Where Is The Lid On My Septic Tank? (Best solution)

  • A septic tank cap, also called a lid or access hatch, is normally located on the top of the tank near the center. A good way to find the lid is to probe around until you can find the perimeter of the rectangle.

How do I find my septic tank lid?

You can locate the lid of your septic tank by poking the ground every few feet with a metal probe. Lids can be buried up to a foot deep on average, so be sure to investigate any bumps that may indicate something is buried underneath.

How many lids are on a septic tank?

In order to make repairs or perform regular maintenance or cleaning/pumping of the tank, access must be provided. There are usually two lids located at the top of the septic tank-one located over the inlet “T” and one located over the outlet “T” (see “Septic Components: Septic Tanks”).

Do septic tanks have 1 lid?

Solid, watertight, buried tank made of concrete, plastic, fiberglass or metal. Septic tanks should have one lid per compartment. Most tanks have (2) compartments. So, most residential tanks should have (2) lids about 5′ away from each other.

How far down is septic tank lid?

Often, septic tank lids are at ground level. In most cases, they have buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

How do septic tanks look?

Septic tanks are typically rectangular in shape and measure approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter.

How do you remove a septic tank lid?

Some tank lids have built-in handles to pull on, but others require a pry bar to lift them open. If the lid comes with handles, ask for the assistance of a friend or family member to remove the lid. If it doesn’t, push a screwdriver into the seam around the lid and insert the pry bar into the gap. Then, press down.

How do I know if my septic tank has two lids?

You will be looking for 2 lids like these if there are risers to surface on the tank. If the tank is not risered, you will find 2-24” diameter concrete lids like the picture below. Riser lids the can be below the surface which will require locating and digging the riser lids as well.

How often should a septic tank be pumped?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How many lids should a concrete septic tank have?

Two or three lids may be included in your system. The average size of a sewage tank is approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. The lid is buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground in most cases.

Should septic tank lids be buried?

In most cases, all components of the septic tank including the lid are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. Unless the septic tank has special risers that position the lid at ground level, you’ll have to dig for it.

How deep are drain fields buried?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

All septic tanks eventually fill with sediments and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain in excellent functioning order. If the tank’s lid is not on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located. A typical septic tank is 4 inches to 4 feet underground, with all of its components, including the cover, buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underneath. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the surface of the ground.

Consult A Map

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank. If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your efforts.

Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land. After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if it is there. Locate the same spot outside and make a note of it. Insert a thin metal probe into the earth, identify the 4-inch sewage line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the property. Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet apart from the home in all states except Alaska.

Whenever the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene it indicates that the tank has been located.

Locate The Lid

The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 5 feet by 8 feet. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its boundaries and outline the rectangle’s boundary using a pencil. A septic tank that was built before 1975 will have a single concrete lid that is 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. If the tank was built after 1975, it will have two covers made of fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at the ends of the rectangle and centered at the ends of the rectangle.

It should be possible to uncover the lid or lids by digging with a spade in specific spots, depending on when year the tank was constructed.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

Mark The Spot

Make a note on the ground near where the tank was pumped by a professional and the lid was buried to serve as a reference in the future. In order to keep track of where you are, you should choose a hefty circular patio tile that is embedded in the ground. Additionally, draw your own map of the area and store it with your other important papers.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid

Previous PostNext PostWhether you realize it or not, it is critical that you be aware of the position of your septic tank lid and the septic tank itself. Despite the fact that septic tanks are fairly huge, they can be difficult to identify, particularly if they have not been properly maintained over time. Continue reading to find out how to locate your septic tank lid.

Why It’s Good to Know Where to Find Your Septic Tank Lid

Knowing the location of your septic tank is a fantastic approach to spot septic tank problems as soon as they occur. Consider the following scenario: If you saw water near your septic tank lid, you would know right away that you could have a problem with your system being overloaded with waste. Furthermore, by understanding where your septic tank is located, you may avoid parking cars on top of it, which might cause the tank to collapse and create flooding. You’ll also be able to point service personnel in the right direction for septic tank services, which will eventually save them time and money while also saving you money.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Opening

Knowing how critical it is to know where your septic tank lid is located, it’s time to go out and find one for yourself. During the search, keep an eye out for a circular lid around two feet across. Septic tank lids are normally constructed of green or black plastic, however they can occasionally be made of concrete. It is not always simple to locate the septic tank lid, however, because untidy vegetation, mud, or debris might obscure the lid’s location. If you live in a snowy climate, look for a patch of lawn where the snow melts more quickly than it does everywhere else on the property.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid as a New Homeowner

During the process of purchasing your house, you should have been provided with a map of your property that showed the location of your septic tank. This is normally included as a part of your home inspection service package. All you have to do from there is compare the diagram to your land, find the septic tank location, and potentially dig around it to check whether the lid has been hidden by vegetation or other obstructions.

People have been known to place an object such as a huge rock on top of the septic lid, so be sure to look beneath landscaping stones as well.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid as an Existing Homeowner

Still having trouble locating your septic tank lid? There’s a significant probability it’ll end up in the ground. The pipes coming from your basement should be followed, as they will take you in the direction of your septic system, which is what we propose. Then, once you’ve determined the correct direction, check for any high or low points in the yard that might reveal the location of your septic tank. You can find the lid of your septic tank by probing the ground with a metal probe every few feet with the probe.

Because most lids have a metal handle or fastener on them to hold the lid closed, you may also use a metal detector to find them.

The majority of lids are buried up to a foot deep, but some lids might be buried as deep as four feet in extreme cases!

How to Maintain Your Septic Tank Lid

Following the discovery of your septic tank lid, keep it in good condition to avoid damage and ensure simple access for future septic tank maintenance, such as pumping your septic tank every three- to five-year period. Here are some pointers for keeping your septic tank lid in good working order:

  • Keeping the grass around the septic tank lid regularly mowed is important. Remove any dirt or debris that may have accumulated on your septic tank lid
  • Mark the area to ensure that no one parks or constructs structures there. It is possible to do this using a flag, garden décor, or ornamental pebbles.

Professional Septic Tank Services

Is it difficult to find trustworthy septic tank services or septic tank installation? If you are looking for septic tank installation, inspection, and cleaning services, check with your local Mr. Rooter ® Plumbing franchise. Mr. Rooter charges a set amount up front, with no overtime fees or additional expenses. To get started, call us at (855) 982-2028 or fill out our online estimate request form. Is the lid of your septic tank obscured by grass? Inquire with The Grounds Guys about routine lawn care and upkeep.

Rooter, is a member of Neighborly’s network of dependable home service experts, which includes Mr.

By hiring The Grounds Guys to provide trustworthy grass mowing and landscape care services, you can be assured that your septic tank lid will always be simple to locate.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank Lid

Despite the fact that septic tanks are vast, they can be difficult to identify, especially if they have not been properly maintained over time. It is critical to be aware of the location of your septic tank lid and septic tank, whether or not you are aware of it. You must be aware of the location of your dishwasher, toilet, and sewage line in order to properly care for these appliances. Despite the fact that septic tanks are vast, they can be difficult to identify, especially if they have not been properly maintained over time.

Continue reading to find out how to locate your septic tank lid. If you have any difficulty locating it, please do not hesitate to contact B D Plumbing for assistance.

Why It’s Important to Know Where Your Septic Tank Lid Is

Locating the location of your septic tank is a good first step in diagnosing septic tank problems as soon as they occur. Consider the following scenario: If you notice water near your septic tank lid, you’ll know right away that there might be an issue with your system being overloaded with waste. Aside from that, understanding the location of your septic tank allows you to prevent parking cars directly on top of it, which might cause the tank to collapse. You may also lead service experts to the appropriate location for septic tank services, saving them both time and money in the process.

See also:  What Do You Do With An Old Septic Tank? (Correct answer)

How to Locate Your Septic Tank Opening

Knowing why it is so critical to know where your septic tank lid is located, you can begin the process of locating the lid. During your search, keep an eye out for a circular top that’s around two feet broad and roughly two feet in diameter. Septic tank lids are often constructed of green or black plastic, although they can also be built of concrete. It is not always simple to locate the septic tank lid, however, because grass, mud, and other debris might obscure the opening.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank as a New Homeowner

During the process of purchasing your house, you should have been provided with a schematic of your property that showed the location of your septic tank. Your home inspection will most likely include this service. Check the diagram against your home to see where your septic tank is located. You may need to dig around the tank to determine whether the lid has been hidden. Consider placing a large item, such as a boulder, on top of the septic lid to serve as a reminder of its location.

Septic Tank Maintenance

It is important to keep your septic tank lid in good condition in order to avoid damage and to make it easier to access for future cleaning and maintenance. Consider trimming the grass surrounding your tank lid on a regular basis, eliminating all dirt and trash, and marking the area so that you can easily identify where the tank lid is.

Get in Touch With B D Today!

Are you dealing with any plumbing issues that necessitate the intervention of a professional? Are you dealing with a plumbing problem that simply must be put off any longer? Inform B D Plumbing of the situation. Plumbing services are provided across the greater Washington, D.C. metropolitan region, including Maryland and Northern Virginia, by B D Plumbing Inc. Get in contact with us by dialing (301) 595-1141 or by following us on social media, which includes Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest (to name a few platforms).

This item was posted on Friday, April 17th, 2020 at and is filed under Uncategorized.

How to Find a Septic Tank Lid

Septic tanks are installed on certain properties, and it is a good idea to be aware of where your tank is located. The first stage will be to locate the septic tank lid, whether it is to prevent damage to the tank and drain field from heavy equipment, to locate the tank for excavating reasons, or to conduct a self-inspection of the septic tank.

We generally give this service to our customers while doing inspections or septic tank pumping, however we understand that some homeowners may prefer to discover it on their own. How to locate a septic tank lid on your own is outlined below.

Use the septic system plans if you have them.

The quickest and most straightforward method of locating a septic tank lid is to consult the original septic system drawings. The septic system drawings will include the position and dimensions of the tank in relation to the house. Simply measure the measurements of the septic tank lid using a measuring tape to determine where it is located. When it comes to septic system plans, it’s probable that your local board of health will have a copy if for some reason you don’t have access to them. It is common for the lid to be buried beneath the grass, necessitating some probing and digging.

The sewer pipe can be your guide to finding the septic tank lid.

Sometimes it’s difficult to locate septic tanks when using these blueprints, or you may not have a copy of your septic plans on hand. The sewer pipe in your basement is your next best chance if you can’t locate it. This is the pipe that transports all of the waste water from your home to the sewer. Take note of the location of the pipe in relation to the ground level. this will give you an idea of how deep your tank will be buried under the earth. In addition, you will need to determine how many feet the pipe is away from the inner corner of your residence.

Make your way to the location where you believe the drain pipe is exiting the building.

Use caution when opening a septic tank lid.

Sometimes it’s difficult to locate septic tanks when using these plans, or you may not have a copy of your septic plans on file. Locating the sewage line in your basement is the next best option. In your house, this is the pipe that transports all of the garbage away. It’s important to note where the pipe is in respect to ground level since this will give you an idea of how far below your tank will be buried. In addition, you will need to determine how many feet the pipe is away from the inner corner of your building.

Make your way to the location where you believe the drain pipe is exiting the structure.

Measure the Levels of Your Septic Tank Yourself

While we provide a handy service to check the levels in your septic tank, you may also do so by yourself if you choose. To measure the amount of sludge, as we discussed in our previous piece, you can use a long stick or a two by four with an adhesive strip attached to one end, or you can acquire a special measuring equipment known as a “sludge judge.” Because the average septic tank contains 4-5 feet of water, it’s preferable to use a measuring stick that’s at least 7 feet long. If necessary, lower your handmade measuring stick or sludge judge down into the septic tank after you’ve opened the lid and maintained perfect verticality of the stick.

As soon as you feel the measuring stick make contact with the bottom of the tank, you may bring it back up and measure the amount of sludge by counting the number of inches of black material that is staining the stick.

As soon as you have an understanding of the levels in your septic tank, you can assess whether or not your septic tank requires pumping.

Make careful to cover the tank promptly and never leave the open tank alone, even for a minute, to avoid uninvited animals or humans from falling in to protect them from drowning.

Need help? Call Grant Septic Tech.

If you want to check the levels in your septic tank, we provide a simple service, but you may also do it yourself. To measure the amount of sludge, as we discussed in our previous piece, you can use a long stick or a two by four with an adhesive strip along one end, or you can purchase a special measuring equipment known as a “sludge judge.” It’s preferable to use a measuring stick that is at least 7 feet long, because the average septic tank holds 4-5 feet of water. If necessary, lower your handmade measuring stick or sludge judge down into the septic tank once you’ve opened the lid and maintained total verticality throughout the process.

As soon as you feel the measuring stick make contact with the bottom of the tank, you may lift it back up and measure the amount of sludge by counting the number of inches of black material that is staining the measurement stick.

With a better understanding of your septic tank levels, you can decide whether or not your septic tank requires pumping.

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Over time, all septic tanks become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to continue functioning properly. Septic tank lids are frequently located at ground level. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. In the event that you have recently purchased a property and are unsure as to where your septic tank is located, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank. Noteworthy: While every property is unique, septic tanks are usually typically huge and difficult to build.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the municipal records. The most straightforward method of locating your septic tank is to review the building plans for your home that were approved by the local government. You should have received an application from the business that installed the septic tank, which should contain schematics and specifications that will help you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was installed. 2. Look for highs and lows in your data. The majority of septic tanks are constructed in such a way that they are barely noticeable.

  • 3.
  • Almost certainly, your septic tank will be installed near where the main sewer line exits your home.
  • Septic tanks are typically positioned between ten and twenty-five feet away from a home’s foundation.
  • When you do, that’s when your septic tank comes into play!
  • Look for the Lid.
  • You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and installed after 1975.
  • Those areas should be excavated in order to disclose the lids.
  • Get in touch with the pros.
  • Lifting concrete lids will necessitate the use of specialized equipment.
  • A fall into an unprotected septic tank has the potential to be lethal.
  • Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you may file away with your other important house paperwork.

That’s all there is to it! If you’ve been wondering where your septic tank is, you now have five options to choose from, which should make finding it easier than ever. To book a plumbing service in Bastrop County, please contact us now!

Finding your septic tank lid

1. Check with the local government. To locate your septic tank, it is most likely the most straightforward method of looking through the building blueprints for your home that were prepared by the town. This application, which should include schematics and dimensions that will assist you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was built, should have been filed by the business that installed the septic tank in question. Find the highs and lows of your experience. In order to be unobtrusive, the majority of septic tanks are placed in a discreet manner.

  1. Follow the rules.
  2. Be a good sport.
  3. Track down and mark the location of the 4-inch sewer that exits the crawl space or basement, and the same location outside the house.
  4. Every few feet, insert a tiny metal probe into the earth, continuing until you reach polyethylene, fiberglass, or flat concrete.
  5. The Lid may be found in Step 4.
  6. You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and is older than that.
  7. In order to disclose the lids, you must excavate in specific areas.

Get in touch with the professionals.

Using special lifting gear to lift heavy concrete lids will be necessary.

It is possible to die after falling into an open septic tank.

Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you can file away with your other important house documentation.

That’s it!

The good news is that you now have five alternatives for locating your septic tank, making it easier than ever to discover your tank.

FIND YOUR SEPTIC TANK LID

Make an appointment for a free on-site quote now!

Do you know where your lid is?

It is a good idea to be familiar with the position of your septic system, particularly the location of the septic tank lid. If you have a septic emergency, this is very crucial to remember. If you want to be proactive, it would be wise to create a map and a detailed description of the location of your septic system. If you do not already have this information, you can acquire it from the Central District Health for Ada, Boise, Elmore, or Valley County, or the Southwest District Health for Adams, Canyon, Gem, Owyhee, Payette, or Washington County, depending on where you live.

  • We can build a bespoke “Riser” that rests flush with the ground to make it simpler to get to a septic tank lid in the winter or to access buried tank lids.
  • Polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and concrete are the most often used materials for these structures.
  • The use of concrete-based ribs is also associated with greater leakage difficulties than other varieties.
  • These risers are more resistant to corrosion caused by chemicals and dirt.
  • PVC risers are one of the lightest materials available, making them extremely simple to install.
  • A septic tank riser installed on your system will prevent you from ever having to dig up or look for your tank lid again, and it will make servicing your tank much easier.

If our repair specialists are required to dig up and locate your tank, you will save money by not having to pay “dig costs.” They serve as a visible reminder to you to keep an eye on your tank and perform routine maintenance on a regular basis.

We provide essential maintenance to all customers!

If you are unfamiliar with your septic system, it is a good idea to learn where it is located, particularly the placement of the tank lid. If you have a septic emergency, this is very crucial to know. If you want to be proactive, it would be wise to create a map and a detailed description of where your septic system is located. This information may be acquired from Central District Health for Ada, Boise, Elmore, and Valley Counties or from Southwest District Health for Adams and Canyon Counties, as well as from Owyhee and Payette Counties.

  • We can build a bespoke “Riser” that lies flush with the ground to make it simpler to access a septic tank lid in the winter or to access buried tank lids.
  • Polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and concrete are the most often used materials for them.
  • The use of concrete ribs results in greater leakage issues than other types of ribs.
  • These risers are more resistant to chemical and soil corrosion than other risers on the market today.
  • The fact that PVC risers are among the lightest options available makes them particularly simple to install.
  • A septic tank riser installed on your system will save you from ever having to dig up or look for your tank lid again, and it will make servicing your tank lot easier as well.
See also:  How To Install 1000 Gallon Infiltrator Septic Tank? (Question)

How to find your Septic Tank Cover in 3 Steps

Home-Diy When dealing with something as enormous as a septic tank, it should be simple to keep track of things, but in reality, the reverse is frequently true. If your bird has been resting in your yard for several years without being disturbed, the dirt above it has settled and the ground cover successfully camouflages it, making identifying one a bit of detective work. When the length of the sources is equal to zero, this.parentNode.removeChild(sources); otherwise, this.onerror = null; this.src = fallback; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace(), ‘, /public/images/logo-fallback.png’) ” loading=”lazy”> ” loading=”lazy”> It might be difficult to locate a septic tank, regardless of its size.

Even if you are successful in locating the tank, you will still need to locate the cover in order to be able to service it. You should, however, be able to complete the task without exhausting yourself with a shovel if you follow the process of logical inference and use two useful instruments.

  • Design a floor plan for your property
  • Metal detector, shovel and a 6-foot piece of rebar are all necessary tools for this job.

Tip

It is common for septic tanks to have two lids, one for cleaning the tank and another for repairing and maintaining the pump. If you don’t find the one you’re looking for, use the metal detector to locate the other one you’re looking for. If you are unable to locate a site plan, locate the sewer clean out and excavate to determine which way the sewage flows. Starting in that direction, begin probing with the re-bar until you come upon the tank.

Warning

You should immediately cease pounding at the bar when you find resistance. If your tank is made of plastic, you run the risk of damaging it. A short distance away will reveal if you have merely discovered a rock or whether you have encountered anything more substantial.

  1. Consult a site plan for your property that indicates where the tank will be located before installing it. If you don’t have one on hand, you may check it up in the records of the county building department, where the contractor who installed it was obligated to submit a copy of the certificate. Take note of the relative orientations of the tank and your house, as well as the distance between the tank and the side of your house where the sewer leaves. The sewage clean-out on the side of your property should be located and measured in the direction that it is intended to flow into the tank. Start probing for the tank at that point by pushing a 6-foot piece of re-bar into the earth with a sledge hammer to determine its location. Immediately after hitting an impediment, stop hammering and start excavating a foot or two farther down the road. a) Continue doing this until you can drive the re-bar even farther into the tank, which indicates that you have reached the end of the tank. In this manner, locate and mark the ends of the tank on both sides. To locate the cover, run a metal detector over the area you marked out with a marker. It is often made of metal, or at the very least contains metal components. In addition, if the tank is equipped with an effluent pump, which is always positioned beneath the lid, the metal detector will detect this as well. Starting at the location where you receive a favourable reading, begin digging.

The Drip Cap

  • When dealing with something as enormous as a septic tank, it should be simple to keep track of everything, yet the contrary is frequently true
  • If your plant has been lying in your yard for several years without being disturbed, the dirt above it has settled and the ground cover successfully conceals it, making identifying it a detective’s task. In order to locate the cover, use a metal detector to search the area you laid out. It is often made of metal, or at the very least contains metal components.

Septic Tank Repair Atlanta GA – Septic System Repair Near Me

Septic tank or system failure is the last thing that any homeowner or business owner wants to deal with on a daily basis. It does, however, happen from time to time, which is regrettable. It is important to know that the crew you call will be prepared to give you with the highest quality septic tank repair Atlanta has to offer when the time comes. This necessitates contacting Septic Masters. We service and repair septic systems across the Metro region, and you will not find a more dedicated or better-informed customer care team anywhere else in town.

Septic Tank Repair Atlanta GA

All aspects of your septic system, including the pump and drain field, may be repaired by our team of experts at Septic Masters. We recognize that the health of your entire home is dependent on the operation of your septic system. As a matter of fact, we believe it is the very last thing you need be concerned about. Nonetheless, if you are experiencing difficulties, we want to make certain that the situation is rectified as quickly as possible. Some of the warning indications that your septic system is malfunctioning are as follows:

  • All aspects of your septic system, including the pump and drain field, may be repaired by Septic Masters, which is based in New Jersey. The health of your entire home is dependent on the proper operation of your septic system, which we recognize. As a matter of fact, we believe it is the very last thing you should be concerned with. For anyone experiencing difficulties, we want to make certain that they are handled as soon as possible. A few symptoms that your septic system is having problems are as follows:

In the event that you detect any of these problems, there is no need to be alarmed. Septic Masters provides excellent septic servicing, pumping, and repair, and we are always here to assist you with your needs.

Septic Tank Repair Near Me

Do not put off septic system repairs any longer than absolutely necessary. Emergency service is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week throughout Atlanta and the surrounding metro region. This includes Gwinnett and Hall counties, Barrow and Forsyth counties, and other nearby counties. Contact our professionals immediately to benefit from a first-class client experience as well as the septic system repairs that you require.

Common Septic Tank Facts

Septic systems are an affordable and usually practical choice for sewer systems. Concrete tanks have been the most frequent since the 1940s, with 3 – 500lids for a 1000 gallon tank and 4 – 500lids for a 1500 gallon tank being the most typical. Tanks began to be equipped with 16″ square concrete plugs with a lifting bail in the late 1990s, allowing for easier access to both sides of the tank. Many tanks today are made of fiberglass or plastic. Over time, the concrete might degrade, and the lids may develop cracks or possibly shatter completely due to the pressure.

  • Even broken lids should be replaced for the sake of the public’s safety.
  • They get access to your septic tank by removing green covers that are 20 inches in diameter.
  • This is done in order to prevent anyone, especially children, from removing a lid and falling into the container.
  • A typical water level for a tank should be 6″ below the top of the tank, and the tank should be kept completely filled at all times.
  • The level of the water is often a good sign of potential problems.
  • Additionally, it might suggest a clogged intake line, which could be caused by roots, a damaged pipe, or a loose joint.
  • If there has been a lot of rain, the earth may get saturated, making it impossible for any additional water to seep through the soil to the surface.
  • If your tank has allowed particles to enter the field lines, this might cause the openings in the corrugated pipe to get clogged, preventing water from percolating through the soil as effectively as it should be.

An output filter may be placed to prevent particulates from entering the field lines, but it would need to be cleaned on an annual basis to ensure that this does not happen. Nonetheless, it is far less expensive than rebuilding field lines.

How to Locate a Septic Tank

A surprising number of homeowners have had to figure out how to find the location of a septic tank on their premises. If you’re purchasing a home with a septic system or discover that your property’s tank hasn’t been maintained in years, you’ll want to know where the tank is located because all septic tanks must be pumped at some point in time. In the course of a real estate transaction, the property owners or real estate agent may be aware of the location of the tank. Inquire about the “as-built,” which is a schematic of the septic system and the specifics of its installation.

Unfortunately, locating the septic tank may not be as simple as it appears.

Because septic system permits have only been needed in Oregon since 1972, you may have to depend on visual indicators to determine whether your system is working properly.

1.Follow the Outgoing Sewer Pipe

Look for the four-inch sewage pipe that runs through the structure and the location where it exits the building in the basement or crawl space. Locate the location outside the building where the pipe exits the building or the location of an access cover over the pipe. It is required that septic tanks be at least five feet away from the structure, although they are usually between 10 and 25 feet away. You may follow the pipe all the way to the tank using a metal probe. It is important to note that sewage lines may curve and run around the corner of a building rather than following a straight path to the holding tank.

2.Search for Septic Tank Risers and Lids

Depending on their age, septic tanks are either one- or two-compartment structures. Each compartment has a cover, with two additional lids for dual-compartment tanks that were added later. If the tank includes an access point known as a riser, the lid may be readily visible from outside. Look for round, plastic discs that are about a foot or two in diameter. Due to the fact that the lids might be flush with the ground or just a few inches above it, they can get overrun with grass and other plants over time.

Tanks without risers are likewise equipped with lids, however they are located underground.

3.Find the Drain Field First

In the absence of a riser and lid, search for indicators of a drain field, such as an area of grass that grows more quickly or more slowly than the rest of the yard, grass that is a different color from the rest of the yard, or areas where snow melts more quickly than in other parts of the yard. Spots of high or low ground in the yard might possibly indicate the presence of a subterranean tank or drain field. You will be able to discover the tank if you probe these regions.

Reasons to Hire a Contractor for Help

Attempting to locate a septic tank on your own can be risky, and in some cases, lethal, if the septic system is old and in danger of collapse. In the event that you fall into a cesspool, dry well, or septic tank, you will die.

Removing septic tank lids on your own might potentially put you at risk of contracting bacterial or virus diseases. If you detect any of the following issues, please contact a contractor to assist you in locating or inspecting your septic tank:

  • Soil that is sinking around the tank or drain field. Drainage backup into the home’s sewer system, or toilet backup
  • A foul odor in the area where you assume the tank and drain field are located
  • When there is no rain, pooling water, muddy soil, or spongy grass might occur. Septic tank covers that are rusted, cracked, or have been replaced with improvised lids are prohibited.

Even though you may be ashamed about forgetting where your septic tank is, it is a very frequent problem among homeowners. A contractor may assist you in locating it, and he or she may do it as part of the pumping service. If you need assistance locating your tank or if you have any other questions, please contact us at 503-630-7802. We are available to assist you!

Procedure for Opening Septic Tanks

  • ASK a question or make a comment about how to open a septic tank safely and properly for inspection or cleaning.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Instructions on how to open the septic tank. The location of the septic tank cleanout or cover, as well as the access and opening processes. We discuss some of the things to look for before opening the septic tank, such as subsidence, indications of recent work, and septic tank coverings that are not suitable to use. Then we demonstrate how to remove the septic tank lid or the access port cover from the tank.

See also:  How To Release Pressure From Septic Tank To Allow Toilet To Flush? (Solution found)

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Procedures for Safe Opening of a Septic Tank, Cesspool, or Drywall for Inspection or Cleaning

The following are the contents of the article:

  • How to remove the lid from a septic tank
  • When it comes to pumping out the septic tank, which septic tank entrance should be used? Why

Instructions on how to remove the lid from a septic tank When pumping out the septic tank, which septic tank entrance should be used? Why;

  • There is a risk of dangerous, perhaps deadly collapse due to subsidence (depressions or low regions in the earth) near the location of the septic tank. Evidence of recent construction activity that may necessitate further investigation in order to determine the status of the septic system
  • Backup or effluent breakout at the surface of the ground in the septic tank region.
  • Here is an example of a septic tank cover that was discovered atop an unstable home-made collection of concrete blocks that had been piled by the owner to serve as an access well to his septic tank. Because the masonry blocks were misaligned and loose, and because the tank aperture into which the cover opened was bigger than the cover, there was a serious collapse risk that may have resulted in a deadly hazard. We covered the area with plywood and roped it off, and we quickly informed the residents and the property owner of the situation, both verbally and in writing

Procedure for Opening the Septic Tank Pumping Access Port

Pumping the septic tank through a small access opening such as over the intake or outlet baffle does not provide enough space to adequately reach and remove sludge from the septic tank bottom, and it increases the risk of future clogging of the tank inlet or outlet by partially-removed floating scum.In this example, we already knew the measurements to the exact location of the septic tank from previous work.Pumping the septic tank through a small access opening such as over A wrecking bar is about to be used to remove the cover from the septic tank entrance.

Take note that we excavated far enough away from the tank opening so that when we remove the cover, we won’t have a lot of dirt falling into the tank itself.

Reader CommentsQ A

@Ron, In order for a concrete septic tank lid to be correctly erected, it must feature both access openings and cast in iron loops to which a hoist may be attached. Alternatively, if your septic tank cover does not have those points of purchase for lifting, you will require a flat bar and a larger wrecking bar to pry up the excavated lid from the septic tank sufficiently to allow you to put a chain around the lid, most likely two Chainz, and lift the lid with a hoist and tripod mechanism or you will use an on-site motorized hoist.

  • 1/2 x 27/4 removing the top of a septic tank @Phil, Although what you describe is theoretically doable, it may be less expensive and more rational to do so in a different way.
  • This is due to the fact that just stitching a circular hole does not ensure that I am creating a hole through which the lid will not be dropped.
  • Edge My concrete septic tank, which was constructed when the home was built in 1979 and does not have any manholes or openings for pumping out, is in poor condition.
  • Is it feasible to cut two manholes using a concrete saw that are 20″/24″ in diameter and then build risers and a cover on top of them?
  • Could you please share a picture of the tank top?
  • It is common for the concrete top to be tapered; nevertheless, it may just be trapped by effloresent salts and filth.
  • I have a feeling that simply tugging will not be effective.

This would have stopped leaks but would have made it extremely difficult to open the tank for the next person who needed to open the tank.

Repeat this process many times all around the cover’s perimeter.

For me, this has worked almost every time in the past.

It is recommended that you build a septic tank riser that is sealed to the tank top, as well as a new secure cover on top of the riser if your septic tank lid is not near to the ground level.

Never work on your own.

I’ve erected two wood 4x4s on top of the lifting ring to provide additional support.

All I’ve done three times is shattered those 4x4s.

Do you have any recommendations?

A septic tank pumping provider can remove plastic bags, tiny pebbles, and other debris from your tank, as well as the sediments, scum, and sludge that has accumulated there.

What is the best way to get them out?

When the septic tank is drained out, would it make sense to place a plastic bag over the top hole of the tank to keep the odors contained?

Gerard A plastic bag as a sewer line cap doesn’t seem right to me – it’s not durable, it’s the incorrect material if a cover is required, and if it’s a vent rather than an access pipe, the vent must be open to the atmosphere and protected from animal intrusion.

What is the function of this item?

A typical septic tank is equipped with clean out access covers that are strategically placed.

Maybe something as basic as a flat piece of concrete or stone will be sufficient, or maybe something more complex.

To be quite honest, I would have expected the contractor who dug the hole to be accountable for ensuring that the system was repaired and safe.

What should I do to solve it?

What store would I go to in order to acquire septic tank covers?

A few years ago, I had a beautiful new house built for me.

I have three plastic polylok lids, one of which is above ground and is for the pump.

I’d like to purchase risers so that I may build all three at a depth of around 6 inches below ground level.

What are the advantages and disadvantages.

Do you have any other suggestions?

I apologize for the lengthy post.

Sorry, but “True Bolt” isn’t a phrase I’m familiar with or associate with septic tank lids in any way.

Although this is not always the case, Mary, as the pumper may be able to access the entire tank bottom from a single opening depending on the tank’s size and shape; however, if your pumper is unable to do so from a single opening, you may want both openings opened to inspect the condition of the tank baffles.

There are two holes in my septic tank. Is it necessary to open both doors for a pump out?

Question:cannot find the manhole cover of the septic tank

(8th of August, 2014) “We’ve located the cesspool concrete lid (about 12 foot diameter), but after digging a 2 foot perimeter, we were unable to locate the manhole cover, which was required for an inspection.” vicki levin stated Help? My husband is becoming increasingly upset with the digging!

Reply:

If it’s a cesspool, rather than a septic tank, and it’s spherical, the access lid is normally located in the center of the container.

Question: how do i remove septic tank lid that is stuck

The entrance lid would normally be in the center of the cesspool, if it is in fact a cesspool rather than a septic tank, and it is spherical.

Reply:

Anon:WARNING: If the septic tank cover, lid, or access aperture has partially caved in or sank into the tank, the condition is extremely dangerous – an unsecure cover implies that someone might fall into the tank, which is generally lethal very quickly. Please keep everyone away from the septic tank area until such time as you have had the tank inspected and opened for additional inspection by a professional. Depending on the tank type and condition, lifting the lid may necessitate the use of a pry bar or wrecking bar, as well as a small portable winch (which is unusual).

Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Pumping ProcedurePumper Truck Operation Articles

  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION
  • MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • HOW TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN NOT TO PUMP A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO FIND A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK
  • INSPECT THE SEPTIC TANK BEFORE PUMPING
  • SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION PROCEDURE
  • SEPTIC TANK LEVELS OF SEWAGE
  • PUMPER TRU

Suggested citation for this web page

HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK at Inspect a Tank An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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How to Find Your Septic Tank

Many folks have contacted me through e-mail (typically from across the nation) to inquire about the location of their septic tank. “I have no idea,” I generally say as a helpful response to the question. I really want to add something like, “It’s just off your driveway, near that bushy thing,” or anything along those lines. But, truly, even for the most experienced searchers, septic tanks are difficult to come by. The following are some strategies you might employ to assist you in locating your tank.

  • Precaution should be exercised before you get started.
  • So, proceed with caution!
  • Please let me know if you have any queries or need assistance.
  • Get to know the beast!
  • tanks are normally buried 4 inches to 4 feet below the surface of the ground.
  • You might be astonished to hear that someone knows exactly where it is hidden in plain sight.
  • It is against the law to dig or probe in your own yard without first locating and marking the underground services.

You will receive the following tools to aid you in your search: Measurement tape, tile probe, and a shovel (if you are ambitious) The following tools are required: a metal detector (borrow or rent one since septic tanks often include iron steel rebar in the lids), and a hoagie sandwich (because locating sewage tanks makes you hungry.trust me on this).

  1. Examine the basement wall to see where all of the pipes join together and exit through the basement ceiling.
  2. If you don’t have a basement, walk outdoors and check for the roof vents on your house.
  3. Ordinarily, the sewage line that leads to the septic tank will exit the home right below this ventilation opening.
  4. On sometimes, the ancient proverb “The grass is always greener on the other side of the septic tank” is true.

Your tank may be located by probing or digging for it, and with luck, you will locate it. Keep in mind that not everything that seems to be a septic tank actually is! It’s possible that you came upon one of the following instead:

  • Rubble buried in the ground (not to be confused with Barney Ruble)
  • SepticDrywell
  • An old foundation
  • In case you happen to live in a cemetery (which is spooky), you may use a grave vault to keep your belongings safe.

After a few hours of unsuccessfully digging around in your yard, it will be time to eat your hoagie and take a short nap. Following that, it will be necessary to rent or borrow a metal detector. In the event that your next-door neighbor collects Star Wars action figures or has more than three unidentifiable antennas on his roof, there is a good chance that you can borrow his metal detector. If you’re lucky, the metal detector will really assist you in finding your septic tank, rather than simply a bunch of old buried automobile parts.

According to local legend, a pumper known as “Zarzar The Incredible” can locate septic tanks with a metal measuring tape measuring 30 feet in length.

Continue to press your commode (“commode” sounds sophisticated) tape deeper and farther down the pipes until he “feels” the bottom of the tank with his tape.

I recently acquired locate equipment that can be used to locate septic tanks, and I’m excited about it.

For more information, please contact me at 574-533-1470.

After that, you can have a video of the inside of your sewer pipes created!

Related: Visit our Septic System Maintenance page for more information.

Services provided by Meade Septic Design Inc.

Both Clients and Projects are included.

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