How Steep Slope To Septic Tank? (Question)

In a conventional gravity system, the pipe from the house to the septic tank, and the outlet pipe from the tank to the distribution box or leach field, should both slope downward with a minimum slope of 1/4 in. per ft. (1/8 in. per ft.In a conventional gravity system, the pipe from the house to the septic tank, and the outlet pipe from the tank to the distribution box or leach fieldleach fieldThe drain field typically consists of an arrangement of trenches containing perforated pipes and porous material (often gravel) covered by a layer of soil to prevent animals (and surface runoff) from reaching the wastewater distributed within those trenches.https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Septic_drain_field

Septic drain field – Wikipedia

, should both slope downward with a minimum slope of 1/4 in. per ft. (1/8 in. per ft.

  • In a conventional gravity system, the pipe from the house to the septic tank, and the outlet pipe from the tank to the distribution box or leach field, should both slope downward with a minimum slope of 1/4 inch per foot. Sewage lines should slope downward to the septic tank and drain field at min. 1/4″ per ft. For steep drops, a 45% slope is best.

How much slope should a septic line have?

A typical septic tank has a 4-inch inlet located at the top. The pipe that connects to it must maintain a 1/4-inch-per-foot slope toward it from the house. This means that for every 10 feet of distance between the tank and the house, the inlet must be 2 1/2 inches below the point at which the pipe exits the house.

Can you install a septic system on a slope?

If you have to install a conventional perforated pipe and gravel trench drainfield on a steep slope you’ll need to run the trenches along the slope or parallel to the fall line, stepping down the slope from trench to trench.

Can a septic drain field be on a slope?

Locate the drainfield in soil with good drainage; the soil should filter out effluent but allow liquid waste to seep deep into the ground. The drainfield should not be on a steep slope; a steep slope would allow effluent to flow down the slope instead of into the soil.

Can you have too much slope in drain pipe?

The ideal slope of any drain line is ¼ inch per foot of pipe. That’s right, it is possible to have too much slope in your drain lines. According to Redwood Kardon, a former plumbing inspector, “Oversloped pipes (greater than ½ in.

How much slope does a toilet drain need?

The plumbing code requires drain pipe to be sloped at a minimum of 1/2 inch per foot and a maximum of three inches per foot or vertical. A slope of less than a quarter-inch per foot will cause a lot of drain clogs and a slope of more than three inches will allow the water to drain.

Do septic lines have to be straight?

My experience is that many waste line installers simply install a straight sewer line from house to septic tank or house to sewer main, regardless of the building slope, provided that we have at least 1/8″ per foot, preferably 1/4″ per foot, or more. Lower slope or nearly-flat drain lines are more likely to clog.

Can I level my leach field?

Yes you can. You just have to ensure that the the surface level of the septic flushes with the ground level so that the storm water doesn’t get in it.

How many Infiltrator chambers do I need?

As a general rule, trenches ‘fingers’ should be no longer than fifty feet ( 12 or 13 Infiltrators long ) for best function and most even effluent distribution. Unless you are installing as a “bed” system (where the chambers are right next to each other), leave at least six feet of undisturbed soil between fingers.

What is the fall on a 4 inch sewer pipe?

For 4-inch PVC piping and a building sewer less than 50 feet long, the minimum slope is 1 inch in 8 feet, or 1/8-inch per foot, and the maximum is 1/4-inch per foot. For sewers longer than 50 feet, the slope should be 1/4-inch per foot.

How deep are septic tank pipes?

The general rule of thumb is that most septic tanks can be buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

How deep is the septic tank outlet pipe?

After the solids settle out, effluent leaves the septic tank through the outlet pipe and flows to the drain field. The outlet pipe should be approximately 3 inches below the inlet pipe.

How far should a septic tank be from a house?

Most importantly, a septic tank must be at least seven metres from a house, defined as a ‘habitable property’. Septic tanks are built underground and release wastewater slowly into the surrounding environment. For this reason, they must be a set distance away from a home.

How do you tell if your septic tank is full?

How to tell your septic tank is full and needs emptying

  1. Pooling water.
  2. Slow drains.
  3. Odours.
  4. An overly healthy lawn.
  5. Sewer backup.
  6. Gurgling Pipes.
  7. Trouble Flushing.

How high should the water level be in a septic tank?

A septic tank should always be “filled” to its normal liquid level, or the bottom of the outlet pipe which carries effluent to the absorption area. This normal liquid level is usually between 8” to 12” from the top of the tank on average (see picture at right).

Guide to Installing Septic Drainfield Piping on steep slopes

  • Septic tank bacteria are anaerobic, which means that they do not require oxygen to function properly. As the term implies, anaerobic bacteria do not require oxygen from the surrounding environment. A byproduct of their anaerobic activity, which is the most prevalent of which is hydrogen sulfide gas, they produce smells. This gas has an odor that is similar to that of rotten eggs.not it’s very appealing. The amount of gas produced in a septic tank is not significant
  • Yet, the gas must be evacuated in order to avoid the tank’s pressure building up. It is also more common for odors to be present before a crust forms on the surface of the water in the septic tank or before bacteria in the tank becomes harmful. What you flush down the toilet and into the sink, among other things, must be considered carefully. In some cases, downdrafts can be created by wind that blows over the roof from the other side of the roof where the vent is placed. It is also possible for downdrafts to be caused by the wind blowing over neighboring trees that are taller than the house. Winds from a certain direction and at a specific speed can cause downdrafts to occur only in certain conditions. As a result, the odours may only appear once in a blue moon. It is possible that wind currents will transfer odors along and down the vent pipe if it is not installed high enough above the roofing material. What are some of the possible remedies to the odor situation? Adding extension to the plumbing vent and extending it high over the roof line might be a straightforward option. The use of proper septic venting results in no odors. ByAES Australia|October 20th, 2014|News|Comments Off on Correct Septic Venting = No Odors! Uncomplicated ways to resolve odor problems

Anaerobic bacteria are responsible for the activity of bacteria in a septic tank. Anaerobic indicates that the bacteria do not require oxygen from the surrounding environment. As a result of their anaerobic activity, they produce smells, the most prevalent of which is hydrogen sulfide gas, which is very toxic. The smell of hydrogen sulfide is similar to that of rotting eggs.not particularly pleasant! The amount of gas produced in a septic tank is not significant; yet, the gas must be discharged in order to avoid the tank being overburdened.

It is critical to be cautious about what you flush down the toilet and into the sink, among other things.

Downdrafts can also be caused by wind blowing over neighboring trees that are taller than the house.

  1. As a result, the scents may only appear once in a while.
  2. What are some of the possible remedies to the odor problem?
  3. Correct Septic Venting = No Odours!
  4. A step-by-step strategy to removing odor problems

Guide to Septic Installations on Steep Slopes or Stepped Slopes

The bacteria that are active in a septic tank are anaerobic. Anaerobic implies that the bacteria do not receive any oxygen from the surrounding environment. As a result of their anaerobic activity, they produce smells, the most frequent of which is hydrogen sulfide gas. The odor of hydrogen sulfide is similar to that of rotting eggs.not particularly pleasant! Although there is not a huge volume of gas created in a septic tank, the gas must be evacuated in order to prevent pressure from building up in the tank.

It is critical to be cautious of what you flush down the toilet, into the sink, and so on.

Wind passing over neighboring trees that are taller than the house can also generate downdrafts.

As a result, the scents may only appear every once in a while.

What are the possible remedies to the odor problem? One easy remedy may be to prolong the plumbing vent and extend it high over the roof level. ByAES Australia|October 20th, 2014|News|Comments Off on Correct Septic Venting = No Odours! A straightforward method to addressing smell problems

  • Anaerobic bacteria are responsible for the activity in a septic tank. Anaerobic indicates that the bacteria do not receive oxygen from the surrounding environment. Due to their anaerobic activity, smells are produced, the most frequent of which is hydrogen sulfide gas, which is toxic to humans. The odor of hydrogen sulfide is similar to the odor of rotting eggs.not particularly pleasant! Although there is not a huge volume of gas produced in a septic tank, the gas must be evacuated in order to prevent pressure from building up in the tank. Additionally, odors are more noticeable before a crust forms on the surface of the water in the septic tank or before the bacteria in the tank becomes unhealthy. It is critical to be cautious of what you flush down the toilet and into the sink, among other things. Wind passing over the roof from the other side of the roof where the vent is positioned may generate downdrafts down the side of the roof where the vent is located. It is also possible for downdrafts to be caused by wind blowing over surrounding trees that are taller than the house. Downdrafts are only likely to occur when the wind is blowing from a specific direction and at a specific speed. As a result, the scents may only appear every now and again. If the top of the vent pipe is not elevated sufficiently above the roof line, wind currents may convey the odors down the roof line and down toward the ground. What are some of the possible remedies to the odor issue? Adding extension to the plumbing vent and extending it high over the roof line may be a straightforward option. Correct septic venting = no smells! ByAES Australia|October 20th, 2014|News|Comments Off on Correct Septic Venting = No Odors! A step-by-step strategy to eliminating smell problems

Guide to Installing Steep Slope Septic Drainfield Systems

The sketch at the top of the page illustrates one strategy for installing septic drainfields on a steep or rolling slope. Septic tank and seepage pit systems are seen in the photo above, which is placed in the flat region below the hillside and connected to a sewer line running down the steep slope. The question becomes, however, what to do when the septic effluent absorption system or soakbed itself must be placed down a steep hillside. Here are some details about the product.

  • Septic systems with a D-box for steep slopes: When septic effluent is clarified, it is discharged from the septic tank (or an effluent pumping station) and directed into a big distribution box. A larger D-box with more connection ports will be required than those used for a standard flat-area drainfield since each effluent line that will be installed across the hillside will need to be connected directly to the D-box. Separate effluent lines for steep slope septics are required: Individual septic effluent drain lines are connected to the distribution box, and each of these drain lines is directed to a separate gravel trench and perforated drainfield. Feeder pipes for effluent lines in steep slope septic systems include the following: It is not perforated, but rather solid pipe that connects the distribution box to the drainfield trench. Effluent lines for hillside or rolling land drainfields are placed along the slope, not uphill or downhill, and sloping gently (1/8″ to 1/4″ per linear foot) from the inlet end of each drainfield trench to the lowest point of the drainfield trenches.

Installing Septic Drainfield Piping on Steep Slopes Located Downhill from the Septic Tank – Rolling Land

  • For steep slope septics, flexible distribution pipe or gravelless systems are recommended: Because flexible effluent lines may be routed in a trench that must be curved in order to remain parallel to the fall line of the slope of rounded hilltops or rolling ground, flexible piping may be more convenient to construct than rigid pipe systems in areas where the land is rolling or contoured. Dosing with high pressure for steep slope septic systems: Septic effluent handling methods, such as pressure distribution systems, may be more forgiving of installation on steep or uneven sloping ground, and they may use rigid or flexible perforated pipe, depending on the application. Pressurized Septic Systems (also known as Pressure Dosing Septic Systems)
  • For septic system effluent dispersal, drip lines—which employ flexible distribution piping—might also be effective on some steep locations. Some aerobic systems that dispose of effluent using drip systems or spray systems, or that feed drip irrigation systems, can solve the problem of steep slope septic effluent disposal, according to the manufacturer. AEROBIC SEPTIC SYSTEMS, ATUs, ATUs-home Alternatively, see DESIGN AND INSTALLATION GUIDE FOR HOOT AEROBIC SYSTEMS DRIP DISPOSAL Alternatively, see “Guidance for the Design, Installation, and Operation of Subsurface Drip Distribution Systems as a Replacement for Conventional Title 5 Soil Absorption Systems for the Disposal of Septic Tank Effluent,” published by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection in 2006, which rewrites the state’s 310 CMR 15.240, 15.242, 15.247, and 15.280-15.289 regulations. Graywater disposal systems also include designs that can assist with effluent of graywater GREYWATER SYSTEMS are discussed more below.
See also:  How Make Septic Tank Baffle Outlet? (Solution)

Why Drainfield Effluent lines need to be properly sloped

For septic system effluent dispersal, drip lines—which employ flexible distribution piping—might also be effective on some mountainous terrain. Septic wastewater disposal problems on steep slopes can be solved by certain aerobic systems that dispose of effluent using drip or spray systems or that feed drip irrigation systems. AEROBIC SEPTIC SYSTEMS, ATUs, ATUs-Home Alternatively, please consult with A DESIGN AND INSTALLATION GUIDE FOR HOOT AEROBIC SYSTEMS DRIP DISPOSAL Alternatively, see “Guidance for the Design, Installation, and Operation of Subsurface Drip Distribution Systems as a Replacement for Conventional Title 5 Soil Absorption Systems for the Disposal of Septic Tank Effluent,” published by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (2006), which rewrites the state’s 310 CMR 15.240, 15.242, 15.247, and 15.280-15.289 regulations.

Graywater disposal systems also include designs that can assist with effluent of graywater disposal GREYWATER SYSTEMS are discussed in detail below.

Steep Slope Septic Design Research

  • Gustafson, David M., James L. Anderson, Sara F. Heger, and Barbara W. Liukkonen published a paper in which they discussed their findings. Making the decision to install an alternative septic system on a home site with a steep incline (2000). Retrieved on March 30, 2021, from the University of Minnesota Extension. the original source is:

Reader CommentsQ A

Dr. David M. Gustafson, James L. Anderson, Sara F. Heger, and Barbara W. Liukkonen published a paper in which they discussed their findings. Making the decision to install an alternative septic system on a home site with a steep incline is a complicated process (2000). obtained on March 30, 2021, from the University of Minnesota Extension source of origin:;

Steep Slope Septic System Articles

  • SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, ENGINEERS
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN ALTERNATIVES-home
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN BASICS-home
  • SEWER / SEPTIC LINES at STEEP SITES
  • STEEP SLOPE SEPTIC DESIGNS
  • SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, ENGINEERS
  • SEPTIC CONSULT

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SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, AND ENGINEERS; SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN ALTERNATIVES-home; SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN BASICS-home; SEWER / SEPTIC LINES on STEEP SITES; STEEP SLOPE SEPTIC DESIGNS; SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, AND ENGINEERS; SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, AND ENGINEERS; SEPTIC

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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installing drain piping on steep slopes

  • In this section, you can ask questions and express your opinions regarding sewage or septic pipe lines on steeply sloping premises.

In this section, you can ask questions and express your opinions on sewage or septic plumbing lines on steeply sloping land.

Guide to installing the replacement sewer pipe line at Steep Sites

Using real-world examples and photographs, we demonstrate how to diagnose and replace a clogged sewage line in an actual case study. Septic or sewage line blockage and backups may be prevented by having the proper drain line slope installed. In this section, we will talk about

  • Septic pipe installed in a zig-zag pattern on steep hillsides
  • Septic pipes with a U-turn on steep hillsides
  • Septic pipework running parallel to the fall line of a slope Designing steep septic systems for sewer or septic pipe repair or new installations

When it comes to a drain waste pipe, what is the right slope or pitch to use? When wastewater travels at the proper pace via a drainpipe, the water transports solid waste, such as feces and toilet paper, as well as water, to a septic tank or sewage mains for disposal. Generally speaking, plumbing rules and wastewater piping guidelines state that building drains should be pitched at a rate of 1/8” to 1/4” of slope for every foot of linear length or distance. Problems associated with steep dips between the home and the septic tank include: A steep building site, such as the one depicted in our page top photograph, can result in a significant drop in elevation between a building main drain and the septic tank inlet opening (or sewer main connection), resulting in waste piping slopes that exceed the recommended limits for slope in the waste piping.

If waste passes through the sewage line at a rate more than 2 fps, there is a possibility that water will leave sediments behind in the pipe, resulting in recurring obstructions.

ZigZagging Drain Line Piping Down a Slope

zigzagging the pipe down a steep slope, making multiple bends, would be one method of reaching the required wastewater flow rate in a drain line down a steep slope. However, in my opinion, the increased number of turns and length of this approach may increase the likelihood of future sewer line blockages. Additionally, the zigzag drain line approach will make it more difficult to clean out blockages, and therefore you will need to include sewer line cleanout access points at every run and turn in the installation.

Straight-run Drain Line Piping Down a Steep Drop Slope between House and Septic Tank or Sewer Main

According to my observations, many waste line contractors simply establish a straight sewer line from the home to the septic tank or from the house to the sewage main, regardless of the building slope, as long as we have at least 1/8″ per foot, ideally 1/4″ per foot, or more, of water pressure. Drain lines with a lower slope or those are practically flat are more likely to clog. On a related note, if you’re building a drain line that may be too steeply sloped and you won’t be able to readily correct the problem, make sure to include extra cleanout access ports.

Experience in Installing Steep Sewer Drain Line Piping

It is my opinion that if the whole pipe run is steeper than what is generally specified, it is possible that you will never see a clog occur. The sewage line dips on a slope between 2″ and 3″ per foot over a 40-foot run between the home exit line and the septic tank entrance baffle at the property depicted in these images and in the other photos in this series on sewer line replacement, as seen in the other photos in this series. In order to avoid leaving particles behind while flushing the toilet, this house-to-septic tank drain pipe should be placed in the “risk zone.” However, after managing this property for more than two decades, we can confidently state that we have never had an issue with too-rapid drainage clogging the waste line.

Since we replaced the old clay plumbing with plastic piping, we have not experienced any sewage obstructions.

The black line on the right-hand pipe portion indicates to the installer when the pipe sections have been completely connected together.

The only issue we experienced with the line was when the previous clay line was smashed and subsequently became clogged with mud and other debris. SO If you use plastic piping, run it in straight lines, and make nice couplings, you should be able to get by.

Other Steps to Avoid Problems with Septic or Sewer Drain Lines on Steep Sites

  • Cleanouts of septic tanks or sewer drain lines: I’d put external cleanout access ports on the sewage line every 20 feet or so for the sake of ease. Proper septic pipe hookups include the following: Ensure that the new pipe connections are made correctly, that they are lubricated, and that they are completely seated during the assembly process. The following are the proper sewage pipe directions: The receiving pipe hub, often known as the “female” end of the pipe, is located at the bottom of the following downhill segment. Make sure you don’t do this in reverse or you’ll attract leaks and blockage in your sewage system.
  • Smooth drain line connections should be employed: the hub-less drain pipe connector shown in our photo was used to connect the new plastic waste line (which runs downhill to the septic tank) to the old cast iron waste line at the point where it exited the structure. These pipes needed to be correctly aligned (to avoid leaks at the connector) and their connections and pipe ends needed to be filed smooth in order to reduce the likelihood of waste line clogs at this point in the system.

Installing SepticDrainfieldPiping on Steep Slopes is a Different Matter Entirely

Please understand that we have examined the installation of solid plumbing between a building and its septic tank or sewage main in this articleand that higher slopes may be acceptable in some circumstances. However, the possibility of a “OK” for steep drain pipe does not apply in any manner to the perforated piping put in a septic drainfield gravel trench, which is a different story. Those looking for help on installing a septic system on a steeply sloping or rolling site should check out the following articles:

  • For further information, see AEROBIC SEPTIC SYSTEMS, ATUs, and HOME – some of these systems can be used on steep slope locations. Or SeeHOOT Aerobic Systems Drip Disposal Design and Installation Guide for more information. Alternatively, see “Guidance for the Design, Installation, and Operation of Subsurface Drip Distribution Systems as a Replacement for Conventional Title 5 Soil Absorption Systems for the Disposal of Septic Tank Effluent,” published by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection in 2006 and refining Massachusetts regulations 310 CMR 15.240, 15.242, 15.247, and 15.280-15.289
  • Or “Guidance for the Design, Installation, and Operation of Subsurface Drip Distribution Systems as SYSTEMS DE DOSAGE For hilly sites where the drainfield must be located either uphill or downhill from a septic tank or structure, PRESSURE is a term that refers to pressure dosing systems that may be beneficial for disposing of sewage. GRAVELLESS SEPTIC SYSTEMS – Other gravelless systems are capable of handling mild bends required to follow rolling slope lines
  • However, some gravelless systems are not. A system that will be required when the elevation of a structure or a septic tank is lower than the elevation of the drainfield or sewer main is Septic pumps, sewage ejector pumps, grinder pumps, effluent pumps, sump pumps, septic pumping stations, and septic pump alarms Installation of septic drainfields on steep or rolling terrain is described in STEEP SLOPE SEPTIC DESIGNS, which is part of the SEPTIC DESIGNS section.

Reader Q A – also see the FAQs series linked-to below

@hello there, dude. Sweep turns with a wider radius (e.g., 2 45s) will often flow better than sharper turns. On a corner where the toilet waste flow is present. If trenching provides for 4″ deeper depth, is it preferable to construct the 90° corner with a 1° drop rate as normal, or is it preferable to make the corner with two 45° corners while lowering the 4″? [email protected], Start by consulting with your local building or health department to see what type of design would be considered suitable in your nation and neighborhood.

  1. We have a shortage of service personnel for upkeep, and I believe that a sprinkler system would be more beneficial to our grounds.
  2. [email protected] That doesn’t appear to be a concern in my opinion.
  3. @inspectapedia.com.moderator, Yes, without a doubt, that is not hygienic.
  4. [email protected], In a situation when you are just transferring a cleared fluid, there should be no particulates left behind in the wastewater stream.
  5. That is a very other issue.
  6. What if it’s been sitting in a septic tank for a while, breaking down as if it were going to a leach field instead?
  7. That would be the material that would be sent to the aerobic tank.
See also:  Using Cottennel Wipes In Toilet When You Dont Have A Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

You may be required to utilize a grinder sewage pump and force main; we are in the process of establishing a traditional tank close to our home.

What is the maximum percent drop per foot for the effluent line in terms of percent drop?

@Ted.

Thank you very much.

It goes without saying that such lines must have the proper pitch in order to reach the final position of the septic tank.

You should verify with your local building authority to find out exactly what is required to be placed at a 4 foot depth in your area.

My issue is, can I dig a smaller trench and then descend vertically to the requisite four-foot depth before finishing?

Thank you for the information, it was really useful.

What would be the best configuration for the septic tank and pipes when the designated drain field area is 500 feet away from the house?

The slope before and after the hill is rather level, descending very gradually in the direction of the drain field before becoming steeper.

A construction site located in a swale below the city sewer lateral service point has been identified as a potential concern.

(Let’s pretend it’s 8 feet below the surface) Is there an alternative to the brute force strategy of bringing in hundreds of cubit yards of fill and compacting it to raise the elevation of the construction site?

A septic tank is just 18 inches away from the building foundation, which is a little near.

Solids dropping vertically have the potential to adhere to and clog the pipe; however, employing 45-degree elbows instead of 90-degree elbows can help to mitigate this danger.

I would begin by having the tank examined to identify which items are most important in this order of significance.

A sound septic tank, as opposed to one built of brick or rusted steel; how well the baffles and protection from groundwater leaks are maintained; and how well the baffles and protection from groundwater leaks are maintained.

The quality and capacity of the drainfield are important considerations.

Is this a reasonable drop?

This is an ancient septic tank that I was allowed to utilize because of a grandfather clause.

What is the length of the pipe drop when the septic tank is 120 feet away?

How steep do the pipes have to be from one drop box to the next?

Does the length of the pipe, in addition to its angle of incline, have a limit in terms of length?

Please let us know if this is the case!

Verne, you have an issue with a septic or wastewater system that has too much downslope.

The difficulty with longer segments of excessive slope sewer plumbing is that the liquid waste will occasionally overtake the solid waste in the line, causing the system to back up.

One of the most valuable aphorisms I can share, at least in the context of the building construction and mechanicals fields, is that it is extremely uncommon to come into a situation that has never been experienced before.

According to one of the solutions described on this page, the sewage line is made even longer by zig-zagging across the steeply inclined areas of the land.

I’ll leave the graphic specifics to your imagination, so go ahead and go creative.

Let’s put the question to your septic installer and see what she has to say about it.

STATIONS FOR PULLING OUT SEWAGE Hello, I have a question concerning the installation of a toilet in a cabin that is around 300 feet from the main home, septic tank, and field.

Is too much slope a concern in this circumstance, given the considerable distance that the effluent must travel to reach the tank?

Do you think that building a sewage pump would make any difference in this circumstance, considering that the septic tank is located downhill from the toilet?

There should be a thorough inspection of the whole sewage line (perhaps using a sewer camera), and any slope issues should be addressed.

It’s always filled, no matter how long you wait.

Is it necessary to have the angle coming out of the home re-done?

What type of valve is used to connect the pump to the drain field?

Alternatively, seeSEWER / SEPTIC LINES for STEEP SITES FAQs- questions and answers that were originally posted at the bottom of this page. Alternatively, consider the following:

Steep Slope Septic System Articles

  • Septic consultants, designers, and engineers
  • Septic system design alternatives-home
  • Septic system design basics-home
  • Septic system design alternatives
  • Septic system design basics
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN BASICS
  • S

Suggested citation for this web page

INSPECTION OF SEWER AND SEPTIC LINES AT STEEP SITES An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to DRAIN SEPTIC SEWER PIPES

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Is steep septic line a myth?

Author Message
HeusMember Posted: 29 Jun 2014 10:11ReplyI have been told that a septic line cannot be too steep because the fluids will pass up the solids in the line and cause the solids to plug the line. After searching the Internet, I see that many say this is a myth. Has anyone ever put in a line from house to septic tank on a steep angle? I have a septic system about 300 feet downhill from my cabin on a gradual slope. The drop is 30-40 feet I estimate. I’m tempted to put in a line going with the existing slope of the land to test this theory. I realize the proper way would be to create a series of step downs. Any thoughts on this?
NirkyMember Posted: 29 Jun 2014 13:27ReplyNo myth. You want 1/8″ drop per foot, every 8 ft = 1 inch drop. What I did is tape a 1″ cube of foam insulation onto my 8 ft level. You can also use a 8ft 2×4 and tape or nail something 1″ and then set any level on. I learned this from the septic service guy.For your steep drop, you’re going to need one or more vertical drops mixed in with the gradual 1/8″ per foot slope.
HeusMember Posted: 29 Jun 2014 14:03ReplyMy other thought was to simply build an outhouse close to the septic tank with running water.
old243Member Posted: 30 Jun 2014 21:53Replycould you not put your septic tank just outside your cabin. Not sure if the tile runs could then be steep. I would think that the tile runs would just have liquids. Someone that knows for sure could chime in. old243
JustMember Posted: 30 Jun 2014 22:15Replyif you install a sewage pump after the septic tank you can pump it any were up or down hill but your weeping bed must only have the 18 in. fall
AtlincabinMember Posted: 1 Jul 2014 00:14 – Edited by: AtlincabinReplyI’ve been reading on waste lines and the most consistent information I come up with is that they should have a minimum drop of 1/4 inch per foot up to 3 inches per foot (that is not a typo).That is for a 3″ diameter line.Larger pipes can tolerate a smaller drop per foot. YMMVGreg
BzzzzztMember Posted: 1 Jul 2014 17:00ReplyIf you install a saniflo masceration pump you can drop however much you want. robot_redir=1
NirkyMember Posted: 1 Jul 2014 18:25 – Edited by: NirkyReplyThe International Plumbing Code (2012) saysSIZE -MINIMUM SLOPE (inches)-(inch per foot) 21/2 or less-1/4 3 to 6-1/8 8 or larger-1/16 doesn’t specify what slope is optimum, just that the min is 1/8″. My septic guy says that for my 4″ pipe, 1/8″ slope is optimum, solids pretty much keep up with liquids. Works well 8 months in, no backups or cleanouts.
bldginspMember Posted: 2 Jul 2014 08:10ReplyI agree with old243 that its best to have your septic tank as close to the house, or toilets, as possible, so that solids have less distance to travel to the tank, reducing possibility of blockage. The effluent from the tank is all liquid and can travel any distance any angle to get to the drainfield.I don’t know if the ‘steeper angle causes clogs’ idea is a myth or not, but I think it’s a matter of probability- steeper would be more likely to cause a clog. With the low water use toilets they require here in Calif. it’s probably more of an issue than before.One way or the other, 300 ft from toilet to septic tank is a long way and probably more prone to clogging. In general, health depts. will allow you to have as many septic tanks as you choose all draining to the same septic drainfield, the main issue from their point of view is having a properly sized drainfield for the number of users.

Steep Slope Solution Saves the Sale

The effluent is only received via the 4-inch distribution pipe in the middle horizontal triple module configuration of the triple module arrangement. Using gravity, the water from the distribution pipe then flows through the remaining four rows of EZflow by Infiltrator bundles in the drainfield, which measures 32 by 12 feet.

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Receive articles, news, and videos about Alarms/Controls sent directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Alarms/Controls+ Receive Notifications Daren Hofschulte’s point-of-sale inspection of a two-bedroom single-family house in Pine Island, Minnesota, came to an end when he discovered a dry well. Dry wells are in violation of state law, according to the code. However, Hofschulte, the proprietor of Hofschulte Backhoe and Septic, in Elgin, Minnesota, usually constructs mound systems with leaching chambers for such properties, but he did not do so in this instance.

The usage of the region west of the house was abolished by a shared potable well, and the hill behind the house climbed in a 10 percent slope.

” Chris Priebe, an advanced designer at G-Cubed Engineering in Chatfield, Minnesota, was contacted for assistance.

We were able to minimize the gap to 12 inches by including UV disinfection and designing a pressurized at-grade system.

Site conditions

Silt loam on limestone bedrock with a loading rate of 0.78 gpd per square foot characterizes the soils, which are 12 to 18 inches thick. The plot of land measures 0.8 acres.

System components

Priebe built the system to handle 300 gallons per minute (gpd). The following are the major components:

  • A four-chamber, 2,080-gallon tank by Wieser Precast Steps that houses a Hoot Systems H-600A aeration unit and clarifier that produces 600 gallons per minute
  • SJE-Rhombus control panel
  • 36 EZflow by Infiltrator Water Technologies geosynthetic aggregate module
  • A.Y. McDonald Mfg. Co. effluent pump, 4/10 hp
  • 3G ultraviolet disinfection unit, SALCOR Inc.

System operation

In the pretreatment compartment, wastewater runs through a 4-inch PVC lateral for 20 feet before arriving to the 715-gallon aeration chamber through an 8-inch PVC lateral. Aeration stones in the bottom of the chamber generate finely dispersed bubbles that help to keep the bacteria alive and the sediments moving through the chamber. Solids are separated from the liquid as it passes through the 205-gallon clarifier before going into the 760-gallon pump chamber. The pump runs for 7.4 minutes six times each day, six times per week.

Drainback accounts for an extra 66 gallons.

The effluent is only received via the 4-inch distribution pipe in the middle horizontal triple module configuration of the triple module arrangement. Afterwards, water from the distribution pipe flows by gravity through the last four rows of bundles in the drainfield, which is 32 by 12 feet in size.

Installation

The tank and drainfield were both installed at the same time by Hofschulte’s crew. Following the pumping of the old septic tank, son Corey Hofschulte and worker Jeff Rahman used a John Deere 75D tracked excavator to smash and abandon the tank and dispose of the waste. The ATU tank, which measured 14 by 7 by 5 feet, was able to be squeezed between the property line setbacks east of the house and parallel to the road. Even as Hofschulte and Rahman worked their way through sand, sandstone, and bedrock, the walls began to collapse.

See also:  Who Can Locate A Septic Tank? (Solution)

As a last resort, Daren Hofschulte called in reinforcements: his John Deere 160 LC track excavators with a 29-foot reach.

In Daren Hofschulte’s words: “We carried away the stony debris and saved the sandy soil for backfill.” It was heaped up behind us, on both sides of the road, and even on the road itself, but we allowed enough room for passing vehicles to go past it.” During this time, operator Britt Coulson utilized the 75D to slope the hill to prepare for the drainfield, grade the area to drain runoff, and scarify the soil to prepare it for the drainfield.

In addition, Hofschulte points out that the west side of the home provided plenty of space for moving equipment past retaining walls and up the hill.

According to Hofschulte, “I would use them every day if they suddenly materialized on the job when we arrived.” “They perform admirably on steep slopes, but moving them proved to be the most challenging aspect of this installation.” After strapping the bundles to a utility trailer, Hofschulte had to stop many times to secure them as the wind began to rip the cargo away.

“When you break a bundle, millions of little peanuts fly all over the place.

As a result, Rahman and Corey Hofschulte snapped three 30-foot-long bundles together to equal 32 feet of absorption area.

They placed five rows of geotextile cloth before covering them with a tarp.

The excavation of the 3-foot-deep trench and the installation of the force main were simple tasks. According to Hofschulte, “We construct onsite systems on a daily basis, and we do it on steep slopes.” We considered this to be a standard installation for us.”

Maintenance

The manufacturer’s necessary service contract is managed by a third-party organization. In addition to inspecting the mechanical and electrical components on a biannual basis, the technician also takes an effluent sample to test for fecal coliform bacteria before cleaning the UV bulb, which is replaced every two years.

4 Parameters for Septic Drainage System Design

It is not enough to just install a septic drainage system; a professional must first design the system in order to avoid the need for a significant overhaul or replacement in the near future. Here are the four most important considerations for a successful septic system design.

1. Tank Size

The size of the tank influences the cost of installation, the frequency with which you must top up the tank, and even the lifespan of the tank itself. Although septic tank sizing is an exact science, the criteria listed below might help you get a general idea of the size of the tank you should place on your property. The total number of people The amount of sewage effluent generated by a household is determined by the size of the household. As a result, a larger tank is required for a home with a high number of occupants than for a home with a smaller family.

Active bacteria digest and treat the effluent in the tank, therefore a tank that has less bacteria activity will take longer to treat its wastes than a tank that has greater bacteria activity.

Regulations promulgated by the government In some areas, the local authority is also able to influence the size of the tank that will be installed.

2. Drainfield Size

This is the region where the actual absorption of treated wastes takes place in a septic drainfield (also known as a leach field). After the bacteria have digested the wastes in the tank and sorted the solids from the liquids, the solids sink to the bottom of the tank and the liquid drains from the tank into the surrounding environment. The treated liquid then percolates through the soil in the septic drainfield at a gradual and steady rate. The composition of the soil is one of the most important factors in determining the size of a septic drainfield.

The size of the tank is also important since a large tank produces more waste than a small tank, necessitating the usage of a large drainfield to accommodate the large tank.

3. Drainfield Location

Because the position of the drainfield is critical to the effectiveness and durability of the system, it is important to make an informed decision when selecting a location.

The following are some of the elements that influence the location of drainfields:

  • The whole area of the land. You must provide appropriate area for the drainfield
  • Otherwise, the wastes would take a long time to be absorbed by the drainfield, causing pollution of the surrounding environment. It’s all about the dirt. The drainfield should be located on soil that has adequate drainage
  • The soil should filter out effluent while yet allowing liquid waste to soak deep into the earth. The physical environment. In order to prevent effluent from flowing down the slope and into the soil, the drainfield should not be located on a steep slope
  • Otherwise, the drainfield would be ineffective.

The elements listed above are only a few instances of what you should take into consideration. Your septic professional will assist you in determining the most appropriate location for your drainfield on your property.

4. Tank Material

Septic tanks are available in a variety of materials, each with their own set of advantages and disadvantages. The following are some examples of standard tank materials:

  • Concrete. These tanks are quite inexpensive and simple to build, however they are subject to cracking due to the fact that they are made of steel. The tanks are not subject to cracking, but they are susceptible to rust damage
  • They are made of fiberglass. Unlike concrete and steel, the tanks do not break or corrode, as is the case with these materials. The unfortunate fact is that they are more vulnerable to harm as a result of soil movements.

Last but not least, consider your own tastes as well as the cost, the nature of the soil in your house, and any recommendations given by the specialist when making your decision on which material is ideal for you. Septic system design and installation necessitates the involvement of qualified septic professionals. If you do not, your septic system may collapse before its time. For assistance in designing and installing an effective septic drainage system, contactEconomy Septic Tank Service.

Septic Systems: The Effects of Topography and Landscape Position on On-Site System Placement — MARLIN – Septic Tank Cleaning, Inspection, Installation, and Repair

Water movement over a site and through the soil is influenced by the position and slope of the landscape. It is therefore necessary to have a good grasp of the slope and landscape position in order to estimate water flow and site appropriateness for on-site system deployment. On-site systems that are properly positioned guarantee that water is properly drained away from the site and that a suitable depth of aerated soil (12 – 18 inches) is maintained under the treatment and disposal trenches, respectively.

Relief encompasses slope and landscape location, and is one of the five soil-forming elements that impact the soil’s characteristics.

Slope and topography are important considerations.

Slope and topography are not synonymous.

  • Hilly, mountainous, or flat topography can be defined as a region’s topography, as can coastal plains, foothills, piedmont terrains, plateaus, or mountain ridges, among other things. When it comes to topography, it may be as simple as in locations with flat land surfaces, or as complex as in areas with suddenly uneven land surfaces. When looking at a topographic map, you can see contours of height, the forms of hills and mountains, valleys and ravines, and the locations of streams and rivers. On-site solutions that are conventional in nature can be built on slopes ranging from 0 to 65 percent. Additionally, the slope’s form at a certain location is significant. An outward or convex curve on a slope, for example, may indicate a favorable placement location, whereas an inward or concave curve indicates a poor placement site
  • For example,

Position in the landscape. Landscape position refers to the particular location of a topographic feature in relation to the landscape. If, for example, a region has billy topography and the landscape position of an on-site system is at the bottom of a hill in the region, this is known as a billy topography. The location of the treatment and disposal area in relation to the surrounding landscape is crucial to the operation of an on-site system. The slope and the position of the terrain. The diverse landscape locations are depicted in Figure 4.4.24: interfluve or ridgetop, shoulder slope, side slope, foot slope, and toe slope, among others.

When the distance between the streams is great, the area between the streams is referred to as the interfluve.

2.

This slope is concave, which means that water drains off rather than collecting in the soil below it.

3. The nine different forms of side slopes are as follows: linear-linear, linear-convex, linear-concave, convex-linear, convex-convex, convex-concave, concave-linear, concave-convex, and concave-concave (Figure 4.4.25).

  • Linear slopes are defined by a straight line down the hill, however they might be flat or have a curve over the slope in the horizontal direction, depending on the slope type. It is referred to as linear/linear if the land follows a straight line down the slope and across the slope, and it is also referred to as linear/linear. If the linear slope bends outward across the slope, the slope is said to be linear/convex, and if it curves inward, the slope is said to be linear/concave.
  • In contrast to linear/concave slopes, linear/linear and linear/convex slopes carry more runoff away from the site than linear/concave slopes. This indicates that on linear/linear and linear/convex slopes, less water collects in the soil than on linear/concave slopes
  • On linear/concave slopes, more water accumulates in the soil.

4. The foot slope and the gentler toe slope are located toward the bottom of the hill. 5. Colluvium, soils created by debris flowing down a hill, and alluvium, soils formed by deposits of silt from streams, can both be found in this region. The toe and foot slopes have a concave contour in the vertical direction and are frequently under-draining because of this.

Landscape position and slope in siting on-site systems.

4. The foot slope and the gentler toe slope are located at the bottom of the hill. 5. In this area, you’ll find colluvium, which are soils produced by debris rolling down a hillside, and alluvium, which are soils formed by silt deposits from streams. Because they are concave in the vertical plane, the toe and foot slopes are frequently under-drained.

  • Land with a consistent slope of less than 15 percent is deemed suitable for on-site systems
  • However, land with a uniform slope greater than 15 percent is considered unsuitable. If the topography of the property is such that the land has a consistent slope between 15 and 30 percent, the land is deemed PROVISIONALLY SUITABLE for on-site systems
  • Otherwise, the land is considered UNSUITABLE. Property with a slope more than 30 percent is categorized as UNSUITABLE unless an inquiry reveals that a modified conventional on-site system can be implemented adequately in accordance with rule 15A NCAC lSA.1956
  • Otherwise, the land is classed as SUITABLE. A slope with a gradient greater than 65 percent is always considered unsuitable. It is regarded unsuitable for on-site systems where the topography has complicated forms to the slopes or if there are numerous gullies and ravines cutting the slopes. Unsuitable locations for on-site systems are depressions, or bowl-shaped indentations in the ground surface that are typically found in rural areas and are categorised as UNSUITABLE. Depressions gather water and are often wetter than the soils around them, making them unsuitable for farming or other uses. Sites that comply with all other requirements and have been approved by the local health department may be regarded suitable for use. The toe slopes, the foot slopes, the head slopes, and depressional regions are all tough landscape situations for installing septic systems since these areas are frequently not well drained.

For on-site systems, land with a uniform slope of less than 15 percent is regarded suitable; however, land with a uniform slope of more than 15 percent is deemed unsuitable. A uniform slope between 15 and 30 percent on the land is deemed suitable for on-site systems if the land’s topography is such that the land has a consistent slope between 15 and 30 percent. Unless an examination demonstrates that a modified conventional on-site system can be built adequately in accordance with rule 15A NCAC lSA.1956, land with a slope more than 30 percent is categorized as UNSUITABLE; It is usually considered unsuitable to go down slopes more than 65 percent in gradient.

Unsuitable locations for on-site systems are depressions, or bowl-shaped indentations in the ground surface that are typically found in rural areas and are designated as such.

On the other hand, if the location meets with all other requirements and is recognized by the local health department, it may be regarded suitable.

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