How Close Deck Piers To Septic Tank? (Best solution)

It is usually not a good idea to build a deck near or on top of a septic tank. Most zoning ordinances will require that you maintain at least a 5′ setback from an underground septic system. Installing frost footings and applying deck loads over a septic tank could result in damaging the tank or waste lines.

inspectapedia.com

  • Even if your locality allows footings closer than 5 feet, it is still wise to keep the deck footings at least five feet from the tank. Doing so will ensure that you never compromise the integrity or effectiveness of your septic system. Can You Build a Floating Deck Over a Septic Tank?

Can you build a deck next to a septic tank?

You should never build a deck over a septic field; doing so will prevent the natural draining and dissipation of the effluent. This can ruin the septic system, not to mention releasing foul smells into the air all around your deck. The dissipating effluent can also rot the deck from underneath.

How close can you build to a septic tank?

“Septic tanks should be sited at least 7m from any habitable parts of buildings, and preferably downslope.”

How far away from leach field can you build?

Common guidelines require at least 50′ clearance distance between a well and a septic system tank or 150′ between a well and a septic drainfield or leaching bed but you will see that different authorities may recommend different distances. Local soil and rock conditions can make these “rules of thumb” unreliable.

How do you build a patio with a septic tank?

You can’t build a paver patio on top of a septic tank, and doing so could be against the planning laws of your state or local area. Septic tanks can take very little weight without getting damaged, and you’ll also need access to the tank in the future too. You shouldn’t build a deck on one either.

Can you build a deck over a water tank?

Yes. You sure can. This is a very common request. In fact, not only can you build a deck over a concrete patio, doing so provides a moisture barrier.

What is a floating deck?

A floating deck is a deck that isn’t attached to a building and they “float” above the ground. Generally, floating decks are low to the ground and don’t require handrails or even staircases. They are sometimes called “grade-level” or “freestanding” decks because they’re built just above the ground level, or grade.

How far from a house does a sewage treatment plant need to be?

At least 10 meters away from any habitable building.

Do I have to replace my septic tank by 2020?

Under the new rules, if you have a specific septic tank that discharges to surface water (river, stream, ditch, etc.) you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

How far should septic be from well?

Department of Health in many States requires that new septic tanks or human-waste lagoons to be installed at least 50 feet from a well. Septic tank drain fields must be at least 100 feet from a well.

Can you put a garden over a septic field?

Planting over a septic leach field (drain field) is possible if it is done with care. If you have limited space on your property where you can garden, the leach field may be the only spot for landscaping. Vegetable gardening over a leach field is not recommended.

What can you put on top of a septic field?

Put plastic sheets, bark, gravel or other fill over the drainfield. Reshape or fill the ground surface over the drainfield and reserve area. However, just adding topsoil is generally OK if it isn’t more than a couple of inches. Make ponds on or near the septic system and the reserve area.

How far from septic tank is distribution box?

It’s usually somewhere near the edge of your drain field on the end that’s closest to your septic tank. Distribution boxes are usually only about 6 inches to 2 feet deep. This narrows your search, but you’ll need some other clues to help you find the exact location.

Can you build a concrete patio over a septic tank?

You should not build a patio over or near a septic tank. Septic tanks are not built to withstand the weight of a concrete slab or pavers and you risk damaging the tank or the waste lines.

Can I pour a concrete slab over my septic tank?

You should never pave over your septic tank. Although soil compaction is not a major issue for septic tanks, there are other dangers presented by placing an insecure septic tank underneath concrete and heavy vehicles.

Can you put a concrete slab over a leach field?

Overall, it is not recommended to build over your leach filed and you should also not put anything heavy on top of it, such as parking a vehicle.

Can You Build Deck Over Septic Tank?

It is one of the most exciting and gratifying home remodeling tasks you can undertake to create an outside living space. A finished deck, no matter how complicated or basic, is a wonderful location to spend time with friends and family while also enjoying your house. What might put a kink in your deck-building plans, though, is the question of whether or not you can build a deck on top of a septic tank. Although it is possible to construct a deck over a septic tank, this does not automatically imply that it is a good idea.

Creating a deck over a septic tank requires careful planning and execution.

In this article, you’ll discover the fundamentals of installing decks over septic tanks, as well as the dangers and construction codes related with these projects, allowing you to determine whether or not this is a good idea for your home or not.

Can You Build a Deck Over a Septic Tank?

It is feasible to construct a deck over a septic tank, but it is not necessarily a smart idea. There are a variety of factors that should cause you to stop before deciding to build your deck over a septic tank. Building a deck without disrupting your septic system is a difficult task, and you will need to be resourceful. However, it is not impossible or difficult; it simply takes more preparation and adjustment. Consider it a one-of-a-kind design challenge that will push you to be more creative and strategic in your planning!

Risks of Building Over a Septic Tank

The construction of a deck directly over the tank will make it difficult, if not impossible, to pump out the tank. The tank’s upkeep is extremely vital, and covering the tank with a wood framework makes that task much more difficult to complete. Every three to five years, your septic tank should be drained and emptied, and older tanks may require more frequent maintenance. This makes it unwise to construct a deck over a septic tank unless you are forced to do so by circumstance. It is also critical to preserve the septic lines and drain field in their original condition.

This liquid, which is referred to as effluent, drains out into the drain field and dissipates in the earth and the surrounding air.

When something interferes with the process, however, it becomes readily apparent to the observer.

Building a deck over a septic field is not recommended since it will impede the natural draining and dissipation of the effluent from occurring.

This can cause damage to the septic system, as well as the release of unpleasant odors into the air all around your deck area. The dispersing effluent can also cause the deck to deteriorate from the bottom up. There is nothing more unpleasant than sitting on a deck that smells like a sewer!

Guidelines for Building Decks Over Septic Tanks

Pumping the tank will be difficult, if not impossible, if the deck is constructed directly over it. The tank’s upkeep is quite vital, and covering the tank with a wood framework makes this task much more challenging. Pumping and emptying your septic tank once every three to five years is a must, and older tanks may require more frequent service. As a result, unless you have no other option, it is not advisable to construct a deck over a septic tank. It’s also critical to leave the septic lines and drain field alone throughout the cleaning procedure.

  1. Exfluent is a liquid that drains into a drain field where it decomposes in the earth and the surrounding air.
  2. It is readily obvious when something interrupts the process, on the other hand.
  3. Never construct a deck over an existing septic field since doing so will impede the natural drainage and dissipation of effluent from taking place.
  4. The effluent that is dispersing might potentially destroy the deck from underneath.

Deck Over Septic Tank: Footings and Framing

Building a deck directly over the tank will make pumping the tank extremely difficult, if not impossible. The tank’s upkeep is extremely crucial, and covering the tank with a wood framework makes that task much more difficult. Your septic tank should be pumped and emptied at least once every three to five years, and older tanks may require more frequent service. As a result, unless you have no option, it is not advisable to construct a deck over a septic tank. It’s also critical to avoid disturbing the septic lines and drain field.

This liquid, which is referred to as effluent, drains out into a drain field and dissipates in the ground and the surrounding air.

When something interferes with the process, though, it becomes readily apparent.

Building a deck over a septic field is not recommended since it will inhibit the natural draining and dissipation of the effluent.

This has the potential to damage your septic system, not to mention release bad odors into the air all around your deck. The dispersing effluent can also cause the deck to deteriorate from the bottom. Nobody wants to spend time on a deck that smells like a sewer!

How Big Is a Septic Tank?

Septic tanks are available in a variety of sizes depending on the size of the residence; for example, a two-bedroom ranch will have a significantly smaller tank than a six-bedroom country estate. The Environmental Protection Agency advises sizing the septic tank depending on the number of users and the size of the home, as well as the amount of water that will be used. The usual size of a septic tank is between 750 and 1250 gallons in capacity. This is enough to allow the tank to filter and treat a few years’ worth of water and waste before it has to be replaced.

See also:  How To Get Rid Of Solids And Toilet Paper In Septic Tank? (Solution found)

Tanks extend approximately one foot in each direction for every 250 gallons that the capacity required rises.

Septic tanks are generally made of precast concrete, plastic, fiberglass, or steel, with steel being the least popular due to the high cost and corrosion prone nature of steel tanks.

How Deep Are Septic Tanks Buried?

Contrary to popular opinion, septic tanks are not buried particularly deeply in the ground, as is commonly assumed. Septic tanks that are dug too deeply might be cracked or collapsed by soil weight, causing the effluent to leak and soak into the soil around the tank rather than draining into the drainage field. The majority of septic tanks are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet below ground level. This is dependent on the kind of soil, the slope of the yard, the tank design, and a variety of other factors.

This will assist you in avoiding the placement of deck footings in areas where they might cause harm.

Rules and Codes Regarding Septic Tanks

Before you begin construction on your deck, you should research the building rules in your area that pertain to septic tanks. Construction of a floating deck over an existing septic tank is permitted in some locations. In others, it is prohibited, and violating the law can result in penalties and the removal of the deck. Septic tanks, drain lines, and drain field must be positioned at least 10 feet away from building slabs, roadways, decks, and other buildings in some jurisdictions, such as Ohio.

You will never be permitted to build over septic lines or drain fields; these regulations are only applicable to construction near tanks.

These requirements apply not just to decks, but also to other types of construction, such as walls and trees, foundations, slabs, and other types of landscaping.

It is not permissible to construct structures near or on top of the tank, lines, or drainage field if these limitations apply in your location.

How Close Can a Deck Be to a Septic Tank?

If possible, the footings of the deck should be at least 5-10 feet away from the tank at all times, depending on where you reside. This might result in the deck’s size being reduced or increased in order to fit these regulations. You may use this site to gather information on septic systems at the state level. Consult your local building codes or chat with a professional plumbing contractor or house inspector to have a better understanding! If your municipality permits footings closer than 5 feet to the tank, it is still advisable to maintain the deck footings at least five feet away from the tank.

Can You Build a Floating Deck Over a Septic Tank?

The construction of floating decks, which are essentially free-standing wooden platforms that are placed at or slightly above grade, should not take place over an existing septic tank. The weight of the deck on the supports might cause the septic system’s ability to properly process and drain waste to become displaced and disrupted. It is possible that you may become the proud owner of the stinkiest floating deck in the city if you ignore this warning. Construction of a hybrid floating deck, which uses underground footings similar to that of a traditional deck while remaining short and distinct from the home, is a straightforward option.

Can You Build a Deck Over a Septic Field?

It is never recommended to construct a deck over a septic field. In order for sewage to flow out into the groundwater or evaporate into the air, septic fields must be built to allow for this. When you disturb the septic field, it causes backup, which causes the ground to become murky with tainted wastewater. The stink and look will be quite visible, and it is possible that the entire septic system will need to be repaired. Even if you are planning to construct on top of an existing septic field, you should properly evaluate the soil to ensure that it is no longer dripping with water.

What Can You Put Over a Septic Tank?

Septic tanks cannot be immediately overtopped except for decks or pergolas that are built on footings more than five feet away from the tank’s inlet and outlet. In addition to septic system components such as concrete slabs, foundations, and shrubs, other constructions can have a negative impact on the system’s health and performance.

Conclusion

Decks or pergolas with footings more than five feet away from a sewage tank are the only objects that can be built directly over a septic tank. Septic system health and effectiveness can be significantly harmed by other constructions such as concrete slabs, foundations, and even shrubs.

How close can a deck be to a septic tank?

Asked in the following category: General The most recent update was made on the 7th of February, 2020. – A slab foundation for a building such as a garage must be at least 10 feet away from the septic tank and 10 feet away from the leaching area. – The deck’s concrete columns must be at least 5 feet away from the leaching area and must not interfere with the septic system. In most cases, it is not a good idea to construct a deck near or on top of an aseptic tank. You will be required to maintain a minimum of a 5′ setback from an underground septic system under most zoning regulations.

  • In addition, how much weight can you place on top of a septic tank before it collapses?
  • In the same vein, how near can you build to a septic tank before it becomes a problem?
  • When building a carport or other slab foundation, the distance between the septic tank and leaching area must be 10 feet or more.
  • What is the maximum distance between a drain field and a septic tank?* Yoursepticsystem site plan is normally created directly on top of your property survey, indicating the septic tank’s setbacks from the house and the tank’s location.

the garden should be 5-10 feet away from the home, the leach field should be at least 20 feet away from the house, at least 100 feet away from wells and streams, 25 feet away from dry gulches, and 10 feet away from the property

Can You Build a Deck Over a Septic Tank?

Previously, we explained how to construct a deck over a manhole or drain; but, what about constructing the same structure over an onsite septic tank? The ability to provide space for a manhole cover or a drain, or to construct an easily accessible hatch, is one thing; but, what does the code say about building a deck on top of a septic tank? In the event that you have a septic tank in your backyard, you may have a slew of questions running through your head at any given time. Is it possible to construct a deck over a septic tank?

What, if any, threats does it provide, and what should you do if you have no choice but to construct it there?

A deck over your septic tank is not recommended if your tank is in an exposed location.

What Is a Septic Tank?

In the United States, septic tanks and septic systems are wastewater treatment facilities that are typically found in rural settings. It is not unusual to see some subterranean tanks near buildings if there is a lack of available space, although this is not the norm in most situations. These tanks utilize a combination of nature and technology to purify the wastewater that flows through your home’s plumbing system (and, in some cases, throughout the neighborhood). As a result, it is reasonable to presume that these tanks are exceedingly dangerous to people if they are exposed to the gases or water contained within them.

  • It’s common for these drain-fields to be soil absorption fields.
  • Solids sink to the bottom of the sea, whereas oily debris floats to the top.
  • These pipes are buried in leach fields, chambers, or other units that are designed to guarantee that water seeps gently into the soil as it passes through.
  • Some tanks simply employ the same organic matter that is used as a filter in other tanks (peat, sawdust, or foodstuffs, for example).
  • It is not commonplace for most states, counties, towns, and localities in the United States and the United Kingdom to restrict the construction of anything over septic system tanks or drain fields, particularly in rural areas.

The Environmental Protection Agency recommends that you check with them before planning to install a deck over an existing septic tank.

Dangers of Building Over a Septic Tank

The risks associated with septic tanks may be separated into two categories: those associated with inadvertently puncturing the tank or its pipes, and those associated with not doing so. Unlike the latter, the former are active threats, whilst the latter are passive threats. In spite of technical advancements, it is critical to remember that septic tanks pose a threat to human health and will most likely continue to do so in the foreseeable future. As a consequence of the sewage gases that have been trapped within the structure, notably carbon monoxide (which is produced as a result of bacteria eating organic materials), it is potentially dangerous to humans.

  • After 15 to 40 years of use, the average lifespan of a septic tank is reached, at which point the tank begins to degrade.
  • In addition to endangering human health, this poses a threat to the ecosystem as well.
  • They differ in that the former include aggressive threats, whilst the latter involve passive threats.
  • As a consequence of the sewage gases that have been trapped within the structure, notably carbon monoxide (which is produced as a result of bacteria eating organic materials), it can be dangerous to people.
  • When it comes to septic tanks, the typical lifespan is between 15 and 40 years after which the tank begins to degrade.
  • In addition to being a threat to human health, this has environmental implications.
See also:  How To Repair Rv Septic Tank Pull Lever? (Correct answer)

Can You Build a Deck Over a Septic Tank?

With the exception of the hole around the perimeter of the septic tank, In the event that you must construct a deck on posts or bricks, we propose that you construct a floating deck, as we discussed in our earlier article. However, this is only applicable to the construction of a deck over a septic TANK, not a drain field or other drainage system. This is due to the fact that the drain field is immediately absorbing water from the tank. Although the water has been treated, this does not imply that it is fully safe.

  1. Furthermore, floating decks lessen the likelihood of someone falling into the tank in the event that a deck board fails to support it.
  2. It is critical that you remember that exposure to septic tank gases or water may be highly harmful and even lethal if not handled properly.
  3. If, on the other hand, you are constructing the deck in order to create a patio on top of it, we strongly advise that you stop.
  4. Do not lift it more than 6 to 8 feet above the ground; this will allow you to circulate enough blood to prevent further harm.
  5. Because of the air circulation beneath the deck, the temperature of the ground will not be a significant concern.
  6. Dirt compression will result in you exerting pressure on the pipes of your sewer system or even on the tank itself.
  7. Another issue that you are likely to encounter is the failure of a deck board or a deck panel.
  8. As long as your deck is 6 to 8 feet high, you may install a heavy-duty net beneath it to ensure that no one (or nothing) falls through to the tank’s uppermost level below.
  9. The one below would only serve as a last resort in the event that the worst should happen.
  10. Wood is a lightweight material that is less likely to exert excessive strain on the top of your septic tank.

If, on the other hand, you believe untreated wood is either too expensive or just not accessible, remember to stain and seal it first. This will considerably extend the life of the wood, hence significantly lowering the likelihood of an accident occurring.

Deck footing next to septic pipe?

Once you get started on any house “maintenance” job, you’ll quickly discover that you have a lot more problems than you first anticipated. We are expanding our deck rather than merely replacing our decking since we are having troubles with our present posts. The septic line is around two inches from where the concrete pier would be installed, which we discovered while digging the footings about two feet out from the present footings (I know, it’s strange, but it worked for us). We believe that this is already the situation with the present post/footing because our new footing is in the exact same location as the current post/footing, although a little further away from the home.

We live in Minnesota, and the building rule requires that we put at least 42″ of concrete down on footings.

Have any of you noticed any additional problems?

r/HomeImprovement – Building a Deck Near Septic System

Every house “maintenance” job has the potential to become overwhelming once you begin working on it and discover that you have far more issues than you first anticipated. Instead of merely rebuilding our decking, we are extending our deck as a result of problems with our existing supports. The septic pipe is around two inches from where the concrete pier would be installed, which we discovered while digging footings approximately two feet out from present footings (I know – it’s strange, but it worked for us).

So we’re assuming that everything will be OK, but does anyone have any cause to be concerned?

We will be going closer to 60″ on this footing because we want to be absolutely certain that the septic pipe is never, ever disturbed by frost heave again.

Because the pipe is only a few inches away from the concrete, we presume that there will be no problem with freezing in the winter because the existing post must remain the same.

  1. I may submit an application for a deviation to the code to see if I can construct a structure closer to the tank. I was under the impression that we would only need to come out about 5 feet from the rear of the house, which would leave us with a 6 foot setback from the tank. When it comes to granting a variance, how probable is it that the county will do so? In fact, is it even wise to build that near to the sewer line? If I can’t construct the deck on the right side owing to the septic tank, can I still construct the deck on the left side of the house? Do you think there is a problem with the deck being built on top of the waste line that runs from the home to the tank? Are there any other possibilities that I am not aware of? Is there anybody else in Ohio who has dealt with the issue of building a deck near a septic tank? If yes, please describe what you did.

Thank you to everyone.

Building Near and Over Septic Tanks

Posted on a regular basis In most cases, minimum setback rules imposed by the Texas Commission on Environmental Equality (TCEQ) preclude the building of a new residence from occuring over any point of an existing sewage disposal system. Foundations, pools, property lines, wells, and other structures must be kept at a certain distance from the septic tank and drainfield in order to meet these setback requirements.

It is possible that some homeowners will install objects such as patio decks or house additions over their systems, whether by accident or design. This might result in higher costs when it comes to locating and maintaining the system.

Building over septic tanks

Construction of a building over any section of your septic system is not recommended. The most typical issue we see is when someone wants to pump out their septic tank but is unsure of where their tank is situated on their property. Tanks hidden beneath a hardwood deck, pool patio, driveways, or even room extensions are not unusual for us to discover and investigate. The majority of the time, this occurs because the homeowner is uninformed of the tank’s location and/or does not have a plan in place for future tank maintenance.

However, in this scenario, the homeowner will be able to pump out their septic tank because no permanent constructions should be constructed over any component of the system.

Building over drainfields

In order for the drainfield to function, water in the solids and some evapotranspiration must be absorbed. In order for bacteria in the soil beneath a drainfield to treat wastewater from a drainfield, the soil beneath the drainfield must have sufficient oxygen. However, if a permanent structure is constructed over a drainfield, it has the potential to reduce the amount of oxygen that can be absorbed by the soil and hence reduce evapotranspiration. The potential of causing the drainfield lines to collapse is a significant concern when constructing over them.

Depending on the age of your system and the restrictions of your local authorities, repairing or shifting your drainfield may need the installation of a whole new system.

We can assist you with any of your wastewater system needs, and our specialists can also assist you with your septic installation and maintenance requirements: 210.698.2000 (San Antonio) or 830.249.4000 (Austin) (Boerne).

Can You Build a Deck Over a Septic Field?

Image courtesy of Eric Vega/E+/Getty Images & Images.

In This Article

  • Image courtesy of Eric Vega/E+/Getty Images /

You can enjoy the outdoors in complete comfort when you have a raised deck. If, on the other hand, the greatest location for a deck is directly over the septic field, you might reconsider your intentions for enhancing your property. An effective septic drain field requires exposure to sunlight and air movement to allow liquids to soak through the soil and evaporate into the atmosphere. In addition to interfering with the two tasks, a deck has the potential to reduce the lifespan of the septic system and drain field.

Tip

For a septic field to work correctly, it requires air movement and sunlight. A deck interferes with both, making that particular location an unsuitable location for a deck or any other construction. Septic systems are a type of sewage treatment and disposal system that is commonly seen in rural and semi-rural settings. It is necessary to transport all of the liquids and waste from the home into a tank. The solids sink to the bottom of the container and liquids disseminate into an aleach field, which is also known as a drain field or aleach field.

After flowing from the septic tank into the drain field, liquids slowly soak into the soil and evaporate into the air as they pass through the system.

Drain fields should be built in full-sun sites where the soil enables liquids to evaporate or percolate into the subsoil in order for them to work correctly.

Structures and Septic Fields

It is not advisable to build a deck or other building on top of a drain field. A deck provides protection from the sun and restricts air movement. Even if the supports are set with care between the leach lines, you run the chance of destroying the field, which is an expensive error that affects the entire household while the system is being fixed or replaced. An additional disadvantage of a deck is that it limits access to the septic system, which includes the concrete or polyethylene tank, which should be examined every three years and emptied every three to five years.

Because of the additional dirt in a raised bed and the base of a shed, a substantial amount of weight is added to the field, which can cause the pipes to get damaged and interfere with evaporation from the ground.

See also:  What Are The Measurements Of 1500 Gal Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

Plants Appropriate for Septic Fields

While constructing a deck or other structures to the property is not permitted due to the septic field’s design, creating a wildflower meadow or lawn is. Shallow-rooted grasses and flowers absorb moisture and nutrients from the leach lines, increasing the ability of the system to distribute the wastewater into the environment and reduce the amount of time it takes. Wildflowers such as native grasses and clover that attract butterflies and hummingbirds, as well as poppies and salvias, as well as a range of other flowers that attract butterflies and hummingbirds, improve the scenery while preventing human activity over the septic field.

Planting deeper-rooted plants, shrubs, and certain trees along the perimeter of the septic field is permissible as long as they are kept at least 10 feet away from the drainfield lines.

Make use of smaller shrubs and trees, such as crepe myrtles, blooming cherries, and dogwoods, and place them at a distance that is equal to or more than their maturity height.

Plants and Trees to Avoid

Planting water-loving plants in close proximity to septic fields is discouraged. While the roots of most trees spread out to around twice the width of the canopy, the roots of willow trees seek find water to the extent that they spread out three to four times the average root spread of other species. Beech, elm, and red maple trees are among the other species that should not be planted near a septic system, according to the EPA. Planting a vegetable garden above drain lines is not recommended, even if the field is the sole sunny location in the environment.

Furthermore, avoid growing bulbs in the drain field, since this will need the digging of holes in the overlying soil. Putting in naturalizing bulbs in areas other than the septic field will let them to expand over a larger area without any further work on your part.

Can I Build a Patio or Deck Near a Septic Tank?

Is it permissible to construct a patio or deck near a septic tank? tybeedreaming inquires, My septic tank is located around 15 feet from the back of my house. I’d want to build a patio or perhaps a deck out on the back deck. With regards to dealing with a septic tank, which would be preferable?

Our Answer

It is permissible to construct a patio or deck in close proximity to an existing septic tank. In response to Tybeedreaming’s question, My septic tank is located around 15 feet from the back of my home. The addition of a patio or maybe a deck would be wonderful. With regards to dealing with a septic tank, which one would you recommend?

How far away from a septic tank can you build?

However, while the requirements will differ from one place to another, the standard minimum distance from the home is 10 feet. Most of the time, the contractor will excavate for the septic tank and system at the same time as he digs the footings for the home foundation. It is necessary to have a full foundation at a distance of 10 feet from the septic tank and 20 feet from the leaching area. When building a carport or other slab foundation, it must be at least 10 feet from the septic tank and 10 feet from the leaching area.

  • In addition to the aforementioned, can you build over septic lines?
  • It is not recommended to build permanent structures above septicfieldlines due to the high amounts of moisture present and the necessity for open air circulation.
  • Structures with foundations may be able to trap moisture beneath the structure’s foundation.
  • * Yoursepticsystem site plan is normally created directly on top of your property survey, indicating the septic tank’s setbacks from the house and the tank’s location.
  • What is the distance between the septic tank and the house?

How Remodeling Can Affect Your Septic System

Building near a septic tank and drain field may have a negative impact on the performance of any septic system, and it is easy to ignore this while upgrading a property. This is also true for people who are considering purchasing a property and intend to remodel it. It is preferable if you are aware of the exact location of your tank and drain field. This will prevent new construction projects from interfering with the normal maintenance of your system or causing damage to your septic tank. Before beginning on any big job that may include your septic system, make sure you have a solid understanding of septic systems under your belt.

Take a look at our ebook, which is provided below. It is an excellent resource that can help you feel much more confident about owning, maintaining, and renovating in close proximity to a septic system.

Building Near aSeptic Tank

What may possibly happen if you fail to locate your system? It is possible that your septic tank is in the route of a huge construction truck. It would be the least of your worries if your septic tank lid were to break. Cracks in the septic tank may be caused by the weight of building equipment on the site. It is possible that these will not be apparent soon after the event. Cracks will grow with time, however, and will pose a major structural threat over time. In most cases, a tank is clearly marked in some way to make it easier to locate.

  1. This will guarantee that the driver is aware of the exact location of the tank and that the tank has enough space to move about.
  2. In addition to causing damage to your tank, construction may prevent a pumper from entering the tank.
  3. This not only makes it difficult to locate the tank, but it also makes it difficult, if not impossible, to maintain it.
  4. If you have a deck or patio that prevents access to the tank, you may be forced to demolish the building, squandering the money you invested on its construction.

Building Near aDrain Field(Leach Field)

If a drainage field is destroyed, the expense of replacing it might be significantly higher. The most serious problem that might occur from building near a drain field is the damage that heavy construction equipment can inflict to the drain field. The weight of a large number of heavy trucks moving over a drain field will shatter the pipes in the drain field and compress the soils beneath the trucks. Compacted dirt in a drain field will impair the ability of the drain field to drain effectively.

Without any air pockets to fill, the effluent will be pushed to rise towards the surface of the soil, where it will eventually pour out onto the ground.

A few instances of how construction near a drain field might potentially result in a problem are shown below.

Problems Building Near a Drain Field

  • Building an in-ground pool would almost certainly need a permit, but it is critical that it be located away from your drainfield. The most obvious issue would be if you were to cut into your drainage system. However, even approaching too close might cause soil compaction in the surrounding area, reducing the life expectancy of the drain field. An above-ground pool adds a significant amount of weight to the earth. It is common to see sheds built on top of leach fields because the water that drains out will soak down into the drainfield and add a significant amount of water. While it is possible that the weight of the shed could cause some soils to contract, it is also likely that traffic from machines would increase. Larger sheds and pole barns should be maintained away from drainfields at all costs. They are unquestionably large and heavy enough to cause issues. They are also large enough to accommodate heavy vehicles, which will further exacerbate the situation. Some individuals choose to build gardens on top of the drain field to beautify the area. Make certain that you are not growing anything with roots that are large enough to penetrate the pipes. In most cases, there is a two-foot layer of dirt cover, but this might vary. When in doubt, it’s advisable to be careful and move the garden to a different location. Fence posts are commonly found in and around gardens. Make certain that the posts are not too large that they are digging into the drain field stone (aggregate). It is possible that huge posts or poles that are buried too deeply will pose an issue. Decks, flagpoles, and huge fences are examples of structures that might cause this. When a septic tank is replaced, it is possible that a leach field will be harmed. The big trucks required to transport the concrete septic tank will have a negative impact on the soils. A plastic septic tank is an excellent solution for completely avoiding the problem. Because they are small and lightweight, they can be carried by hand.

Having established the dangers associated with developing near your septic system, we can go on to discussing ways to avoid any difficulties from arising in the future. The most effective technique of preventive is to be aware of the locations of each component of your system.

How to Locate Your Septic System

Keeping track of where your system is at all times might be a challenge. A large number of consumers only get a glimpse of the entire system during the house purchasing inspection process. In the event that you still have access to your report, it may contain information on the system’s location, as well as a 2-D drawing of the system’s layout. We will provide photographs with our report in order to provide a more accurate reference for the location of the system components. The option to have someone come out and find your system is always available if you have misplaced your report.

Building near a septic tank and drain field can be hazardous, so exercise caution and use common sense while constructing any structure in the vicinity. To understand much more about having a septic system and how to properly maintain it, please see our booklet by clicking on the link below.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *