How Far Below Ground Level Is A Septic Tank Riser? (Perfect answer)

the depth of soil backfill over the septic tank lid or septic tank riser lid, ranging from 0″ (which means you should see it) to just a few inches (which means grass may be dead in this area) to 6-12″ or even more.

  • A septic tank can be installed usually 3 feet below the surface, but the average is approximately 18 inches. Risers can be stacked on top of each other until they can reach right below the surface.

How high are septic risers?

Tank risers are typically installed about 3 inches above grade. Having the lid above grade will make it easy to find, however, some people will choose to have the lid just a couple of inches below grade so that is easier to mow over and less visible.

Should septic tank riser be above ground?

Landscaping Around Septic Tank Risers However, septic tank risers should never be buried. Instead, they should be 2 inches above final grade to prevent groundwater from entering the system.

How deep is the top of my septic tank?

Septic tanks are typically rectangular in shape and measure approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground.

How much weight can a septic tank riser lid hold?

The 24-inch solid fiberglass DuraFiber riser lid from Orenco Systems has a flat-style lip for PVC and HDPE pipe. It weighs 10 pounds, but resists damage from lawn equipment and can withstand a 20,000-pound load.

How do you measure for a septic tank riser?

Measure the diameter of the manhole cover: If 26-29 inches, the riser will fit down into the tank opening. Measure the distance from ground to the top of the septic tank and ADD 3 inches. If more than 29 inches: a 3-foot square fiberglass plate (with 22-inch hole in the center) is needed.

How do you hide a septic tank riser?

The easiest way to hide your septic riser is by simply placing something over it, such as a hollow, lightweight landscape rock, a birdbath, a sundial or a decorative lawn ornament. Apply basic landscaping principles when deciding what to use.

How many lids are on a septic tank?

A septic tank installed before 1975 will have a single 24-inch concrete lid in the center of the rectangle. A two-compartment tank installed after 1975 will have two lids of either fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at opposite ends of the rectangle.

How far apart are septic tank lids?

The distance between lids will be different for each sized tank: 1000 gallon tank = 6-6.5 ft.; 1250 gallon = 7-7.5 ft.; 1500 gallon = 8.5-9 ft.. Dig up the outlet chamber access lid. If you are extraordinarily lucky, the as-built drawing is accurate and you have hit the lids spot on.

Does my septic need a riser?

Your septic system is one of the most important mechanical systems in your home. With a one-time installation fee, a septic tank riser will protect your septic system for years to come. The quick access for maintenance and pumping will almost immediately provide a return on your investment.

Are septic tank risers safe?

Fortunately, lids and risers in today’s onsite market can help prevent these unfortunate incidents. These innovative products ensure septic tank covers are secure and prohibit unauthorized tank access. Polyethylene septic tank covers from Hedstrom Plastics fit standard 18- and 24-inch double-wall corrugated pipe.

Do they make square risers for septic tanks?

The Polylok square riser adapter ring is designed to connect the Polylok septic tank risers or lids to an existing concrete tank with large square or round openings.

How much soil should be on top of a septic tank?

the depth of soil backfill over the septic tank lid or septic tank riser lid, ranging from 0″ (which means you should see it) to just a few inches (which means grass may be dead in this area) to 6-12″ or even more.

How much dirt should be on top of a septic tank?

Each layer should be uniform, no greater than 24 inches thick, and of nearly equal heights around the perimeter of the tank. However, compaction under the haunch (bottom curvature of some tanks) is best done in 6- to 12-inch layers.

How deep are drain fields buried?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

Septic Tank Design Depth – how deep should the septic tank be located

  • When establishing a septic tank, you may ask a QUESTION or make a COMMENT regarding how deep the septic tank should be located.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Design depth for a septic tank: What are the most frequent depths to which septic tanks, cesspools, seepage pits, and drywells are buried? Is it necessary to locate the septic tank below the frost line in order to prevent it from freezing? Septic tanks are placed at a certain depth, and there are various elements that impact the actual depth to which a septic tank (or cesspool, drywell, or soak-pit) will be sunk, which are discussed below.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Septic Tank Installation Depth

Table of Contents for the Article Series

  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH- this article
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANKDRAINFIELDFREEZE PROTECTION

How Deep Should WePutthe Septic Tank at Original Installation?

Septic tanks may be built almost anywhere in the soil, regardless of its depth. When operating in a freezing climate, even in uninhabited homes, it is unlikely that the septic tank serving an occupied home or even an unoccupied one will freeze. This is due in part to latent heat received by the septic tank’s bottom from earth, in part to heat generated by bacteria in the septic tank, and in part to warm wastewater entering from a building served by the septic system, and in part to warm wastewater entering from the building served by the septic system.

You’ll kill the bacteria, damage the drainfield, and taint the surrounding ecosystem as a result of this.

Factors Determining Septic Tank Depth

The following are the primary elements that influence the actual depth at which a septic tank is likely to be buried (and, consequently, the depth to which you may have to dig to locate the septic tank) at a specific site:

  • The depth to which the lowest sewage line departs the structure that the septic tank serves is referred to as the sewer line depth. Given that we often rely on gravity to transport sewage from a building to a septic tank, the tank will be lower than the waste line that exits the building that it serves. a spot where the contractor discovered site characteristics suited for burying a septic tank because of its form, rocks, and impediments If a location has bedrock or huge rocks that are near to the surface, the tank may be relocated
  • The greater the distance between the tank and the structure, and the greater the depth of the tank if the system relies on gravity to carry sewage, the deeper the tank will be. We don’t place septic tanks any deeper than they need to be since we are normally transporting effluent from the septic tank to the drainfield by gravity as well as by pumping it out. Plumbers often build sewage lines to slope down from the inlet to the outlet at a rate of 1/8″ per foot to 1/4″ per foot of linear run of the waste pipe, depending on the kind of waste pipe. In order to avoid septic drainfield burial at an excessive depth, we must ensure that there is sufficient air in the soil, since the absence of oxygen deep in the soil will inhibit certain desired bacterial action (the aerobic bacteria) that is required to break down and process sewage. It is certainly possible to locate and position the septic tank anywhere, including uphill from the building, if a sewer ejector pump or grinder pump system is utilized to transport sewage from a structure to an underground storage tank. If a sewage effluent pump is used to transport septic effluent from the septic tank to the drainfield, we may, of course, locate the tank “downhill” from the drainfield as well
  • But, if a sewage effluent pump is not utilized, we cannot. Growing grass: If the septic tank is just 2 or 3 inches below the surface of the earth, you might as well have left the top of the tank visible, because grass will not grow in such thin soil as you would expect. Adding 6″ to 12″ of backfill may be sufficient to allow grass to grow over the septic system
  • However, this is a purely aesthetic issue and does not affect the system’s functionality. See SEPTIC SYSTEMS, OVERHAULED PLANTS
  • Recommendations from the manufacturer: Some modern septic treatment system designs need the use of a skilled system operator to perform highly specified inspection and maintenance intervals. According to the information provided atBAT MEDIA SEPTIC PLANTS, BAT septic systems (biologically accelerated treatment) are maintained or examined at 6-month intervals, among other things. According to the maker of that technology (Jet Inc.), it is extremely critical that the finishing grade slope away from the facility when completed. In addition, the grade must be at least 1″ below the bottom of the access covers to be considered. (Jet retired in 2016)

A service riser should be put in deep septic tanks to provide access to the tank. Plungers are large-diameter “wells” that are installed over the entrance and/or outlet ports of a septic tank in order to provide simple access for tank pumping, inspection, and baffle repair. Plungers are also used for septic tank pumping, inspection, and baffle repair. If the septic tank is sunk more than a few inches below the surface of the earth, good practice calls for the installation of a septic riser, which is a high diameter pipe that allows for easy access to the septic tank for inspection and cleaning.

Continue reading atSEPTIC TANK DEPTH to learn how to determine the depth of a septic tank’s cover, or choose a topic from the closely-related articles listed below, or see the completeARTICLE INDEX for more information.

Alternatively, view the FAQs on SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH – questions and answers that were originally posted on this page. Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Tank Articles

  • The following topics are covered: SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD SIZE
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM INSPECTION LEVELS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN STRENGTH SPECS
  • SEPTIC TANKDRAINFIELDFREEZE PROTECTION
  • SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO FIND
  • SEPTIC
  • THE DISTANCE TO THE SEPTIC TANK
  • FINDING THE MAIN WASTE LINE EXIT
  • POSITIVE SEPTIC TANK LOCATIONS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK LOCATING EQUIPMENT
  • SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • SEPTIC TANK GRASS OR SNOWMELT
  • SEP
  • THE MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • THE SEPTIC TANK PUMPING PROCEDURE
  • THE SEPTIC TANK PUMPING SCHEDULE
  • THE SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • THE U.S. SEPTIC AUTHORITIESDESIGN SPECIFICATIONS
  • THE MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING

Suggested citation for this web page

DEPTH AT INSPECTION OF SEPTIC TANK DESIGN An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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Septic Tanks Risers- Bring Your Access To Ground Level

Getting a little tired of having to dig up your yard every time your septic tank has to be pumped out or serviced? Are you getting tired of dealing with incredibly hefty concrete lids? It appears that you are in need of septic tank risers in order to bring your access down to ground level! Our septic tank risers and covers are constructed of high-quality, heavy-duty polyethylene plastic, which makes them extremely sturdy and durable while also being lightweight and simple to handle.

THE POLYLOK ADVANTAGE

Septic tank risers are available in a variety of shapes, sizes, and designs on the current market. We believe our Polylok septic tank risers are the best money can buy in terms of quality. There are several causes for this, but the following are the most significant:

FACTORY INSTALLED GASKETS

The Polylok brand is the only one on the market that is sent to you from the factory with gaskets already in place, making it unique. This means that there is no further work necessary to ensure that the riser system is air and water tight! Keep ground water out of your tank, wastewater in your tank, and potentially hazardous gases out of your yard! In contrast to most other products, our Polylok septic tank risers do not require you to purchase or use any other type of sealant between each riser part.

See also:  What Happens If I Don'T Clean My Septic Tank 2018? (Solution found)

INTERNAL STRUCTURAL RIBS

Once the hole has been backfilled, the structural ribs in the Polylok septic tank risers are inserted inside around each riser piece, providing them with tremendous strength and allowing them to maintain their shape under the pressure of the earth being pressed on them. As a result of the freezing and thawing of the ground in many parts of the country, it is necessary to have a smooth surface on the outside of the riser’s exterior. It is possible for items that have structural support on the outside of the riser to actually be lifted from the tank, causing damage to both the riser and seal, during periods of freezing and thawing.

Because the Polylok products are fully smooth on the outside, they will not cause any problems in frosty environments!

LIDS WITH HANDLES

The access lid on a riser system is one of the most significant components since it is the part of the system that is visible from the outside and that must be removed every time the system is pumped or otherwise maintained. The Polylok lids are pre-installed with handles, which make it simple to remove the lid whenever you need to get access to the system or to replace it. The bottom of the lids is structurally supported, which allows them to remain relatively flat rather than domed in shape, as is the case with many other items on the market.

LARGE ADAPTER RING

An adapter ring is required in order to properly install septic tank risers on your septic tank. We have one of the largest adapter rings available on the market, allowing you to cover up to a 25″ square or 27″ circular aperture with a Polylok adapter ring. This ring fits both 20″ and 24″ risers, allowing you to have a great deal of versatility no matter what size your opening happens to be!

GET OUT YOUR MEASURING STICK!

A few measures must be taken before purchasing a septic tank riser system in order to ensure proper installation. The first thing to consider is the size of your opening. Take a measurement of the aperture in your septic tank at its widest point to determine the size of your tank. Instead than measuring the present lid, it’s critical to measure the opening. Because you will be removing the present cover, the measurements of the lid are no longer important and may differ from the size of the aperture itself.

You are now prepared to make a purchase based on these two measures!

THE COMPLETE RISER SYSTEM

We have a large selection of components from which you may pick to create your own own full riser system. Our many various options offer our product the adaptability to be utilized in virtually any application, but they may also be a bit daunting when attempting to pick which components to buy for a certain application. Each component is discussed in further depth below.

ADAPTER RINGS

The adapter ring is the first component that you’ll need to put together in order to assemble a full riser system. The adapter ring attaches directly to the septic tank, allowing the risers to stack, lock, and mount to it without the need for any additional hardware. Having this component is critical since the risers are not flat on the bottom because they are meant to be stackable, and it is not feasible to install them straight to the septic tank without this piece. The adapter ring provides the flat surface you need to mount to the tank while also being able to accommodate the stackable risers that are included with the tank.

Our square tank adapter ring can accommodate big square apertures up to 25 inches in diameter and large round openings up to 27 inches in diameter.

They are intended to be used with openings that are 24″ or less in diameter.

Concrete anchors, a masonry bit for installing the anchors, and butyl sealer are all included in this set. The use of this installation kit assures a secure mount and a good seal between the adapter ring and the septic tank throughout the installation process.

RISERS

Following your selection of the adapter ring, it is time to go shopping for risers. The Polylok risers are available in two heights: 6″ and 12″, as well as in two diameters: 24″ and 20″. Stackable, each unit has a gasket that has been fitted as well as stainless steel screws to allow for easy installation. Determine which risers will work best for your application based on the height measurement you made between the septic tank and ground level.

OPTIONAL SAFETY SCREEN

In addition to the 20″ and 24″ riser systems, Polylok also produces safety screens that fit within the riser systems. These screens serve as a supplementary layer of protection in the event that the riser cover is unintentionally damaged or removed, and they keep foreign objects from entering the septic tank. They also keep dogs from slipping into unprotected septic tank openings!

RISER LIDS

You will require a lid to complete your riser system, which is the final component you will require. Both the 20″ and 24″ riser systems may be used with the Polylok lids, which are available in two different types to suit your needs. For ease of access, the basic lid is equipped with handles and a gasket that has been factory placed, as well as stainless steel screws to keep it in place. These lids are strong enough to withstand foot traffic as well as the weight of a riding lawn mower driving across them.

  • Stainless steel screws are included for installation.
  • Installations below grade or in regions with a high volume of foot traffic are advised for the heavy-duty lids.
  • The shipping of these items in large boxes necessitates the addition of additional time, materials, and UPS shipping fees.
  • If you place your order before 2 PM CST, you will be able to get your order sent the same day you placed it.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

The following are some of the most commonly asked inquiries that our customer support representatives are asked. Take a peek below; it’s possible that the queries you have have been answered!

WILL THE LID FIT DIRECTLY ON THE ADAPTER RING OR DO I NEED TO USE A RISER?

With the exception of the 24″ Heavy Duty Lid, the lid will often fit straight onto the adapter rings in the majority of cases. The underside of the 24″ Heavy Duty Lid is strengthened for added strength. The height of this reinforcement is actually more than the height of the adapter ring. Therefore, the 24″ Heavy Duty Lid will only be able to be used without using an adapter when the opening is at least 24″ in diameter. The lid will not fit through any aperture less than 24 inches in diameter.

CAN I CUT THE RISER SYSTEM DOWN TO A SPECIFIC HEIGHT?

No, the Polylok riser system is available in increments of 6″ and 12″, and it cannot be customized to a certain height.

Cutting the riser will result in the lid not being adequately secured on the riser that has been cut down.

DO I BRING THE RISER SYSTEM JUST BELOW, AT, OR ABOVE GRADE?

It is entirely up to you whether you want to bring the riser system up to grade, raise it above grade, or leave it slightly below grade. Because the riser system is airtight and watertight, there is no danger in moving it up to or above grade level.

SHOULD I USE THE STANDARD OR THE HEAVY DUTY LID?

The regular lid is sturdy enough to withstand foot activity and weights up to the weight of a small riding lawn mower passing over it without bending or breaking. If the riser system is located in a high traffic location or is going to be run over by lawn equipment on a frequent basis, the heavy duty lid is recommended. If you have any more queries, please contact us at 1-877-925-5132 or [email protected].

What You Should Know About Septic Tank Risers

Septic tank risers are an important part of any septic system, and they should be installed in every property. This article will provide you an overview of septic tank risers and how they may help your septic system. What Is the Function of a Septic Tank Riser? A septic tank riser is a conduit that connects your home’s surface drainage system to your septic tank beneath the ground level. An access port or the pump-out ports on the septic tank are where the riser connects to the tank. Septic tank risers are equipped with lids that can be quickly removed to allow you to check or pump your septic tank without having to dig up your yard.

  • These structures are often made of materials that disintegrate slowly over time, such as plastic or concrete.
  • What Are the Advantages of Using Risers?
  • Normally, this entails digging up your yard before the pump is installed and reburying the tank once it has been installed.
  • The use of a septic tank riser can help to minimize the amount of time spent pumping your septic tank.
  • The fact that the riser is visible above the surface of your yard makes it an ideal signal for locating your septic tank the first time you need to discover one in your yard.
  • For those who want to stay in their house for several years, septic tank risers are not only handy, but they are also cost-effective.
  • Concrete risers are more durable, but they are also more expensive, and the price will be determined by the quote you receive from the contractor who will be installing them.

Because labor expenses account for a large amount of the fees that contractors charge for septic system inspection and pumping, installing a riser may possibly reduce the future cost of septic service by as much as 50 percent.

Each and every property can profit from the installation of a septic tank riser, but this does not imply that you should do so immediately.

This allows for the installation of the pump and riser to be completed in a single step.

Because a riser should be considered a long-term investment, you should be certain that your tank is in good functioning shape before installing one.

A septic tank riser is a straightforward concept that may save you a significant amount of money and pain when it comes to septic system maintenance and repair.

We look forward to hearing from you and addressing any concerns you may have concerning your septic system requirements. Contact us now. Please let us know how we may be of assistance to you and your septic system right now!

How deep is a septic tank in the ground?

Between 4 inches and 4 feet is the range.

Steel Septic Tank Typical Dimensions
Steel Septic Tank Size (Gallons Capacity) Tank Length (Inches) Tank Depth (Height) (Inches)
1000 58 96
1250 58 120
1500 58 144

As a result, the question arises as to whether septic tank lids should be buried. The majority of septic tank components, including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet beneath the surface of the earth. You can use a metal probe to detect the boundaries of the object and mark the perimeter of the object. If you are unable to locate the lid by probing, shallow excavation along the tank’s perimeter with a shovel should uncover the lid. Also, do you know how much soil should be placed around a septic tank?

What is the maximum capacity of a septic tank?

The 2500 is the biggest capacity below-ground storage tank currently available on the market.

The end ribs are capable of accepting fittings up to 4″ in diameter.

Are septic tank risers required?

Asked in the following category: General The most recent update was made on February 28th, 2020. It is recommended that deep septic tanks have a serviceriser installed. If the septic tank is sunk more than a few inches below the surface of the earth, good practice calls for the installation of an aseptic riser, which is a high diameter pipe that allows for easy access to the septic tank for inspection and cleaning purposes. If you have an older septic system, you may be wondering what a septic tank riser is and why you need one.

  • Septic tank risers make it easier to reach your septic tank from the ground level and provide better view into the operation of your septic system.
  • The riser of an aseptic tank is a concrete or plastic pipe that extends vertically from the pump-out holes or access ports at the top of the tank to about ground level.
  • In light of this, what is the purpose of risers on a septic tank, specifically?
  • At the ground surface, it forms a vertical gateway providing convenient access to the septic tank for inspection and pumping out.
  • What is the cost of a septic tank riser system?

However, while concreterisers are the cheapest (about $100), they are also the most heaviest and trickiest to install. Arisers manufactured of polyethylene or PVC will normally cost between $200 and $300, depending on their size and complexity.

Installing Access Risers

In order to perform fundamental septic system maintenance, you must first evaluate the condition of your septic tank and pump chamber (if you have one), which can be time-consuming and labor-intensive if you do not have access ports known as risers. Consider the prospect of having to dig through two feet of dirt to check the oil on your vehicle. Installing septic tank risers for an off-site septic system is broken down into four steps, which are outlined below. Please keep in mind that the currentWashington State Coderequiresrisers for all septic systems, which means you may be forced to install one if you are asking for a construction permit, land division, or any other type of official action in the state.

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A few safety tips before you get started:

  • Struck by an underground electrical wire while excavating may be quite dangerous! If you are in any way doubtful about the presence of subterranean lines on your property, you can have them found by contacting 1-800-424-5555 or 811, or by visiting the website
  • Use the buddy system to your advantage! Working with a partner is usually recommended since the fumes connected with open sewage can be dangerous and cause a person to go unconscious. Never leave a septic tank that is open unattended! Once the lids have been removed, exercise caution around the tank and keep dogs and children at a safe distance. Examine the structural integrity of your septic tank! If a septic tank is more than 20 years old, it is recommended that it be pumped to ensure that the tank’s structural integrity and water-tightness are not compromised. Instead of spending money on costly repairs, it is preferable to replace the tank with a contemporary septic tank that includes risers as part of the installation. A permit from your local Environmental Health department is required for the replacement of a septic tank.

Gather all the MaterialsTools You will Need

It should be possible to get most of the components required to construct a septic tank riser at your local plumbing hardware store or on the internet. PVC risers are available in a variety of shapes and sizes. Some of the brand names you might be familiar with include “Tuf-Tite,” “Polylok,” and “Orenco.” Risers are typically 24 inches in diameter and may be readily inserted into the tank hole opening without difficulty. Due to the fact that certain tanks have square openings, it might be difficult to fit a riser around the square entrance.

Some types of risers are made to order based on the height you want, while others are available in increments of 6-12 inches.

Then purchase an Adapter and Risers that are somewhat bigger in diameter than the hole.

See below for Step 4 on attaching risers to the tank entrance.

  1. Tank Adapter Ring (TAR)
  2. Riser Adapter Ring Kit
  3. Butyl Rope
  4. Risers
  5. Domed Lid OR Flat Lid
  6. Stainless Steel Screws

The following materials will be required for digging up your septic tank(s):

  1. As-built condition of the sewage treatment system The following items are required: sketch on paper, measuring tape, shovel, probing instrument, eye protection, and work gloves.

To cut risers to the proper size, the following tools are required:

  1. Circular saws, saber/jig saws, and hand saws
  2. Raspor file
  3. Marking pen
  4. Tape measure
  5. Drill with a 1/4″ bit

Materials required to seal the risers to the tank include:

  1. High-strength concrete patch mix
  2. A small bucket
  3. A mixing stick
  4. And gloves

Follow the four simple procedures shown below to install access risers on your septic components, or download and print a copy of theSeptic Tank Manhole and Access Riser Installationbrochure from Thurston County Environmental Health to get started right now.

Step 1: LocateYour Septic Tank(s)

When looking for your underground septic tank or tanks, it is essential to consult the ‘As-built’ Record Drawing linked with your septic system for assistance. Essentially, this is a plot diagram that shows where your septic system was put on your property, as well as distances between septic components and notable landmarks. The Online Permit System will guide you through the process of locating septic-related documentation if you do not have a “as-built” document. It is possible that you may need to contact Environmental Health to examine the paper records or seek a specialist to find your tank if an as-built is not accessible.

Probing the area around the septic tank with the probing instrument until you contact concrete should be done lightly.

The presence of underground electricity or other utility lines and cables might put your septic tank in danger.

If you run into a power line, the consequences could be fatal. Call 1-800-424-5555 or 811 or go online to make sure that any electrical utilities are found before you begin digging before you begin digging.

Step 2: Uncover Your Septic Tank (s)

When looking for your underground septic tank or tanks, it is essential to consult the ‘As-built’ Record Drawing linked with your septic system for guidance. This is a plot plan that shows the location of your septic system on your property, as well as the distances between septic components and landmarks. The Online Permit System will guide you through the process of locating septic-related papers if you do not have a “as-built” plan. It may be necessary to contact Environmental Health to examine the paper records, or to hire a specialist to find your tank if an as-built isn’t readily available.

Probing the area around the septic tank with the probing tool until you touch concrete will take some time.

The presence of underground electricity or other utility lines and wires might put your septic tank in danger.

WARNING: Call 1-800-424-5555 or 811 or go online to make sure that any electrical utilities are found before you begin digging before you start digging.

Step 3: Fit Risers to Component Openings

In accordance with the diameter of the septic tank manholes, huge risers will either sit on top of the septic tank or will fit down into the aperture of the tank by 1-3 inches. It’s important to keep this in mind while calculating the height of the riser. The surplus can be easily removed; nevertheless, it is difficult to add a few inches to the length. Take the following measurements of the manhole cover’s diameter:

  • Theriser will fit into the tank hole if the aperture is between 26 and 29 inches in diameter. Measure the distance from the ground to the top of the septic tank and multiply the measurement by three inches. The following is required if the aperture is greater than 29 inches: a 3-foot square fiberglass plate (with a 22-inch hole in the middle) is required. In this case, it lies above the manhole and narrows the aperture, allowing a 24-inch riser to be utilized instead of a more expensive 30-inch riser, saving money.

The distance between the ground and the top of the fiberglass plate should be measured. You may choose to place the risers so that they are level with the surface of the ground, or you may want them to stand out a few inches above the ground (if a riser is above ground make sure you are careful when mowing). Tips: To shorten a big riser with ribs, drill a 1/4-inch hole between the ribs above the cut line and finish the cut by following one of the grooves between the ribs with a saber/jig saw to finish the cut.

By eliminating one of the ribs from the largeriser, it may be made to fit more snugly into a smaller manhole entrance.

Step 4: Attach Risers toSeptic Tank (s)

It is recommended to pump out an old septic tank that is 20 years or older in order to check its structural integrity and water-tightness before using it again. If the tank requires extensive repairs, it is preferable to replace it with a new septic tank that includes risers as part of the installation. A permit from the local health department is required for the replacement of a septic tank. Remove any dirt and debris from the tank’s surface by cleaning it off. Using the butyl rope, construct the components of the risers in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

  1. Jet-Set, Rapid-Set, Thorough-Set, and Perco-Plug are just a few of the brand names available.
  2. NOTE: For optimal results, just a little amount of concrete patch should be mixed at a time.
  3. The patch mix should be used to seal the riser to the septic tank.
  4. If you want to avoid a safety danger, make sure you properly attach theriser lid using the screws that come with it!
  5. Risers for inlet or outlet apertures that are smaller than the openings should have the bottom few inches sanded with rough sandpaper to allow a firmer connection between the two surfaces.
  6. A useful source of information on correct installation of risers on septic tanks may be found at your local hardware store where you purchased the risers and covers.

Thurston County Environmental Health is should be commended for providing the foundation for this documentation.

How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

All septic tanks eventually fill with sediments and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain in excellent functioning order. If the tank’s lid is not on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located. A typical septic tank is 4 inches to 4 feet underground, with all of its components, including the cover, buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underneath. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the surface of the ground.

Consult A Map

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank. If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your efforts.

Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land. After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if it is there. Locate the same spot outside and make a note of it. Insert a thin metal probe into the earth, identify the 4-inch sewage line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the property. Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet apart from the home in all states except Alaska.

Whenever the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene it indicates that the tank has been located.

Locate The Lid

The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 5 feet by 8 feet. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its boundaries and outline the rectangle’s boundary using a pencil. A septic tank that was built before 1975 will have a single concrete lid that is 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. If the tank was built after 1975, it will have two covers made of fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at the ends of the rectangle and centered at the ends of the rectangle.

It should be possible to uncover the lid or lids by digging with a spade in specific spots, depending on when year the tank was constructed.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

See also:  What Cleaning Products Can You Use With A Septic Tank? (Question)

Mark The Spot

Make a note on the ground near where the tank was pumped by a professional and the lid was buried to serve as a reference in the future. In order to keep track of where you are, you should choose a hefty circular patio tile that is embedded in the ground. Additionally, draw your own map of the area and store it with your other important papers.

Leaking Septic Risers & Water Infiltration

What would you think if your entire yard turned into a filthy swimming pool overnight? We’ve really assisted a client who had this same situation occur. to say nothing of the fact that you can’t rush mother nature. If you’re interested in what transpired during this conference call, you may watch the video below. This movie shows what occurs when you have a leaky septic riser, which allows water to invade your yard and cause it to flood. This problem may be more than simply a source of irritation; it can also be potentially harmful to you and your neighbors.

  1. Consider the following: what a septic riser is and what you should be on the lookout for to ensure that this problem does not occur to you.
  2. Because your septic tank is most usually positioned below ground level, it might be difficult to notice whether there is a problem when one occurs.
  3. If your septic system is older, it is possible that you do not have a riser; if this is the case, you should consider having one installed.
  4. When you install a riser, you will no longer have to dig down to your septic tank when maintenance is necessary.
  5. If your septic system is equipped with an alarm, the most straightforward approach to determine whether or not it is leaking is to check the alarm.
  6. If you hear the alarm, you know it’s time to contact a qualified professional for assistance.
  • Yard that is too moist
  • Standing water
  • Foul odor Toilets or sinks that are backing up or draining slowly

If you see any of these indicators, it is possible that your septic system is failing. If your system begins to leak and the problem is not handled immediately, water infiltration will almost certainly occur. When water from the ground surface begins to seep into the soil, this is known as water infiltration. Watching the video described earlier, you’ll notice that it creates quite a mess and may be very tough to clean up after yourself. Don’t be concerned if you’re experiencing septic system problems.

Whatever situation you are in, our experts can overcome it and restore your system to regular operation in a timely manner. If you have any concerns concerning your septic system or how to take the best care of it, please don’t hesitate to contact us. Call (804) 758-4314 for more information.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

It may seem impossible to imagine that one of the largest and most visible elements of your whole plumbing system is also one of the most difficult to locate, but when your property is served by a septic system, this is perfectly true. A strong explanation for this is because septic tanks are huge, unattractive, stink horrible and give off an unwarranted impression of dirt. Not only does burying them underground assist to prevent them from harm, but it also provides you with additional useable space on your property and conceals what would otherwise be a blight on your landscape.

This site is dedicated to assisting you in locating your septic system without the need for any time-consuming digging.

How To Find A Septic Tank: Step By Step

It is critical to maintain the health of your septic tank since it is responsible for securely storing and handling the wastewater that drains from your house. It is necessary to pump your septic tank once every 1-3 years, depending on the number of people living in your household and the size of your tank, in order to avoid septic tank repairs or early failure, which means you must be familiar with the location of your tank. It’s not often simple to identify your septic tank, and many plumbers charge extra for this service, which is especially true if your tank’s lid is buried beneath.

1. Gather Some Helpful Tools

Septic tank location may be made much easier with the use of several simple instruments and techniques. To locate your septic tank, you only need to know the following information: A soil probe is one of the most useful instruments for locating a septic tank. It is a tiny piece of metal that is used to puncture through the earth and detect anything that could be buried underneath. Start at the point where your sewage line exits your home and work your way straight out, inserting your soil probe every two feet along the way.

Using this method, you may also locate the cover for your septic tank.

While we highly advise keeping your cover clean and exposed in the event that you require emergency septic service, we recognize that this is not always the case.

2. Use a Septic Tank Map

If you are a new homeowner who is trying to figure out where your septic tank is, a septic tank map should be included in your inspection documentation.

You can use this information to assist you in pinpointing the exact position of your storage tank. If you don’t have access to this map, there are a few of additional strategies you might employ.

3. Start Ruling Areas Out

The location of a septic tank cannot be constructed in specific areas due to the risk of causing major damage to your property or tank, as specified by local rules. Your septic tank will not be affected by the following:

  • Immediately adjacent to your well
  • Beneath your home
  • Directly against your home
  • For example, underneath your driveway
  • Under trees
  • And other locations. Structures like a patio or deck are good examples of this.

4. Inspect Your Property

If you take a hard look around your land, there’s a high possibility you’ll be able to locate your septic tank without having to do any probing whatsoever. In many circumstances, a septic tank may be identified by a slight dip or slope on your land that cannot be explained by any other means. Due to the fact that the hole that your contractors excavated for your septic tank may not have been exactly the proper size, they proceeded to install the tank anyhow. This is a rather regular occurrence.

When there is a minor divot or depression, it indicates that the hole was too large and that your contractors simply did not fill the depression to level the hole.

The likelihood of your septic tank being discovered in a few specific locations is quite high.

  • Your water well, if you have one (for a variety of reasons that are rather clear)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a driveway, sidewalk, or patio unless they were added after the home was built and no one conducted a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built If there is any particular landscaping

5. Inspect Your Yard

A comprehensive investigation of your yard may be necessary to discover your septic tank considerably more quickly in some cases. The following are important items to check for in your yard:

  • If your septic tank is overfilled, sewage can leak out into the ground and function as fertilizer for your lawn, resulting in lush green grass. A area of grass that is very lush and green is a good sign that your septic tank is just beneath it
  • Puddles that don’t make sense: If your septic tank is seriously overfilled, it is possible that water will pool on your grass. Another telltale indicator that your septic tank is below ground level is an unexplainable pool of water. Ground that is uneven: When installing septic tanks, it is possible that the contractors will mistakenly create high or low patches on your grass. If you come across any uneven terrain, it’s possible that your septic tank is right there.

The metal soil probe can let you find out for certain whether or not your septic tank is located in a certain area of your yard or not. As soon as your metal soil probe makes contact with the tank, you may use your shovel to dig out the grass surrounding it and discover the septic tank lid.

6. Follow Your Sewer Main/Sewer Pipes

Following your sewage lines is one of the most straightforward methods of locating your septic tank. These pipes have a diameter of roughly 4 inches and are commonly found in the basement or crawlspace of your house. They are not dangerous. Following the pipes from your house out into your yard, using your metal soil probe every 2 feet or so until you reach the tank, is a simple process once they are located. Aside from that, every drain in your home is connected to your sewage main, which in turn is connected to your septic tank.

The likelihood that one of your major sewer lines is located in your basement or crawlspace is high if you have exposed plumbing lines in your basement or crawlspace.

If the line is labeled, it is usually made of plastic or rubber. It is important to determine where this line exits your property and in which direction it is moving, as it often travels straight out to the septic tank itself.

7. Check Your Property Records

Lastly, if all else fails, a search of your property’s public records will almost certainly reveal the location of the tank you’re looking for. Your builders most likely secured a permit for your property because septic systems are required to be installed by law in every state. In order to do so, they had to develop a thorough plan that depicted your property as well as the exact location where they intended to construct the tank. This is done to ensure that the local health department is aware of the tank and is prepared to deal with any issues that may arise as a result of its presence.

If you look hard enough, you may be able to locate the original building records for your home without ever having to get in your car or visit your local records center.

What to Do Once You Find Your Septic Tank

Upon discovering the position of your septic tank, you should mark its location on a map of your property. Use something to indicate the location of your lid, such as an attractive garden item that can’t be changed, to help you locate it. A birdbath, a rock, or a potted plant are just a few of the possibilities. You are now ready to arrange your septic tank inspection and pumping service. Contact us now! If you have any more concerns regarding how to locate your septic tank, or if you want septic tank servicing, please contact The Plumbing Experts at (864) 210-3127 right now!

What’s the Purpose of a Septic Tank Riser?

2:11 p.m. on August 24, 2021 In order to properly function, your septic tank need a riser. It is still necessary to be able to access the septic tank, even though it is normally buried underground; this is what the purpose of a septic tank riser is. Here is some further information about septic tank risers, as well as some reasons why you should have a septic tank riser installed. What is a septic tank riser and why do you need one? In order to provide simple access to your subterranean septic tank, you should install a riser to bring the entry to the surface level.

There are many older septic tanks that do not have surface access and require a significant amount of digging in order to be accessible.

Plastic or concrete are commonly used in the construction of these structures.

For starters, having easy access to your septic tank will prevent your grass from having to be dug up every time your tank requires service or is pumped.

As an added bonus, using a septic tank riser to serve as a visible reminder to check on your septic tank can help to extend the life of the equipment.

It’s possible that at that moment you’ll be blaming yourself for not keeping up with the usual maintenance that may have prevented problems from arising in the first place.

One advantage of this is that septic tank risers are rather unobtrusive in their appearance.

Installation by a professional is necessary.

The septic tank riser may also be difficult to identify if it is concealed in a small, inconspicuous area.

Contact the professionals at B.H. Cameron Septic Services LLC now for the best septic tank riser service available at a fair price. Septic Tank Risers are classified as follows: Writer was the author of this article.

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