fills to the right level, which will be just below the intake pipe when you are through.

  1. When it comes to groundwater, the water is filtered via sand and gravel in the drainfield before being returned into the system.
  2. Solids and toilet paper begin to accumulate immediately after the first flush.
  3. The use of cigarette butts, tampons, condoms, baby wipes, and adult wipes, as well as diapers, wash clothes, and other items that do not decompose with natural bacteria in a tank are all examples of things that people flush down the toilet.
  4. If you leave these sediments to accumulate in your tank for an extended period of time, they will eventually make their way into your drainfield.
  5. It might cost you hundreds of dollars to replace the item in question.
  6. When a field fails, the water is no longer filtered and will begin to bubble up through the surface of your perfectly manicured grass.
  7. Depending on the size of your family, you should have your septic tank drained every 3-5 years.
  8. The age of your system is also taken into consideration while planning your maintenance program.
  9. Drainfields normally have a life cycle of 20-25 years, although this may be extended by doing routine maintenance.

If you tend to use more toilet paper than the average person, you may wish to stick to a two-year timetable. Please do not hesitate to contact us at any time to discuss your maintenance requirements or to ask any queries you may have.

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Many folks have contacted me through e-mail (typically from across the nation) to inquire about the location of their septic tank. “I have no idea,” I generally say as a helpful response to the question. I really want to add something like, “It’s just off your driveway, near that bushy thing,” or anything along those lines. But, truly, even for the most experienced searchers, septic tanks are difficult to come by. The following are some strategies you might employ to assist you in locating your tank.

  • Precaution should be exercised before you get started.
  • So, proceed with caution!
  • Please let me know if you have any queries or need assistance.
  • Get to know the beast!
  • tanks are normally buried 4 inches to 4 feet below the surface of the ground.
  • You might be astonished to hear that someone knows exactly where it is hidden in plain sight.
  • It is against the law to dig or probe in your own yard without first locating and marking the underground services.

You will receive the following tools to aid you in your search: Measurement tape, tile probe, and a shovel (if you are ambitious) The following tools are required: a metal detector (borrow or rent one since septic tanks often include iron steel rebar in the lids), and a hoagie sandwich (because locating sewage tanks makes you hungry.trust me on this).

  • Examine the basement wall to see where all of the pipes join together and exit through the basement ceiling.
  • If you don’t have a basement, walk outdoors and check for the roof vents on your house.
  • Ordinarily, the sewage line that leads to the septic tank will exit the home right below this ventilation opening.
  • On sometimes, the ancient proverb “The grass is always greener on the other side of the septic tank” is true.

Your tank may be located by probing or digging for it, and with luck, you will locate it. Keep in mind that not everything that seems to be a septic tank actually is! It’s possible that you came upon one of the following instead:

  • Most of the time, I receive emails from folks asking where their septic tank is situated (typically from all across the nation). “I have no idea,” I normally say in response to be helpful. “It’s right off your driveway near that bushy thing,” I want to add in my head, but I’m not sure how. On the other hand, even for professionals, finding septic tanks can be difficult. You can use the following strategies to assist you in finding your tank. The following information will almost certainly have you exclaiming, “How intelligent these guys at Meade Septic Design are!” when you have finished reading. The reality is that they are not proprietary or innovative strategies, but rather tried and true ways for locating your tank in the marketplace. Here’s a word of warning before you start: It is possible for an ancient septic tank and drywell lids to fail, sending you plummeting to the ground or worse, drowning. Take precautions, then. “How to locate your septic tank” and “When Should I Pump My Septic Tank” are two of the films I’ve created. Please let me know if you have any questions or need assistance. Thanks! Stuart A core sampler is a good place to start if you don’t have one already. Learn everything you can about the creature. Septic tanks are typically 4.5 feet wide, 8.0 feet long, and 6 feet tall, depending on their size. tanks are normally buried 4 inches to 4 feet below the surface of the earth. Make sure to check with previous homeowners, your local health agency, and area pumpers before starting your quest for your yard’s favorite hidden concrete block. The fact that someone is aware of its whereabouts may come as a surprise. It is also free to call 811 to get your utilities tagged. Excavating or probing in your own yard without first marking the underground utilities is against the law! Don’t probe or attempt to dig up a high-pressure gas line “just for fun,” and don’t intentionally break the fiber-optic cable that connects the White House to the NORAD silos in North Dakota once they have been identified! Get the following tools to aid you in your search: Measurement tape, tile probe, and a spade (if you are ambitious) The following tools: a metal detector (borrow or rent one since septic tanks often include iron steel rebar in the lids), and a hoagie sandwich (because locating septic tanks makes you hungry.trust me on this). In order to begin, ask yourself, “Where does the sewage come out of my house?” The good news is that you have an unfinished basement. Examine the basement wall to see where all of the pipes join together and exit through the basement floor. Most of the time, your tank will be 10′ – 20′ outside of your home, directly in front of this pipe. For those of you who don’t have a basement, walk outside and look for the roof vent. This is a pipe that protrudes from your roof and is used to vent sewage gases to the outside environment. Ordinarily, the sewage line that leads to the septic tank will exit the home right below this ventilation vent. We hope that from this point on you will be able to locate your septic tank without too much trouble! “The grass is always greener on the other side of the septic tank,” as they say, is true on sometimes. Yes, the position of your tank may be indicated by a green rectangle in your backyard (perhaps you should have figured that out yourself.). The best you can do is probe or dig for your tank in the hopes of stumbling across it. It is important to be cautious since not everything that seems to be a septic tank actually is! In its place, you could have come across one or more of the following:
See also:  Why Are There Bubbles In My Toilet With Septic Tank? (Best solution)

After a few hours of hopelessly digging about in your yard, it will be time to eat your hoagie and take a little sleep. Following that, it will be necessary to rent or borrow a metal detector. In the event that your next-door neighbor loves Star Wars action figures or has more than three unidentified antennae on his roof, there is a significant probability that you can borrow his metal detector. If you’re lucky, the metal detector will really assist you in finding your septic tank, rather than simply a bunch of old buried automobile parts.

  1. According to local legend, a pumper known as “Zarzar The Incredible” can locate sewage tanks using a metal measuring tape spanning 30 feet in length.
  2. Continue to press your commode (“commode” sounds sophisticated) tape deeper and farther down the pipes until he “feels” the bottom of the tank with his tape.
  3. I recently acquired locate equipment that can be used to locate septic tanks, and I’m excited about it.
  4. For further information, please contact me at 574-533-1470.
  5. After that, you may have a movie of the inside of your sewer pipes created!
  6. Related: Visit our Septic System Maintenance page for more information.
  7. Services provided by Meade Septic Design Inc.
  8. Both Clients and Projects are included.
  9. Send me an email!

Frequently Asked Questions

Having spent a few hours unsuccessfully digging about in your yard, it will be time to eat your hoagie and retire for the evening. Then it will be necessary to rent or borrow a metal detector to complete the investigation. If your next-door neighbor loves Star Wars action figures or has more than three unidentified antennae on his roof, there is a significant probability that he has a metal detector that you may use to search for treasure. If you’re lucky, the metal detector will really assist you in discovering your septic tank, rather than simply a bunch of old buried auto parts.

  • As told in local legend, a well-known pumper known as “Zarzar The Incredible” can locate sewage tanks by using a 30′ metal measuring tape to trace their location.
  • Continue to press your commode (“commode” sounds sophisticated) tape deeper and farther down the pipes until he “feels” the bottom of the tank with his fingers.
  • Locating equipment that can be used to find septic tanks was just acquired by me.
  • Call me at 574-533-1470 if you’d like to learn more.
  • A video of the interior of your sewer pipes can then be created for you.
  • Related: For further information, please see our Septic System Care page.

Related: Well, Dosing Tank, and Distribution Box are all included. A Brief Description of Services Provided by Meade Septic Design Inc Detailed information about Meade Septic Design, Inc. Prospective clients, as well as specific projects Questions about a septic system? You may contact me via email!

Septic System FAQ’s Grayling MI

Is it necessary to get my septic tank cleaned or serviced on a regular basis? In accordance with the recommendations of the District Health Department10, a service frequency of about every 3 to 4 years is recommended. (To be added to our “service reminder” email list, please click here. ) Q2:How can I find the location of my septic tank? A2: Visual indications, such as slightly mounded or slightly depressed portions in the yard, may sometimes be used to identify the position of a septic tank.

  1. Most of the time, the tank is constructed of concrete and is positioned within 20 feet of the structure.
  2. When purchasing a property with a septic system, what should I do is to ask the following questions: A3:We suggest that a septic system check be performed prior to the sale of any house.
  3. For price information or to book an inspection, please contact us.
  4. A4: Please see ourSeptic System Maintenance Tipspage for more information.
  5. In the case of a big vehicle or machinery, you should avoid driving over the septic tank or drainfield area entirely if possible.
  6. Q6:How can I determine whether or not I have a septic system or whether or not I have sewer service?
  7. If you want to be certain, you should contact that particular unit of government.
  8. Anything with a large root system should not be planted within 10 feet of the septic tankORdrainfield, according to A7.

Why do I need to clean my septic tank every three years?

Pumping and checking your septic system on a regular basis can assist to extend the life of your onsite wastewater system, avoid costly repairs, and safeguard the quality of the water you use. Michigan has more than 1.3 million onsite wastewater treatment systems, according to the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. The vast majority of them are for single-family houses with a septic system. On-site wastewater treatment systems, which include septic tanks and soil absorption fields, are the most frequent kind of household wastewater treatment system in rural areas throughout the United States.

  • We are vulnerable to fecal pollution because of the failure of our onsite waste water systems, which are either inefficient or non-existent.
  • This pollution might be caused by a leaking septic tank system.
  • Residential wastewater systems in Michigan’s rural areas require frequent maintenance to keep them operating properly.
  • As of this writing, Michigan is the only state to have standard onsite wastewater rules.
  • Accordingly, onside wastewater system regulations differ from one county to the next in different states.
  • Generally speaking, most regulations state that a household of four should have their well pumped and inspected every three years on average.

Many also demand that newly installed systems be inspected before they may be used. Nothing comes back to check on the system a year or two later to ensure that it is still in good working order. In most cases, an onsite wastewater system is composed of three main components:

  1. • The drain waste pipes that carry waste from the home to a septic tank
  2. • The septic or settling tank, which is often divided in half by a baffle
  3. • The dispersion box and soil absorption or drain field

Sewage water is channeled through drain pipes from the toilets, laundry, and kitchen sinks of the house and into the septic tank. Septic tanks are constructed of solid cast concrete (in the majority of cases) and include both an intake and an outflow for effluent. As soon as the waste is introduced into the tank, the particles fall to the bottom and begin to breakdown, forming the sludge layer. The middle layer is made up of effluent water, while the top layer is made up of lighter oil and soaps that float to the top and form the scum layer.

Newer tanks may have a baffle, which creates a second settling region before water is discharged into the soil absorption field, which is beneficial.

It is important to note that if the sludge is not pushed out on a regular basis, the layer will get thick, enabling solids to seep into the drainage field.

Many people believe that this is an indication that the septic tank is full, which it most certainly is, but it is also a symptom of a failure.

This is one of the most often seen failures.

You should seek professional assistance if you are suffering sewage waste backup into your home from your septic tank.

Regular inspections and pumps might help you avoid costly issues down the road.

The usual guideline is every three years for a normal family house with three bedrooms and a 1000 gallon tank, which is fitted with a water heater.

Tanks in older homes may be smaller in size.

For example, if a three-bedroom home has a 900-gallon septic tank and there are six people living in the residence, the tank should be pumped every one and one-half to two years to avoid failure.

Pumping will be required on a more frequent basis in this residence.

Inspectors examine your system to ensure that it is in good working order.

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has a guidance on underground onsite wastewater treatment systems, however its recommendations are not enforceable under Michigan law.

For further in-depth information, the National Environmental Services Center at West Virginia University has a nice paper that includes a timetable in years for pumping recommendations at the conclusion of it.

A lengthier training film (about 110 minutes) about onsite wastewater septic systems can be found here.

For additional information on onsite waste water treatment septic tanks, contact Michigan State University ExtensionNatural Resources educators who are working around the state to provide instructional programming and support on water quality and septic tank management.

You can reach out to an educator using MSU Extension’s ” Find an Expert ” search engine by searching for “Natural Resources Water Quality” in the keywords field.

Additional Resources:

Education on Septic Systems Do you have any water? Septic examinations at the time of sale can help to safeguard water quality: Part 1. Michigan has the nation’s laxest septic system rules, according to the EPA. Michigan’s rivers are being threatened by thousands of faulty septic tanks. In Michigan, there are specific requirements for on-site wastewater treatment.

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