How Close Can Addition Be To Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

How close can a proposed house addition be from a septic system? – A full foundation must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 20 feet from the leaching area. – A slab foundation such as a garage must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 10 feet from the leaching area.

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  • How close can a proposed house addition be from a septic system? Answer – A full foundation must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 20 feet from the leaching area. – A slab foundation such as a garage must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 10 feet from the leaching area.

How far from a property should a septic tank be?

Most importantly, a septic tank must be at least seven metres from a house, defined as a ‘habitable property’. Septic tanks are built underground and release wastewater slowly into the surrounding environment. For this reason, they must be a set distance away from a home.

How close to a septic tank can I build a patio?

It is usually not a good idea to build a deck near or on top of a septic tank. Most zoning ordinances will require that you maintain at least a 5′ setback from an underground septic system.

How far from a leach field can you build?

Common guidelines require at least 50′ clearance distance between a well and a septic system tank or 150′ between a well and a septic drainfield or leaching bed but you will see that different authorities may recommend different distances. Local soil and rock conditions can make these “rules of thumb” unreliable.

Can you pour concrete over septic tank?

Paving Over Your Septic Tank You should never pave over your septic tank. Although soil compaction is not a major issue for septic tanks, there are other dangers presented by placing an insecure septic tank underneath concrete and heavy vehicles. This is particularly the case for old, reused septic tanks.

Do you need planning permission for a septic tank?

The short answer is yes. You will need planning permission from a local authority in order to have a septic tank installed, no matter if it’s at your own home or on a business site.

Do I have to replace my septic tank by 2020?

Under the new rules, if you have a specific septic tank that discharges to surface water (river, stream, ditch, etc.) you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

Can I build next to a septic tank?

It is never recommended to build a structure over any portion of your septic system. No permanent structures should be built over any portion of the system, but at least in this case the homeowner can pump out their septic tank.

How close can a septic tank be?

According to recommendations by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, as well as the Department of Housing and Urban Development, a septic tank should be at least 50 feet away from a well that is used for drinking water.

How far should a septic tank be from a foundation?

Local codes and regulations that stipulate the distance of the septic tank from the house vary depending on the locale, but the typical minimum distance is 10 feet.

Can you put a garden over a septic field?

Planting over a septic leach field (drain field) is possible if it is done with care. If you have limited space on your property where you can garden, the leach field may be the only spot for landscaping. Vegetable gardening over a leach field is not recommended.

Can I build a deck over a septic tank?

You should never build a deck over a septic field; doing so will prevent the natural draining and dissipation of the effluent. This can ruin the septic system, not to mention releasing foul smells into the air all around your deck. The dissipating effluent can also rot the deck from underneath.

What can you put on top of a septic field?

Put plastic sheets, bark, gravel or other fill over the drainfield. Reshape or fill the ground surface over the drainfield and reserve area. However, just adding topsoil is generally OK if it isn’t more than a couple of inches. Make ponds on or near the septic system and the reserve area.

Can I put pavers over septic tank?

You can’t build a paver patio on top of a septic tank, and doing so could be against the planning laws of your state or local area. Septic tanks can take very little weight without getting damaged, and you’ll also need access to the tank in the future too. You shouldn’t build a deck on one either.

Can you put a pool on a drainfield?

Never put a pool on top of a drainfield, soakbed, raised bed septic or septic mound: Never locate a swimming pool on top of a drainfield or mound: the work of installation is likely to damage the drainfield, and even a simple, lightweight plastic swimming pool liner and above ground frame, built by tiptoeing onto the

Can you walk on a leach field?

Your family can walk on a well-maintained drain field without fear of encountering puddles of affluent and dangerous bacteria. Bicycles and tricycles are also acceptable because they are not heavy enough to compress or disturb the soil.

How close can you build a home addition to a septic tank system in Florida?

A septic system cannot be situated closer than 5 feet from the foundation of a house or the foundation of a manufactured home. However, while sidewalks, decks, and patios are not subject to the 5 foot limit, you are not permitted to place a drainfield beneath them. Any tank located underneath a driveway must have a lid that has been constructed by a Florida-licensed engineer to withstand the expected traffic load. The following is an extract from the Florida Administrative Code that is relevant: 64E-6.005 (2) Unless property lines abut utility easements that do not contain underground utilities, or unless recorded easements are specifically provided for the installation of systems for service to more than one lot or property owner, systems shall not be located under buildings or within 5 feet of building foundations, including pilings for elevated structures, or within 5 feet of mobile home walls, pool walls, or within 5 feet of property lines.

(a) Sidewalks, decks, and patios are exempt from the 5 foot setback requirement; however, drainfields are not permitted to be placed beneath these types of buildings.

Concrete constructions that are intended to be erected over a septic tank must have a barrier of soil or plastic material placed between the structure and the tank in order to prevent the structure from adhering to the tank.

as well asDoes it make sense to upgrade my septic tank when I build a home addition?

  1. See the following blog pages for further information about SEPTIC TANK SYSTEMS: When it comes to gray water reuse in Florida, what are the requirements of the building code?
  2. What is it about septic tank contractors that makes them urge you to get rid of your garbage disposal?
  3. Is it necessary to re-certify a septic tank after a residence has been empty for a period of time?
  4. How frequently should I get my septic tank pumped?
  5. What happened to the septic tank?
  6. It is possible for a house to have more than one septic tank.

If the washing machine drain is diverted to a nearby piece of ground in the yard, is this permissible? You may find further relevant blog entries on this subject by visiting ourSEPTIC TANK SYSTEMSpage or by using theINDEXfor a comprehensive listing of all our articles.

Building Near and Over Septic Tanks

Posted on a regular basis In most cases, minimum setback rules imposed by the Texas Commission on Environmental Equality (TCEQ) preclude the building of a new residence from occuring over any point of an existing sewage disposal system. Foundations, pools, property lines, wells, and other structures must be kept at a certain distance from the septic tank and drainfield in order to meet these setback requirements. It is possible that some homeowners will install objects such as patio decks or house additions over their systems, whether by accident or design.

Building over septic tanks

Construction of a building over any section of your septic system is not recommended. The most typical issue we see is when someone wants to pump out their septic tank but is unsure of where their tank is situated on their property. Tanks hidden beneath a hardwood deck, pool patio, driveways, or even room extensions are not unusual for us to discover and investigate. The majority of the time, this occurs because the homeowner is uninformed of the tank’s location and/or does not have a plan in place for future tank maintenance.

However, in this scenario, the homeowner will be able to pump out their septic tank because no permanent constructions should be constructed over any component of the system.

Building over drainfields

In order for the drainfield to function, water in the solids and some evapotranspiration must be absorbed. In order for bacteria in the soil beneath a drainfield to treat wastewater from a drainfield, the soil beneath the drainfield must have sufficient oxygen. However, if a permanent structure is constructed over a drainfield, it has the potential to reduce the amount of oxygen that can be absorbed by the soil and hence reduce evapotranspiration. The potential of causing the drainfield lines to collapse is a significant concern when constructing over them.

Depending on the age of your system and the restrictions of your local authorities, repairing or shifting your drainfield may need the installation of a whole new system.

We can assist you with any of your wastewater system needs, and our specialists can also assist you with your septic installation and maintenance requirements: 210.698.2000 (San Antonio) or 830.249.4000 (Austin) (Boerne).

How Far Should You Put the Septic Tank From the House?

Image courtesy of Kwangmoozaa/iStock/Getty Images.

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In This Article

  • Amount of distance from the home
  • Basic safety concerns
  • Suggestions for a successful installation

For those who don’t have access to a municipal sewage system, an alternate solution, such as a septic tank and field lines, will be required.

The design and operation of these systems are fairly straightforward. When designing a septic system, you must keep in mind the requirements of local construction codes as well as public health concerns.

Tip

Depending on where you live, local ordinances and regulations that specify the distance between the septic tank and the home vary. However, the normal minimum distance is 10 feet between the two structures. Consult your local ordinances and regulations for a detailed answer as to how far your septic tank must be installed from your home. Requirements differ from one location to the next, although the standard minimum distance from the home is 10 feet in most cases. In the case of a private well for drinking water, however, keep in mind that many state departments of health demand a minimum distance of 50 feet between a new septic tank and a well.

It is possible that the septic tank will be placed considerably closer to the structure since it will be easier and require less plumbing in some cases.

Basic Safety Considerations

If you’re the type of person who prefers to do things on their own, there are certain important measures you should take before starting this endeavor. Before you start digging the hole for the tank, call your local utility providers to find out where the service lines are located. A gas line, water line, phone line, or electrical connection that has been severed is not only potentially dangerous, but it may also be extremely expensive to repair. Once you have finished excavating the hole, proceed with caution.

It’s also important to understand that a concrete septic tank can weigh up to 5 tons.

Make sure the hole is available when the tank is delivered so that it can be installed straight in the desired location.

Tips for a Successful Installation

Plan ahead of time to get your water supply switched on prior to installing your septic tank. You must fill the tank with water as soon as it is placed in its final position for this to be possible. This has absolutely nothing to do with the septic system itself, but it is a prudent precaution. In the event of a heavy downpour, the groundwater may swell and a septic tank may float out of the ground, even if it has been buried. If this occurs, contact a qualified professional immediately. Repairing any damage done to the lines or to the tank itself, as well as putting the tank back in its original location, may be a costly and time-consuming endeavor.

Initially, you may be confident that you will remember the exact location of the marker when it is time to top up the tank — which is generally every three to five years — but your memory may fade over time.

In the absence of a marker, you may end up digging holes in the wrong place when it is time to service the tank.

How Remodeling Can Affect Your Septic System

Building near a septic tank and drain field may have a negative impact on the performance of any septic system, and it is easy to ignore this while upgrading a property. This is also true for people who are considering purchasing a property and intend to remodel it. It is preferable if you are aware of the exact location of your tank and drain field. This will prevent new construction projects from interfering with the normal maintenance of your system or causing damage to your septic tank. Before beginning on any big job that may include your septic system, make sure you have a solid understanding of septic systems under your belt.

It is an excellent resource that can help you feel much more confident about owning, maintaining, and renovating in close proximity to a septic system.

Building Near aSeptic Tank

What may possibly happen if you fail to locate your system? It is possible that your septic tank is in the route of a huge construction truck. It would be the least of your worries if your septic tank lid were to break. Cracks in the septic tank may be caused by the weight of building equipment on the site. It is possible that these will not be apparent soon after the event. Cracks will grow with time, however, and will pose a major structural threat over time. In most cases, a tank is clearly marked in some way to make it easier to locate.

  • This will guarantee that the driver is aware of the exact location of the tank and that the tank has enough space to move about.
  • In addition to causing damage to your tank, construction may prevent a pumper from entering the tank.
  • This not only makes it difficult to locate the tank, but it also makes it difficult, if not impossible, to maintain it.
  • If you have a deck or patio that prevents access to the tank, you may be forced to demolish the building, squandering the money you invested on its construction.

Building Near aDrain Field(Leach Field)

If a drainage field is destroyed, the expense of replacing it might be significantly higher. The most serious problem that might occur from building near a drain field is the damage that heavy construction equipment can inflict to the drain field. The weight of a large number of heavy trucks moving over a drain field will shatter the pipes in the drain field and compress the soils beneath the trucks. Compacted dirt in a drain field will impair the ability of the drain field to drain effectively.

Without any air pockets to fill, the effluent will be pushed to rise towards the surface of the soil, where it will eventually pour out onto the ground.

It is preferable to keep any new structures away from the drain field if as all possible. A few instances of how construction near a drain field might potentially result in a problem are shown below.

Problems Building Near a Drain Field

  • Building an in-ground pool would almost certainly need a permit, but it is critical that it be located away from your drainfield. The most obvious issue would be if you were to cut into your drainage system. However, even approaching too close might cause soil compaction in the surrounding area, reducing the life expectancy of the drain field. An above-ground pool adds a significant amount of weight to the earth. It is common to see sheds built on top of leach fields because the water that drains out will soak down into the drainfield and add a significant amount of water. While it is possible that the weight of the shed could cause some soils to contract, it is also likely that traffic from machines would increase. Larger sheds and pole barns should be maintained away from drainfields at all costs. They are unquestionably large and heavy enough to cause issues. They are also large enough to accommodate heavy vehicles, which will further exacerbate the situation. Some individuals choose to build gardens on top of the drain field to beautify the area. Make certain that you are not growing anything with roots that are large enough to penetrate the pipes. In most cases, there is a two-foot layer of dirt cover, but this might vary. When in doubt, it’s advisable to be careful and move the garden to a different location. Fence posts are commonly found in and around gardens. Make certain that the posts are not too large that they are digging into the drain field stone (aggregate). It is possible that huge posts or poles that are buried too deeply will pose an issue. Decks, flagpoles, and huge fences are examples of structures that might cause this. When a septic tank is replaced, it is possible that a leach field will be harmed. The big trucks required to transport the concrete septic tank will have a negative impact on the soils. A plastic septic tank is an excellent solution for completely avoiding the problem. Because they are small and lightweight, they can be carried by hand.

Having established the dangers associated with developing near your septic system, we can go on to discussing ways to avoid any difficulties from arising in the future. The most effective technique of preventive is to be aware of the locations of each component of your system.

How to Locate Your Septic System

Keeping track of where your system is at all times might be a challenge. A large number of consumers only get a glimpse of the entire system during the house purchasing inspection process. In the event that you still have access to your report, it may contain information on the system’s location, as well as a 2-D drawing of the system’s layout. We will provide photographs with our report in order to provide a more accurate reference for the location of the system components. The option to have someone come out and find your system is always available if you have misplaced your report.

Building near a septic tank and drain field can be hazardous, so exercise caution and use common sense while constructing any structure in the vicinity.

3 Tips for Remodeling Your Home with a Septic System – Septic Maxx

You may be considering expanding your house by adding another bedroom or a full new floor. You must also take into account the consequences that upgrading your house may have on your septic system in addition to the flooring and wall colors you choose. There are certain specific aspects to which you must pay great attention, such as how to reroute your plumbing and how much the entire operation will cost you in the long run. Inadequate consideration for your septic system while upgrading your house might result in expensive repairs that may wind up costing more than the actual home renovation project itself.

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Locate Septic Tank

The location of your septic tank should be the first step taken before any construction begins. It is normally plainly marked on the layout plan of your house, but if that is not accessible for your use, you may have to do a little digging to find out where it is located. The distance between your residence and your septic tank must be at least 5 feet in every state. Generally speaking, in older homes, the septic tank is located in the rear, near the main bathroom window. It’s also a good idea to look for low or high points in the grass.

One of the quickest and most straightforward methods of locating your septic tank is to just follow the sewage line and probe the ground throughout the yard until you feel a firm surface underneath you.

Consider How Alterations Will Affect Your Septic Tank

Finding the location of your septic tank should be the first step taken before you start any construction. In most cases, it will be plainly marked on the floor plan of your house; however, if this is not the case, you may have to perform a little detective work. Regardless of the state, septic tanks must be at least 5 feet away from your residence. The septic tank is usually located in the rear, near the main bathroom window, in most older homes, although not always. Also look for low or high patches in the grass, if there are any.

That anything is buried under the surface is indicated by this symbol. Using a simple method such as following the sewage line and probing the ground across your yard until you find a firm surface, you can discover your septic tank in no time.

Check Local Permit Requirements

In addition, you should make certain that the alteration of your property is approved. For example, in the aforementioned scenario where you may wish to add another floor to your house, many states may demand that your septic tank have a specific size in order to accommodate the additional level. This will guarantee that it is capable of dealing with the additional volume of garbage that you will be creating. Failing to comply with these requirements can result in fines as well as the inability to utilize insurance to pay any resulting septic system repairs that may arise.

Don’t forget about your sewage; our quality septic cleaning products are an environmentally safe approach to assist in the removal of fats, grease, oils, and other contaminants.

Septic System Permitting

The cost of a new septic system permit is $425. A detailed site evaluation and soil analysis to determine placement and sizing of the system, system construction specifications, and installation and final connection inspections to ensure the septic system meets all applicable State Codes and required setbacks are all included in this fee. If you have any questions, please contact us. The application for a system permit must be submitted by the property owner or the owner’s authorized representative (someone whom the property owner has designated in writing).

  • The cost of a new septic system permit is $425 dollars. This fee includes the permit application fee, a detailed site evaluation and soil analysis to determine the placement and sizing of the system, system construction specifications, and installation and final connection inspections to ensure that the septic system complies with all applicable State Codes and required setbacks, among other things. Applications for a system permit can be submitted by the property’s owner or the owner’s authorized representative (someone whom the property owner has designated in writing). The following documents must be included with your application:

Repairs to Existing Systems

Before a septic system can be fixed, a repair permit must be obtained from the local building department. The charge for this permit is $300. A detailed site evaluation and soil analysis to determine the placement and sizing of the replacement drainfield, system construction specifications, and installation and final connection inspections to ensure the septic system complies with all applicable State Codes and setback requirements are included in this fee. Before a septic system can be fixed, a repair permit must be obtained from the local building department.

A detailed site evaluation and soil analysis to determine the placement and sizing of the replacement drainfield, system construction specifications, and installation and final connection inspections to ensure the septic system complies with all applicable State Codes and setback requirements are included in this fee.

  • Before a faulty septic system can be fixed, a repair permit must be obtained from the local government. It costs $300 to obtain a permit for this activity. There are several components to this cost: the permit application fee, a detailed site evaluation and soil analysis to determine where and how large to make the replacement drainfields, system construction specifications, and installation and final connection inspections to ensure that the septic system meets all applicable State Codes and required setbacks. Before a faulty septic system can be fixed, a repair permit must be obtained from the local government. It costs $300 to obtain a permit for this activity. There are several components to this cost: the permit application fee, a detailed site evaluation and soil analysis to determine where and how large to make the replacement drainfields, system construction specifications, and installation and final connection inspections to ensure that the septic system meets all applicable State Codes and required setbacks.

Modification of Existing Systems

A septic system that is already in place may be unable to handle the increased amount of wastewater produced as a result of certain types of building additions, such as adding a bedroom to an existing house or purchasing a larger mobile home, as well as the addition of office space or changes in business practices. It is necessary to modify the septic system, and a permit for the modification must be obtained. The charge for this permit is $320. A detailed site evaluation and soil analysis to determine the location and size of the increased drainfield and new septic tank (if applicable), system construction specifications, and installation and final connection inspections to ensure the septic system complies with all applicable state codes and required setbacks are all included in this fee, as well as a permit application fee.

The application for a system permit must be submitted by the property owner or the owner’s authorized representative (someone whom the property owner has designated in writing). The following documents are necessary in order to submit an application for the permit:

  • • a “pumpout certification letter” from a professional septic tank pumper stating the size and structural condition of the septic tank or tanks
  • The creation of a detailed site plan that depicts all existing features of the property, including all structures on the property, drainage features, the location of existing wells and septic systems as well as the distances between property lines, easements, and surface water bodies (if applicable)
  • Document demonstrating property ownership, such as a property tax identification number or a contract for the conveyance or sale of the property. • an interior floor plan of the residence or building that the existing septic system serves, with details such as the number of bedrooms, exterior dimensions of the structure, and total heated and cooled square footage of the structure
  • A diagram of the addition that is to be constructed onto the existing building (if applicable)

If you would like more information on the operation of traditional or sophisticated wastewater treatment systems, or if you have any questions about maintaining your septic system, please call us at (386) 758-1058.

NJDEP- Division of Water Quality- Bureau of Stormwater Permitting-Onsite Wastewater Management Program- Homeowners

This material is intended for persons who live in a home served by a septic system or who are considering purchasing a home with a septic system. To assist individuals in understanding the science and best management practices connected with onsite wastewater treatment technology, the Department has prepared a Homeowner’s Manual as well as additional assistance. For begin, New Jersey law mandates that individuals adhere to a variety of statewide norms and regulations. Known as “Standards for Individual Subsurface Sewage Disposal Systems,” these guidelines help to guarantee that disease-causing bacteria and chemical nutrients from home wastewater are effectively removed from the environment.

Sales of real estate and the installation of onsite wastewater treatment systems In the event that a property is served by a septic system, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection suggests that all potential buyers have their septic system inspected in order to avoid any costly repairs or penalties following a real estate transaction.

A major document in the Onsite Wastewater Management Program is the Technical Guidance for Inspections of Onsite Wastewater Treatment and Disposal Systems, which is titled “Technical Guidance for Inspections of Onsite Wastewater Treatment and Disposal Systems.” A system inspection is crucial because it determines whether or not a system is now running effectively and whether or not the system will meet long-term requirements, such as plans for future extensions, plans for decks, plans for swimming pools, and plans for other building projects.

It is also recommended that people who are planning pre-purchase home construction and who are unsure about the location and condition of their septic system consider obtaining an inspection before proceeding.

Finally, all homeowners considering the purchase of a septic system should be aware that proper care begins with the establishment of a maintenance schedule (as with any other home utility, such as a furnace) and the knowledge of what can and cannot be discharged into the system, which is then recharged into the groundwater system.

What is the Process of a Septic System? While the mechanisms that treat wastewater are complicated, the operation of a traditional septic system is really relatively easy to understand and operate. A basic septic system consists of three primary components: a tank, a filter, and a pump.

  • Aseptic tank, aneffluent distribution system, and anabsorption field are all examples of septic systems.
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When a person flushes the toilet, empties a bathtub, or empties a washing machine, the wastewater flows through the plumbing and into the septic tank, generally by gravity. After settling out in the tank, the liquid is allowed to remain long enough to be fermented and enhanced with beneficial microorganisms. The septic tank is normally composed of concrete, fiberglass, or plastic, and it is buried underground. It should be completely waterproof. Baffles (or tees) are installed at the entrance and exit of all septic tanks to ensure correct flow patterns.

Even though most sewage tanks are built to store at least 1000 gallons of sewage, the actual size of the tank might vary based on the number of bedrooms in the house and on state and local regulatory standards.

The particles, referred to as sludge, gather in the bottom of the tank, while the scum floats on the surface of the liquid at the top of the tank.

Allowing solids to travel through the septic tank has the potential to block the absorption field.

Figure 1. Image showing the basic diagram of inside a septic tank.

Effluentfilters installed on the septic tank’s exit provide an extra layer of protection against particulates entering the absorption field. There are many potentially disease-causing bacteria and other pollutants in the wastewater (effluent) that comes out of the septic tank. These contaminants include nitrates, phosphates, and chlorides. After the effluent has been discharged from the septic tank, it is carried to the distribution box and laterals, either by gravity or by pumps. As part of the system, a distribution box is used to distribute the septic tank effluent uniformly onto a network of distribution lines that serve as the absorption field.

The laterals are placed underground and form a component of the zone of treatment and the zone of disposal when they are completed.

Effluent is spread through perforated pipes, emerges through holes in the pipes, and trickles into rock or gravel, where it is held until absorbed by the soil. The zone of treatment, which is located in the soil’s unsaturated zone, is responsible for treating the soil.

Figure 2. Image showing animation of basic disposal field cross-section.
wastewater through physical, chemical,and biological processes. The soil alsoacts as a natural buffer to filter out manyof the harmful bacteria, viruses, and excessivenutrients, effectively treating the wastewateras it passes through the unsaturated zonebefore it reaches the groundwater. Thistreatment primarily occurs at the top ofthe zone of treatment, where a Biomat develops,consisting of living beneficial bacteria,organic matter, and mineral precipitates.The Biomat provides a substrate for decompositionof the “bad” bacteria. The “clean”wastewater enters the ground water againin the “Zone of Disposal”, whichis typically permeable soil or rock materialthat is above the water table. If the zoneof treatment has adequate oxygen, whichoccurs when it is separated from the watertable by at least 2 to 4 feet, it effectivelyconverts ammonia nitrogen to nitrate nitrogen,and it reduces the number of harmful bacteriaand viruses to levels that are safe forhumans. Even after treatment, wastewaterstill contains nutrients, such as nitratesand phosphates, that in excessive amountsmay pollute nearby waterways and groundwatersupplies. Excessive nutrients in drinkingwater supplies can be harmful to human healthand can degrade lakes and streams by enhancingweed growth and algal blooms. Some of thenutrients are retained or become assimilatedby plants and microbes, but much of thenitrate nitrogen and some of the phosphatesstill discharge to the ground water, andmay enter streams and can cause or contributeto the eutrophication. Therefore, thoughgenerally safe for humans, the conventionalseptic system is responsible for a certainamount of water pollution even when thesystem is working perfectly. Requiring distancesetbacks from streams and potable wellsprovides the final level of protection.With the setbacks in place, and as longas the septic systems are not malfunctioning,homeowners can be assured that both drinkingwater and surface water are adequately protected.

Well & Septic Permits

You should bear in mind that, during the COVID-19, extra limits will be implemented during inspections and entrance into facilities in order to ensure the safety of both personnel and clients. Please check to see that no one in the building is sick, has tested positive for COIVD-19, or is exhibiting signs of the virus before proceeding. Fever, chills, recurrent shaking with chills, muscular pain, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell, coughing, or trouble breathing are some of the signs and symptoms of meningitis.

During the inspection, it is also necessary to ensure the following requirements are met:

  • Throughout the site tour, social separation must be maintained as much as possible. Reduce the number of persons who will be on site to a bare minimum
  • If at all feasible, building occupants should put on a face mask. All entrances and exits to inspection areas must be conveniently accessible, and the door must be open at all times. This is done in order to limit the number of “touchpoints” during the examination.

If these standards are not met, the sanitarian will not proceed with the service and will leave the premises in order to safeguard both the client’s and the employee’s well-being.

Important Information

  • MISS Dig must label any subsurface utilities before to the site visit for all services performed on the property. Persons engaged in groundbreaking activities on the site are needed to submit a ticket to MISS Dig in order for the property to be marked appropriately. The presence of unmarked properties will result in service delays or postponements. Missing an appointment may result in a $75 fee
  • Failure to show up may result in a $50 fee. If any field activities are initiated before the application fees are received, they are nonrefundable. All applications that are cancelled prior to the start of field work are subject to a $50 processing charge. Unless otherwise specified, permits and site evaluations are valid for two years and are non-transferable.

Septic Services

Program to establish if a land is suitable for a specific style of development as well as for on-site wells and septic systems, among other things.

On-site Sewage Disposal

Installation of on-site sewage disposal (septic) systems necessitates the acquisition of a permit. If the application is for new development, it must contain a thorough site plan as well as floor layouts.

  • Application for a Residential Well-Septic Permit
  • Application for a Non-Residential Well and Septic Permit
  • Alternative Wastewater Application
  • Alternative Wastewater Application SepticSmart
  • Landscaping around a septic system

Real Estate Evaluation

In many cases, prior to selling an existing building, it is necessary to inspect and evaluate the well and septic system, whether private or commercial.

  • Homebuyer’s Guide to Septic Systems
  • Real Estate Evaluation Application
  • Sanitary Facility Evaluation Guidelines
  • EPA – Real Estate Evaluation Application

Addition/Change of Use

Review of planned construction/change of use projects to determine whether or not they would have an impact on existing water wells and onsite wastewater disposal systems.

  • The request for an Environmental Health Addition/Change of Use Review has been submitted.

Subdivisions, Site Condominiums and Land Division Evaluation

a study of a planned subdivision of property that would be supplied by onsite wastewater treatment facilities and/or individual water supply wells According to the Michigan Land Division Act (Public Act 288 of 1967), all land divisions of less than one acre, subdivisions, and site condos must be approved by the local health department before proceeding.

Sewage Regulations

  • Guidelines for Site Modification in Kent County, Michigan
  • Sewage Disposal Rules for Kent County, Michigan Subsurface Sewage Disposal Criteria
  • Subdivision Regulations

System Specifications

  • Gravity mounds, pressurized mounds, pump chambers, full cutdowns, and partial cutdowns are all possibilities (T-trench)

Well Services

There are several types of mounds, including gravity mounds, pressure mounds, and pump chambers (T-trench)

  • Application for a residential well-septic system
  • Well Maintenance for Drinking Water

Well RegulationsGuidelines

  • Michigan Abandoned Water Well Plugging Manual
  • Water Well Disinfection Manual
  • Kent County Water Supply Regulations
  • Well Construction Code Administrative Rules (Part 127 of Act 368)
  • Minimum Isolation Distance Chart
  • Michigan Abandoned Water Well Plugging Manual
  • Well Disinfection Manual Guide to Well Water
  • Nitrate and Nitrite in Drinking Water
  • And Arsenic in Well Water

Type II Wells Public Supply PermitForms

A Type II non-community public water supply serves 25 or more persons at least 60 days per year or has 15 or more service connections if it is not part of a community water system.

Type II Well Permit
  • Well Permit Application for Type II Well
  • Type II Well Permit Instructions
  • Existing and Proposed Fixture Count Sheet
  • Type II Well Permit Fee Schedule
Operational Forms
  • Worksheet for determining the action level for lead and copper
  • Lead and Copper Sample Report Form
  • And Start-up Instructions. Obtaining Certification for a Seasonal Noncommunity Public Water Supply Application for TypeII Water Supply at the Level 2 Assessment Level
Regulations and Guidelines
  • Safe Drinking Water Act 399 – Providing Water to the Public
  • Seasonal Public Groundwater Supply Handbook
  • Well Construction Code Administrative Rules (Part 127 of Act 368)
  • Well Construction Code Administrative Rules
Information about Contamination in Kent County

Safe Drinking Water Act 399 – Providing Water to the Public; Seasonal Public Groundwater Supply Handbook; Well Construction Code Administrative Rules (Part 127 of Act 368); Well Construction Code Administrative Rules (Part 127 of Act 368); Well Construction Code Administrative Rules (Part 127 of Act 368); Well Construction Code Administrative Rules (Part 127 of Act 368); Well Construction Code Administrative Rules (Part 127 of Act 368); Safe Drinking Water Act 399 – Providing Water to the Public; Well Construction Code

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