How Often Do You Have To Pump Out A Philippine Septic Tank? (Solved)

When to Empty Your Tank Most septic tanks need to be pumped out every 3-5 years.

  • One is to just have it pumped every two or three years. The other is to open the access port to the first chamber (see Figure 1) once every year and insert a long pole to the bottom of the tank and withdraw it. You can see the depth of sludge by the darkness on the pole.

How do I know if my septic tank is full in the Philippines?

Septic Tanks required routine maintenance, here are the sign that Septic Tanks are full and needed and immediate action:

  • Bad Odor.
  • Slow Drains.
  • Trouble Flushing.
  • Pooling Water.
  • Sewage Backup.

How often should a septic tank need to be pumped?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How much does it cost to clean a septic tank in the Philippines?

The usual cost of septic tank cleaning services is around P3,000 per truck.

How long can a septic tank go without being pumped?

You can wait up to 10 years to drain your tank provided that you live alone and do not use the septic system often. You may feel like you can pump your septic tank waste less frequently to save money, but it’ll be difficult for you to know if the tank is working properly.

How many leaching chambers in a septic tank are required in the Philippines?

Yet as cited Plumbing Code of the Philippines, residents and establishment owners are only required to have two-chamber septic tanks.

How do you know septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  1. Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  2. Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  3. Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  4. You Hear Gurgling Water.
  5. You Have A Sewage Backup.
  6. How often should you empty your septic tank?

Can a septic tank never be pumped?

What Are the Consequences of Not Pumping Your Tank? If the tank is not pumped, the solids will build up in the tank and the holding capacity of the tank will be diminished. Eventually, the solids will reach the pipe that feeds into the drain field, causing a clog. Waste water backing up into the house.

Can you pump a septic tank too often?

If your septic tank is pumped too often, that bacteria will have no place to go but out into the drain field, which can lead to clogs and failures. So unless your septic tank’s sludge and scum levels reach certain thresholds, it’s actually beneficial to leave the septic tank alone.

How do I keep my septic tank healthy?

Do’s and Don’ts when maintaining your septic system

  1. Regularly inspect and maintain your septic system.
  2. Pump your septic tank as needed.
  3. Keep your septic tank lids closed and secured.
  4. Be water-wise.
  5. Direct water from land and roof drains away from the drainfield.
  6. Landscape with love.
  7. Keep septic tank lids easily accessible.

What is the standard size of septic tank in the Philippines?

The three chamber septic tank will measure 3.1 meters (10 feet) by 1.9 meters (6 feet) and will be 2.1 meters deep (almost 7 feet). The tank will have a concrete slab on the bottom, filled, steel reinforced hollow block walls and a concrete top with clean-out ports.

How do I remove sludge from my septic tank?

How to Reduce Sludge in a Septic Tank Without Pumping

  1. Install an aeration system with diffused air in your septic tank.
  2. Break up any compacted sludge.
  3. Add a bio-activator or microbe blend.
  4. Maintain the aeration system.
  5. Add additional Microbes as required.

How do I schedule my Maynilad septic tank to clean?

Contact 1626 / 9813333 for Maynilad customers and 1627/ 9175900 for Manila Water customers. Customers may avail of scheduled desludging service per Barangay at NO COST.

Do septic tanks really need to be pumped?

Septic Tanks require regular pumping to prevent malfunction and emergency servicing. The most fundamental, and arguably the most important element required to maintain your septic system is regular pumping of the septic tank. Most experts recommend pumping the septic tank every 3 to 5 years.

Can I shower if my septic tank is full?

Only the water would get out into the leach field in a proper system unless you run too much water too fast. The thing to do is to run your shower water outside into it’s own drain area, but it may not be allowed where you are. Used to be called gray water system.

How do you know when to empty a septic tank?

Here are some of the signs for which you should look.

  1. Water puddling above the septic tank. So you noticed a small pool of water but it didn’t rain?
  2. Drains moving slowly. If the drain is moving slowly when you flush the toilet, it could be due to a clog.
  3. Bad smells coming from the septic tank.
  4. The sewer has backed up.

Our Philippine House Project – Septic and Drainage Systems

Our Philippine House construction project. Septic tank, catch basins, and drainage system are all included. Excavation of a septic tank One of our employees has been tasked with the responsibility of excavating the pit in which the septic tank will be installed. The three chamber septic tank will have a diameter of 3.1 meters (10 feet), a height of 1.9 meters (6 feet), and a depth of 2.1 meters (almost 7 feet). The tank will be constructed with a concrete slab on the bottom, filled hollow block walls with steel reinforcement, and a concrete top with clean-out ports.

The soil is exceptionally thick clay, as is characteristic of most rice fields (which is why they are referred to as “rice paddies” since they hold water so well).

If one were to do a percolation test to determine the absorptive capability of this clay, one would have to assume that there would be none during the rainy season.

There are issues with wastewater disposal in our “community” that must be addressed.

  • No treatment will be provided for rainwater from the roof gutters, or for water from washing machines, sinks, and showers.
  • It is likely that as our community grows and develops, a drainage system or a formal ditch will be constructed to transport wastewater to the nearest stream bed.
  • There is essentially no sewage treatment in the Philippines, save from treatment in a septic tank, which is the exception.
  • When you purchase property in a formal subdivision, you should have access to a formal drainage system that has been installed by the developer, which is a significant advantage.
  • I’m not familiar with on-site leaching systems, which are common in the United States.
  • Construction of an excavation for the septic tank using steel rebar cages The tank’s concrete floor, as well as the beginnings of walls and partitions Even in a septic tank, there are plenty of smiles!
  • I’m waiting for the lid to open.

Our home is equipped with 10 catch basins that are connected by 4′′ pipe.

You’ll spend twice as much, but saving money on pipe is a bogus economic strategy.

It is simple to drive a shovel through the inexpensive pipe, and it is more susceptible to damage from tree roots and digging animals.

Three components of the drainage system are seen in this photograph.

Only toilet waste is disposed of in the septic system; everything else is recycled.

Because of the steepness of the slope, solids will not be transported to the septic tank.

The rule of thumb is 1/4 inch of slope for every one foot of line run or 2.5 inches of slope for every ten foot piece of pipe.

The 1/4-inch minimum slope ensures that there is sufficient flow velocity for the transfer of materials in the system.

The flow velocity of a 3′′ drain with a 1/8′′ per foot slope is just 1.59 feet per second.

The importance of this is magnified in the case of 1.6 gpf water closets, due to the restricted waste carry of some low flow water closets.

Mine, on the other hand, had not.

Our location is fairly far away from the house.

Keep in mind that the sewer line that exits the home is pretty fixed at a height of a few inches below the horn of the toilet.

The level of the input pipe into the septic tank must be maintained at the right level in order for the tank to function effectively.

Once the home and tank are constructed, there is nothing that can be done but accept the consequences of any faults that have been committed.

It is possible to see two 2′′ PVC pipes coming through the wall and joining to the 3′ drain pipe in the photograph.

On the left, the 3′′ pipe continues on until it empties into the catch basin system.

Except for the p-trap beneath the lavatory basin, there are no p-traps.

We haven’t encountered any issues with odors.

They solely provide service to the water closets; they do not provide service to the sinks, floor drains, or shower.

We have not been in a rush to make holes in our gorgeous long span roof since it is so beautiful.

When we’re finished, the vent pipes will be routed into the ceiling.

The Orangeburg brand of pipe is extremely attractive.

A shovel can easily be driven through the cheaper pipe, but this is less likely to happen with the heavier Atlanta.

I greatly regret that we just utilized one length of the less expensive pipe.

It is possible that you will be charged for Atlanta and receive National.

Of course, if you consistently utilize the highest-quality materials, the cost of your home (excluding land) per square meter might wind up being substantially more.

Old foreigners with just a few years to live, at the most, insist on building buildings that will endure a hundred years, which is somewhat paradoxical. Here’s a sampling of the prices we paid, most of which were in the second half of 2010.

  • We’re working on a project called the Philippines House. Septic system, catch basins, and drainage system are all included in this price. Excavation of septic tanks It has been allocated to one of our employees the responsibility of excavating the pit in which the septic tank will be constructed. 3.1 meters (10 feet) by 1.9 meters (6 feet) and 2.1 meters deep, the three-chamber septic tank will be built on a 10-foot by 6-foot foundation (almost 7 feet). The tank will feature a concrete slab on the bottom, filled hollow block walls with steel reinforcement, and a concrete top with clean-out ports on it. Cement with the waterproofing chemical “Sahara” will be used to parge the surface. During typhoons, the large amount of water that comes from the roof downspouts will be gathered in a series of concrete catch basins and routed away from the lot. The soil is exceptionally thick clay, as is characteristic of most rice fields (which is why they are referred to as “rice paddies” since they hold water). When it comes to the water table, it changes greatly depending on the season, ranging from being more or less at ground level during the wet season to being around fifteen feet below ground level in the winter months. There must be none during the rainy season if one were to conduct a percolation test to determine the absorptive capability of this clay. It is during the dry season that the clay cracks and becomes extremely absorbent. (See Figure 1) A problem exists in our “community” when it comes to wastewater disposal. There is no municipal or subdivision drainage system in which to discharge due to the fact that the area is flat and primarily undeveloped agriculture In ordinary septic systems, only “black water” (toilet waste) is allowed to enter. No treatment will be provided for rainwater from the roof gutters, or for water from washing machines, sinks, and showers. Rather, it will be collected in a series of concrete catch basins, piped through the wall, and released into a ditch. A drainage system or a formal ditch will most likely be constructed as our community grows, to transport wastewater to the nearest stream bed. The streams are home to many local residents who live along their banks and have dug wells in or near them. Sewage treatment is essentially non-existent in the Philippines, with the exception of in a septic tank. In our experience, Boracay is an exception. In a formal subdivision, you should have access to a formal drainage system, which is supplied by the developer, which is a significant advantage when purchasing real estate there. The trash will just be finally released into a ditch, stream, river, or the ocean, but at the very least it will be transported away from your property. On-site leaching systems, such as those used in the United States, are something I’ve never heard of before! Septic tank frame with reinforcing bar reinforcement. Septic tanks are not brought by truck in the Philippines
  • Instead, they are erected on-site. Construction of an excavation for the septic tank using steel rebar cage. Floor of the tank is made of concrete, while walls and partitions are being built in the background. Even in a septic tank, there are lots of smiles! Our block was 6 inches in diameter. In the process of waiting for the lid Concrete lid forms for a septic tank The floor and formations of the Catch Basin Water from the gutters and downspouts as well as gray water from the shower, floor drain, lavatory, and kitchen sink are collected and discharged into an outdoor drainage ditch through a system of concrete catch basins and drain pipes that encircle the home. Four-inch pipe connects 10 catch basins in our residence. Purchase a high-quality pipe, such as the “Atlanta” model. Even though you’ll pay two times as much, buying inexpensive pipe is a waste of money. Keep in mind that you’ll be excavating and planting in the near future. Putting a shovel through the inexpensive pipe is simple, and it is more vulnerable to damage from tree roots and digging animals. Caps removed from completed catch basins TIP: You should take lots of pictures during the construction of your home so that you can later review them and refresh your memory on how things were done and where items were placed. Three drainage system components are shown in this photograph. The septic system is connected to the toilet through the upper 4′′ PVC orange pipe. Septic systems are designed to handle just toilet waste. Nothing else is processed via them. Remember to check that the sewage and drain lines have an appropriate slope maintained by your staff. Septic tank solids will not be transported to the septic tank if the slope is too small. Because of the steepness of the pipe, particles will be left behind when the water rushes to the septic tank. A quarter-inch slope for every one foot run of line, or 2.5 inches per ten-foot piece of pipe, is the general formula for calculating slope. Drain piping 3 inches in diameter and less must be run at a minimum slope of 1/4 inch per foot, according to plumbing code requirements. In order for solids to be transported efficiently, the 1/4′′ minimum slope must be maintained. For soil and trash lines, a minimum velocity of two feet per second is suggested. The flow velocity of a 3 inch drain with a 1/8 inch per foot slope is just 1.59 feet per second. The flow velocity of a 3 inch drain with a 1/4 inch per foot slope is 2.25 feet per second. When using 1.6 GPF water closets, this is especially critical since the waste carry capacity of some low flow water closets is restricted. Such a rule is likely to be unknown to your employees. I couldn’t say that about my. The Philippines, on the other hand, may not have such a problem because the septic tank is typically located extremely near to the home. Unlike the home, ours is a long way away. It takes some real forethought to arrange everything just perfect so that you wind up with the appropriate slope at the end of the day. You should keep in mind that the sewer line that exits the home is quite fixed, and it is located about an inch or two below the horn of the water closet. To go deeper, the septic tank must be larger, which increases the cost of installation. Otherwise, the septic tank will not function effectively if the input line into the tank is not at an appropriate level of elevation. The completed floor level of the bathroom, as well as the height of the septic tank intake, should be determined before any of the other details are decided. One has no choice but to accept whatever faults have been made after the home and tank are constructed. The bottom 3′′ orange PVC pipe transports downspout water from the roof, as well as wastewater from the kitchen, showers, lavatories, and floor drains, to a series of collect basins, which are subsequently routed through the perimeter wall to a drainage ditch. Two 2′′ PVC pipes can be seen going through the wall and connected to a 3′ drain pipe in the photograph. The one on the right comes from the sink in the master bedroom bathroom, while the one on the left comes from the shower and floor drain. Continue to the left until it empties into the catch basin system, which is 3 inches in diameter. To try to minimize clogging, we utilized 2′′ pipe. It worked. It is just under the lavatory bowl that there are p-traps. Always remember that gray water is disposed of in catch basins rather than in septic tanks. So far, there have been no odor issues. For the bathroom, we built two 3′′ PVC vent pipes that are concealed within the walls of the room. Only the water closets are serviced
  • The sinks, floor drains, and showers are not. These vents were designed to extend through the roof and into the attic space beneath the building. In our lovely long span roof, we haven’t felt the need to make any holes just yet. As a result, we have not experienced any odor issues in our attic. When we’re finished, the vent pipes will be routed through the roof of the building. A lot of our drain pipe was Atlanta brand, which was heavier and more expensive. It also appears to be an Orangeburg brand pipe. Cheaper pipe is available, but it is vulnerable to damage both before and after construction — for example, from landscaping work. A shovel can easily pass through the less expensive pipe, but this is less likely to happen with the heavier Atlanta. Because of this, decent pipe is more than double the price of economy pipe, as you can see in the table below: The use of one length of the less expensive pipe was a big mistake, and I regret it greatly. Guess which pipe you’ll get if you hire someone else to build your home! The Atlanta fee may be levied, but you may obtain National service instead. Every aspect of it would be kept underground for security reasons. If you constantly choose the highest-quality materials, your house’s per-square-metre cost (without land) might wind up being much more than the national average. Old foreigners with just a few years to live, at the most, insist on building buildings that will endure a hundred years, which is very absurd! Listed below is a sampling of the prices we paid, the majority of which occurred in the second half of 2010:
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Downspouts are in place for the time being. It became necessary to relocate a catch basin when we expanded a porch a little bit. They’re a ton of weight! Catch basins and downspouts have been installed. Drains and catch basins have been filled and painted. Despite the fact that our home is not very huge, the roof has a total surface area of more than 300 square meters. In the course of tropical rains, the volume of water that comes off the roof is astounding. Due to the amount of water eroding the fill and creating a muddy condition around the home, we were obliged to temporarily install our downspouts while we finished the rest of the house.

  • The designs called for a total of twelve 3′′ downspouts to be installed to drain the roof.
  • We included them since they were part of the original ideas.
  • Despite the fact that our home is not very huge, the roof has a total surface area of more than 300 square meters.
  • Due to the amount of water eroding the fill and creating a muddy condition around the home, we were obliged to temporarily install our downspouts while we finished the rest of the house.
  • The designs called for a total of twelve 3′′ downspouts to be installed to drain the roof.
  • We included them since they were part of the original ideas.
  • You may find out everything about our Philippine House construction project at/building-our-philippine-house-index/.

Pumping (Cleaning Out a Septic Tank)

The majority of residential septic tanks need to be cleaned every three to five years. When solids fill between one-third and one-half of the tank, it is necessary to pump the tank. If this occurs, the only way to determine when it does is to have your tank inspected by an experienced septic contractor. When the following situations occur, the contractor will propose that a qualified septic pumper be hired:

  • There is a 6 inch gap between the bottom of the scum (grease) layer and that of the bottom of the outlet tee
  • And a 12 inch gap between the top of the sludge layer and the top of the outlet tee.

After the tank has been pumped, there is no need to “reseed” it with new material. Seeding is the process of promoting excellent bacterial growth by introducing substances such as yeast, dung, or dead animals. The Department of Health and Human Services does not propose seeding the system since the sheer act of utilizing the system will give all of the germs necessary to ensure that the system functions properly.

Yeast, dung, meat, and dead animals will not aid in the development of the colony of bacteria in the tank any quicker than they already are.

General Advice on Septic Tank Pumping Frequency

  • A single tenant has a pump that has to be replaced every 12 years
  • Two people have a pump that needs to be replaced every 6 years
  • Four inhabitants have a pump that needs to be replaced every 3 years. The number of inhabitants is six, and the pump is replaced every two years. The number of inhabitants is 8
  • The pump is replaced once a year.
  • A single tenant has a pump that has to be replaced every 12 years
  • Two people have a pump that needs to be replaced every 6 years
  • Four occupants have a pump that needs to be replaced every three years. 6 people live there
  • The water is pumped every two years. — Pumping every year for a total of 8 residents.
  • Pump every 19 years for one resident
  • One pump every nine years for another resident
  • Four pumps every four years for the remaining inhabitants
  • And one pump every four years for the remaining occupants. A pump is required for each of the following numbers of residents: 6 for every 3 years
  • 8 for every 2 years.

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How Often Should A Septic Tank Be Pumped

In the United States, more than one in every five houses – generally in rural regions – relies on an individual onsite system or small community cluster system to treat wastewater, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). With the average cost of a new septic system ranging between $3,000 and $7,000, periodic septic system maintenance not only saves homeowners money, but it may also assist to ensure that their homes are safe and healthy.

Septic System Basics

A septic system is comprised of two major components: a septic tank and a drain field. The septic tank is the primary component of the system.

  • Tanks are water-tight containers that are placed underground and used to store sediments and scum that have collected from your wastewater
  • They are made of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene. In a drain field, pollutants are removed from the liquid as it is absorbed into the ground by a layer of soil.

Because it is expensive to replace a septic system, it is critical to keep it in good working order. The more proactive you are in keeping your system in good working order, the longer it will endure. Septic tanks, on the other hand, may survive for up to 30 years or more. The primary objectives of a septic tank maintenance program are to avoid the buildup of sediments in the tank as well as any pollution of groundwater. The good news is that septic system maintenance is not difficult, and can be accomplished with only a few simple tasks.

Septic Tank Cleaning

Drain pipes that link the tank to the drain field will gradually fill with solids and other material and become clogged with debris over time. In order to eradicate and clean any debris that might hinder your system from running smoothly, the majority of pros advocate high-pressure water jetting every five years.

Using Your Septic System Wisely

Following the exit of wastewater from your septic tank, it is directed towards the drain field of your septic system. If the drain field becomes flooded, either from within your system or from outside sources, it might flood, resulting in a backup of the system. As a result of this:

  • Planting gardens and trees too close to your drain field should be avoided. Never park, drive, or otherwise operate your vehicle over it. Remove it from the vicinity by diverting roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems.

Water Use

The average single-family house uses roughly 70 gallons of water per person, each day, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, a leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water every day. Furthermore, the less water that enters your septic system, the better off you are.

  • If you reside in a house with a septic system, you may increase its performance by doing the following: replacing existing toilets with high-efficiency models
  • Replacing existing toilets with high-efficiency models Using aerators on faucets, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restrictors to save water. repairing dripping faucets and overflowing toilets Maintaining a safe distance between rainwater drainage systems and your drain field

Another important source of worry is the use of washing machines. The right load size for your washing machine should be chosen carefully. If you are unable to pick the load size, only full loads should be used. Additionally, distribute laundry responsibilities throughout the week. Clothes washers that have earned the ENERGY STAR designation consume 35 percent less energy and use 50 percent less water than regular units. For hot tubs, ensure sure the water has cooled before draining it to avoid any unpleasant surprises later.

Proper Disposal

Everything that goes down your drains – whether you flush, pour, or grind it (like in a garbage disposal) – ends up in your septic system. There’s no getting around this basic fact: And the health of your septic system is affected as a result. Toilets are a particular source of temptation for far too many of us. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the only items that should be flushed down the toilet are human waste and toilet paper. There will be no cooking oil, flushable wipes, paper towels, feminine hygiene products, dental floss, diapers, cigarette butts, medications, coffee grounds, paper towels, or cat litter among other items, to mention a few of the most popular.

Also, while dealing with a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers.

Call and ask for our drain cleaning service if a plunger or a drain snake don’t work for you. Even garbage disposals are a source of contention. The majority of authorities advise that people who live in homes with septic tanks should minimize or avoid using them altogether.

Septic System Maintenance

We recommend that you get your septic system inspected by a service specialist once a year to ensure that it is operating effectively. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, septic systems in homes should be flushed every three to five years. When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Keep complete records of every maintenance performed, including reports on prospective or present leaks, scum levels, and any potential harm to the system.

  1. When you get your system serviced, it’s also crucial to have the service provider clean or replace your filter.
  2. In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.
  3. Despite the fact that Casteel can handle most common domestic plumbing issues, it does not provide septic tank service.
  4. Contact the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association if you need help locating service specialists in your region (NOWRA).

Septic Tank Treatment

You should utilize living, organic bacteria to break down artificial compounds and sediments that can enter your septic system, such as detergents and soaps. These common home compounds have the potential to harm naturally existing microorganisms that are essential to the correct functioning of your system. Additives that inhibit the growth of bacteria assist to maintain your pipes clean and clear, as well as allowing your system to work correctly and without smells.

Septic Pumping

Pumping a septic system when it is necessary will help to keep it from failing completely.

How Often Should A Septic Tank Be Pumped?

The result is that septic tanks are normally drained every three to five years for the majority of homeowners. The size of the household, the total volume of wastewater created, the amount of particles present, and the size of the tank are the primary parameters that influence the frequency of pumping. If the top of the scum layer is within 12 inches of your tank’s T-shaped exit, the EPA recommends that you get it pumped. This is because sludge and scum are prevented from leaving the tank. Systems with electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components must be examined more frequently, generally once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order.

Establish a routine to avoid solids from collecting in your system later on.

Problem Solving

In certain cases, the presence of bad odors in your septic system indicates that your system is blocked with particles and is therefore more likely to fail. In the event that you fail to properly maintain your septic system and facilities, sewage may back up into your home. If this occurs, avoid coming into touch with the sewage, which may include diseases and bacteria that are dangerous to your health. You’ll want to bring in a professional cleanup crew and report the breakdown of your septic system to your local health agency.

Most importantly, seek the services of specialists. Search the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association’s network of service providers to discover a specialist that is knowledgeable and qualified in their field.

A Beginner’s Guide to Septic Systems

  • Septic systems are used to dispose of waste from homes and buildings. Identifying the location of the septic tank and drainfield
  • What a Septic System Is and How It Works Keeping a Septic System in Good Condition
  • Signs that a septic system is failing include:

Septic systems, also known as on-site wastewater management systems, are installed in a large number of buildings and houses. It is easy to lose sight of septic systems, which operate quietly, gracefully, and efficiently to protect human and environmental health due to their burying location. Septic systems are the norm in rural regions, but they may also be found in a lot of metropolitan places, especially in older buildings. It is critical to understand whether or not your building is on a septic system.

Is Your Home or Building on a Septic System?

It is possible that the solution to this question will not be evident. If a structure looks to be connected to a sewage system, it may instead be connected to a septic system. It is fairly unusual for tenants to be unaware of the final destination of the wastewater generated by their residence. Some of the hints or signs listed below will assist in determining whether the facility is served by a septic system or whether it is supplied by a sewer system:

  • Sewer service will be provided at a cost by the city or municipality. Pay close attention to the water bill to see whether there is a cost labeled “sewer” or “sewer charge” on it. If there is a fee for this service, it is most likely because the facility is connected to a sewage system. Look up and down the street for sewage access ports or manholes, which can be found in any location. If a sewage system runs in front of a property, it is probable that the house is connected to it in some way. Inquire with your neighbors to see if they are connected to a sewer or septic system. The likelihood that your home is on a sewer system is increased if the properties on each side of you are on one as well. Keep in mind, however, that even if a sewage line runs in front of the structure and the nearby residences are connected to a sewer system, your home or building may not be connected to one. If the structure is older than the sewer system, it is possible that it is still on the original septic system. Consult with your local health agency for further information. This agency conducts final inspections of septic systems to ensure that they comply with applicable laws and regulations. There is a possibility that they have an archived record and/or a map of the system and will supply this information upon request
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All property owners should be aware of whether or not their property is equipped with an on-site wastewater treatment system. Georgia law mandates that the property owner is responsible for the correct operation of a septic system, as well as any necessary maintenance and repairs.

Locating the Septic Tank and Drainfield

Finding a septic system may be a difficult process. They can be buried anywhere in the yard, including the front, back, and side yards. After a few years, the soil may begin to resemble the surrounding soil, making it impossible to distinguish the system from the surrounding soil. It is possible that in dry weather, the grass will be dryer in the shallow soil over the tank and greener over the drainfield, where the cleansed water will be released, but this is not always the case, especially in hot weather.

  • The contractor who built the house should have presented the initial owner with a map showing the tank and drainfield locations, according to the building code.
  • The installation of the system, as well as any modifications made to it, would have been examined by your local health authority.
  • Unfortunately, if the system is very old, any records related with it may be insufficient or nonexistent, depending on the situation.
  • Look for the point at where the wastewater pipes join together if the building is on a crawlspace or has an unfinished basement.
  • The sewer line that runs through the structure is referred to as the building sewer.
  • To “feel” for the tank, use a piece of re-bar or a similar metal probe.
  • If you use this free service, you may avoid accidentally putting a rod through your gas or water line.

Try to locate the tank after a rainstorm, when the metal probe will be more easily maneuvered through moist dirt.

This should be done with care; extreme caution should be exercised to avoid puncturing the building sewer.

A tank is normally 5 by 8 feet in size, however the dimensions might vary.

Be aware that there may be rocks, pipes, and other debris in the area that “feels” like the tank but is not in fact part of the tank.

However, it is possible to have the lid or access port positioned on a riser in addition to being on the same level as the top of the tank in some cases.

Once the tank has been identified, make a rough drawing of its placement in relation to the house so that it will not be misplaced again!

It may be easier to discover the drainage lines now that the tank has been identified, particularly if the area has been subjected to prolonged periods of drought.

How a Septic System Works

Typical sewage treatment system (figure 1). It is composed of three components (Figure 1): the tank, the drain lines or discharge lines, and the soil treatment area (also known as the soil treatment area) (sometimes called a drainfield or leach field). The size of the tank varies according to the size of the structure. The normal home (three bedrooms, two bathrooms) will often include a 1,000-gallon water storage tank on the premises. Older tanks may only have one chamber, however newer tanks must have two chambers.

  1. The tank functions by settling waste and allowing it to be digested by microbes.
  2. These layers include the bottom sludge layer, the top scum layer, and a “clear” zone in the center.
  3. A typical septic tank is seen in Figure 2.
  4. It is fortunate that many of the bacteria involved are found in high concentrations in the human gastrointestinal tract.
  5. Although the bacteria may break down some of the stuff in the sludge, they are unable to break down all of it, which is why septic tanks must be cleaned out every three to seven years.
  6. In addition, when new water is introduced into the septic tank, an equal volume of water is pushed out the discharge lines and onto the drainfield.
  7. The water trickles out of the perforated drain pipes, down through a layer of gravel, and into the soil below the surface (Figure 3).
  8. A typical drainfield may be found here.
  9. Plants, bacteria, fungus, protozoa, and other microorganisms, as well as bigger critters such as mites, earthworms, and insects, flourish in soil.
  10. Mineralogical and metallic elements attach to soil particles, allowing them to be removed from the waste water.

Maintaining a Septic System

Septic systems are shown in Figure 1. It is composed of three components (Figure 1): the tank, the drain lines or discharge lines, and the soil treatment area. The tank is the largest of these components (sometimes called a drainfield or leach field). According to the building’s dimensions, tank sizes vary. A 1,000-gallon tank is commonly found in the ordinary home (three bedrooms, two bathrooms). In contrast to previous tanks, which may only have one chamber, new tanks must contain two. The tank is frequently constructed of concrete, although it can also be constructed of various types of materials.

  1. Figure 2 shows the formation of three levels in the septic tank as wastewater flows into it.
  2. Thick particles sink to the bottom of the tank and accumulate there to create the sludge layer, while oil and light solids float to the top and accumulate there to produce the scum layer (see Figure 1).
  3. Sludge is partially decomposed by bacteria and other microorganisms, and this is the result of their activity.
  4. Each time the septic tank is flushed, a fresh supply of these is introduced (no additives are needed).
  5. The baffles on the discharge side of the septic tank only enable water from the middle layer to be sent to the field lines and not from the bottom layer.
  6. If there is a distribution box between the tank and drain lines, wastewater may be sent to various lines in the drainfield at the same time.
  7. 3.
  8. The drainfield of a typical home or business.
  9. A variety of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungus, and protozoa flourish in soil, as do bigger critters such as mites, earthworms, and insects.

Chemical bonds form between minerals and metals in soil particles, allowing them to be removed from the waste water. It is inevitable that the treated water will find its way into groundwater supplies.

Signs a Septic System is Failing

A failed system manifests itself in the following ways:

  • Sinks and toilets drain at a snail’s pace
  • Plumbing that is backed up
  • The sound of gurgling emanating from the plumbing system House or yard aromas that smell like sewage
  • In the yard, there is wet or squishy dirt
  • Water that is gray in hue that has accumulated
  • An region of the yard where the grass is growing more quickly and is becoming greener
  • Water contaminated by bacteria from a well

If you notice any of these indicators, you should notify your local health department immediately. An environmentalist from the health department can assist in identifying possible hazards. There are also listings of state-certified contractors available from the local health department, who may do repairs. Repairs or alterations to the system must be approved by the health department and examined by an inspector. Keep an eye out for any meetings that may take place between a health department inspector and a contractor to discuss repairs to your system.

  1. Household garbage that has not been properly handled is released into the environment when systems fail.
  2. It has the potential to pollute surrounding wells, groundwater, streams, and other sources of potable water, among other things.
  3. The foul odor emanating from a malfunctioning system can cause property values to plummet.
  4. Briefly stated, broken systems can have an impact on your family, neighbors, community, and the environment.
  5. Septic systems are an effective, attractive, and reasonably priced method of treating and disposing of wastewater.

Figures 2 and 3 reprinted with permission from: CIDWT. 2009. Installation of Wastewater Treatment Systems. Consortium of Institutes for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment. Iowa State University, Midwest Plan Service. Ames, IA.

History of the current status and revisions Published on the 15th of August, 2013. Published on March 28th, 2017 with a full review.

Cleaning Of Septic Tank – (02) 531 9179 or 0920 908 6869

In this perspective, we frequently inquire as to how frequently a septic tank should be cleaned. Actually, the frequency with which a septic tank should be cleaned or pumped would be determined by the number of residents in a dwelling or structure, as well as the gallon capacity of the tank. It would be normal for services to be performed on a monthly basis if preventative maintenance is included in the contract. In line with this category, the following are some of the steps we take when cleaning your septic tank system.

  • Prior to draining the septic tank, it has always been vital to do preliminary inspections. Step 2: Remove all liquid and collected sediments from all compartments of the septic tank in one continuous motion. It is necessary to utilize the water hose to assist in loosening particles in preparation for removal. 3. During the cleaning operation, the following tank characteristics should be noticed and recorded on the pumping report that will be sent to the property owner: a. The tank is leaking. The manhole covers or the top of the tank must be carefully reinstalled and sealed when the cleaning procedure is completed. Step 4: Cleaning any minor spillages of trash occurring from the cleaning procedure is accomplished by washing thoroughly with water in Step 5. Large amounts of leakage must be cleaned up, sterilized, or buried. If the spill is considered serious, as stated in the following clause, the Environmental Health Service must be notified.

The garbage collected in our trunk will be sent to our sanitation facility in Tagaytay city for proper disposal of the septic tank waste.

Maintaining Your Pressure Distribution System

Many years have passed since septic tanks with gravity flow drainfields were first installed in places that were not served by municipal sewers. Not all soil and site conditions, however, are well suited for the use of these basic methods. Non-standard sewage treatment systems are frequently employed to preserve human health and water quality in regions where regular sewage treatment systems are unable to provide safe sewage treatment.

The pressure distribution system is an example of an out-of-the-ordinary system. It includes the following features:

  • Periodic dosing and resting
  • Uniform dispersion of effluent
  • Shallow placement of the drainfield
  • And

The following information will assist you in better understanding your pressure distribution system and ensuring that it continues to operate safely and at the lowest cost feasible. A typical pressure distribution system is composed of three functional components:

  1. The sewage treatment plant
  2. The pump chamber as well as the pump
  3. The drainfield and replacement area, respectively

The Septic Tank

Most septic tanks are constructed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene and are buried beneath the ground surface. All of the waste water from your home is channeled into the tank. Heavy materials sink to the bottom of the tank, where they are partially decomposed by bacterial activity. Fats and oil, among other lighter particles, float to the surface and form a scum layer on the surface of the water. Effluent is the term used to describe the wastewater that exits the septic tank. Despite the fact that it has been partially treated, it still includes disease-causing germs as well as several other contaminants.

Proper Care Includes:

  1. Septic tank maintenance should include an inspection once a year and pumping it as necessary. Unless the septic tank is regularly emptied, sediments escaping from the tank will clog the pump and drainfield, causing them to fail prematurely. Because it increases the quantity of particles entering the tank and necessitates more frequent pumping, the use of a trash disposal is strongly prohibited in order to avoid the flushing of dangerous materials into the septic tank. Don’t put anything into the tank that may cause a fire or explosion. This includes grease and cooking oils as well as newspapers and paper towels. You shouldn’t put anything into the tank that could cause a fire or explosion. In order to obtain information on the correct disposal of hazardous home trash, you should contact the Humboldt Waste Management Authority. It is important to avoid the use of any form of chemical or biological septic tank additive. As previously stated, such products are not essential nor beneficial to the effective operation of a septic tank, nor do they minimize the need for routine tank pumping.

The Pump Chamber

The pump chamber is a container made of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene that collects the effluent from the septic tank. A pump, pump control floats, and a high water warning float are all included within the chamber. Pump activity can be regulated either via the use of control floats or through the use of timed controls. A series of control floats is used to switch the pump “on” and “off” at different levels in order to pump a certain volume of effluent per dose of medication. Using the timer settings, you may create dosages that are both long and short in duration, as well as intervals or rest periods between doses.

If you employ pump timer controls, the alarm will also sound to alert you if you are using too much water in your house.

The alarm should be equipped with a buzzer and a bright light that can be seen clearly.

The pump discharge line should be equipped with a union and a valve to facilitate the removal of the pump.

Proper Care Includes:

  1. Performing an annual inspection of the pump chamber, pump, and floats, and replacing or repairing any worn or broken parts. Pump maintenance should be performed in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications. Inspection of electrical components and conduits should be performed for corrosion. If the alarm panel is equipped with a “push-to-test” button, it should be used on a regular basis. If your system does not already have one, you should consider installing a septic tank effluent filter or pump screen. It is possible to prevent particles from clogging the pump and drainfield pipes by screening or filtering the effluent from the septic tank. Inspection and cleaning of the filter, when necessary, are quick and simple tasks that help to avoid costly damage caused by particles entering the system. After a protracted power outage or a pump failure, taking steps to prevent the drainfield from over-loading is necessary.
See also:  How Long Does My Septic Tank Drain Field Need To Be? (TOP 5 Tips)

After the pump is turned on, effluent will continue to gather in the pump chamber until the pump starts working. When there is more effluent in the chamber, the pump may be forced to dose a volume that is more than the drainfield’s capacity. If you use up all of the reserve storage in the chamber, the plumbing in your home may get backed up as a result. Reduce your water use to a bare minimum when the pump is regulated by float controls and has been off for more than 6 hours.

The Drainfield

If the pump does not start operating immediately, effluent will continue to gather in the pump chamber. It is possible that the pump will dose an amount of effluent that is more than the capacity of the drainfield.

Your home’s plumbing may get backed up if all of the reserve storage space in the chamber is consumed. Keep water consumption to a minimum while using float controls to control the pump and when the pump is off for more than 6 hours.

Proper Care Includes:

Knowing where your system and replacement area are, and making sure they are protected, are essential. Before you plant a garden, erect a structure, or install a pool, double-check the position of your system and the area designated for replacement.

  1. Practicing water conservation and balancing your water consumption throughout the week will help to prevent the system from being overburdened. The greater the amount of wastewater produced, the greater the amount of wastewater that must be treated and disposed of by the soil. Water is diverted away from the drainfield and replacement area by diverting it away from surfaces such as roofs, driveways, and patios. In order to aid in surface water drainage, the soil above your system should be somewhat mounding. Keeping traffic away from the drainfield and replacement area, such as automobiles, heavy equipment, and cattle, is essential. The pressure might compress the earth or cause damage to the pipes, for example. Ensure that your system is correctly landscaped. Placement of impermeable materials over your drainfield or replacement area is not recommended. Construction materials, such as concrete or plastic, decrease evaporation and the delivery of air to the soil, both of which are necessary for effective effluent treatment. Grass provides the most effective cover for the complete system. On a regular basis, check the drainfield and downslope regions for smells, damp patches, or sewage that has come to the surface. If your drainfield is equipped with inspection pipes, inspect them to determine if the liquid level is consistently more than 6 inches in height. This might be a warning sign of a potential issue. For help, contact the Division of Environmental Health (DEH) of the County of Humboldt.

What If The Alarm Goes On?

If the effluent level within the pump chamber reaches the alarm float for any reason (faulty pump, floats, circuit, excessive water usage, or another problem), the alarm light and buzzer will illuminate. The reserve storage in the pump chamber should provide you with enough time to have the problem resolved if you use water sparingly (avoid baths, showers, and clothes washing). To turn off the alarm, press the reset button on the alarm panel’s front panel. Before contacting a service or repair company, determine whether the problem might be caused by:

  1. A tripped circuit breaker or a blown fuse are examples of this. The pump should be on a separate circuit with its own circuit breaker or fuse to prevent overloading. A piece of equipment can cause the breakers to trip if it’s connected to the same circuit as another piece of equipment
  2. A power cord that has become disconnected from a pump or float switch. If the electrical connections are of the plug-in variety, be certain that the switch and pump plugs make excellent contact with the outlet. The electric power cord, lifting rope, and pump screen are entangled with the control floats and other parts of the chamber. Make certain that the floats are free to move about in the chamber. Debris on the floats and support cable is causing the pump to trip the circuit breaker. Remove the floats from the chamber and thoroughly clean them.

CAUTION: Before touching the pump or floats, always switch off the power at the circuit breaker and unhook any power cables from the system. Entering the pump room is strictly prohibited. The gases that build up inside pump chambers are toxic, and a shortage of oxygen can be deadly. After completing the measures outlined above, contact your pump service person or on-site system contractor for assistance in locating the source of the problem. Pumps and other electrical equipment should only be serviced or repaired by someone who has previous experience.

Septic Pump-Out Program

A valuable resource for Franklin County and the surrounding region, Smith Mountain Lake is located in the Blue Ridge Mountains. A variety of programs and planning activities are being implemented by Franklin County to ensure that the lake continues to provide an economic and recreational benefit to the county’s residents and visitors. The Pump-Out Program is an example of such a program. In response to growing public concern about improperly maintained septic systems and their impact on lake water quality, Franklin County passed an ordinance in July 2006 requiring citizens who own or operate a septic system located within 500 feet of the shoreline of Smith Mountain Lake to pump or inspect their system at least once every five years.

How Your Septic System Works

View a Diagram and Overview of How a Septic System Works (JPG), which was given by the Environmental Protection Agency, for additional information on how your septic system is designed to function. On the Guadallupe-Blanco River Authority website, you can also see an animated, interactive model of a household septic system, which you may interact with.

Benefits of Septic Maintenance

Maintaining your septic system provides benefits not only for the homeowner and the neighborhood, but it also has benefits for the surrounding environment. Check out our “Maintaining Your Septic System” Brochure (PDF) for helpful hints on how to keep your septic system in good operating order. For more information on how to properly maintain your septic system, visit the Environmental Protection Agency’s Septic Smart website or the Virginia Department of Health’s On-Site Septic System Information page.

Registration Process

Any septic system that is placed within 500 feet of the coastline of Smith Mountain Lake must be registered with the state. Fill out and submit the Registration Form (PDF), along with a $35 registration fee, to complete the registration process. For more information, please refer to the form. You will need to make a note of where your system is located. If you are unclear about the location of your septic system, the Virginia Department of Health can assist you with that information as well. Contact the Virginia Department of Health or call the Rocky Mount, Virginia office at 540-483-0292 for further information.

You can also contact a septic service firm that has been approved. Provide proof (a cancelled check and/or a receipt from an approved septic provider) showing the date of your most recent pump-out or inspection, as well as the date of your most recent inspection.

Program Compliance

Septic systems that are within 500 feet of the coastline of Smith Mountain Lake must be registered with the local health department. Fill out and submit the Registration Form (PDF), along with a $35 registration fee, to complete the process. More information may be found on the form. In order to locate your system, you must first indicate its position on a map. if you are unclear about the location of your septic system, the Virginia Department of Health can assist you in locating it Contact the Virginia Department of Health or phone the Rocky Mount, Virginia office at 540-483-0292 to report a health problem.

Bring along proof of your most recent pump-out or inspection (a cancelled check and/or receipt from an approved septic provider), as well as the date of your most recent pump-out or inspection.

Pump-Out Zone

The Franklin County Geographic Information System website allows you to see how your land parcel is situated in respect to Smith Mountain Lake. Enter the parcel number, examine the map, and then choose the Overlays 500-foot layer to determine whether or not the property is located inside the pump-out area. If you have received a notification and think that your system is not within the specified pump-out zone, you must produce adequate evidence demonstrating that your system is not within the 500-foot zone of the designated pump-out zone.

Service Providers

The Virginia Department of Health grants approval for the use of any septic service firm as long as they are qualified to pump and inspect septic systems. Septic Pumping Companies in Rocky Mount, Virginia may be discovered in the yellow pages or by searching online for Septic Pumping Companies in Rocky Mount, Virginia.

How to Care for Your Septic System

Septic system maintenance is neither difficult or expensive, and it does not have to be done frequently. The maintenance of a vehicle is comprised of four major components:

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order. Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract.

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

If additional repairs are recommended, contact a repair professional as soon as possible. An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Everything that goes down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet, ground up in the trash disposal, or poured down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system, which is where it belongs. What you flush down the toilet has an impact on how effectively your septic system functions.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system. A simple rule of thumb is to never flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Cooking grease or oil
  • Wipes that are not flushable, such as baby wipes or other wet wipes
  • Photographic solutions
  • Feminine hygiene items Condoms
  • Medical supplies such as dental floss and disposable diapers, cigarette butts and coffee grounds, cat litter and paper towels, pharmaceuticals, and household chemicals such as gasoline and oil, insecticides, antifreeze, and paint or paint thinners

Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed! Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Toilet Paper Must Be Flushed! To understand why the only item you should flush down your toilet is toilet paper, watch this video.

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The problem of smells from sewage holding tanks is undoubtedly familiar to everyone who has spent any time in an RV or boat.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed. Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.

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