How Far To Top Of Septic Tank? (Best solution)

A septic tank should always be “filled” to its normal liquid level, or the bottom of the outlet pipe which carries effluent to the absorption area. This normal liquid level is usually between 8” to 12” from the top of the tank on average (see picture at right).

  • Septic tanks are typically buried in about eight feet of dirt, though the top is a lot closer to the surface. However, ‘low boy’ septic systems can be a mere four feet from the surface. In this case, it is even more dangerous to put a fire pit over your septic tank.

How much dirt should be on top of a septic tank?

Each layer should be uniform, no greater than 24 inches thick, and of nearly equal heights around the perimeter of the tank. However, compaction under the haunch (bottom curvature of some tanks) is best done in 6- to 12-inch layers.

Can you walk on top of a septic tank?

Play. Children and pets can run and play safely on the grass above the drain field. Your family can walk on a well-maintained drain field without fear of encountering puddles of affluent and dangerous bacteria. Bicycles and tricycles are also acceptable because they are not heavy enough to compress or disturb the soil.

How far down is a septic tank lid?

Often, septic tank lids are at ground level. In most cases, they have buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

Can a septic tank overfill?

There are a few factors that can cause a septic tank to overflow. The tank could be in tip top condition but flooded with too much water at once will only end one way. So, consider which of these possible causes may be to blame: Too many people taking showers and using too much water in a short period of time.

How do you find a buried septic tank?

Tips for locating your septic tank

  1. If the septic tank lid is underground, you can use a metal detector to locate it.
  2. You can use a flushable transmitter that is flushed in the toilet and then the transmitter is tracked with a receiver.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

Can I build a deck over my septic tank?

You should never build a deck over a septic field; doing so will prevent the natural draining and dissipation of the effluent. This can ruin the septic system, not to mention releasing foul smells into the air all around your deck. The dissipating effluent can also rot the deck from underneath.

How close can you build next to a drain field?

– A full foundation must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 20 feet from the leaching area. – A slab foundation such as a garage must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 10 feet from the leaching area. – Concrete columns for a deck must be 5 feet from the leaching area and not disturb the septic system.

Can I take a shower if my septic tank is full?

Only the water would get out into the leach field in a proper system unless you run too much water too fast. The thing to do is to run your shower water outside into it’s own drain area, but it may not be allowed where you are. Used to be called gray water system.

How many lids are on a septic tank?

A septic tank installed before 1975 will have a single 24-inch concrete lid in the center of the rectangle. A two-compartment tank installed after 1975 will have two lids of either fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at opposite ends of the rectangle.

How deep are drain fields buried?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

How do you fix a septic tank that backs up when it rains?

After a major rain event, the only way to relieve pressure on the system is by using it less. If possible, reduce or eliminate water going down the drains until the drainfield dries out. An emergency septic service cleaning can provide temporary relief, but this is often a futile exercise in battling mother nature.

How often pump out septic?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How do I dry out my septic field?

Reducing water usage in the home by 30 percent can dry out a soggy leach field. Conserve water by replacing standard faucet and toilet fixtures with low-flow versions and fixing any toilet or faucet leaks. Reduce water sent to the septic system by reusing water in the landscape where appropriate.

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Over time, all septic tanks become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to continue functioning properly. Septic tank lids are frequently located at ground level. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. In the event that you have recently purchased a property and are unsure as to where your septic tank is located, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank. Noteworthy: While every property is unique, septic tanks are usually typically huge and difficult to build.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the municipal records. The most straightforward method of locating your septic tank is to review the building plans for your home that were approved by the local government. You should have received an application from the business that installed the septic tank, which should contain schematics and specifications that will help you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was installed. 2. Look for highs and lows in your data. The majority of septic tanks are constructed in such a way that they are barely noticeable.

3.

  • Almost usually, your septic tank will be constructed near where the main sewage line exits your property.
  • Septic tanks are typically positioned between ten and twenty-five feet away from a home’s foundation.
  • When you do, that’s when your septic tank comes into play!
  • Look for the Lid.
  • You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and installed after 1975.
  • Those areas should be excavated in order to disclose the lids.
  • Get in touch with the pros.
  • Lifting concrete lids will necessitate the use of specialized equipment.
  • A fall into an unprotected septic tank has the potential to be lethal.
  • Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you may file away with your other important house paperwork.

That’s all there is to it! If you’ve been wondering where your septic tank is, you now have five alternatives to choose from, which should make finding it easier than ever. To book a plumbing service in Bastrop County, please contact us now!

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid

Previous PostNext PostWhether you realize it or not, it is critical that you be aware of the position of your septic tank lid and the septic tank itself. Despite the fact that septic tanks are fairly huge, they can be difficult to identify, particularly if they have not been properly maintained over time. Continue reading to find out how to locate your septic tank lid.

Why It’s Good to Know Where to Find Your Septic Tank Lid

Knowing the location of your septic tank is a fantastic approach to spot septic tank problems as soon as they occur. Consider the following scenario: If you saw water near your septic tank lid, you would know right away that you could have a problem with your system being overloaded with waste. Furthermore, by understanding where your septic tank is located, you may avoid parking cars on top of it, which might cause the tank to collapse and create flooding. You’ll also be able to point service personnel in the right direction for septic tank services, which will eventually save them time and money while also saving you money.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Opening

Knowing how critical it is to know where your septic tank lid is located, it’s time to go out and find one for yourself. Keep an eye out for a circular lid that is roughly two feet in diameter during your quest. Septic tank lids are normally constructed of green or black plastic, however they can occasionally be made of concrete. It is not always simple to locate the septic tank lid, however, because untidy vegetation, mud, or debris might obscure the lid’s location. If you live in a snowy climate, seek for a spot of lawn where the snow melts more quickly than it does anywhere else on the property.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid as a New Homeowner

During the process of purchasing your house, you should have been provided with a map of your property that showed the location of your septic tank. This is normally included as a part of your home inspection service package. All you have to do from there is compare the diagram to your land, find the septic tank location, and potentially dig around it to check whether the lid has been hidden by vegetation or other obstructions. People have been known to place an object such as a huge rock on top of the septic lid, so be sure to look beneath landscaping stones as well.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid as an Existing Homeowner

Still having trouble locating your septic tank lid? There’s a significant probability it’ll end up in the ground. The pipes coming from your basement should be followed, as they will take you in the direction of your septic system, which is what we propose. Then, once you’ve determined the correct direction, check for any high or low points in the yard that might reveal the location of your septic tank. You can find the lid of your septic tank by probing the ground with a metal probe every few feet with the probe.

Because most lids have a metal handle or fastener on them to hold the lid closed, you may also use a metal detector to find them.

The majority of lids are buried up to a foot deep, but some lids might be buried as deep as four feet in extreme cases! In some instances, a professional with specialized locating equipment may be required.

How to Maintain Your Septic Tank Lid

Following the discovery of your septic tank lid, keep it in good condition to avoid damage and ensure simple access for future septic tank maintenance, such as pumping your septic tank every three- to five-year period. Here are some pointers for keeping your septic tank lid in good working order:

  • Keeping the grass around the septic tank lid regularly mowed is important. Remove any dirt or debris that may have accumulated on your septic tank lid
  • Mark the area to ensure that no one parks or constructs structures there. It is possible to do this using a flag, garden décor, or ornamental pebbles.

Professional Septic Tank Services

Is it difficult to find trustworthy septic tank services or septic tank installation? If you are looking for septic tank installation, inspection, and cleaning services, check with your local Mr. Rooter ® Plumbing franchise. Mr. Rooter charges a set amount up front, with no overtime fees or additional expenses. To get started, call us at (855) 982-2028 or fill out our online estimate request form. Is the lid of your septic tank obscured by grass? Inquire with The Grounds Guys about routine lawn care and upkeep.

Rooter, is a member of Neighborly’s network of dependable home service experts, which includes Mr.

By hiring The Grounds Guys to provide trustworthy grass mowing and landscape care services, you can be assured that your septic tank lid will always be simple to locate.

3 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT SEPTIC TANK BAFFLES

By Admin on November 12, 2020 Your efforts to live as environmentally conscious as possible, as a responsible homeowner, are likely already underway, with practices such as recycling, composting, and purchasing energy-efficient equipment among your list of accomplishments. As a septic tank owner, you want to be sure that anything you put into your tank and septic field is causing the least amount of ground contamination as is reasonably practicable. Fortunately, there are a number of modest improvements you can do immediately to make your septic system even more ecologically friendly than it already is.

  • Have your septic tank inspected and pumped on a regular basis.
  • A bigger septic tank with only a couple of people living in your house, for example, will not require pumping as frequently as a smaller septic tank or as a septic tank that must manage the waste products of multiple family members will require.
  • When in doubt about how often to pump your septic tank, consult with a professional for advice.
  • In addition to locating and repairing any damage, a professional can ensure that the septic field is in good working order and that your septic tank is functional, large enough to handle your family’s waste, and not causing any unwanted pollution in nearby ground water.
  • Avoid flushing non-biodegradable items down the toilet or down the toilet.
  • Items that are not biodegradable are unable to properly decompose in the septic tank and might cause the system to get clogged.
  • In addition to causing issues in your house, septic system backups can damage ground water in the area surrounding your septic field.
See also:  Why Are There Bubbles In My Toilet With Septic Tank? (Best solution)

Towels made of paper Products for feminine hygiene Grease or fats are used in cooking.

grinds from a cup of coffee Even if you have a trash disposal, the food scraps that you flush down the drain and bring into your septic system may cause unanticipated harm to your plumbing system.

Food scraps can enhance the amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus in the wastewater, which can disturb the natural bacterial balance of the septic tank, among other things.

Water conservation should be practiced.

Exceedingly large amounts of water use will interfere with the normal flow of wastewater from your home into your septic tank.

Limiting the amount of time you spend in the shower and turning off the faucet while brushing your teeth, as well as purchasing a smaller dishwasher and washing machine that use less water, are all simple strategies to reduce water use in your home.

The following are some basic steps you can take to make your septic system more ecologically friendly: save water, maintain your septic system and tank, and recycle wastewater. To get answers to any of your septic tank-related issues, get in touch with the experts at Upstate Septic Tank, LLC.

Help! My Septic Tank is Full!

Posted on a regular basis We receive a lot of calls concerning septic tanks that are “full.” But what does the term “full” truly imply? A septic tank should always be “filled” to its normal liquid level, which is the level at which the effluent exits the tank and flows to the absorption area, according to the manufacturer. On average, this typical liquid level is between 8″ and 12″ below the tank’s maximum capacity, depending on the model (see picture at right). If the liquid level is near the bottom of the outflow pipe, it is reasonable to believe that the absorption area is receiving the wastewater generated by the home.

If the tank is overflowing, it is typically a sign that there is a problem with the absorption area.

Plumbing or septic issue?

We get a lot of calls from folks who want us to pump their tank because they claim it is full.usually because they are experiencing troubles. However, there are situations when the plumbing is the source of the problem. What is the best way to determine if an issue can be resolved by your septic maintenance provider or a professional plumber?

Check the cleanout

If the problem is caused by backup in the house, we recommend that you check your cleanout between the house and the tank (if one is present and accessible) to see if there is any backup in the cleanout (which is typically a 4″ PVC pipe with a removable cap). If the problem is caused by backup in the house, we recommend that you check your cleanout between the house and the tank (if one is present and accessible) to see if there is any backup in the cleanout. If there is no backup in the cleanout, we normally recommend that you call a plumber since this implies that the wastewater from the home is not making it to the cleanout.

Afterwards, you may check to see if the liquid level in the septic tank is normal or excessive by removing the lid(s) of the tank and looking inside.

If it is overflowing, you may be dealing with more serious problems (i.e.

Till you have a cleanout, your odds of requiring the services of either a plumber or a septic firm are 50/50, and you won’t know unless one of the two comes out to inspect the situation for you.

Check for smells

A foul odor in the house is typically indicative of a problem with the ventilation or plumbing. Unless you are having backup inside the house or septic system difficulties outside the house, we recommend that you consult with a plumber for assistance.

Signs of a larger problem

After being drained out, a septic tank would normally refill to its regular liquid level within a few days to a week, depending on the size of the tank and the number of people living in the property. As soon as the tank has been refilled to its usual liquid level, effluent can begin to flow back into the absorption area again. The fact that the septic tank is “overfull” may indicate a more serious problem with the entire system (see picture at right). If you are experiencing this problem, draining out your septic tank may provide some temporary respite, but it is unlikely to provide long-term relief.

Over the course of 80 years, Van Delden Wastewater Systems has proven itself to be the premier Wastewater System provider, supplying San Antonio, Boerne, and the surrounding Texas Hill Country with services you can rely on today and in the future.

We can assist you with any of your wastewater system needs, and our specialists can also assist you with your septic installation and maintenance requirements: 210.698.2000 (San Antonio) or 830.249.4000 (Austin) (Boerne).

How to Care for Your Septic System

A septic tank will normally refill to its regular liquid level within a few days to a week after it has been drained out, depending on the size of the tank and the number of people living in the property. As soon as the tank has been refilled to its usual liquid level, effluent can begin to flow back into the absorption region. The fact that the septic tank is “overfull” may indicate a more serious issue with the system (see picture at right). A short solution such as pumping out the septic tank will generally suffice in this situation; however, it is unlikely to provide long-term solutions.

Over the course of 80 years, Van Delden Wastewater Systems has proven itself to be the premier Wastewater System provider, supplying San Antonio, Boerne, and the neighboring Texas Hill Country with services you can rely on today and in the future.

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order. Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract.

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

If additional repairs are recommended, contact a repair professional as soon as possible. An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Everything that goes down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet, ground up in the trash disposal, or poured down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system, which is where it belongs. What you flush down the toilet has an impact on how effectively your septic system functions.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system. A simple rule of thumb is to never flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Septic systems are not meant to be used as garbage disposal systems. A simple rule of thumb is that you should not flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet if you can help it

Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed! Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed. Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.
See also:  How To Tell A Clog From A Full Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Prior to discharging wastewater into the environment, several alternative systems are designed to evaporate or disinfect the effluent.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. All of the water that leaves your home drains down a single main drainage pipe and into a septic tank. An underground, water-tight container, often composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, serves as a septic system’s holding tank. Its function is to retain wastewater for a long enough period of time to allow particles to sink to the bottom and form sludge, while oil and grease float to the surface and produce scum. Sludge and scum are prevented from exiting the tank and moving into the drainfield region by compartments and a T-shaped outlet. After that, the liquid wastewater (effluent) exits the tank and flows into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered hole dug in unsaturated soil that serves as a drainage system. Porous surfaces are used to release pretreated wastewater because they allow the wastewater to pass through the soil and into the groundwater. In the process of percolating through the soil, wastewater is accepted, treated, and dispersed by the soil, finally discharging into groundwater. Finally, if the drainfield becomes overburdened with too much liquid, it can flood, causing sewage to flow to the ground surface or resulting in toilet backups and sink backups. Finally, wastewater percolates into the soil, where it is naturally removed of harmful coliform bacteria, viruses, and nutrients. Coliform bacteria are a kind of bacteria that may be found in the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals, with humans being the most common host. As a result of human fecal contamination, it is a sign of this.

The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has built an animated, interactive model of how a residential septic system works, which you can view here.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • You make use of well water. In your home, the water pipe that brings water into the house does not have a meter. In the case of a water bill or a property tax bill, you will see “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” It is possible that your neighbors have a septic system

How to find your septic system

The water comes from a well. You do not have a meter on the water pipe that enters your home. Whether it’s on your water bill or your property tax statement, it says “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” You have septic systems in your neighbors’ yards.

  • Taking a look at the “as constructed” drawing of your house
  • Making a visual inspection of your yard for lids and manhole covers
  • Getting in touch with a septic system service provider for assistance in locating it

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly. Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

Why Your Septic Tank Looks Full After Pumping – Septic Maxx

Septic tanks must be pumped on a regular basis in order to maintain an effective and healthy system. You’ve probably peered inside your tank after it’s been pumped and wondered why the water level is still so high. When you see a high water level, it might be alarming, especially if you are not familiar with what happens throughout the pumping process. What you need to know about your septic tank is outlined here.

Water is Necessary

Pumping a septic tank removes the solid waste or sludge from the tank’s bottom, allowing it to function properly. Excessive sludge in a septic tank can find its way through the outlet and into the drain field pipes, causing severe flooding in the surrounding area. Not everyone is aware that there is a specified operating level for all septic tanks, which may be found here. 8 to 12 inches from the top of the septic tank’s lid should indicate that the tank is “full.” This might vary based on the size and kind of septic tank used.

When the water level in your tank exceeds the capacity of the pipe, your tank is considered to be overfilled.

You should get your septic system examined and water usage should be restricted until an expert can determine the source of the problem.

What Can Cause Your Septic Tank to Overfill

There might be a variety of factors contributing to your septic tank being overfilled. The presence of an overfilled septic tank is frequently a symptom that your drain field is not operating properly. The drain field is the final fixture in the septic system, and it is responsible for returning treated wastewater to the surrounding soil. When your drain field floods, the water flow becomes obstructed, causing the water level in your septic tank to increase significantly. Plumbing problems and excessive water use are two more prevalent problems.

Excessive water use might cause the septic tank to fill with more contents than it is capable of handling, resulting in a high water level.

Septic Maxx provides high-quality solutions that effectively tackle the problems that afflict septic tanks.

Our environmentally friendly premium products are biodegradable and may be used to clean your septic tank of unwanted build-up by simply flushing them down the toilet that is the furthest away from your septic tank. Get in touch with us to talk with a septic specialist right now.

Maine Septic Services

The following are some of the most frequently asked questions about septic tanks. If you don’t find your question answered on this page, please contact us and we’ll be happy to assist you further.

Q. How often should I have my septic tank serviced?

It is recommended that you replace your A/C system once every two to five years, depending on how often you use it and how many people are utilizing the system.

Q. Do you have to drive on my lawn to service my septic tank?

A. No, it is not our policy. We carry roughly two hundred feet of hose, which is generally more than enough for most residential applications. We may bring additional hose if necessary if we are given advance notice.

Q. Is it O.K. to use drain cleaners with a septic system?

A. Avoid using drain cleaners and other chemicals whenever possible. They have the potential to disrupt the naturally existing biological processes in the septic tank and leaching region of the property. One gallon of some hazardous compounds can damage twenty-two million gallons of ground water, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Q. Do I need to use additives in my septic system?

In order to maintain a healthy pH balance in your system and to encourage better sewage digestion, we recommend that you flush one cup of baking soda down the toilet once a week.

Q. What do you do with my septage once it is removed from my tank?

It is transported to a Maine DEP-licensed disposal facility, such as a Wastewater Treatment Facility, where it is disposed.

Q. How do I find my septic tank?

A. Here are a few options for you to consider. Septic tanks are typically rectangular in design, measuring around 4 by 8 feet.

  • You’ve probably come across a rectangular stretch of ground where the snow melts first in the winter and the grass burns first in the summer. An underground septic tank can be submerged to any depth between flush with the surface of the earth and more than 6 feet. When you look down in your basement, you can see where the sewer pipe exits through a hole in the wall. Take note of how far the pipe extends below the top of the foundation and whether or not it exits through the wall directly. When looking from the outside of the house, this will provide you with an approximate orientation for the pipe leading to the tank. To determine how far the tank is below grade, measure down from the top of the foundation wall to the ground’s surface and subtract that measurement from the inside measurement (also subtract another 6 because the top of the sewer pipe is usually 6 down on either side or end of the tank) to get a rough estimate of how far the tank is below grade. You can probe for the tank top using a steel bar or rod that you push into the earth. Keep in mind that you are searching for a flat rectangular space around 4 x 8 inches below the surface of the earth
  • Many septic systems are not gravity systems and require pumping to function properly. Excavation around your septic tank and/or pump tank should always be done with extreme caution since electrical lines can be hidden underground and are not usually marked, posing a possible electrical danger. Never fear if you can’t identify your septic tank
  • We have specialized equipment that can help us locate the tank if necessary
  • Just give us a call.

Q. Can my septic tank baffles be repaired?

Is there a rectangular region where the snow melts first in winter and the grass burns fastest in summer where you’ve observed this before? An underground septic tank can be placed at any level between flush with the ground surface and more than 6 feet below it. When you look down in your basement, you can see where the sewer line exits through a wall into the street. Notify the plumber how far the pipe has receded from the top of the foundation and whether the pipe exits the wall directly. This will point you in the general direction of the line leading out to the tank from the outside of the house.

To locate the tank top, you can drive a steel bar or rod into the earth and probe for it.

Excavation around your septic tank and/or pump tank should always be done with extreme caution since electrical lines might be hidden underground and are not usually marked, posing an electrical hazard.

Q. Are septic tank filters any good, don�t they plug up frequently?

An absolutely necessary addition to your septic tank is the installation of a Zabel filter by our team. These filters help to keep particles down to one-sixteenth of an inch in the septic tank by trapping about 80% more solids. Over the years, we’ve discovered that the Zabel filters appear to be the most effective. It is just necessary to remove the clogged filter, wash it well and replace it when the problem arises.

In most cases, filter maintenance is performed at the same time as septic tank maintenance. The most significant benefit of the filter is that it contributes to extending the life expectancy of the leach field, which is typically 20 to 25 years.

Q. I hate digging up my septic tank and having the mess in my lawn every three years or so.What can we do to save all that mess?

The installation of a riser above the service cover is recommended. It is recommended that each of the access covers for the filter and pump be equipped with a riser as well. Risers are now required under the State of Maine’s Subsurface Rules. We choose to use Fralo risers because they may be erected in sloping grass areas and because they are simple to install flush with the ground surface.

See also:  Where To Look On Septic Tank For Dimensions? (Question)

Q. Do you have any other tips you can give me?

A. Without a doubt! View the State of Maine’s Ten Tips for Maintaining Your Septic System for more information.

6 Things to Know About Landscaping Around Your Septic Tank

You’re undoubtedly already aware that dumping some items into your sewage system, such as paint or grease, can cause harm to your septic tank. However, you may not be aware that certain gardening methods can actually cause harm to your septic system. In order to avoid unwittingly causing difficulties or damage to your septic tank, here are six things you should know regarding landscaping around your septic tank. 1. The location of the access point. It is OK to use landscaping to conceal the entry port to your septic tank; however, you must not totally conceal it.

  1. One option to conceal your access port without totally concealing it is to use a landscaping element such as a birdbath or any other fixed lawn decoration to mark out its position on the property.
  2. Characteristics of Vegetation that is Safe It is possible for some species of vegetation to grow above and around a septic tank without the risk of septic tank damage rising.
  3. You should also limit the vegetation that grows above your tank to plants that do not require a lot of water.
  4. In order to grow anything other than grass over your sewage tank, use perennials that are drought-resistant to the elements.
  5. Characteristics of Trees that Have the Potential to Be Destructive Large bushes or trees should not be planted anywhere near your septic tank under any circumstances.
  6. In the case of a 20-foot-tall tree, it is recommended that it be placed at least 20 feet away from the septic tank.
  7. Trees with actively growing roots can cause damage to septic tanks and pipelines, even if they are located a long distance away.

4.

Grazing animals consume the protective vegetation that covers your drain field, exposing the components of your septic system to the elements.

There are a lot of methods you may use to keep livestock from grazing on your septic tank.

You may also apply animal repellents around your drain field, which deter animals by emitting unpleasant sounds or odors that they find uncomfortable.

Preventing vehicular and pedestrian traffic.

Your landscaping should be planned and your yard should be put out in such a way that cars do not drive over the area where your septic tank is positioned.

Foot traffic, in addition to car traffic, can cause damage to a septic tank.

As an alternative, if possible, direct foot traffic away from the area.

The Positioning of Architectural Elements You could choose to include architectural elements into your landscaping, such as retaining walls, stone paths, or fire pits.

If you plan to incorporate architectural elements into your landscaping, be certain that these elements are located far away from your septic tank. Get in contact with Walters Environmental Services if you want to learn more about maintaining your septic tank in excellent working order.

A Beginner’s Guide to Septic Systems

  • Septic systems are used to dispose of waste from homes and buildings. Identifying the location of the septic tank and drainfield
  • What a Septic System Is and How It Works Keeping a Septic System in Good Condition
  • Signs that a septic system is failing include:

Septic systems, also known as on-site wastewater management systems, are installed in a large number of buildings and houses. It is easy to lose sight of septic systems, which operate quietly, gracefully, and efficiently to protect human and environmental health due to their burying location. Septic systems are the norm in rural regions, but they may also be found in a lot of metropolitan places, especially in older buildings. It is critical to understand whether or not your building is on a septic system.

Is Your Home or Building on a Septic System?

It is possible that the solution to this question will not be evident. If a structure looks to be connected to a sewage system, it may instead be connected to a septic system. It is fairly unusual for tenants to be unaware of the final destination of the wastewater generated by their residence. Some of the hints or signs listed below will assist in determining whether the facility is served by a septic system or whether it is supplied by a sewer system:

  • Sewer service will be provided at a cost by the city or municipality. Pay close attention to the water bill to see whether there is a cost labeled “sewer” or “sewer charge” on it. If there is a fee for this service, it is most likely because the facility is connected to a sewage system. Look up and down the street for sewage access ports or manholes, which can be found in any location. If a sewage system runs in front of a property, it is probable that the house is connected to it in some way. Inquire with your neighbors to see if they are connected to a sewer or septic system. The likelihood that your home is on a sewer system is increased if the properties on each side of you are on one as well. Keep in mind, however, that even if a sewage line runs in front of the structure and the nearby residences are connected to a sewer system, your home or building may not be connected to one. If the structure is older than the sewer system, it is possible that it is still on the original septic system. Consult with your local health agency for further information. This agency conducts final inspections of septic systems to ensure that they comply with applicable laws and regulations. There is a possibility that they have an archived record and/or a map of the system and will supply this information upon request

All property owners should be aware of whether or not their property is equipped with an on-site wastewater treatment system. Georgia law mandates that the property owner is responsible for the correct operation of a septic system, as well as any necessary maintenance and repairs.

Locating the Septic Tank and Drainfield

Finding a septic system may be a difficult process. They can be buried anywhere in the yard, including the front, back, and side yards. After a few years, the soil may begin to resemble the surrounding soil, making it impossible to distinguish the system from the surrounding soil. It is possible that in dry weather, the grass will be dryer in the shallow soil over the tank and greener over the drainfield, where the cleansed water will be released, but this is not always the case, especially in hot weather.

  1. The contractor who built the house should have presented the initial owner with a map showing the tank and drainfield locations, according to the building code.
  2. The installation of the system, as well as any modifications made to it, would have been examined by your local health authority.
  3. Unfortunately, if the system is very old, any records related with it may be insufficient or nonexistent, depending on the situation.
  4. Look for the point at where the wastewater pipes join together if the building is on a crawlspace or has an unfinished basement.
  5. The sewer line that runs through the structure is referred to as the building sewer.
  6. To “feel” for the tank, use a piece of re-bar or a similar metal probe.
  7. If you use this free service, you may avoid accidentally putting a rod through your gas or water line.

Try to locate the tank after a rainstorm, when the metal probe will be more easily maneuvered through moist dirt.

This should be done with care; extreme caution should be exercised to avoid puncturing the building sewer.

A tank is normally 5 by 8 feet in size, however the dimensions might vary.

Be aware that there may be rocks, pipes, and other debris in the area that “feels” like the tank but is not in fact part of the tank.

However, it is possible to have the lid or access port positioned on a riser in addition to being on the same level as the top of the tank in some cases.

Once the tank has been identified, make a rough drawing of its placement in relation to the house so that it will not be misplaced again!

It may be easier to discover the drainage lines now that the tank has been identified, particularly if the area has been subjected to prolonged periods of drought.

How a Septic System Works

Typical sewage treatment system (figure 1). It is composed of three components (Figure 1): the tank, the drain lines or discharge lines, and the soil treatment area (also known as the soil treatment area) (sometimes called a drainfield or leach field). The size of the tank varies according to the size of the structure. The normal home (three bedrooms, two bathrooms) will often include a 1,000-gallon water storage tank on the premises. Older tanks may only have one chamber, however newer tanks must have two chambers.

  1. The tank functions by settling waste and allowing it to be digested by microbes.
  2. These layers include the bottom sludge layer, the top scum layer, and a “clear” zone in the center.
  3. A typical septic tank is seen in Figure 2.
  4. It is fortunate that many of the bacteria involved are found in high concentrations in the human gastrointestinal tract.
  5. Although the bacteria may break down some of the stuff in the sludge, they are unable to break down all of it, which is why septic tanks must be cleaned out every three to seven years.
  6. In addition, when new water is introduced into the septic tank, an equal volume of water is pushed out the discharge lines and onto the drainfield.
  7. The water trickles out of the perforated drain pipes, down through a layer of gravel, and into the soil below the surface (Figure 3).
  8. A typical drainfield may be found here.
  9. Plants, bacteria, fungus, protozoa, and other microorganisms, as well as bigger critters such as mites, earthworms, and insects, flourish in soil.
  10. Mineralogical and metallic elements attach to soil particles, allowing them to be removed from the waste water.

Maintaining a Septic System

The most typical reason for a septic system to fail is a lack of proper maintenance. Septic systems that are failing are expensive to repair or replace, and the expense of repairs rests on the shoulders of the property owner (Figure 4). Fortunately, keeping your septic system in good working order and avoiding costly repairs is rather simple. Figure 4. Septic system failure is frequently caused by a lack of proper maintenance. It is in your best interests to be aware of the location of the system, how it operates, and how to maintain it.

  1. You should pump the tank if you aren’t sure when the last time it was pumped.
  2. It is not permissible to drive or park over the tank or drainage field.
  3. No rubbish should be disposed of in the sink or the toilet.
  4. It’s important to remember that garbage disposals enhance the requirement for regular pumping.
  5. When designing a landscape, keep the septic system in mind.
  6. It is also not recommended to consume veggies that have been cultivated above drainfield lines (see Dorn, S.
  7. Ornamental Plantings on Septic Drainfields.

C 1030).

Any water that enters your home through a drain or toilet eventually ends up in your septic system.

Don’t put too much strain on the system by consuming a large amount of water in a short period of time.

Additives should not be used.

Various types of additives are available for purchase as treatment options, cleansers, restorers, rejuvenator and boosters, among other things.

To break up oil and grease and unclog drains, chemical additives are available for purchase.

Pumping out the septic tank is not eliminated or reduced by using one of these systems.

They remain floating in the water and travel into the drainfield, where they may block the pipes. Acids have the potential to damage concrete storage tanks and distribution boxes.

Signs a Septic System is Failing

A failed system manifests itself in the following ways:

  • Sinks and toilets drain at a snail’s pace
  • Plumbing that is backed up
  • The sound of gurgling emanating from the plumbing system House or yard aromas that smell like sewage
  • In the yard, there is wet or squishy dirt
  • Water that is gray in hue that has accumulated
  • An region of the yard where the grass is growing more quickly and is becoming greener
  • Water contaminated by bacteria from a well

Slowed-draining sinks and toilets Plumbing that is backed up Sounds of gurgling coming from the plumbing system the presence of sewage odors in the house or yard Yard dirt that is wet or squishy; Greyish-colored water that has accumulated; An region of the yard where the grass is growing quicker and greener than the rest; Water contaminated by bacteria from a well.

Figures 2 and 3 reprinted with permission from: CIDWT. 2009. Installation of Wastewater Treatment Systems. Consortium of Institutes for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment. Iowa State University, Midwest Plan Service. Ames, IA.

History of the current status and revisions Published on the 15th of August, 2013. Published on March 28th, 2017 with a full review.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *