How To Check Septic Tank Level Without Digging Ot Up? (TOP 5 Tips)

  • If the location of the tank is unknown, check the direction of the large wastewater pipe coming from the toilet. The tank is usually in that direction, about 10 feet from the house. On most waterfront lots the top is less than a foot below the surface of the ground; many are at ground level or above.

How do I check the water level in my septic tank?

This normal liquid level is usually between 8” to 12” from the top of the tank on average (see picture at right). If the liquid level is at bottom of the outlet pipe, then one would assume the absorption area is accepting the household wastewater.

How do I know if my septic holding tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  1. Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  2. Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  3. Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  4. You Hear Gurgling Water.
  5. You Have A Sewage Backup.
  6. How often should you empty your septic tank?

How do I check my septic tanks sludge level?

To measure the sludge layer:

  1. Slowly lower the tube into the septic tank until it touches the bottom of the tank.
  2. As the device is slowly pulled out of the water, the check valve closes capturing a liquid/solid profile of the septic tank water. The thickness of the sludge layer can be measured.

Can I shower if my septic tank is full?

Only the water would get out into the leach field in a proper system unless you run too much water too fast. The thing to do is to run your shower water outside into it’s own drain area, but it may not be allowed where you are. Used to be called gray water system.

What are signs of septic tank problems?

7 Warning Signs Your Septic System Is Failing

  • Gurgling Pipes. They would occur when you run water in the house (e.g. when using the sink or shower) or flush the toilet.
  • Bad Odours. It’s never a pleasant experience when this occurs.
  • Water At Ground Level.
  • Green Grass.
  • Slow Drainage.
  • Blocked Pipes.

What can mess up a septic system?

9 Ways You’re Destroying Your Septic Tank

  • Flushing Paper Products.
  • Pouring Grease Down the Drain.
  • Using Too Much Drain Cleaner.
  • Introducing Additives to Your System.
  • Flushing Cat Litter.
  • Neglecting to Pump Your Tank Regularly.
  • Planting Trees and Shrubs on Your Drain Field.
  • Washer Lint Overload.

How long can a septic tank go without being pumped?

You can wait up to 10 years to drain your tank provided that you live alone and do not use the septic system often. You may feel like you can pump your septic tank waste less frequently to save money, but it’ll be difficult for you to know if the tank is working properly.

How do I clean my septic tank naturally?

You can mix about a 1/4 cup of baking soda with 1/2 cup of vinegar and 2 tablespoons lemon to make your own natural cleaning agent. The baking soda will fizz up to help get the dirt and grime in your tub and drains. It’s a great cleaner and your septic system will thank you!

How often should you empty a 1000 gallon septic tank?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

How do I remove sludge from my septic tank?

How to Reduce Sludge in a Septic Tank Without Pumping

  1. Install an aeration system with diffused air in your septic tank.
  2. Break up any compacted sludge.
  3. Add a bio-activator or microbe blend.
  4. Maintain the aeration system.
  5. Add additional Microbes as required.

Can a full septic tank cause gurgling?

Septic tank needs to be pumped: When your septic tank is too full, gurgling noises will be common with any plumbing fixture or element you use. The tank will be unable to drain, blocking the sewer lines from flowing as they should. You may also notice sewage seeping from the ground or a strong odor outside your home.

What are the do’s and don’ts of a septic tank?

DON’T flush material that will not easily decompose, such as hair, diapers, cigarette butts, matches, or feminine hygiene products. DO conserve water to avoid overloading the system. They kill the bacteria needed to decompose wastes in the septic tank and drain field. DO use substitutes for household hazardous waste.

Is Ridex good for septic?

How additives, like Rid-x, interfere with your septic system’s eco-system. According to the EPA and the Ohio Department of Health, not only are additives like Rid-X not recommended, but they actually have a detrimental and potentially hazardous effect on your septic system’s waste treatment process.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

It may seem impossible to imagine that one of the largest and most visible elements of your whole plumbing system is also one of the most difficult to locate, but when your property is served by a septic system, this is perfectly true. A strong explanation for this is because septic tanks are huge, unattractive, stink horrible and give off an unwarranted impression of dirt. Not only does burying them underground assist to prevent them from harm, but it also provides you with additional useable space on your property and conceals what would otherwise be a blight on your landscape.

This site is dedicated to assisting you in locating your septic system without the need for any time-consuming digging.

How To Find A Septic Tank: Step By Step

It is critical to maintain the health of your septic tank since it is responsible for securely storing and handling the wastewater that drains from your house. It is necessary to pump your septic tank once every 1-3 years, depending on the number of people living in your household and the size of your tank, in order to avoid septic tank repairs or early failure, which means you must be familiar with the location of your tank. It’s not often simple to identify your septic tank, and many plumbers charge extra for this service, which is especially true if your tank’s lid is buried beneath.

1. Gather Some Helpful Tools

Septic tank location may be made much easier with the use of several simple instruments and techniques. To locate your septic tank, you only need to know the following information: A soil probe is one of the most useful instruments for locating a septic tank. It is a tiny piece of metal that is used to puncture through the earth and detect anything that could be buried underneath. Start at the point where your sewage line exits your home and work your way straight out, inserting your soil probe every two feet along the way.

Using this method, you may also locate the cover for your septic tank.

While we highly advise keeping your cover clean and exposed in the event that you require emergency septic service, we recognize that this is not always the case.

2. Use a Septic Tank Map

If you are a new homeowner who is trying to figure out where your septic tank is, a septic tank map should be included in your inspection documentation.

You can use this information to assist you in pinpointing the exact position of your storage tank. If you don’t have access to this map, there are a few of additional strategies you might employ.

3. Start Ruling Areas Out

The location of a septic tank cannot be constructed in specific areas due to the risk of causing major damage to your property or tank, as specified by local rules. Your septic tank will not be affected by the following:

  • There are some restrictions that state exactly where a septic tank cannot be built in order to prevent major harm to your property or tank from taking place. The following will not be true of your septic tank:

4. Inspect Your Property

If you take a hard look around your land, there’s a high possibility you’ll be able to locate your septic tank without having to do any probing whatsoever. In many circumstances, a septic tank may be identified by a slight dip or slope on your land that cannot be explained by any other means. Due to the fact that the hole that your contractors excavated for your septic tank may not have been exactly the proper size, they proceeded to install the tank anyhow. This is a rather regular occurrence.

When there is a minor divot or depression, it indicates that the hole was too large and that your contractors simply did not fill the depression to level the hole.

The likelihood of your septic tank being discovered in a few specific locations is quite high.

  • Your water well, if you have one (for a variety of reasons that are rather clear)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a driveway, sidewalk, or patio unless they were added after the home was built and no one conducted a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built If there is any particular landscaping

5. Inspect Your Yard

Your water well, if you have one (for a variety of reasons that are quite self-explanatory); Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built); any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a driveway unless it was added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built); any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one conducted Landscaping that is distinctive;

  • If your septic tank is overfilled, sewage can leak out into the ground and function as fertilizer for your lawn, resulting in lush green grass. A area of grass that is very lush and green is a good sign that your septic tank is just beneath it
  • Puddles that don’t make sense: If your septic tank is seriously overfilled, it is possible that water will pool on your grass. Another telltale indicator that your septic tank is below ground level is an unexplainable pool of water. Ground that is uneven: When installing septic tanks, it is possible that the contractors will mistakenly create high or low patches on your grass. If you come across any uneven terrain, it’s possible that your septic tank is right there.

The metal soil probe can let you find out for certain whether or not your septic tank is located in a certain area of your yard or not. When your metal soil probe contacts the tank, you may use your shovel to dig up the grass and discover the septic tank lid.

6. Follow Your Sewer Main/Sewer Pipes

Using your metal soil probe, you can determine whether or not your septic tank is located in a certain area of your yard. As soon as your metal soil probe makes contact with the tank, you may use your shovel to dig out the grass surrounding it and discover the septic tank lid.

7. Check Your Property Records

Lastly, if all else fails, a search of your property’s public records will almost certainly reveal the location of the tank you’re looking for. Your builders most likely secured a permit for your property because septic systems are required to be installed by law in every state. In order to do so, they had to develop a thorough plan that depicted your property as well as the exact location where they intended to construct the tank. This is to guarantee that the local health agency is aware of the tank and can solve any concerns that it could pose.

If you look hard enough, you may be able to locate the original building records for your home without ever having to get in your car or visit your local records center. Some localities make these records public on the internet, whereas others do not.

What to Do Once You Find Your Septic Tank

Upon discovering the position of your septic tank, you should mark its location on a map of your property. Use something to indicate the location of your lid, such as an attractive garden item that can’t be changed, to help you locate it. A birdbath, a rock, or a potted plant are just a few of the possibilities. You are now ready to arrange your septic tank inspection and pumping service. Contact us now! If you have any more concerns regarding how to locate your septic tank, or if you want septic tank servicing, please contact The Plumbing Experts at (864) 210-3127 right now!

How to unclog your leach field

Upon discovering the position of your septic tank, you should mark the site on a map of your property. A ornamental garden element that can’t be readily relocated should also be used to designate the location of the lid when it’s closed. A birdbath, a rock, or a potted plant are just a few examples of what you might use. The time has come for you to arrange for a septic tank checkup and pumping service. Call The Plumbing Experts at (864) 210-3127 if you have any more concerns about how to locate your septic tank or if you want septic tank servicing right away.

How is a leach field made?

It is critical that the leaching bed functions well in the wastewater treatment system, and if it does not, the entire system will be adversely affected. It is also critical to prevent structural problems from occurring in the first place by ensuring that the building is designed correctly. As a result, only fully licensed contractors are permitted to do such a project. But, first and foremost, you will need to conduct a percolation test as well as a comprehensive review by an engineering professional.

A quick percolation rate is seen in sandy soils; whereas, a sluggish percolation rate is found in clay soils.

In order for a soil to be considered excellent, its percolation rate should not be too high or too low.

If, on the other hand, it takes more than an hour for the water to settle, this indicates that the effluent is not infiltrating quickly enough, which might result in backflow difficulties.

Steps followed when building a leach field

  • The moment has come to start digging the trenches after all of the testing have been performed and the building plan has been finalized and approved by the project team. The number of trenches that will need to be built depends on the size of the septic tank and the volume of wastewater that will be released into the leaching field throughout the construction process. Each trench should have the same breadth as the others (approximately 3-4 feet). In addition, the ditches should have a modest downhill slope to them. Following the excavation of the trenches, they should be filled with crushed stone. The crushed stone bed should be at least one to one and a half inches thick and evenly distributed throughout the ditches. This procedure is critical because it enables for more effective drainage of the effluent under the perforated pipes
  • Nevertheless, it is not required. The perforated pipes are then laid on top of a bed of crushed stone to allow for proper drainage. Crushed stone is then placed on top of the perforated pipes to ensure that they are securely attached — enough to prevent them from moving or getting misaligned over time. A layer of crushed stone between 1 and 3 inches thick should enough.
  • Following that, a geotextile membrane is laid over the crushed stones. The membrane prevents soil or dirt from falling between the crushed stones and clogging the leaching bed
  • sIf not previously done, install a drain line connecting the septic tank to the leach field pipes
  • Finally, the trenches are filled with dirt to make them more level and to make the surface of the leach field more consistent in appearance. After that, you may cover the area with a covering of grass. And, at all costs, avoid planting anything else in or near this part of the yard.
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How long does a septic leach field last?

Weeping beds should last at least 25 years if they are well-maintained, but they may live much longer or shorter depending on a variety of conditions. The majority of leaching fields collapse as a result of biological or hydraulic overstress. Hydraulic overload occurs when an excessive amount of water is discharged into the septic tank. Consequently, it is advised that duties such as washing be spread out throughout the course of the week rather than being completed in a single weekend session.

When an excessive amount of organic material enters the leaching field, this is referred to as biological overloading.

The only solid waste that should be disposed of in your septic system is toilet paper and human waste (feces).

Additional to this, we advocate the frequent use of biochemical additives to improve the overall efficiency and lifetime of the system. Because of the high activity of the bacterial flora in your system, Bio-Sol’sSepti +can help to avoid biological overload in your system.

What is clogging your leach field?

The leaching bed, like the septic tank, is not meant to survive indefinitely. All leaching fields will need to be replaced at some point in the future. However, with careful care and maintenance, your leaching bed should last for many years, if not for a lifetime. The leaching bed utilizes aerobic bacteria on the receiving soil to filter wastewater before it reaches the groundwater table, preventing groundwater contamination. These bacteria decompose organic materials and aid in the elimination of viruses as well as the reduction of nutrients in wastewater.

Clogging in the leaching bed, on the other hand, causes this process to be slowed down, resulting in unavoidable environmental contamination.

Biomat

During the wastewater treatment process, a black, gelatinous layer forms beneath the distribution pipes as the wastewater passes through the leach field. Rather than sludge, this layer is really a biomaterial sludge known as “biomat.” Because the biomat is waterproof, it significantly minimizes the amount of wastewater that percolates into the soil. In most cases, this biomat is formed of organic waste and anaerobic bacteria that have attached themselves to the soil or broken stone. The organic stuff in the effluent provides food for these bacteria.

  • Contrary to this, it aids in the further filtering of wastewater by reducing the rate of infiltration and retaining the organic matter before the water is allowed to reach the soil.
  • More black gelatinous sludge builds up in the trenches, the more difficult it will be for the wastewater to permeate and subsequently percolate into the soil as a result of the accumulation.
  • As soon as sewage begins to back up, it will always flow to the spot that provides the least amount of resistance.
  • When this occurs, the objective should not be to entirely remove the biomat from the environment.
  • It is important to note that good care and maintenance of the system will assist in preventing such an imbalance, which will save you a great deal of headache (like having to unclog your leach field).

How do you know if your leach field is failing?

It goes without saying that the most visible indicator of a failing leaching bed is when wastewater overflows and reaches the surface. The effluent will rise to the top of the soil or, in certain situations, will pour out the end of the trenches if the receiving soil in the leaching bed is unable to absorb any more water from the receiving soil.

The most common reason for the effluent to stop flowing is due to an excessive amount of biomatis being created. Check out the following indicators to determine if you need to unclog your leach field:.

Sluggish drains and toilets

Prior to the drain field failing altogether, you may notice that water is draining through the home at a slower rate. The drains will continue to function as long as there is enough space for the water to flow. On the other hand, it is possible that the water is draining more slowly. If you neglect this problem, which is caused by the leach field, the situation will deteriorate over time and become more serious. It is possible that the septic tank will become overflowing and that the water will be unable to penetrate into the earth at all.

Septic odors

Septic tank scents might be detected in the vicinity of the leaching area or within the house itself. Another sign that the leaching field is failing is the presence of rust. Due to the fact that it is so uncomfortable, this is perhaps one of the easiest indicators to recognize. To determine if you are experiencing the rotten egg smell, first check to see if there has been a buildup of organic material in the plumbing system. You may either use an ecologically friendly drain cleaner (such as SeptiDrain) or check your septic tank for abnormally high water levels to resolve the problem.

Sewage backing up in the house

In the case of clogged septic fields, water is returned to them, which causes the water level in the septic tank to rise. Water will back up through the hole in the septic tank or into your home if there isn’t enough room left in the tank. The leach field in your septic tank is almost certain to be the source of the problem if you see an excessively high water level in the tank. The water level in the septic tank should always be at or below the level of the drain pipe that connects the tank to the leaching field.

It is thus required to verify if the soil may be saturated owing to significant rainfall or snowmelt and also to determine if there has been a recent hydraulic overload.

However, if the situation persists, we can conclude that the leaching bed is no longer operating correctly (it is most likely clogged).

Greener and taller grass around the drainfield

A sign that your leach field is not operating correctly is the presence of higher, greener grass in the area where it’s supposed to be placed. When wastewater is unable to penetrate the soil, pressure can force it to rise to the surface, causing it to become visible. Because of the nutrients in the wastewater, the grass might grow more quickly and seem greener as a result of this.

Puddles of water in the yard

A sign that your leach field is not operating effectively is the presence of higher, greener grass in the vicinity of where the field is located.

When wastewater can no longer be absorbed by the soil, it can be forced to the surface by pressure. Nutrients from wastewater can stimulate quicker growth and a greener appearance in the grass when this occurs.

Soil sinking or collapsing over the leachfield

The presence of excessively damp soil where the leaching bed is placed may also be an indicator that the leaching bed is no longer performing effectively, according to the manufacturer.

How to unclog your leach field?

When you find an issue with your leaching bed, you should make an attempt to fix it as quickly as possible. If this is not done, the condition may worsen and result in wastewater overflows. Those spills are potentially hazardous to both you and the environment. Also prohibited is the pollution of the environment, and local authorities may order you to replace your septic system if you fail to comply with the law. In addition to promoting the growth of biomat, as previously described, the discharge of organic particles into the leaching bed generates an imbalance in the natural water filtration system.

  • As a consequence, a waterproof biomaterial sludge is formed, and this sludge significantly reduces the rate of infiltration of wastewater into the receiving soil, which is abnormal.
  • Because of this, it is necessary to minimize the accumulation of organic matter in leaching fields and to reduce the thickness of the sludge layer that clogs the leaching fields.
  • However, the one offered by Bio-Sol is without a doubt the quickest, easiest, safest, and most ECONOMIC method available!
  • These shock treatments are 100 percent environmentally friendly (and hence safe), and they are simple to do on your own.
  • It is typically necessary to introduce a high concentration of these bacteria and enzymes into the leaching bed in order to break down the organic waste that has collected in the leaching bed and unclog the leach field.
  • The result is that your septic system is back in operating order!
  • The majority of the time, this occurs when a large truck passes by.
  • If this is the case, you should use a camera to evaluate the area to ensure that there is no structural damage.

How much does a new leach field cost?

Choosing to repair your leaching bed will almost certainly necessitate the replacement of your complete septic system as well. You will require a fresh percolation test as well as an appraisal by an engineer with appropriate qualifications. When using a standard septic system, you may expect to pay between $5,000 and $12,500 for the installation and maintenance. However, if you require the installation of a more sophisticated system, the cost of the replacement will be significantly higher (between $15,000 and $30,000).

As a result, we highly recommend you to attempt to resolve the problem first by selecting one of the alternative options that have been provided.

PROMOTION TO ASSIST YOU IN UNCLOGGING YOUR LEACH FIELD: By visiting our monthly specials page, you can receive a discount on a shock treatment. To save even more money, click here: SAVE UP TO 150$ ON A SHOCK TREATMENT WITH THIS PROMOTION.

Conclusion

A blocked leach field will jeopardize the integrity of the entire system. It can result in sewage backups in the house, septic smells, sewage leaking on the yard, and groundwater contamination, among other problems. Unclogging your leachfield with shock treatment can help you to avoid these and other problems associated with leachfield failure in the future. It is the injection of billions of bacteria and enzymes into the sewage system through the use of biological additives that is known as shock treatment.

This septic-safe solution from Bio-Sol is manufactured from bacteria and enzymes, and it will clear your leach field without harming the bacteria or enzymes in your system.

4 Things to Do When Your Septic Tank Is Flooded

If your neighborhood has recently been flooded or has been subjected to strong rains, you may discover that your toilet isn’t flushing properly and that your drains are draining more slowly than usual. It is possible that raw sewage will back up into your tub and sink drains. Drains that are slow or clogged may signal that the water table has risen over the level of your septic field and septic tank. If you believe that your septic system has been flooded, there are four things you should do immediately.

  1. Check the level of groundwater in your area.
  2. The top of the septic tank is normally a few feet below the earth.
  3. If you are aware of the location of your septic tank and drainfield, you should check the water level in the area to ensure that flooding is not a concern.
  4. When there isn’t any evident standing water in the area, use a probe to check the water level or an auger to dig deep into the earth to find out how much water is there.
  5. If your tests reveal that the water level is higher than the top of the septic tank, you should immediately cease utilizing the tank.
  6. 2.
  7. Until the Ground Becomes Dry When you believe that your septic system has been flooded, contact a septic pumping specialist immediately; however, you must wait until the earth has become less soggy before having your tank drained.
  8. If a septic tank is pumped out when the earth is saturated, it may potentially float out of its location.
  9. Following a decrease in the water table level, it is necessary to pump your system as quickly as feasible.
  10. 3.
  11. Approximately 70 gallons of water are flushed down the toilet per person every day in the average home.

The first step is to check for leaks in all of your fixtures. An inoperable toilet flapper or fill mechanism can leak up to 200 gallons per day, creating a backup of water that your flooded septic system doesn’t have room for. Other suggestions for keeping water out of the drains are as follows:

  • It’s possible that your toilet isn’t flushing properly or that your drains aren’t emptying quickly if your neighborhood has recently been flooded or has been subjected to strong rainfall. Your tub and sink drains may even become clogged with raw sewage. It is possible that the water table has risen above your septic field and septic tank bottom, resulting in slow or backed-up drainage. Four things should be done immediately if you detect flooding in your septic system. 1. Determine the level of groundwater Drainfields for septic tanks are typically located between 2 and 4 feet below the surface of the soil’s water table. Septic tanks are typically located a few feet below the surface of the earth. Your septic system may be unable to manage wastewater from your home if the ground level rises over certain levels. Verify that flooding is not a concern in the area where your septic tank and drainfield are located if you know where they are located. You may have a flooded septic system if you notice standing water over the drainfield or tank. When there isn’t any evident standing water in the area, use a probe to check the water level or an auger to dig deeper into the earth to find out how much water is there. Select a location that is within 10 feet of the tank and 20 feet of the drainfield. The use of your septic tank should be discontinued if your tests reveal that the water level has risen over its maximum capacity. It is OK to utilize your septic system sparingly until the water table drops at least 3 feet below the level of your tank. 2. Refrain from pumping till later. For as long as the ground remains moist When you believe that your septic system has been flooded, contact a septic pumping specialist immediately. However, you must wait until the earth has become less soggy before having your tank pumped. Waiting too long might result in the infiltration of water into the tank and drainfield, exacerbating the situation. Additionally, if the septic tank is drained out when the earth is inundated, the tank may float away from its location. Pipes in the inlet and outflow areas may be damaged as a result. As soon as the water table has been decreased, it is necessary to have your system pumped as quickly as feasible. In order to minimize compaction of the soil, avoid driving any heavy gear near the septic region prior to this happening. 3 – Minimize the amount of water that is flushed down the toilet Approximately 70 gallons of water are flushed down the toilet per person every day in the average household. It is necessary to restrict the quantity of water you use until the groundwater level falls below your septic tank in order to lessen the amount of water that enters the already failing system. The first step is to check for leaks in all of your fixture. An inoperable toilet flapper or fill mechanism can leak up to 200 gallons per day, creating a backup of water that your flooded septic system cannot handle. The following are other suggestions for keeping water out of drains:

If your clothes washing machine drains into your main sewage line, it can cause a significant amount of water to be discharged into your septic system. Wash your garments at the laundry until the water table begins to fall below the surface. In the event that you must use the washing machine, wash only modest loads and wait a few hours between each load of laundry. 4. Make modifications to your septic system to make it more efficient. After your septic tank has been drained and your house drainage system has been restored to working order, you should make certain modifications to your system in order to minimize flooding problems in the future.

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During a septic emergency, the backflow preventer prevents waste water from entering your home or building.

Also, check to be that your yard’s storm drainage does not overflow into your septic field and storage tank area.

When your septic system is inundated, call Eckmayer Inc right away.

How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

All septic tanks eventually fill with sediments and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain in excellent functioning order. If the tank’s lid is not on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located. A typical septic tank is 4 inches to 4 feet underground, with all of its components, including the cover, buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underneath. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the surface of the ground.

Consult A Map

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank. If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your efforts.

Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land. After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if it is there. Locate the same spot outside and make a note of it. Insert a thin metal probe into the earth, identify the 4-inch sewage line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the property.

Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet apart from the home in all states except Alaska. The majority of them are between 10 and 25 feet away. Whenever the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene it indicates that the tank has been located.

Locate The Lid

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewer line that runs from the residence into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if applicable. Make a note of the exact same place outside. Insert a thin metal probe into the ground, identify the 4-inch sewer line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the line. Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet away from the home in all states except Alaska and Hawaii.

The tank has been located when the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

Mark The Spot

Septic tank lid opening is best left to the pros after you’ve discovered where it may be found. Several lifting tools are required to remove concrete septic tank lids, which are very heavy in some cases. An open tank may release toxic vapors into the atmosphere. Anyone roaming about on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be seriously injured or perhaps killed. In addition to the noxious vapors, falling into an open tank can be lethal.

4 Potential Problems If You Skip a New-Home Septic Inspection

Some septic issues are quite visible, while others are less obvious. You may notice that the septic leach field is all squelchy and emitting foul odors if you’re considering purchasing a property with a septic tank and you’re thinking about purchasing the home. This will likely cause warning bells to sound in your brain. Other septic diseases, on the other hand, may need more subtlety and knowledge to identify. If the seller assures you that the septic system is in good operating order, this does not imply that it will continue to function well after you purchase the home.

In order to do so, you will require a septic inspection rather than a normal house inspection.

1. Tree Roots in Pipes

Tree roots, even those in a septic system, have the potential to physically kill water pipelines. Therefore, all trees should be placed at a distance from the system that is at least equal to the tree’s mature height when fully grown (and some should be kept even further away). However, the problem in your circumstance is that, even if roots do manage to penetrate into the pipes, the seller may be completely unaware of the situation, leading to the creation of a metaphorical ticking time bomb in the system.

Depending on if the seller has planted any trees in the last several years (or whether there has been a drought, causing existing trees to seek water further afield), new roots may have recently gotten into the irrigation system.

2. A Tank Full of Sludge

When it comes to routine house inspection, you’d think it would be difficult for someone to overlook a septic tank that hasn’t been drained out in decades. However, there are two possible reasons why the inspector could overlook this. First and first, some house inspectors do not even enter the septic tank to assess the quantity of sludge. This is especially true if the tank can’t be reached without first digging a trench. Second, a tank that had not been pumped in decades may have been pumped as soon as the home was put on the market after it was sold.

3. A Tank That’s Taking On Water

Septic tanks, like ships, should never be allowed to fill with water since they will eventually sink. Because a septic tank is placed underground, a fracture in the side might enable water from the surrounding ground to seep into the tank and cause damage. Because a septic system is only capable of handling a limited quantity of water, this can be quite detrimental. A breach that allows water to enter the tank might cause your septic system to become overburdened with water, significantly reducing its ability to handle your wastewater.

4. A Compressed Leach Field

Given that you weren’t able to observe the leach field’s original level, you won’t be able to determine much about its current status by just comparing it to when it was first constructed. The previous owners had the option of treating the land above a septic system as if it were regular ground, which might easily lead the soil to contract and produce difficulties in subsequent years. For example, the following conditions can cause a leach field to become compacted and problematic:

  • Parking automobiles, trailers, recreational vehicles, and other vehicles in the vicinity
  • In the case of a picnic table or a swingset, or any other heavy item on the earth
  • Allowing an excessive amount of foot traffic (even for maintenance tasks such as mowing) The grazing of big animals, such as cows, in the region is permitted.

When it comes to septic systems, the ability to disperse the treated water at the end of the treatment process is critical since the entire system is dependent on this ability to function. The leach field is the final phase in the treatment process, and it is here that all of your wastewater must drain (or evaporate) away before it can be recycled. The earth’s ability to manage wastewater decreases as the soil becomes more compacted. Even if you have a general house inspection, it may be easy to overlook these four issues, so call AERO Plumbing for assistance now.

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Does My Lawn Need To Be Dug Up To Pump The Septic Tank?

When it comes time to pump out your septic tank (which should be done every three to five years), you may be concerned about the impact the job will have on your yard. Even though in the past, specialists may have required to dig around the region in order to do exploratory diagnostics, contemporary technology allows technicians to repair and pump your septic tank without the need of invasive procedures.

When having your septic tank drained, there are a few things you should be prepared for:

Finding the Tank

Despite the fact that the specialists may do this step for you, they will charge you a fee if they have to identify the tank and remove the lid, thus completing this step on your own will save you money. If you have an as-built map of your septic system, it can assist you in locating the tank; however, if you do not have one or are unable to locate one, you should locate the plumbing vents (on the roof) and determine whether or not they line up with the sewer line that leads to the septic tank.

However, if that approach does not work, you may try an electronic detecting gadget, which flushes down the toilet and sends an electrical signal to a receiver.

Pumping the Tank

Make certain that you have a receipt from the team that outlines the services that were provided. In this case, the format should be something like this:

  • The estimated number of gallons that were pumped
  • Information about the measures of the scum layer
  • Pumping capacity
  • Condition of the tank and baffles
  • Number of compartments pumped Information on any other services that were provided

Pay particular attention to the measurements of the sludge layer since they will assist you in determining the timing of your next pumping. The pace at which sediments build up in the tank will decide how frequently you should have the tank professionally cleaned.

When Digging Might be Necessary

When cleaning or pumping the tank, there should be minimal reason to poke about in the tank too much. Professionals, on the other hand, could decide to repair or replace worn sewage lines if they discover enough damage to warrant tank replacement. This would need considerable excavating. If you choose a reliable business, on the other hand, they should notify you in advance of any works that would cause disruption in your yard. Regular system maintenance is the most effective strategy to prevent small tank concerns from necessitating the need for subsurface procedures.

Septic Tank Installation and Pricing

To process and dispose of waste, a septic system has an underground septic tank constructed of plastic, concrete, fiberglass, or other material that is located beneath the earth. Designed to provide a customized wastewater treatment solution for business and residential locations, this system may be installed anywhere. Although it is possible to construct a septic tank on your own, we recommend that you hire a professional to do it owing to the amount of skill and specific equipment required.

Who Needs a Septic Tank?

For the most part, in densely populated areas of the nation, a home’s plumbing system is directly connected to the municipal sewer system.

For more remote regions, municipal sewer connections aren’t available therefore sewage is treated with a septic tank. If you’re moving into a newly constructed house or onto land that doesn’t already have a septic tank, you’ll be responsible for putting in a septic system on your own.

How to Prepare for Your Septic Tank Installation

Here are a few pointers to keep in mind to make sure your septic tank installation goes as smoothly as possible.

Receive Multiple Estimates

Receiving quotations from licensed septic tank installers and reading reviews about each firm using trustworthy, third-party customer evaluations should be done before any excavation or signing of any paperwork is done. Examine your options for a contractor and make sure they have the appropriate insurance and license, as well as the ability to include critical preparations such as excavation and drain field testing in their quotation.

Test the Soil and Obtain a Permit

For septic systems to function properly, permeable soil surrounding the tank must absorb and naturally handle liquid waste, ensuring that it does not pollute runoff water or seep into the groundwater. This region is referred to as the drain or leach field.Before building a septic tank, you are legally required to conduct a percolation test, often known as a “perc,” on the soil. This test indicates that the soil fits the specifications established by the city and the local health agency. In most cases, suitable levels of permeable materials, such as sand or gravel, are necessary in a soil’s composition.

Prior to acquiring the land that you want to utilize for residential purposes, we recommend that you obtain a soil test.

Plan for Excavation

Excavation of the vast quantity of land required for a septic tank necessitates the use of heavy machinery. If you are presently residing on the property, be careful to account for landscaping fees to repair any damage that may have occurred during the excavation process. Plan the excavation for your new home at a period when it will have the least influence on the construction process if you are constructing a new home. Typically, this occurs before to the paving of roads and walkways, but after the basic structure of the home has been constructed and erected.

The Cost of Installing a Septic Tank

There are a few installation charges and additional expenditures connected with constructing a new septic system, ranging from a percolation test to emptying the septic tank and everything in between.

Percolation Test

A percolation test can range in price from $250 to $1,000, depending on the area of the property and the soil characteristics that are being tested. Ordinarily, specialists will only excavate a small number of holes in the intended leach field region; however, if a land study is required to identify where to excavate, the cost of your test may rise.

Building Permit Application

A permit will be required if you want to install a septic tank on your property. State-by-state variations in permit prices exist, however they are normally priced around $200 and must be renewed every few years on average.

Excavation and Installation

When you have passed a percolation test and obtained a building permit, your septic tank is ready to be professionally placed.

The cost of a new septic system is determined by the size of your home, the kind of system you choose, and the material used in your septic tank. The following is a list of the many treatment methods and storage tanks that are now available, as well as the normal pricing associated with each.

Types of Septic Tank Systems

Septic system that is used in the traditional sense Traditionally, a septic system relies on gravity to transport waste from the home into the septic tank. Solid trash settles at the bottom of the sewage treatment plant, while liquid sewage rises to the top. Whenever the amount of liquid sewage increases over the outflow pipe, the liquid waste is discharged into the drain field, where it continues to disintegrate. This type of traditional septic system is generally the most economical, with an average cost of roughly $3,000 on the market today.

Drain fields for alternative systems require less land than conventional systems and discharge cleaner effluent.

See also:  How Mush Use Septic Tank? (Solution found)

Septic system that has been engineered A poorly developed soil or a property placed on an uphill slope need the installation of an engineered septic system, which is the most difficult to install.

It is necessary to pump the liquid waste onto a leach field, rather than depending on gravity to drain it, in order to ensure that it is equally dispersed across the land.

Types of Septic Tanks

  • Concrete septic tanks are long-lasting and rust-proof, but they are difficult to repair if they are damaged. It is possible that concrete tanks will cost up to $2,000 depending on their size. Plastic —While plastic tanks are cost-effective, they are also susceptible to damage. They are around $1,200 in price. Fiberglass —While fiberglass septic tanks are more durable than their plastic counterparts, they are susceptible to shifting or displacement if the water table rises to an excessive level. Depending on the model, these tanks may cost up to $2,000

More information may be found at: Septic Warranty Coverage and Costs.

Using Your Septic Tank

It is important to maintain the area around your new septic tank’s drain field and to frequently check your tank using the lids included with it. Never use a trash disposal in conjunction with your septic tank since it might cause the system to clog. Additionally, avoid driving over the land where your septic tank is located or putting heavy gear on top of your septic tank or drain field to prevent damage. Most of the time, after five years of septic system use, you’ll need to arrange a cleaning and pumping of the system.

Send an email to our Reviews Team [email protected] if you have any comments or questions regarding this post.

septic tank — Butte County Septic — Magneson Tractor Service Inc.

Welcome to the World Wide Web! This is the location where messages propagate rapidly, regardless of their legitimacy. However, this was occurring long before the advent of the internet, through the basic medium of word of mouth. With the abundance of information available and flowing, it can be difficult to discern between realities and urban legends. We’ve chosen to put the record straight on a few common misconceptions concerning septic tanks and systems in order to help others from making the same mistakes.

Starting With a New Septic Systems Requires Seeding

What exactly is seeding? It does exactly what it says on the tin: it assists your system and bacteria in growing by providing “seeds,” or in this case organic material. Also, we’ve heard of everything under the sun, including flushing an entire pound of yeast, manure, worms, and other such methods of waste disposal. This is a myth! Your septic system does not require your assistance to get up and running. Simply said, the system must be followed.

You have enough “seeding” powers in your human waste to get it started. The one area in which the truth does show through is in maintaining the health of your system, particularly if you tend to use a lot of antibacterial or bleach products. This takes us to the second myth we’ll look at.

Additives Keep Old Systems Running Great

You’ve undoubtedly heard someone make this assertion. Do you have an outdated system or a system that isn’t performing as efficiently as it should? Just add a few ingredients and you’re done! However, the idea that septic additives can perform miracles is a fallacy. Septic tanks that are properly balanced do not require any assistance. Some septic treatments that are commercially available either include corrosive pesticides that can cause harm to the bacterial colonies in your system or are pricey yeast extracts that are not effective (yes, like the stuff used to make bread).

This is especially useful if your family uses a lot of antibacterial and bleach-based products, which is something you should avoid, but that’s a topic for another discussion.

Pump Your Septic Tank every 5-7 years

A typical family may fill a septic tank to operational level in less than a week, without having to make any changes to their ordinary water usage. It is not necessary to pump the septic tank just because it is full or has reached a specific age. Simply let your healthy system to carry out its functions. In reality, as long as your tank is sized adequately for your home and your property is kept in good condition, your system will continue to break down and handle waste for many more years than you may expect.

You should always get your system examined before to arranging a pumping.

There are a few situations in which you should refrain from pumping your tank, but we’ll cover those in more detail in a future blog article.

Once Installed, Septic Tanks Take Care of Themselves

Yes, this is correct! In conjunction with their biological processes and gravity flows, septic systems and tanks handle the majority of the job with little assistance from the homeowner. Because they are buried, they are readily forgotten. Despite the fact that you may not be required to take immediate action, your behaviors will have an impact on the overall health of your septic system.

You’ll Only Need One Septic System

In most cases, septic systems will not survive a lifetime. With adequate care and maintenance, systems can endure for 25 to 30 years on average. If you want your system to last as long as possible, learning how to do regular maintenance is priority number one. However, there are certain fallacies about septic systems that need to be dispelled. Understanding which stories are factual and which are nothing more than old wives’ tales can be difficult. Do you have any questions regarding some of the advice you’ve received?

Call Magneson Tractor Service today—we have the solutions you’re looking for. Do you have a disturbing myth that you would want us to investigate? Send us a message or leave a comment, and we’ll be pleased to sort out the crap from the truth about your situation!

Alternative Septic Systems For Difficult Sites

When the soil is too dense, too shallow over bedrock or hardpan, or the water table is too high, alternative engineered systems may be required on waterfront properties and other environmentally sensitive areas to help protect water sources.When the problem is soil that is too dense, too shallow over bedrock or hardpan, or the water table is too high, alternative engineered systems may be required on waterfront properties and other environmentally sensitive areas to help protect water sources.

  • They require more frequent monitoring and maintenance in order to avoid complications.
  • Because there is no one-size-fits-all solution, if either the designer or the installer is inexperienced with the technology being utilized, it is possible that it will not work as planned.
  • Inspect the track records of your designer and installer to ensure that they are both familiar with the specific system you are using.
  • When it comes to success with alternative systems, proper maintenance is essential.

MOUND SYSTEMS

Mound systems are often two to three times more expensive than ordinary septic systems, and they need more frequent monitoring and maintenance. To see a larger version, click here. Ohio State University Extension provides the following information: The mound is comprised of a network of tiny distribution pipes that are embedded in a layer of gravel on top of a layer of sand that is normally one to two feet deep. Topsoil is applied to the tops and sides of the structure (see illustration). A dosing chamber (also known as a pump chamber) is included in a mound system, and it is responsible for collecting wastewater that is discharged from the septic tank.

Most feature an alarm system that notifies the owner or a repair company if the pump fails or if the water level in the tank increases to an unsafe level.

Aside from that, monitoring wells are frequently placed to keep track on the conditions inside and outside the leach field.

The most expensive items are the additional equipment, as well as the earthwork and other materials that are required to construct the mound.

In extreme cases, a mound system can cost more than $20,000 in some locations. Additionally, owing of the increased complexity, mound systems need more regular pumping as well as additional monitoring and maintenance. In certain cases, annual maintenance expenditures may exceed $500.

OTHER ALTERNATIVE SEPTIC SYSTEMS

Sand filters that do not have a bottom are frequent on coastal properties and other ecologically sensitive places. There is a large variety of alternative septic systems available on the market, with new ones being introduced on a regular basis. Some are designed at community systems that serve a number of houses, and they are often monitored and maintained by a professional service provider. Some alternative systems are well-suited to particular houses, albeit the costs, complexity, and upkeep of these systems must be carefully evaluated before implementing them.

Before the wastewater reaches the leach field, which serves as a miniature replica of a sewage-treatment plant, some larger community systems employ pre-treatment to reduce the amount of bacteria present.

There are numerous other versions and combinations of systems and components that may be employed, including the following:

  • Pressurized dosing: This method makes use of a holding tank and a pump to drive effluent through the distribution pipe in a more uniform and regulated manner, hence boosting the effectiveness of the leach field. When used in conjunction with other techniques, such as a mound system, a sand filter, plastic leach fields or drip irrigation, it can be used to rehabilitate a leach field
  • However, it should not be used alone.
  • Septic system with alternative leach field made of plastic: This is a normal septic system with an alternative leach field that may be shrunk in some jurisdictions, making it ideally suited for tiny construction sites. Because the half-pipe plastic chambers provide a gap for effluent flow, there is no need for gravel in the system. Infiltrator System, for example, has been in service for more than two decades and, according to the manufacturer, can withstand traffic volumes with only 12 inches of compacted cover. The higher cost of the plastic components is somewhat countered by the lower cost of gravel and the smaller area of the drain field, respectively.
  • Sand filter: This is a big sand-filled box that is 2-4 feet deep and has a waterproof lining made of concrete or polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Using filtration and anaerobic microorganisms, the sand is utilized to pre-treat wastewater before it is discharged into the leaching field. The boxes are often partially or completely buried in the ground, although they can also be elevated above ground level as necessary. While a pump and controls are typically used to equally administer the effluent on top of the filter, gravity distribution is also viable in some instances. The most common setup is shown in Figure 1. A collection tank at the bottom of the tank collects the treated effluent, which is either pumped or gravity-fed to the drain field. Some sand filters recycle the effluent back to the tank multiple times before discharging it into the drain field, while others do not. The majority of sand filters are used for pre-treatment, although they can also be utilized as the primary treatment in certain situations. A “bottomless sand filter” is used in this situation since the effluent drains straight into the soil underneath the filter (see photo above). A well designed and manufactured sand filter that is regularly maintained will prevent sand from being clogged on a consistent basis. More information about Sand Filters may be found here.
  • Aerobic treatment system: These systems treat wastewater by the use of an aerobic process, which is normally carried out in an underground concrete tank with many chambers. Aeration, purification, and pumping of the effluent are all accomplished through the use of four chambers in the most complicated systems. The first chamber functions similarly to a smaller version of a regular septic tank in its function. An air pump is employed in the second “treatment” tank to ensure that the effluent is continually injected with fresh air. The presence of oxygen promotes the growth of aerobic bacteria, which are more effective in processing sewage than the anaerobic bacteria found in a standard septic system. It is possible to utilize a third and fourth chamber in certain systems to further clarify the water and to pump out the purified water. In addition, so-called “fixed-film” systems make use of a synthetic media filter to help the bacterial process go more quickly. In the correct hands, aerobic systems may create better-quality wastewater than a typical system, and they may also incorporate a disinfectant before the purified wastewater is discharged. A smaller drain field may be used in urban areas while a larger area may be sprayed across a whole field in rural areas. Technically speaking, they are tiny sewage treatment plants rather than septic systems, and they rely mostly on anaerobic treatment to accomplish their goals. They are referred to as ATUs in some circles (aerobic treatment units). These systems are expensive to construct and operate, hence are usually employed where high-quality treatment is needed in a small area or with poor soils. A growing number of them are being built on beachfront sites. More information on Anaerobic Treatment Systems can be found here.
  • Systems that employ aerobic processes to treat wastewater are commonly found underground in the form of a multi-chamber concrete tank with many chambers. Aeration, purification, and pumping of the effluent are performed in four chambers in the most complicated systems. Essentially, the first chamber serves as a miniature replica of the regular septic tank. To continuously inject air into the effluent in the second “treatment” tank, an air pump is utilized. The presence of air encourages the growth of aerobic bacteria, which are more efficient at processing sewage than the anaerobic bacteria found in a normal septic system, according to the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. For additional clarity and pumping out of the cleaned water, third and fourth chambers are employed in some systems. A synthetic media filter is frequently used in so-called “fixed-film” systems to improve the bacterial process. In the correct hands, aerobic systems may create better-quality wastewater than a typical system, and they may even incorporate an additional disinfection before the purified wastewater is discharged. A smaller drain field may be used in urban areas whereas a larger area may be sprayed in rural areas. Mini sewage treatment plants (rather than septic systems) are technically what these are, as they are dependent mostly on anaerobic treatment rather than aerobic treatment. The acronym ATU is commonly used to refer to them (aerobic treatment units). Installation and maintenance of these systems are prohibitively expensive
  • As a result, they are mostly employed in situations where high-quality treatment is required in a small area or with poor soils. A growing number of them are being built on beachfront property. Find out more about Aerobic Treatment Systems by visiting their website.
  • Wetlands that have been constructed. These are suitable for those who are environmentally conscious and wish to take an active role in the recycling of their wastewater. They may be used in practically any type of soil. An artificial shallow pond is used in the system, which is lined with rock, tire chippings, or other suitable medium and then filled with water. A pleasant atmosphere is created by the media, which serves as a habitat for particular plants that process wastewater and maintain the ecosystem. Wastewater from the septic tank is dispersed across the media bed through a perforated conduit, where plant roots, bacteria, and other microorganisms break down the contaminants in the water. The treated water is collected in a second pipe located at the back of the marsh. Household members must budget time for planting, pruning, and weeding in the wetlands area.

Wetland areas that have been constructed These are suitable for those who are environmentally conscious and wish to take an active role in the recycling of their wastewater. They may be used in virtually any type of soil. An artificial shallow pond is used in the system, which is lined with rock, tire chippings, or other media and supplied with water to keep the system running. A pleasant atmosphere is created by the media, which serves as a habitat for particular plants that clean wastewater.

The treated water is collected in a second pipe towards the back of the marsh.

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