How Deep Should A Plastic Septic Tank Be Buried? (Solution)

Whatever the case may be, knowing the depth of your septic tank can be a difficult thing given the circumstances, especially if you don’t know where the lids are. The general rule of thumb is that most septic tanks can be buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

What is the ideal depth of a septic tank?

Standard size of septic tank in feet:- standard size of septic tank should be 5 feet long by 2.5 feet wide by 3.3 feet in depth. This septic tank has capacity of 1000 litres of liquid wastages ideal for 5 users of house hold.

What is the lifespan of a plastic septic tank?

A septic tank can last between 20 and 40 years. The lifespan depends on the tank’s material. A steel tank lasts 20 years, while a concrete tank lasts 40 years. Plastic tanks can last as long as 30 years.

How do you keep a plastic septic tank from floating?

How can you prevent this from happening?

  1. Fill the tank with water after it’s pumped to keep weight in the tank and prevent floating.
  2. Divert rainwater runoff away from your system.
  3. Avoid pumping the tank during wet seasons if there is a risk that the tank could float.

Are plastic septic tanks good?

Plastic septic tanks are watertight and are immune to water-based corrosion. They are also rust-resistant. Plastic tanks are less prone to cracking since plastic is flexible, and thus a plastic septic tank does not crack as much as a cement septic tank. Plastic septic tanks are more hygienic than cement tanks.

Can you pump a plastic septic tank?

When is Pumping a Septic Tank Not Recommended If the septic tank is plastic or fiberglass, and if ground water is still high around the septic tank, the tank may actually float up out of the ground, leading to damaged septic piping and more costly repairs.

How deep are drain fields buried?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

Should septic tank lids be buried?

In most cases, all components of the septic tank including the lid are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. Unless the septic tank has special risers that position the lid at ground level, you’ll have to dig for it.

How often should you pump your septic tank?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

Which septic tank is best?

The best choice is a precast concrete septic tank. Precast septic tanks hold many advantages over plastic, steel, or fiberglass tanks. This is why so many cities and towns actually require the use of concrete septic tanks.

How can buoyancy be prevented?

Buoyancy countermeasures

  1. Base extension (cast-in-place or precast). Using the additional weight of soil by adding shelves is a common method used to counteract buoyancy.
  2. Anti-flotation slab.
  3. Increase member thickness.
  4. Lower structure elevation and fill with additional concrete.

Will a septic tank float out of the ground?

A septic tank may also float out of place if it’s pumped while the ground is flooded. This can damage inlet and outlet pipes. Your system does need to be pumped as soon as possible after the water table is lowered. Before this happens, don’t drive any machinery near the septic area to avoid compressing the soil.

Why do septic tanks float?

All tanks have the potential of being floated out of the ground due to forces acting on the tank in saturated soil. At the gas station, the tank hole was excavated into relatively solid or dense soil and then backfilled with a less dense material that will allow water to collect in the excavation.

Septic Tank Design Depth – how deep should the septic tank be located

  • When establishing a septic tank, you may ask a QUESTION or make a COMMENT regarding how deep the septic tank should be located.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Design depth for a septic tank: What are the most frequent depths to which septic tanks, cesspools, seepage pits, and drywells are buried? Is it necessary to locate the septic tank below the frost line in order to prevent it from freezing? Septic tanks are placed at a certain depth, and there are various elements that impact the actual depth to which a septic tank (or cesspool, drywell, or soak-pit) will be sunk, which are discussed below.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Septic Tank Installation Depth

Table of Contents for the Article Series

  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH- this article
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANKDRAINFIELDFREEZE PROTECTION

How Deep Should WePutthe Septic Tank at Original Installation?

Septic tanks may be built almost anywhere in the soil, regardless of its depth. When operating in a freezing climate, even in uninhabited homes, it is unlikely that the septic tank serving an occupied home or even an unoccupied one will freeze. This is due in part to latent heat received by the septic tank’s bottom from earth, in part to heat generated by bacteria in the septic tank, and in part to warm wastewater entering from a building served by the septic system, and in part to warm wastewater entering from the building served by the septic system.

You’ll kill the bacteria, damage the drainfield, and taint the surrounding ecosystem as a result of this.

Factors Determining Septic Tank Depth

The following are the primary elements that influence the actual depth at which a septic tank is likely to be buried (and, consequently, the depth to which you may have to dig to locate the septic tank) at a specific site:

  • The depth to which the lowest sewage line departs the structure that the septic tank serves is referred to as the sewer line depth. Given that we often rely on gravity to transport sewage from a building to a septic tank, the tank will be lower than the waste line that exits the building that it serves. a spot where the contractor discovered site characteristics suited for burying a septic tank because of its form, rocks, and impediments If a location has bedrock or huge rocks that are near to the surface, the tank may be relocated
  • The greater the distance between the tank and the structure, and the greater the depth of the tank if the system relies on gravity to carry sewage, the deeper the tank will be. We don’t place septic tanks any deeper than they need to be since we are normally transporting effluent from the septic tank to the drainfield by gravity as well as by pumping it out. Plumbers often build sewage lines to slope down from the inlet to the outlet at a rate of 1/8″ per foot to 1/4″ per foot of linear run of the waste pipe, depending on the kind of waste pipe. In order to avoid septic drainfield burial at an excessive depth, we must ensure that there is sufficient air in the soil, since the absence of oxygen deep in the soil will inhibit certain desired bacterial action (the aerobic bacteria) that is required to break down and process sewage. It is certainly possible to locate and position the septic tank anywhere, including uphill from the building, if a sewer ejector pump or grinder pump system is utilized to transport sewage from a structure to an underground storage tank. If a sewage effluent pump is used to transport septic effluent from the septic tank to the drainfield, we may, of course, locate the tank “downhill” from the drainfield as well
  • But, if a sewage effluent pump is not utilized, we cannot. Growing grass: If the septic tank is just 2 or 3 inches below the surface of the earth, you might as well have left the top of the tank visible, because grass will not grow in such thin soil as you would expect. Adding 6″ to 12″ of backfill may be sufficient to allow grass to grow over the septic system
  • However, this is a purely aesthetic issue and does not affect the system’s functionality. See SEPTIC SYSTEMS, OVERHAULED PLANTS
  • Recommendations from the manufacturer: Some modern septic treatment system designs need the use of a skilled system operator to perform highly specified inspection and maintenance intervals. According to the information provided atBAT MEDIA SEPTIC PLANTS, BAT septic systems (biologically accelerated treatment) are maintained or examined at 6-month intervals, among other things. According to the maker of that technology (Jet Inc.), it is extremely critical that the finishing grade slope away from the facility when completed. In addition, the grade must be at least 1″ below the bottom of the access covers to be considered. (Jet retired in 2016)

A service riser should be put in deep septic tanks to provide access to the tank. Plungers are large-diameter “wells” that are installed over the entrance and/or outlet ports of a septic tank in order to provide simple access for tank pumping, inspection, and baffle repair. Plungers are also used for septic tank pumping, inspection, and baffle repair. If the septic tank is sunk more than a few inches below the surface of the earth, good practice calls for the installation of a septic riser, which is a high diameter pipe that allows for easy access to the septic tank for inspection and cleaning.

Continue reading atSEPTIC TANK DEPTH to learn how to determine the depth of a septic tank’s cover, or choose a topic from the closely-related articles listed below, or see the completeARTICLE INDEX for more information.

Alternatively, view the FAQs on SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH – questions and answers that were originally posted on this page. Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Tank Articles

  • The following topics are covered: SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD SIZE
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM INSPECTION LEVELS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN STRENGTH SPECS
  • SEPTIC TANKDRAINFIELDFREEZE PROTECTION
  • SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO FIND
  • SEPTIC
  • THE DISTANCE TO THE SEPTIC TANK
  • FINDING THE MAIN WASTE LINE EXIT
  • POSITIVE SEPTIC TANK LOCATIONS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK LOCATING EQUIPMENT
  • SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • SEPTIC TANK GRASS OR SNOWMELT
  • SEP
  • THE MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • THE SEPTIC TANK PUMPING PROCEDURE
  • THE SEPTIC TANK PUMPING SCHEDULE
  • THE SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • THE U.S. SEPTIC AUTHORITIESDESIGN SPECIFICATIONS
  • THE MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING

Suggested citation for this web page

DEPTH AT INSPECTION OF SEPTIC TANK DESIGN An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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Technical ReviewersReferences

Citations can be shown or hidden by selecting Show or Hide Citations. InspectApedia.com is a publisher that provides references. Daniel Friedman is an American journalist and author.

How Deep Are Septic Tanks Buried? (And How Do You Find It?)

It is possible that this content contains affiliate links. It is possible that I will receive a commission if you make a purchase after clicking on an affiliate link. In addition, as an Amazon Associate, I receive a commission from qualifying purchases.- Septic tanks, for example, might become a requirement in more remote places where some services are not readily available or easily accessible. After all, we rely on contemporary conveniences such as adequate plumbing to make our lives more comfortable and easy.

Discovering the location of your septic tank in your yard, as well as what may be grown near or on top of it, will help you determine how much of your yard is suitable for regular gardening.

You May Not Know

Despite the fact that it appears to be something that every homeowner should be aware of, understanding how deep a septic tank is buried can be difficult to determine. Perhaps you forgot about the septic tank after it was installed years ago, or perhaps you are moving into a house that already has a septic tank constructed in previously. Whatever the situation, determining the depth of your septic tank can be a challenging task under the circumstances, especially if you are unsure of the location of the lids.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Perhaps you’re unsure of the location of your septic tank on your property and are attempting to identify it on your own. There are really quite a few quick and simple methods for determining the location of your tank without having to go through a lengthy process. The first method is to follow the path laid out by your sewer lines. Typically, the tank and your drain field will be placed along a line parallel to the sewage line that goes from your property out to the street. Your home’s crawl area or basement may even have a four-inch sewage line that leads away from the structure of the building.

  1. Follow the pipe all the way across the yard, checking every few of feet to make sure you’re still on the right track, and then turn around.
  2. When you don’t feel like digging around in your yard, you can always look up your house’s address in the county records database.
  3. Diagrams with measurements and even the particular location of where the septic tank is located should be included in this document.
  4. You can also choose to dig your lid out from under it.
  5. This is what will tell you how many lids are on your septic tank and how many are missing.
  6. The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around in the neighborhood of 5′ x 8′ in size.
  7. If you are unable to determine the position of your septic tank using a probe, you will need to do a shallow excavation around the perimeter of the tank using a shovel in order to finally locate the lid.
  8. First, look for visual cues to help you.
  9. There is no doubt about it, this will tell you exactly where the tank is located beneath.
  10. Take a look at the plumbing in your structure, as well as the overall state of the property, to get a good sense of where the tank is situated.

It will be full to just a few inches below the underside of your tank lid when your tank is fully charged to its regular level of filling capacity. If the lid is constructed of plastic, fiberglass, or steel, the upper surface of the lid may have some variation in color or texture.

Where Should the Septic Tank Be Located?

If your property does not presently have a septic tank, but you are interested in the possibility of installing one, it is critical that you understand where it should be installed. Ordinarily speaking, most septic tanks will be situated between 10 and 25 feet away from the house. You should bear in mind that septic tanks cannot and should not be located any closer than five feet from your residence. Using a probe, you may search for flat concrete to determine whether or not a tank has previously been put on a property that you have recently purchased.

See also:  How Do.I.Find Out Where My Septic Tank Is? (Correct answer)

Planting Above a Septic Tank

Even though it may not appear to be the finest idea in the world, putting vegetation over a septic tank may really be perfectly acceptable as long as you choose the appropriate plants to grow. Not only is it perfectly OK to do so, but it may also be rather helpful depending on what you are planting and harvesting. It is possible to avoid erosion in your tank with the correct sort of vegetation, and it is even possible to absorb some of the additional moisture that might accumulate in your drain field.

  • Perennial plants and grasses (as previously indicated) are the ideal kind of plants to use in and around your drain field and septic tank.
  • You can use non-woody ground covers for a similar purpose as you do with woody ground covers.
  • Take, for example, the expanding environment.
  • If you don’t have access to enough sunshine, you might want to choose a shade garden plant instead.
  • Keep in mind that the soil that surrounds the septic tank drain field will typically be wetter than the surrounding soil in the rest of the yard.
  • As a result, choose a perennial such as a hollyhock, wild violet, or bee balm to ensure that you cover all of those bases when planting.
  • A septic system beneath these plants does not imply that deer will avoid the area because of its presence on your property.
  • Something like a spring bulb or an attractive grass that the deer aren’t generally interested in eating.

Plants That You Don’t Want to Grow

Just because you have the option of planting over your septic tank does not mean that everything is appropriate for this situation. A few plants should be avoided at all costs while landscaping around your septic tank, particularly huge trees that are known for their rapid growth. On the same vein, shrubs and trees with aggressive root systems are some of the worst plants to grow around your home. These roots will shoot out in quest of water, and they will not be concerned with where they locate it.

The infiltration of those roots into your septic drain field might result in catastrophic damage to your septic tank and drain field.

It’s possible that you’ll need a complete replacement.

Many other plants have strong root systems that you should avoid growing anywhere near your septic tank or drain field, and there are lots of them.

How Your Septic System Works

It is possible that understanding how your septic system operates may help you better manage, maintain, and care for it. Aside from that, it is just a large tank buried in the ground that collects your waste (which is true, but still). In remote locations, there may be a deficiency in sewage infrastructure. Because not every rural location is the same, it is not a given that septic systems will be required in your local rural area. The septic tank, in any case, serves as a form of wastewater treatment facility when there are no sewage lines available.

  1. The tank is designed to be waterproof, ensuring that your wastewater does not leech into the surrounding environment.
  2. Solids sink to the bottom of the container, scum rises to the top of the container, and liquids sit in the center of the three levels described above.
  3. The wastewater that is being discharged from your home is the cause of the exit.
  4. This liquid is carried out of your home through a pipe and into a bigger portion of your sanitary sewer system.
  5. Your drain is typically comprised of a network of perforated PVC pipes that are put underground in trenches to collect water and waste.
  6. Because the drains are perforated, the wastewater is allowed to seep out into the crushed gravel or stone, and then eventually into the surrounding soil.
  7. The natural evaporation process will then take care of any surplus moisture in the soil, unless you do something to prevent the water from flowing out of the pipes.

How to Plan a Septic Field

The tank is only one component of the whole equation. You’ll also need a drain field to catch all of the liquid waste that will be generated. When you are planting around your septic tank, the drain pipes are the most significant source of worry. Having those aggressive roots infiltrate and ruin your septic drain system is the very last thing you want. When this occurs, it can prevent your septic tank from emptying correctly and potentially cause it to get contaminated by groundwater. According to a solid rule of thumb, the less horticultural labor you have to do in close proximity to your septic tank, the better.

Just remember that they must be planted every year, so keep that in mind while planting them.

The first step is to fill in the septic drain field with earth.

In the second instance, too much mulch is being applied to the area in question. The third issue is that you may be watering your plants more than you should be. All three of these factors can impair the capacity of your drain field to evaporate in a typical manner.

How Low Can You Go?

Get articles, news, and videos about Onsite Systems delivered directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Plus, there are Onsite Systems. Receive Notifications The topic of whether or not there are guidelines for septic tank burial levels was put to me a few months ago and it seemed easy enough. Of course, there are standards, and they are based on the strength of the materials used in the tank’s construction as well as the materials’ capacity to bear all of the forces acting vertically and laterally on the tank where it is located.

As I continued to think about the subject, I began to think about all of the different types of tanks and all of the different manufacturers, and I realized that I should take a closer look at the specifications as well.

In the codes

Receive articles, news, and videos about Onsite Systems delivered directly to your email! Make your registration right now. Plus, there are On-Site Systems available to customers. Receive Notifications. The topic of whether or not there are guidelines for septic tank burial levels was put to me a few months ago and seemed to be rather straightforward. Of course, there are standards, and they are based on the strength of the materials used in the tank’s construction as well as their capacity to bear all of the forces acting vertically and laterally on the tank where it is located.

I further informed the questioner that the majority of state rules address the issue, and that the manufacturer should, of course, include this information when their product is utilized.

When it came to tank strength, I looked at a handful of different state statutes to see how they addressed the issue.

Precast concrete manual

The National Precast Concrete Association (NPCA) maintains an online Best Practices Manual that may be accessed from any computer. It typically encompasses all parts of a precast process, from the selection of materials through the production of a watertight, structurally sound product; storage; transportation to an installation site; and the procedures for installing the product. Anybody who works with precast concrete products will find it to be an invaluable resource. According to the guideline, a septic tank must be built to endure a wide range of loading situations during the manufacturing, installation, testing, and operation phases of the tank.

  1. If these calculations are to be completed by a competent professional engineer, they should be tested according to ASTM C1227.
  2. It is available in English and Spanish.
  3. Consequently, the rules come into play by stating the pounds per square foot of soil backfill that will be placed over the tank’s surface.
  4. Consider approaches to minimize permeability, enhance durability, and boost strength for consideration by the readers of this article.
  5. It also emphasizes the importance of regular water-cement mix ratios in order to assure the strength of the concrete.
  6. Because of this, it is vital that the product can stand empty, then endure the soilpressures applied vertically and laterally, as well as withstand temperature variations in my region of the world.

It is possible that failing to follow these recommendations could result in the tank breaking during installation or will cause difficulties with watertightness down the road.

Other tank materials

Best Practices Manual for Precast Concrete is available online from the National Precast Concrete Association (NPCA). Overall, it encompasses all phases of a precast operation, from material selection to production of a waterproof, structurally sound product, as well as the following: storage, transportation to an installation site, and installation methods. For everyone involved in the production of precast concrete products, this is an invaluable resource. During manufacturing, installation, testing, and use, a septic tank must be built to endure a range of loading circumstances.

  1. Vertical soil backfill, concentrated wheel loads in anticipation of traffic over the tank (which we wish to minimize), lateral loads, soil-bearing capacity, and buoyant forces are all factors to take into consideration.
  2. It contains information on concrete thickness, mix design, and reinforcing.
  3. Minimum reinforcing cover criteria must be met, and the thickness must be sufficient to resist the design-loading requirements.
  4. 4,000 psi compressive strength is required in the concrete mix after 28 days of curing time.
  5. Various materials that may be used to improve these components are discussed throughout the booklet.
  6. A properly reinforced septic tank will be able to withstand the stresses that are given to it during the construction and maintenance of a septic system.
  7. It also includes precise installation guidelines, such as bedding and backfilling, that must be followed in order to prevent adding extra strains and loads on the tank during construction.

Septic Tank Depth

Trevor, The amount of heat created by biological activity in a septic tank is unknown to me, but I think that a tank that is actively functioning will generate more heat than a tank that is in “holiday” mode. The overall amount of warm water and “food” placed into the tank may not be very much if you have a two-person family like mine, hence the tank may not contain very much in general. If you are away from home for an extended period of time, it is possible that the temperatures in the tank will stratify.

  1. If the frost line penetration corresponds to the tank height, the total temperature in the tank may be able to reach freezing temperatures at some point.
  2. Even though the ground temperature 6′ down may only be 35-40 degrees Fahrenheit in the middle of winter, that should be sufficient to keep an idle tank from freezing.
  3. When flowing into a 1500 gallon tank, the amount of heat provided by a warm shower is not very significant.
  4. Ice spreads in all directions, which may put pressure on the tank’s walls as a result of the expansion.
  5. Because the tank I have is relatively thin in comparison to the ones I remember from decades ago, I’m hoping that someone out there can offer anecdotal evidence regarding how robust the new thin tanks are.
  6. When the ice penetrated deep enough into the earth to freeze all the water pouring from the house during a particularly harsh winter, my next-door neighbor was forced to rescue a friend.
  7. Oddly enough, I don’t recollect my neighbor mentioning whether or not the output pipe had frozen as well.
  8. The hypothesized explanation is that automobiles push ice into the ground while on the road.
  9. I believe that driving a car across the tank top would be a more serious problem.
  10. Snow provides some insulating properties, however it appears that windy circumstances may cause the snow to become thin, as your sand has done in your case.

Perhaps Michael can contribute some real-world insights concerning the inlet and outflow danger in your region based on his own experiences. Although I live in a 6B zone, temperatures can drop below -20 degrees Fahrenheit at times.

What size of septic tank do I need?

Probably one of the last things on your mind when you are constructing a new house is the location of your septic system. After all, shopping for tanks isn’t nearly as entertaining as shopping for cabinetry, appliances, and floor coverings. Although you would never brag about it, your guests will be aware if you do not have the proper septic tank placed in your home or business.

See also:  How Do I Know What Size Septic Tank I Need? (Correct answer)

septic tanks for new home construction

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size. Of course, all of this is dependent on the number of people who live in the house as well as the amount of water and waste that will be disposed of through the plumbing system.

For the most accurate assessment of your septic tank needs, you should speak with an experienced and trustworthy sewer business representative.

planning your drainfield

Here are some helpful hints for deciding where to locate your drainfield when you’re designing it.

  • Vehicles should not be allowed on or around the drainfield. Planting trees or anything else with deep roots along the bed of the drain field is not recommended. The roots jam the pipes on a regular basis. Downspouts and sump pumps should not be discharged into the septic system. Do not tamper with or change natural drainage features without first researching and evaluating the consequences of your actions on the drainage field. Do not construct extensions on top of the drain field or cover it with concrete, asphalt, or other materials. Create easy access to your septic tank cover by placing it near the entrance. Easy maintenance and inspection are made possible as a result. To aid with evaporation and erosion prevention, plant grass in the area.

a home addition may mean a new septic tank

Do not make any big additions or renovations to your house or company until you have had the size of your septic system assessed. If you want to build a house addition that is more than 10% of your total floor space, increases the number of rooms, or necessitates the installation of new plumbing, you will almost certainly need to expand your septic tank.

  • For a home addition that will result in increased use of your septic system, your local health department will require a letter from you that has been signed and authorized by a representative of your local health department confirming that your new septic system is capable of accommodating the increase in wastewater. It is not recommended that you replace your septic system without the assistance of a certified and competent contractor.

how to maintain your new septic system

Septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services are provided by Norway Septic Inc., a service-oriented company devoted to delivering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to households and business owners throughout the Michiana area. “We take great delight in finishing the task that others have left unfinished.” “They pump, we clean!” says our company’s motto. Septic systems are something we are familiar with from our 40 years of expertise, and we propose the following:

  • Make use of the services of a qualified specialist to develop a maintenance strategy. Make an appointment for an annual examination of your septic system. Utilize the services of an effluent filter to limit the amount of particles that exit the tank, so extending the life of your septic system. Waste items should be disposed of properly, and energy-efficient appliances should be used. Make sure you get your septic system professionally cleaned every 2 to 3 years, or more frequently if necessary, by an experienced and qualified expert
  • If you have any reason to believe that there is an issue with your system, contact a professional. It is far preferable to catch anything early than than pay the price later. Maintain a record of all septic system repairs, inspections, and other activities

common septic questions

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions by our septic customers.

How do I determine the size of my septic tank?

If you have a rectangular tank, multiply the inner height by the length to get the overall height of the tank. In order to find out how many gallons your septic tank contains, divide the number by.1337.1337

How many bedrooms does a 500-gallon septic tank support?

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size.

How deep in the ground is a septic tank?

Your septic system is normally buried between four inches and four feet underground, depending on the climate.

How deep are septic tank lines buried?

Depth. According to the Clemson Cooperative Extension, the pipes should be placed in the leach field at a depth of at least 6 inches and most likely between 18 and 36 inches deep. Because soil and water tables differ from state to state and even within states, each leach field must be designed specifically for that location. 4 feet and 8 inches How deep is a 1000-gallon septic tank, for that matter?

Steel Septic Tank Typical Dimensions
Steel Septic Tank Size (Gallons Capacity) Tank Length (Inches) Tank Depth (Height) (Inches)
750 58 73
1000 58 96
1250 58 120

Simply put, is it possible for a septic tank to be too deep? The depth of the septic tank should not be more than is necessary, because effluent is normally transported from the septic tank to the drainfield by gravity as well as by pumping or suction. Plumbers often build sewage lines to slope down from the inlet to the outlet at a rate of 1/8″ per foot to 1/4″ per foot of linear run of the waste pipe, depending on the kind of waste pipe. Should the lids of septic tanks be buried? A typical septic tank will have all of its components including the lid buried between four inches and four feet underground in the vast majority of situations.

How Deep Should a Septic Leach Field Be?

Photograph courtesy of Valerie Loiseleux/E+/Getty Images.

In This Article

  • Drain Field Operation
  • Drain Field Depth
  • Drain Field Width and Length
  • How the Drain Field Works

It is critical to appropriately size a septic system’s drain or leach field, as an inadequately sized field might result in serious complications. Waste puddles appearing on your lawn are just one of the issues that might arise, therefore it’s crucial to grasp the fundamentals of how a drain field works. Although you are not required to become an expert in septic systems, a little information may go a long way toward ensuring that your drain field is in good operating condition.

Tip

The final depth of a septic system’s drain field is determined by a variety of factors. Drain fields, on the other hand, are typically between 2 and 5 feet deep.

How the Drain Field Works

Solid waste is contained in your septic tank until it is pumped out, which is the final step in the process. The bacteria found in that trash, on the other hand, is far more mobile in nature. As part of the septic process, solid waste is removed from your tank and deposited at the bottom of your tank, while wastewater (together with the bacteria it contains) is discharged from your tank and into your drain field. Once there, the water percolates through the soil and eventually joins the local groundwater supply system.

  1. In the long run, bacteria are eaten by microbes in the soil.
  2. This is a significant project that necessitates the establishment of correct soil conditions, including the selection of the appropriate drain fieldsize and depth.
  3. Typically, a completed bed comprises 12 inches of gravel below the pipe and additional 2 inches of gravel on top of the pipe.
  4. The end product is a drain field that is approximately 3 to 4 feet deep.
  5. This type of circumstance might be caused by underground impediments.
  6. High groundwater tables have the potential to accomplish the same thing, necessitating the installation of a drain field capable of filtering germs at a deeper depth in order to avoid pollution.

Occasionally, this is accomplished by making the drain field shallower, but wider or longer in length. In other cases, a mounded or elevated drain field will be required to prevent flooding.

Drain Field Width and Length

If you have more than one bedroom in your house, your septic system designer will figure out what size drain field you’ll need based on the number of bedrooms you have. In addition, the designer will take into consideration the zoning regulations, soil conditions, and the peculiarities of your lot while designing your home. According to many towns’ regulations, for example, your drain field must be at least a set distance away from your property line. The setbacks from streams, marshes, water supply lines (including local water wells), and other possible barriers are also defined by municipal construction standards.

In addition, pipes are frequently spaced 6 feet apart from one another.

The fact that they are spaced 6 feet apart, on the other hand, provides for the addition of more pipes at a 3-foot spacing if necessary in the future without enlarging the total footprint of the drain field.

It is then decided how this pipe should be laid out in relation to the amount of land available for the leach field to be used.

7 Steps to a New Plastic Septic System

Plastic septic tanks are only one important component of a home’s wastewater management system. There are several other components as well. When you are preparing for your plastic septic tank installation, it is critical to recognize and remember that there are several critical steps to take when installing a new septic system, and if you do not complete each of them carefully, you may be faced with some very expensive consequences down the road.

Step 1: Design Your System

The first step is to take your time and properly design your complete system. There is some critical information that you will need to investigate and get in order to complete this task. You will require a site survey to assist you in determining the borders of your land so that your septic system can be installed in accordance with local restrictions about how near to your neighbor’s property wastewater may be discharged underground. The following are the most crucial pieces of information to look for during the site survey:

  • In addition to the quantity of space available, the land’s topography should be considered as well as the purpose and estimated usage of water based on the size of your home, so you know how much water your septic system will have to treat on a regular basis the position of any wells on your property or on the properties of your neighbors

The quantity of space available; the geography of the property; the purpose and expected usage of water depending on the size of your home, so that you know how much water the septic system will have to treat on a regular basis; and the cost of the system. information about any wells on your property or the properties of your neighbors

  • The quantity of space available
  • The topography of the property
  • The purpose and expected usage of water depending on the size of your home, so that you know how much water the septic system will have to treat on a regular basis
  • The location of any wells on your property or the properties of your neighbors

Once you have completed these tests, you will have the information necessary to build a septic system that is appropriate for your home.

Step 2: Seek Permits

The second stage in the installation process is to submit your plans and applications to your local government in order to obtain the permissions and approvals that are necessary.

In order to gain clearance for these designs, you must ensure that they are in compliance with all applicable plumbing and construction requirements. It is possible that you may be punished and compelled to remove your equipment if you do not obtain these critical permissions.

Step 3: Gather Equipment

Bring together all of the items that will be needed for your plastic septic tank installation. The following is a list of the equipment and parts that you will require:

  • Backhoe – this is by far the most effective method of digging the holes that will be required to install your septic system in the earth. In order to conduct some more accurate digging in the holes you dig with your backhoe, you’ll need a shovel. In order to assure exact measurements for digging, a laser transit surveying equipment is used. A grade pole is a surveying equipment that is used to accurately measure the depth of a hole while digging. (1) – 4′′ Sch. 40 PVC pipe – this is the input pipe from your house, and it may also require fittings
  • And (2) – 4′′ Sch. 40 PVC pipe – this is the output pipe from your home, and it may also require fittings
  • (1) – 4′′ perforated pipe in accordance with ASTM D2729 – output pipe for dispersing effluent into draining field
  • (1) – 4′′ASTM D3034 pipe with suitable fittings
  • (2) – 4′′ASTM D3034 pipe with appropriate fittings
  • – 4′′ Sch. 40 vent caps and test caps – to disperse gas buildup resulting from the degradation of waste in the septic tank
  • – 4′′ Sch. 40 test caps – to ensure that the tank is functioning properly. To join PVC pipes together, PVC primer and PVC adhesive are used. Cutting PVC pipe to the required length requires the use of a manual hand saw or an electric hand saw. The usage of a hammer drill and bits is required if you need to drill through the wall of your house in order to install the septic system. If you drill a hole through a PVC pipe, you may use hydraulic cement to seal the gap between the pipe and the wall of your home. The stone should be 1 12 inches in thickness and should be put below your septic system to guarantee proper drainage. Small and big tape measures – you will need at least 100 feet of tape, therefore it may be beneficial to have both a small and a large tape measure on hand
  • Septic fabric — You will need roughly 3 feet of fabric cut from a roll. Plastic septic tank and risers – check with your local rules to ensure that plastic septic tanks are permitted. Silicone caulk is used to seal the risers of the stairwell. If a septic filter is necessary, it should be installed. Check out the plumbing codes in your area. Distribution box made of plastic – this is utilized when running a system with many laterals to the draining field.
See also:  How Much Does A Septic Tank And Drainfield Cost? (Solution found)

Step 4: Install Intake Pipe

Choose one of the sides of your home or structure from which you want the septic tank to take in waste water for treatment. It is necessary to dig down at least 2 feet and either make a hole in the wall or dig further into the footing of the home or structure at that location. If you have a gravity-fed system, you should design the flow such that it flows downhill, rather than uphill, because gravity-fed systems do not require mechanical techniques to transport waste from a tank to a drain field.

  • Install the 4 inch Sch.
  • It has to be level at the wall and slope down about 1/8 inch per foot toward the plastic septic tank, according to the manufacturer’s specifications.
  • In the event that you swap pipes, make certain that you utilize the proper adaptor while connecting it to the plastic septic tank.
  • If you decide to drill a hole in the wall, you must use hydraulic cement to seal the area around the hole, both on the inside of the building and on the outside as well as the inside.
  • If the pitch is excessively steep, the wastewater will flow too quickly through the system, causing the particles to become caught in the pipe.

Step 5: Install Plastic Septic Tank

Excavate a huge hole deep enough to accommodate your plastic septic tank below the surface of the ground. Make use of your laser transit to identify the top of the intake pipe and measure the distance between the top of the intake pipe and the bottom of the tank with your tape measure. In order to get the depth you want, double that amount by 1 12 inches and add it to the measurement taken from your laser transit to your grade pole. Continue digging until you reach the desired depth. Afterwards, you must dig out your draining field (also known as a leach field) in accordance with the parameters of your survey results as well as any applicable local restrictions.

Make certain that you maintain a sufficient slope to ensure that outward flow from your plastic septic tank installation to your draining field is maintained.

Step 6: Install Draining Field

Generally, a 12 inch coating of washed drain rock will be required surrounding the pipe in order to keep it stable while it is transporting stuff. According to your local health criteria, the size of the gravel and the depth of this layer will be determined. If you are placing perforated pipe in a gravity septic system drain field, keep in mind that the pipe has no slope on either end and is capped on both ends.

Step 7: Inspection and Filling In

Following the permission of your local health inspector, it is time to cover everything with dirt and finish the job. To cover your cleaned drain rock before covering it with soil, you will most likely need a specific cloth that functions as a filter, untreated construction paper, or four inches of straw to cover the drainage region.

Bonus for Pump Plastic Septic Tank Installations:

If you have a pumped plastic septic tank installation, there will only be a few variations in the process you will go through. Before you can connect your plastic septic tank to your draining field, you must first construct a pump chamber in your home. The pump chamber is constructed in a manner similar to that of the septic tank, but the electrical aspects of the pump will necessitate the services of a certified electrician to ensure that you are in compliance with state standards. Those who live in areas with a lot of groundwater may find that their pump chamber is mostly empty most of the time, and others may find that they need to add more weight to the floatation mechanism that switches the pump on and off.

Not until you have obtained your permits and asked for assistance from local septic specialists at the first indication of problems, not after you have put everything together, filled it in, and discovered evidence of sewage leakage when you first turn on the water, should you begin digging.

Early involvement with the specialists will save you a great deal of time, money, and the frustration of having to repair a septic system that was badly constructed.

How Deep Is A Septic Tank?

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you purchase a product after clicking on one of our links, we may receive a commission or free product from the firms featured in this post. Amazon is a good illustration of this. Septic tanks are tanks that are built below the surface of the ground. The depth of the tank is determined by a variety of elements that are taken into consideration during the tank’s installation. It is vital to know the depth of a septic tank, especially when access is required for pumping or inspection of the tank.

So, how far down does a septic tank go?

They are generally rectangular in design and measure 5 by 8 feet in dimensions.

Continue reading to learn more about septic tank depths, including whether or not it is necessary to have the septic tank below the frost line in order to lessen the likelihood of freezing, and what happens if the septic tank is buried deeply in the ground.

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When it comes to septic tanks, how deep should they be? Because every condition and location is unique, the depth of a septic tank must be determined based on the specifics of the situation. As a result, before settling on a structure, the designer takes a variety of things into consideration. Assume that the soil type is such that it permits the use of the gravity system to function. Consequently, the septic tank may be built in a convenient location near to the surface. Now, this suggests that the lid can be raised to the level of the grade.

  1. So it allows for the entire effluent to be transported from the septic tank to the distribution section.’ This is the location where they are disseminated.
  2. Depending on the weather conditions, they might be shallower or deeper.
  3. The depth of the drain field is also determined by the level of the tank.
  4. Septic tanks are built substantially deeper in colder climates to accommodate the ice and snow that accumulates.

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This is determined by elements such as the kind of soil and geology in which it is constructed. Another consideration is the depth of the sewer pipe leading out from the property. Similarly, in cold areas, the latent heat from the earth, along with the bacterial activity of the sewage, keeps the water from being frozen. Any septic tank should not be buried too deeply underground, since this might cause harm to it and prevent it from performing its intended purpose. Here are a few examples of such elements that have been well explained:

  • The presence of a high water table makes a deep septic tank an unwise choice in these circumstances. It is possible that extra soil will be required in order to improve absorption. It results in the formation of a mound, which can function as an above-ground drainfield.
  • Type of Soil– The type of soil and the amount of organic matter in the soil influence the depth of the septic tank. High water tables are frequent in clay-rich areas, and they are especially prevalent in the southwestern United States. Professionals can assess the composition of the soil and make recommendations for the depth of the septic tank based on their findings.
  • Site Characteristics– As you plan your system, your contractor will be able to evaluate the characteristics of your property. Drainage patterns, water bodies in the area, and slope are all included in this type of study. They can calculate the optimal depth of the septic tank based on these considerations.
  • Tank Kind– The type of tank also has an impact on its performance. There are several different types of septic tanks available, some of which may contain up to 2 to 3 feet of earth on top. As a result, if the tanks are placed significantly deeper, the manufacturer’s guarantee will be violated.

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A riser should be constructed in septic tanks that are located deep in the ground. Risers are large-diameter tubes that are commonly referred to as ‘wells.’ These are installed directly above the input baffle access point for the septic tank. This is often where the outlet is located. The major reason for installing it is to make it easier for specialists to get to the pump when they arrive to work. Professionals require access to perform services such as baffle repair, inspection, septic tank pumping, cleaning, and other tasks.

This pipe has a big diameter, which allows for convenient access to the tank for pumping and inspection purposes.

How to Find the Septic Tank Lid Deep Below the Surface?

Following these procedures will assist you in determining the depth of your septic tank lid, which will assist you in determining the depth of your septic tank lid:

  • You must look for the locations where pipes are exiting your home. This will be located in the basement area. So simply keep an eye on where these pipes are leading. You only have to walk 10 steps from your home. Septic tanks are typically located roughly 10-20 feet from your front door
  • You may inspect them with a steel probe if necessary. This should be a maximum of 5 feet in length. Make use of it to drive into the earth. You will be able to feel the location of the septic tank
  • Nevertheless, you must use caution so as not to harm the lid. It is possible to puncture it if you are not careful. The first cap is normally found in a grassy area, and if it is punctured, it will cost a lot of money to repair it, so be careful not to puncture it. This is generally located towards the edge of the tank
  • The tank’s general width is six feet
  • And you may now go back to your front door. You should be able to identify the other cap after only 6 feet of walking. You will receive the discharge cap after taking two steps.

Questions Related to How Deep is a Septic Tank

The lids of septic tanks are often situated around the ground level. The lids are often buried anywhere from 4 inches to 4 feet deep, depending on the situation.

  • It is important to understand what happens if a septic tank is installed excessively deep.

It is not suggested to put a septic tank at a location that is too deep.

If it is implanted too deeply, it is possible that it will malfunction on a regular basis. It is possible that effluent may backlog on a regular basis and will not naturally flow into the drainfield.

  • Whether I am allowed to drive over the septic tank, which is buried underground

No, you should never drive over a septic tank, even if you are aware that it is buried deep down. In a short period of time, driving over the tank will damage its surface, causing it to crack, and cause it to stop operating.

  • Anyone who can tell me what the depth of my septic tank is, please.

You can look through your property records to see if there are any details concerning the septic tank’s construction. If you have only recently moved into the neighborhood, you might inquire with the homeowner. If nothing else seems to work, you might enlist the assistance of the specialists who come to examine or pump your water.

  • How can I find out if there is a problem with my septic tank, which is buried deep underground?

It is advised that you have your septic tank tested on a regular basis in order to spot problems early on. Furthermore, if you notice any indicators of a septic tank problem, such as a bad odor or sewage backup, it is time to have it checked. If you are unsure about the depth of your septic tank, you can get assistance from a septic tank professional. They can assist you in discovering the lid of the tank much more quickly, regardless of how deep the lid is hidden. The depth of the septic lid is typically 5 feet, however this might vary depending on the depth of the tank.

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