How To Rinse Off Brushes When Ou Have A Septic Tank? (Question)

Washing the brushes in the sink will expose helpful bacteria to the toxic substances in the paint so do not attempt to do it. Remember to use gloves when handling the paint so that you do not have to wash off any paint in your sink.

  • If your home is connected to the municipal sewer system, you can wash latex paint brushes directly in the sink. But for septic tanks: Use a small bucket to wash off the paint and a larger bucket to collect the dirty water after each rinse. Let the paint water evaporate outdoors for several days or use sand or kitty litter to soak it up faster.

How do you clean a paintbrush with a septic tank?

Brushes, rollers, and trays can be easily cleaned with soapy water, and the amounts of water required to clean up latex paint will provide enough dilution to make it safe to do outside, away from your septic tank or drain field.

Is it OK to rinse paint down the drain?

DO NOT pour paint down drain. While small amounts of latex paint can safely be washed down drain to a septic system or wastewater treatment plant, this practice should be kept to a minimum. Limit this to brush cleaning and other clean-up. DO NOT throw liquid paint in regular trash.

Can I pour paint brush cleaner down the drain?

When it’s full, bring it to a hazardous-waste-disposal site or similar municipal facility. Never pour solvents or paint sludge down a sink drain or into a street gutter.

Is vinegar OK for septic tanks?

Research shows that using safer biodegradable cleaners, like vinegar, is better than harsher cleaners, especially if you use a lot at one time. So, small amounts of vinegar as a cleaning agent should be OK in a septic system, and certainly is better than superstrong products.

Can you wash paint brushes in sink with septic?

Washing the brushes in the sink will expose helpful bacteria to the toxic substances in the paint so do not attempt to do it. Remember to use gloves when handling the paint so that you do not have to wash off any paint in your sink.

Can you pour latex paint down the drain?

Never pour paint down the sewer, storm drain, or on the ground. Never mix paints with absorbent materials, such as kitty litter, in order to throw in the trash. Paint Disposal: All unwanted paint (latex paint, flammable oil-base paint, aerosol paint cans…) must be disposed of through EH&S.

Should you rinse paint brushes in the sink?

If you have used water-based latex paint, for example, and your house is on a public sewer system, you can clean the used paint brushes in the sink without any problem. Use a bit of soap and hot water for washing, and you are good to go.

Why should paint never be poured down a drain?

Similar to cleaning products, paint should never be poured down the drain even though it’s a liquid. It has the potential to pollute the environment and cause your drain to clog. Many towns have hazardous waste facilities where you can safely dispose of your old or unused paint.

How do you dispose of mineral spirits after cleaning brushes?

How Do I Dispose of Mineral Spirits?

  1. Find your nearest hazardous-waste recycler.
  2. Put your used mineral spirits in a plastic bag or stable box to transport them to the hazardous-waste collection site.
  3. Drop them off at your local hazardous-waste collection site.

How do I get rid of white spirit?

White spirit is hazardous waste, therefore cannot be disposed of the drain. The best approach is to contact your local authorities who offer collection services for such waste. They provide a hazardous waste collection site where you conveniently drop off the waste, and they make arrangements for pick-up.

Where do you clean paint brushes?

Wash it in warm soapy water in a utility sink or bucket. Once the paint has been removed from the brush, warm soapy water will clean the brush of the solvent and remaining paint.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

Is Coca Cola safe for septic tanks?

Dumping a few ounces or even a can of Coke®, Pepsi®, RC Cola® or any other soft drink into a septic system won’t hurt the system.

What will ruin a septic system?

Any paper products like tissues, paper towels, tampons, or sanitary products, even some heavier toilet paper, will clog your system if you flush enough of it. Wet wipes are another product that you should never flush into a septic system.

The paint: your septic tank worst enemy

Is there anything you do with your brush once you’ve finished painting? Well, the answer isn’t always to wash it in your kitchen sink. This might result in the failure of your septic tank. The following is an explanation: Paint is made up of four components: a solvent, a binder, a pigment, and additives. A solvent is used to dissolve the other three components. Additives: The primary function of additives in paint is to kill algae, fungi, and mold; however, they are also used as fillers in some formulations of paint.

In doing so, it contributes to the protection of the surface from damage caused by the weather.

Pigment: This is what gives the paint its color and is responsible for the paint’s appearance.

To summarize, paint and septic tanks do not mix, and you should only purchase paint in quantities sufficient to ensure that you use it up entirely.

The effects of mixing paint and septic tanks

The septic system is meant to treat wastewater by utilizing a combination of physical and biological processes to accomplish this. Organic waste is broken down by bacteria and enzymes in the tank. As a result, other suspended materials settle to the bottom of the tank and create the sludge layer. The fact that paint cannot be digested by bacteria means that dumping it in the septic tank will result in an accumulation of paint in the sludge layer, which might cause the septic tank to fill up more quickly than usual.

Blockage and backups

A large number of chemicals are employed in the production of the binder component of paint. The binder aids in the retention of the paint while also protecting the painted surface from abrasion and moisture exposure. Solvents often evaporate, but the binder forms a layer on top of the paint that will “bond” it together. The binder in most contemporary paints is composed of a polymer compound (plastic). It is possible that the binder in this paint will adhere to the surfaces of the pipes in the plumbing, the septic tank, or even the drain field if it is flushed down the toilet.

Killing helpful bacteria

Bacteria are poisoned by the majority of the components of paint. For example, the primary function of the additives is to destroy microorganisms such as bacteria and fungus in the environment. The same may be said for the polymers included inside the binder.

Also widely employed in paints for pigmentation are lead and other heavy metals, both of which are poisonous to microorganisms. The presence of painted surfaces should be avoided because they constitute a significant threat to germs and should not be permitted to enter the septic system.

Contamination of water

There is a considerable likelihood that paint will wind up in the drain field if it makes its way into a septic tank. This is due to the fact that bacteria are unable to consume paint. Instead, it is possible that it will mix with the effluent and trickle into the drain field. As a result, either groundwater or drinking well water will be contaminated, or both will be contaminated. The legislation is quite rigorous, and if your system pollutes the environment in this manner, you may find yourself facing a large financial penalty for making a completely avoidable error.

Paint and septic tanks – cleaning up after painting

Before you begin painting the home, consider how you will dispose of any remaining paint and how you will clean up when you have finished painting the house. Your primary concern should be preventing paint from entering the septic system. Knowing this from the beginning can assist you to plan your painting project more effectively in the future. For example, you can use disposable paint rollers and brushes to apply the paint. This will save you the time and effort of having to clean up when the task is over.

Your aim will be to use up all of the paint in order to prevent having to cope with the disposal of the leftover materials.

If this occurs, remove the paint from the roller and brushes and transport it to the nearest hazardous waste center, where it will be appropriately disposed of.

Remember to use gloves when working with the paint so that you don’t have to worry about getting paint on your hands or in your sink.

Remedy if paint gets into the septic system

We’ve highlighted the necessity of keeping paint away from the septic system in this demonstration. Despite this, you may find yourself in a scenario where paint is unavoidably flushed down the toilet and into the sewage system. The next actions you take will be determined by how much paint has gotten into the system. If the amount of paint is tiny, like in the case of paint that was transferred from washing your hands, it shouldn’t be a large problem. If, on the other hand, an excessive amount of paint was thrown down the drain, you may need to take more serious actions, such as arranging a tank pumping and administering shock therapy once the tank has been entirely empty.

A large number of bacteria and enzymes will be introduced to the system by the additives, which will aid the septic tank in its recovery from the harmful compounds that were introduced by the paint.

Conclusion

Even while the paint seems to be innocuous when it is seated on your walls, the damage that it can wreak on your septic system is of epic proportions. As the owner of a septic system, it is your obligation to take all reasonable steps to prevent paint from entering the system. It is possible that the paint may not only affect the microorganisms in the septic tank, but that it could also poison the groundwater. To put it another way, consider about how you’re going to dispose of your paint leftovers before you start your DIY project.

How to clean paint rollers with a septic system?

If I live in a property with a septic system, how can I clean my paint rollers? My wife and I recently purchased our first home, which includes a septic system. My mother, on the other hand, has lived in several houses that have septic systems. It is my opinion that it is not a good idea to wash the rollers, brushes, and trays down the drain and into the septic system this weekend or next week because we will be painting all weekend and all of next week. In her family, she claims, this is how her parents handle things.

  1. Will it be acceptable if I wash a little amount of paint into the drainage system?
  2. In terms of advise, the best I’ve seen is to wash the rollers, brushes, and other implements and then dispose of the bucket “in a safe manner.” No idea what it would entail, but I’m guessing it doesn’t involve dumping it down the hillside into the creek at the foot of the hill.
  3. This is the first house we’ve ever owned, and I don’t want to screw it up with the septic system.
  4. We did, in fact, get it examined.
  5. Is there anything else you think I should know?

Hints for Painting Clean Up With a Septic System

Isn’t it a pleasure to be able to live in the country? Except for when you’ve just finished a painting endeavor and it’s time to clean up after yourself. Because paint has the potential to significantly disrupt the delicate balance of biological components in your septic tank, washing your brushes, rollers, and even your hands in the sink is not recommended.

Why Can’t I Do This?

The ingredients found in both latex and oil-based paints prevent them from decomposing properly in your septic tank. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, such chemicals will also “stress or kill the biological therapy taking place” in your tank.

What Could Happen?

It is possible that surface and ground water will get polluted. This is not good. It is possible that your septic tank may be severely damaged and will need to be replaced. This is also not a good sign.

What Should I Do Instead?

Sometimes it’s a toss-up between two options. Paintbrushes and rollers that are thrown away contribute to the landfill’s overpopulation. However, reusable eco-friendly painting materials must be thoroughly cleaned before they may be reused. Maybe you could take all of that stuff to your mother (who, of course, lives in the city) and have her give it a thorough cleaning. Alternatively, you may say “no.” Probably the most effective and environmentally friendly technique is to reduce the quantity of cleanup necessary.

For the tray, you should use disposable liners.

The less clean-up you have to perform, the less of a pain it is to deal with. It’s possible that you’ll have to think twice before repainting. Is it genuinely necessary to carry out this task? Make a selection that is ecologically friendly while while satisfying your remodeling preferences.

Timothy Dahl

Timothy is the creator and editor of CharlesHudson. He formerly worked as an editor at Popular Mechanics, This Old House, and Lifehacker, among other publications. His work has appeared on Wired, Bob Vila, DIY Network, and The Family Handyman, among other publications. He is also the founder of the Webby-nominatedBuilt by Kidswebsite and the host of the popularTool Cravepodcast, both of which are available on iTunes.

Can you wash paint brushes in the sink with a septic system?

Because paint has the potential to severely disrupt the delicate balance of biological components in your septic tank, washing your brushes, rollers, and even your hands in the sink is not recommended. Latex paint should be cleaned with soap and water. If your home is connected to a public sewer system, you may clean the brushes in your sink to prevent backups. However, take care not to dispose of paint in a location where it may leak into the groundwater supply. To remove oil-based paints, a solvent such as paintthinner will be required.

  • The cleaning of your brushes, hands, and other items should be confined to the cleansing of your septic system, which can typically handle modest amounts of latex paint.
  • To put it another way, what does latex paint do to a septic system is unclear.
  • As the paint suspension travels down the septic tank and into the drainfield, the soil in the drainfield can be coated and sealed to prevent further corrosion.
  • All-PurposeCleaners Generally speaking, mild detergents, such as laundry detergents and any other products that may be handled without gloves are safe to use in septic systems.
  • Natural detergents are also an option.

what can go in the septic system? cleaning paint brushes

A big industrial facility in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana region employs me as a process engineer for their wastewater treatment plant. I’ve been here for 19 years. I’m not going to reveal who it is because you people are going to hang me. However, you may put anything into your septic system as long as it is done in moderation. Any chemicals, including bleach, ammonia, soaps/surfactants, gasoline/mineral spirits for cleaning paint brushes, other chemicals, even tiny amounts of cooking oil and degreasers, were placed in the container.

  • EVERYTHING, as well as the microorganisms, is consumed.
  • However, it must be done in moderation, and the bacteria must become used to it before it can be used.
  • The first 2-3 weeks are generally the most difficult, but as the bacteria have acclimated, we are able to achieve 99 percent decomposition.
  • They have no intention of degrading it.

Your septic system’s bacteria will adapt and become used to consuming the waste that you feed it over time. Simply ensure that your oxygen supply is sufficient to prevent them from becoming anaerobic, and your population will evolve, acclimatize, and decay over time.

Washing Paint brushes into Septic Tank

Paint brushes that have been cleaned and flushed down the drain are sent to the septic tank. We won’t be able to pump this tank and discharge it until we identify a new location for it to go. This essay will most likely be of more interest to real estate brokers and home flippers. If you live in Clark, Cowlitz, or Skamania counties, you should be aware that significant changes have occurred at our treatment plants. Treatment plants are where we dispose of septic tanks that have been cleansed by us once they are cleaned.

See also:  Where Do You Get Septic Tank Worms? (Solution found)

The effluent will only be accepted if it complies with the “Three P’s” requirements.

  1. Poop
  2. Pee
  3. Paper (toilet paper only
  4. No flushable wipes or hygiene products)
  5. Poop
  6. Paper

What does this mean for real estate agents and home flippers, and how can they prepare for it? Therefore, if the contractors are washing their tools into the septic tank, when it is time to pump the tank, the load will be refused by the Wastewater Treatment Plant. Everyone in the flipping and real estate industry will exclaim, “I’ve never heard of it before.” And you’d be absolutely accurate. The implementation of this rule began on December 1st, 2018. To be put into effect as soon as possible.

  1. A real estate transaction has taken place.
  2. Every contractor who worked there rinsed all of his or her tools down the drains and into the septic tank after finishing their work.
  3. We determined that pumping the tank was not necessary at this time.
  4. We are unable to shut down a vehicle for that long.
  5. Hopefully, you can appreciate the dilemma we would have found ourselves in if we had decided to pump out the septic tank instead.
  6. However, at this moment, there is no indication of the cost.
  7. Once they have identified the compounds, they may begin the process of removing them one by one.

We must keep this in mind.

“Keep the bacteria alive and healthy,” is the only objective of the plant’s operators when they are at work.

The load has been refused.

Wipes for diapers and other hygiene goods At this point, the facility will still take those, but at a greater expense in terms of personnel and the possibility of us having to enter our tanks to remove the material.

Basically, we have a 4 inch valve on the back of our vehicles, and gravity pulls it away from them and into our facility.

Furthermore, it is not inexpensive.

The garbage, which includes cleaning wipes and hygiene items, forces us to clean our tanks from the inside out. They block up our interior machinery and cause our trucks to become inoperable.

Clean Paint Brushes and Rollers Without Harming The Environment

It is possible that this content contains affiliate links. The result is that we will receive a commission for any purchases made via our affiliate links at no additional cost to you. By doing so, you are helping us to cover our expenses and keep this site running. Thanks! You’ve just completed that massive painting project, and it looks amazing. Congrats! Now, what about those soiled paintbrushes, rollers, and paint cans that have accumulated over the years? It’s true that you can’t just rinse off oil-based stains or latex paints and call it a day when you’ve employed these products.

Following a rainstorm, this untreated water can make its way into streams, causing damage to plants and animals as well as poisoning your local water source.

It’s not difficult.

In terms of speed and ease of cleanup, natural paint wins hands down, with latex paint coming in a close second.

In this article

  • Disposing of paint rollers and storing unused paints are all tasks that need to be completed.

Cleaning up natural paint

Natural paints are ones that are manufactured completely of natural materials such as plants, minerals, clay, or milk protein. As long as no metallic or chemical-based pigments are added to the base, these natural paints are fully non-toxic and biodegradable, according to the manufacturer. As a result, they do not necessitate the use of any special cleaning agents. Remove the paint brushes and empty cans from their holders and rinse them in the sink or bucket until they’re clean. It is also OK to safely discharge the waste water from the buckets you used onto the ground or into a storm sewer system.

Cleaning up latex paint

It is more environmentally friendly to use latex (water-based) paints instead of oil-based paints. Despite this, they are not as safe as natural paints, especially if they contain minimal or no volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This is due to the fact that low-VOC and zero-VOC latex paints still contain potentially dangerous compounds. Therefore, they should be cleaned in the same way as conventional latex paint is cleaned.

  • Excess latex paint should be squeezed back into the can using gloved hands or a wire paint comb. If the paint has dried onto the brushes, they should be soaked in water before using them. Squeeze the brushes with a dry newspaper one more to remove any remaining paint
  • Warm soapy water should be used to clean the brushes.

Is your home on a septic tank?

If your home is linked to the municipal sewer system, you may wash latex paint brushes in the sink without having to use a separate sink. However, in the case of septic tanks:

  • After each rinse, use a small bucket to collect the filthy water and a larger bucket to collect the clean water after each rinse. Allow the paint water to evaporate outside for several days, or soak it up with sand or kitty litter to speed up the process. Latex paint and materials that have dried should be disposed of with ordinary household garbage.

Cleaning up oil-based paintsstains

Oil-based paints and stains may lend rich color and depth to a project, but they must be cleaned with great care because of their toxicity. This is due to the fact that they are classified as hazardous materials, and their inappropriate cleaning can have negative consequences for the local water supply as well as neighboring plant and animal life. Prepare your workplace outside or in a well-ventilated area since the chemicals you’ll need to clear oil-based paints can release toxic fumes.

  • Lay down a drop cloth to protect your flooring or the soil, and put on rubber gloves to keep your hands safe while you work. Re-enter as much paint into the paint container as you possibly can with a wire paint comb
  • Fill an old coffee can or a clean paint can with a couple of inches of non-toxic solvent and set it aside to soak the brushes for a few minutes. Using the brushes, swirl them around for 5 minutes, then remove them and comb any extra solvent back into the container. To carefully wipe the solvent off the paintbrushes, use paper towels or a piece of newspaper. Then soak and blot the brushes 2-3 more times, each time using a new container, and set them out to dry. Combine all of the solvents that have been used into a single container for disposal or reuse.
  • For water-based solvents, let the water drain before putting the residual paint solids in a tight plastic bag and throwing it away. The solvent should then be disposed of at a domestic hazardous waste facility. Allow the paint solids to settle for a few days if you want to reuse the solvent. Once the solvent has settled, strain it through a coffee filter or a non-food strainer into a glass jar using a funnel. Immediately wrap the remaining paint solids in plastic and dispose of them in the trash

Discarding paint rollers

This is a really basic procedure.

Simply allow the paint to dry completely before moving on. Paint rollers should be wrapped in plastic and disposed of in the rubbish when they have dried. Whatever the sort of paint you’ve used, you’ve done a good job.

Storing leftover paints

Keep unused paints in the smallest container possible to reduce airflow and prevent the paint from drying up too quickly.

  • Ensure that the threads on the jar and lid are clean so that it will open more readily afterwards. Inscribe the brand, color, and date on the jar, as well as the space or project it corresponds to
  • Store it in a dry place above freezing temperatures to ensure that it lasts as long as possible
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how do you go about cleaning paint brushes?

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  1. Assuming that pouring white spirit down the drain is not a good idea, what do you do? Do you have to buy new brushes all of the time? The idea of putting a gloss brush in a polythene bag and freezing it so it’s useable the next day is something I’ve heard before. Thanks for sharing. A septic tank serves our needs. White spirit is used to clean our cleaning brushes in the sink. When diluted with water, it becomes virtually insignificant. In my opinion, unless you are pouring gallon after gallon of the stuff down the drain, you will have no difficulties
  2. I clean in a little pot and then bury it behind my workbench, where no plants grow anyhow. You may put your trust in me on this one! You will not find a better product than this one on QVC! Absolutely fantastic
  3. I’ve been using the same brushes and rollers since I first purchased this product and cannot recommend it enough. Only when my wife decides that wrapping them in cling film and then forgetting about them is a good idea do I have to replace a brush or roller with a new one. To remove the paint, attach the roller or brush and, using a drill, ideally an electric drill, spin off all of the paint
  4. Wash with water or white spirit if necessary, and then repeat the process. cm re=PAGE- -SEARCH- -SEARCH
  5. Best Practice – when using, make sure to spin the brush in an empty box that will collect all of the paint
  6. I leave my gloss brushes in water (with the paint still on), and they stay fine for months when I clean them
  7. I leave the dirty white spirits in a jar with the lid on, and the paint settles to the bottom over time, and you can pour off the spirits to use again, leaving you with a sloppy paint mush, which you can pop into an old paint tin and It even works if you’re a ‘artist’ who paints with ‘oils’ and are a professional. To summarize, oil-based paints may be removed using dishwashing liquid and water (after you have spun as much of the paint off as possible), provided that you massage the soap into the bristles well to ensure that it emulsifies. Using white spirit to clean my brushes, followed by swarfega to “degrease” the brushes from the white spirits, followed by washingupliquid to get rid of the swarfega residue, followed by a simple rinse under running tap water to remove any remaining swarfega residue The swarfega muck, as well as the muck from the original washing up liquid, is put down a land drain (not the septic tank). Frank
  8. The first step is to stay away from paints that cannot be wiped away with water. In the event that white spirit is required, the following procedure should be followed: 2 or 3 jars with an inch or two of white spirit in each should be available. Using the brush, wiggle it about in each jar in turn, making sure to leave the white spirit in each jar. Once the brush has been washed in warm soapy water, it should be wrapped with an elastic band and left to dry. Pour all of the white spirit into a single jar and set it aside to cool. As soon as the paint residue has settled to the bottom of the container (this will take a few days), pour the white spirit back into the container for re-use, and scrape the paint residue out with newspaper and dispose of it in your (rarely used) landfill container. Wishing you a successful painting
  9. After you’ve used chocolatepixie’s technique, use the leftover residue to start a bonfire (with items that can’t be composted). Excellent advice – many thanks to everyone

The Effect of Latex Paint on Septics

Whether applied with a brush or roller, latex paint is simple to work with. A fresh coat of paint may radically transform the appearance of a space, bringing it into the modern day. Using water-based or latex paint can help you save time and money by cutting down on drying time and cleaning. Latex paints emit lower amounts of paint fumes than oil-based paints, and you can clean your brushes, roller covers, and paint pans with soap and water once you finish painting with them. However, you should exercise caution while cleaning your brushes since even little amounts of latex paint can be harmful to your septic system.

Septic System Failure

Septic systems make use of naturally existing, living organisms to break down, digest, and treat solid and liquid waste that is delivered into the septic tank. Septic systems are also known as septic tanks. In the case of toxic home chemicals, these organisms can be killed, leading in the failure of your septic system. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the United States says that while typical culprits include oil-based paints, solvents, and cleaning agents that are listed as poisonous or hazardous, even latex paint cleanup should be reduced, according to the agency.

Latex paints should be avoided if possible.

Sludge

Organic materials are broken down, digested, and treated by your septic system, which is its primary function. Most of the time, the organisms that dwell in your septic system are unable to break down the solid components included in latex paint. According to the Shamrock Septic Service website, these sediments will settle to the bottom of your septic tank, where they can result in a thick, gray putty-like substance that is difficult to remove.

Proper Disposal

One of the advantages of latex paint is the simplicity with which it can be cleaned with soap and water. If you believe this, you may believe that it is acceptable to pour latex paint down the toilet. This isn’t correct at all. While your septic system is normally capable of handling modest amounts of latex paint, it should be restricted to washing up the paint off your brushes, hands, and other equipment.

After allowing the latex paint to completely freeze, it should be stored or disposed of in the right manner. Latex paint that has been allowed to dry fully can usually be disposed of using your municipality’s regular solid waste garbage collection routine.

Additives

For households that have septic systems, there are a variety of addition solutions available. Generally speaking, these additions may be divided into two categories: biological and chemical. In contrast to chemical additions, biological additives aim to increase the quantity of living organisms in your septic system, such as enzymes and bacteria, while chemical additives aim to accelerate the breakdown of waste material in your septic system. Neither form of addition has been shown to be beneficial in increasing septic system operation, according to the National Environmental Services Center, and chemical additives may potentially be hazardous to your septic system and the surrounding environment.

Septic & Acrylics

1 through 12 of 12 posts are currently being displayed (of 12 total)

  • On December 16, 2004 at 9:00 p.m., by AuthorPosts 984688 When I wash my brushes in the sink, I’m wondering if I’m causing any damage to my septic system in any manner. A well-known acrylic paint company responded to my inquiry with the statement that they were unaware of any documented concerns. Hmmmm. I would have liked to have seen something a little more scientific from them. Do any of you have any other information? Catherine At 10:12 p.m. on December 16, 2004, 1044278 Your septic system should be in good working order. All of your dishwashing and laundry output should be enough to keep the acrylics from hardening and becoming solid. Common household bleach, as well as damage to the system caused by driving over it with heavy equipment, among other things, are responsible for septic tank failure. On a related subject. A vegetable garden near the drainfield would never be considered because of the poisons that bleed out of the perforated drainfield pipe into the surrounding soil. It will ultimately be necessary to pump out your septic tank. That is merely a normal maintenance task that is enviable. Fujifilm X100F and XT20 cameras, as well as Nikon camera bodies and lenses Photos are from the year 2021. At 10:16 p.m. on December 16, 2004, 1044276 Thanks I’m feeling a lot better now. Please pass the paints! c. At 10:29 p.m. on December 16, 2004, 1044279 As you may be aware, when we paint the walls in our home, we have no choice but to toss away all of the brushes and rollers rather than cleaning them after each painting session. This is not a feasible solution. For the past 16 years, we have resided in this house and have cleaned quite a few brushes and rollers in that time. Our system is in good working order. And its 20 years old. On the Liquitex website, there is a Tips archive, and I came across a remark from an artist who clearly has environmental concerns, and he provided the following information: (This is a procedure that is a little “excited”!) CLEANING THAT IS SAFE FOR THE ENVIRONMENT TIPSWhen it comes to painting, I prefer to use flat enamel pans as my palette. This is what I do to avoid allowing dried up particles of paint fall down the drain, which is especially important because I have a septic system. When I’m finished, I use a moist towel to wipe away any remaining wet paint from the palette. After that, I use a plastic putty knife to scrape away the hard lumps. After that, I fill the pan halfway with water and let it set for a few minutes until all of the dried paint can be scraped off easily with a putty knife. I next strain the liquid through a sieve that I created out of a big embroidery hoop and a plastic window screen to remove any remaining solids. Solids that would otherwise be flushed down the toilet are caught in this trap. The solids then dry on the screen, and I can simply take them off the screen after that. When painting outside, I use the same procedure, with the exception of pouring the scraped pan and its water into a cardboard box with a thick bottom. The bottom of the box collects all of the solids while allowing the water to pass through. The box will survive for a long time and will prevent all of the solids from collecting on the ground beneath it. In addition, I will wash out my brushes in a container and allow the water to evaporate outside before disposing of the dried solids in the ordinary garbage rather than flushing them down the toilet. Fujifilm X100F and XT20 cameras, as well as Nikon camera bodies and lenses Photos are from the year 2021. At 9:08 a.m. on December 17, 2004, 1044275 When I wash my brushes in the sink, I’m wondering if I’m causing any damage to my septic system in any manner. A well-known acrylic paint company responded to my inquiry with the statement that they were unaware of any documented concerns. Hmmmm. I would have liked to have seen something a little more scientific from them. Do any of you have any other information? Catherine There is a correlation between the answer to this question and how much paint you wash down the drain. Acrylic paint is made up of many components: the resin part, pigments, water (which may contain organic cosolvents), and additives such as surfactants, preservatives, deforamers, and flow additives, among others. The organic component of these paints is often degraded in the septic system. The inorganic side of the equation stays a solid. These solids are the ones that are most likely to do the greatest damage. It takes a significant amount of (little) brush cleaning to accumulate a significant amount of a substance in your system. It’s quite improbable that the majority of individuals will accumulate enough paint from painting little paintings to cause severe damage to your system, but it might happen. Pigments containing copper have been shown to interfere with the digestion of organic matter. Copper may be found in phthalo green and blue pigments, among other things. It takes a significant amount of pigment to completely halt the digestive process. Rather than washing out your instruments in a sink, it is preferable to flocculate the particles out of your wash water and dispose of your trash outside of a sewer or a septic system, in my opinion. I believe there will come a time when enforcement and change will be essential, despite the fact that the practice is prevalent and generally deemed safe across our society. If you have the desire to put into practice a more effective method, you should do so. As a statement of participation, an increasing number of people are adopting better health and environmental practices. It may be observed that any method of paint disposal has its disadvantages. The term “disposal” implies that garbage is being generated. GOLDEN PAINTS offers some fantastic material on their website, which you should check out. Their words demonstrate a healthy balance of duty for the law, science, and common sense, respectively. You may save yourself a lot of time and effort by wiping your brushes on paper towels or other surfaces before cleaning them. You have the option of processing your wash water before flushing it down the toilet (septic or public sewer). For further in-depth information, please see the following link. It was probably less difficult for the firm you phoned to say what they said than it was for you to understand what they were saying. The hazards linked with art and artist materials in terms of the environment, health, and other factors are difficult to categorize and describe. Many people have strong feelings regarding such topics and will take the discourse to extremes if they are not addressed properly. RISK is related with the act of exposing oneself. Exposure to little amounts of radiation may not have a substantial effect on anything. It’s a vast, wide world out there. The accumulation of exposures, on the other hand, might lead to more serious consequences. It’s easy for accumulations to creep up on us without our knowledge. With our newly acquired information, we all have duties to balance our actions in order to safeguard, preserve, and avoid disasters from occurring. Your cleaning method may have the potential to make a little difference in the world, but it is quite improbable that small amounts of paint in your septic system will be noticed by anybody. I hope it provides you with a different point of view that is beneficial. Do not try to corner something that you are aware is stronger than you. – It doesn’t take a very large individual to harbor a grudge. You can’t take back a hurtful word you’ve said. Every walkway has a few of puddles in it. When you spend time with pigs, you can expect to become muddy. jerry At 9:28 a.m. on December 17, 2004, 1044283 Catherine, Because this question has been on my mind for the past 2 1/2 years since I began painting with acrylics, I am grateful to you for bringing it to my attention. Despite the fact that my husband and I have lived in our house for ten years (just the two of us and our pets), we’ve never had to have our septic system drained. We do live at an elevation of around 2000 feet above sea level, and I know folks who live in the lowlands who are plagued with septic problems all of the time. A endless number of times, I have cleaned my palette and brushes in the kitchen sink. I’ve heard both “use cold water” and “use warm water,” and I’ve heard both. Cleaning my brushes with a small amount of dish soap is something I’ve only lately begun doing. The sink drain has been running slowly on occasion, but this appears to be typical — plunging the sink drain clears it. I never flush solids down the toilet, and I always work on a wet palette, which is something that does not happen with my paintings. I’ve been more cautious recently because I’m concerned about this, and I’ve started wiping any excess paint off the brushes and plastic palettes that I might use. Plastic lids are simple to use, and they may be thrown away instead of being cleaned. For pre-cleaning, you can use the hand cleaning wipes that you can get at your local grocery shop. I suppose being aware of a possible problem is half of the battle already won. As Damar pointed out, never use bleach since it will interfere with the normal function of the system. Best wishes, and best of luck with your art. Barbara Barbara “Drawing and painting are both attempts at making sense of the world. There are as many answers as there are human beings on the face of the earth.” George Tooker is a well-known author. the year 1920 through the year 2011 At 10:25 a.m. on December 17, 2004, 1044274 This was an excellent conversation. A great many of the components that go into acrylic paints (including “latex,” which is often acrylic or an acrylic/vinyl copolymer) are quite similar to those that go into everyday home products such as laundry detergent, soap, and shampoo. Even Irish Spring soap contains green and white colors, so the usual artist’s use should not cause an issue for the septic system under normal circumstances. However, a dried paint film is always preferable than a wet substance that is flushed down the drain in terms of environmental impact. I use paper towels and old tee shirts to clean brushes of the majority of the paint BEFORE they are placed in the rinse water. I recycle these materials. I have two rinse containers, one for filthy water and the other for clean water, and I alternate between the two. I use the dirty water bottle to remove the most of the color off the brush, and then I use the clean water container just before I return to painting. The unclean water bottle becomes unusable after a while, so I empty it into a 5 gallon bucket and let the water to evaporate naturally. I have a garage studio, so it’s not too bad until I’m painting a lot, in which case the bucket may be a nuisance. When this occurs, I will construct a drying bed in the yard (weather allowing) out of a 2×4 frame and strong poly plastic sheeting that will be attached to the structure. The water evaporates, and I just keep doing this until the plastic becomes too unpleasant to handle, at which point I’ll toss it away. If you have a large amount of water consumption and a high concentration of heavy metal pigments, you might consider using the filter technique. You add certain common components to the bucket, which causes the solids to crash to the ground, and then pour the water through a huge coffee filter through a funnel to remove the sediments. The water that passes through the filter can be poured down the drain, and the filter paper and solids can be dried out and disposed of in the trash after they have dried. This is mostly for educational purposes because I wouldn’t do it until I was producing 5 gallons of filthy water every week. Mike Townsend is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom. At 11:04 a.m. on December 17, 2004, 1044282 Having a septic system that has been in place for more than 40 years, I battled with this as well. After spending hours on the phone with local environmentalists, we came up with the following solution. Cleaning the brushes with a paper towel as thoroughly as possible is recommended. Rinse thoroughly with clean water in a container (I use distilled water). Soap and water are used to clean in a container (I still use distilled water) In a sink, wash your hands with soap and water. By the time you get to the sink, it should be nearly clean, and the amount of residue that will enter the septic system should be negligible. What to do with the water containers that have been collected. I ultimately end up emptying them into 5-gallon pickle barrels and waiting for the liquid to evaporate on its own. When the residue is dry, scrape it up and place it in a glass container, compacting it as much as possible together with the residue from the palette, before discarding it. Place the container in the trash after sealing it with a lid. It was after much deliberation that I and the local enrivo representatives reached to this conclusion. It’s just a different point of view. To access the information kiosk, please click here. 48hlc48 is the name of my YouTube channel. The one person you will never be able to fool is yourself! (Oz The Great and Powerful) “Whether you believe you can or believe you cannot, you are correct!” “The thing about art is that it keeps life from becoming meaningless,” says the author. Robert Genn is a writer and editor who lives in New York City. At 6:08 p.m. on December 17, 2004, 1044277 WOW. Thank you very much to everyone. I now have a number of alternatives, some of which I have already begun to practice and will continue to do. I’m a little hesitant about leaving buckets of water outside, though. I live in a region where mosquitoes are a nuisance, and West Nile virus has been detected in the neighborhood, so we take great care to ensure that there is no standing water. In fact, if we are going to be gone for more than a few days, even the poor birds lose access to their backyard bath. The water must be changed regularly to avoid mosquito breeding. Furthermore, because we have a large number of frogs in the region I don’t want to poison someone who could mistakenly believe my bucket is a swimming pool. My favorite concept, I believe, is the use of a coffee filter to purify the drinking water. This is one that I will absolutely use. Thank you one again. All of these thoughts will be forwarded to the Arts Society, which I am a member of. Many of us live in rural areas where septic systems are in use. At 8:19 p.m. on December 17, 2004, 1044280 …. I follow the same procedure as before, with the exception of pouring the scraped pan and its water into a cardboard box with a thick bottom. The bottom of the box collects all of the solids while allowing the water to pass through. The box will survive for a long time and will prevent all of the solids from collecting on the ground beneath it. In addition, I will wash out my brushes in a container and allow the water to evaporate outside before disposing of the dried solids in the ordinary garbage rather than flushing them down the toilet. All I do is cover the sink with a two-ply-thick Bounty paper towel and let the water drain through it
  • When the water is gone, I discard the paper towels and solids, clean the sink, and go make a cup of tea to relax. By the way, I use the same thing to drain tea leaves from my pot before washing the pot in preparation for the next brew session. At 8:19 p.m. on December 17, 2004, 1044281 All I do is cover the sink with a two-ply-thick Bounty paper towel and let the water drain through it
  • When the water is gone, I discard the paper towels and solids, clean the sink, and go make a cup of tea to relax. By the way, I use the same item to drain tea leaves from my pot before washing the pot in preparation for the next brew session. I highlight Bounty since it is the most durable brand I have discovered. At 12:38 p.m. on December 18, 2004, 1044284 I highlight Bounty since it is the most durable brand I have discovered. Piazzi, you’ve done a good job! It appears to be straightforward, straightforward, and successful! BarbaraBarbara “Drawing and painting are both attempts at making sense of the world. There are as many answers as there are human beings on the face of the earth.” George Tooker was born in 1920 and died in 2011
  • AuthorPosts
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on December 16, 2004 at 9:00 p.m., by AuthorPosts; 984688 When I wash my brushes in the sink, I’m wondering if I’m causing any damage to my septic system in some way. A well-known acrylic paint manufacturer responded to my email with the statement that they were unaware of any reported issues. Hmmmm. Something more scientific from them would have been welcome. Does anyone have any additional information? Catherine At 10:12 p.m. on December 16, 2004 1044278 Hopefully, your septic system is in good working order.

  1. Common household bleach, as well as damage to the system caused by driving over it with heavy equipment, among other things, are responsible for destroying septic tanks.
  2. A vegetable garden near the drainfield would never be considered because of the toxins that leach out of the perforated drainfield pipe into the surrounding environment.
  3. Routine maintenance is nothing more than what can be expected.
  4. Those images are from the year 2021 At 10:16 p.m.
  5. Please, bring the paints.
  6. At 10:29 p.m.
  7. I don’t see how that’s possible.
  8. Our system is up and running perfectly well.

A post from an artist who clearly cares about the environment was found in the Tips archive on the Liquitex website, and the following is what she wrote: (This is a protocol that is a little “excited!”!) CLEANING WITHOUT ENDANGERING THE ENVIRONMENT TIPSWhen it comes to painting, I prefer to use flat enamel pans as a canvas.

  1. If any wet paint remains on the palette after I’m finished, I wipe it down with an absorbent rag.
  2. When it is completely dry, I fill the pan with water and allow it to soak for several hours or overnight, until all of the dried paint can be scraped off easily with a putty knife.
  3. Solids that would otherwise be flushed down the toilet are caught in this chamber.
  4. The process is the same when painting outside, with the exception that I empty the scraped pan and its contents into a thick-bottomed cardboard box.
  5. The box will last for a long time and will prevent all of the solids from accumulating on the ground beneath the house.
  6. Nikon Camera Bodies and Lenses for the Fujifilm X100F and XT20.
  7. on December 17, 2004 1044275 When I wash my brushes in the sink, I’m wondering if I’m causing any damage to my septic system in some way.
See also:  How Far Away From Septic Tank To Plant Garden? (Perfect answer)

Hmmmm.

Does anyone have any additional information?

Painting with acrylics is made up of several components: the resin portion, pigments, water (and occasionally organic cosolvents), and additives such as surfactants, preservatives, deforamers, and flow enhancers.

The solid state of the inorganic side is maintained.

When it comes to building up a significant amount of (small) brush cleaning in your system, it takes a long time.

Pigments containing copper have been shown to interfere with the digestion of organic materials.

In order to slow the digestion process, a significant amount of pigment is required.

I believe there will come a time when enforcement and change will be required for this practice, which is currently widespread and generally considered safe throughout our society.

As a statement of participation, an increasing number of people are adopting better health and environmental habits.

The term “disposal” implies the creation of waste.

A balance of responsibility toward laws, science, and common sense can be seen in their statements Cleaning your brushes on paper towels or other surfaces before washing them can save you a lot of time and effort later.

For more in-depth information, please see the link below.

Such subjects arouse strong emotions in many people, who often go to extremes in their discussions.

Exposure to small amounts of radiation may not have a significant impact on anything.

A buildup of exposures, on the other hand, can result in more serious consequences.

We all have responsibilities to balance our behavior in order to protect, preserve, and prevent the spread of new knowledge.

Please accept my thanks for providing this alternate perspective.

Anger can be carried by even the smallest of individuals.

Some puddles can be found on almost every path.

jerry At 9:28 a.m.

Despite the fact that my husband and I have been in our home for ten years (just the two of us and our pets), we’ve never had to have our septic system pumped.

Innumerable times, I’ve washed my palette and brushes in the kitchen sink.

Using a little dish soap to clean my brushes has only recently become a habit of mine.

The use of a wet palette is something that I do not do with my paints because I never let solids down the drain.

Plastisol can be used instead of glass lids because it is less messy and requires less cleanup.

I suppose being aware of a potential problem is half of the battle won already.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

When it comes to problems, the number of possible solutions exceeds the number of human beings.” George Tooker is an American actor and director.

on December 17, 2004 1044274 An excellent debate.

Even Irish Spring soap contains green and white pigments, so the normal artist’s use should not pose a problem for the septic system under normal conditions.

Prior to putting brushes into the rinse water, I clean them with paper towels and old tee shirts, which I keep on hand for future use.

Once the dirty water container has extracted the most of the color from the brush, it is time to switch to the clean water container just before I return to the painting table.

I have a garage studio, so it isn’t too bad until I am painting a lot, in which case the bucket may be a nuisance.

This will continue until the water evaporates and the plastic becomes too unpleasant to handle, at which point I will discard it.

Then, using a funnel, you pour the water through a huge coffee filter, which causes the particles to tumble to the bottom of the bucket as they are thrown in.

The purpose of this is primarily for schools, since I would not do it until I created 5 gallons of dirty water every week.

At 11:04 a.m.

With the help of local environmentalists, we spent several hours on the phone and arrived at the following conclusion: Use a paper towel to wipe off the brushes as thoroughly as you can.

Soap and water are used to clean the container (I still use distilled water) In a sink, clean with soap and water.

So, what are you going to do with the water bottles?

When the residue is dry, scrape it up and place it in a glass container, compacting it as much as possible together with the residue from the palette, and set it aside.

We got to this decision after much deliberation among the local enrivo personnel.

The information kiosk may be accessed by clicking here.

Your own mind is the one person you cannot deceive!

Robert Genn is a writer and editor who lives in the United States of America.

on December 17, 2004 1044277 WOW.

It appears that I have various possibilities, some of which I am currently doing and others which I plan on practicing in the next weeks.

It is very important to me to not have standing water since I live in an area where mosquitoes are a nuisance and West Nile virus has been detected in the neighborhood.

It is necessary to change the water on a daily basis in order to prevent mosquito breeding.

My favorite idea, I believe, is the use of a coffee filter to clean the water before use.

Please accept my sincere gratitude once more As a member of the Arts Society, I will also pass along all of these thoughts.

Wednesday, December 17, 2004 8:00 pm to 8:19 pm: 1044280 ….

This is accomplished by allowing the water to filter through a solids-trapped bottom of the box.

In addition, I will wash out my brushes in a container and let the water to evaporate outside before disposing of the dried solids in the usual garbage rather than flushing them down the toilet.

Simple.

Wednesday, December 17, 2004 8:00 pm to 8:19 pm: 1044281 All I do is cover the sink with a two-ply-thick Bounty paper towel and let the water drain through it; when the water is gone, I discard the paper towels and solids, clean the sink, and go make a cup of tea.

By the way, I use the same thing to drain the tea leaves from my pot before washing the pot in preparation for the next brew session.

At 12:38 p.m.

What a great idea, Piazzi!

BarbaraBarbara “Drawing and painting are both attempts at making sense of the world around you. When it comes to problems, the number of possible solutions exceeds the number of human individuals.” George Tooker was born in 1920 and died in 2011.

  • New replies are no longer allowed on the subject ‘SepticAcrylics’.

Lagoon Maintenance

A lagoon is a system that collects and treats wastewater from your house. It requires regular maintenance in order to function effectively. The depth of a lagoon ranges between three and five feet, and the size is decided by the number of beds in a house. (Each bedroom has a total water surface area of 440 square feet.) A lagoon is used to cleanse residential sewage through a biological process that requires enough of sunshine, wind, and appropriate water depth to be effective.

What should be done to maintain a lagoon?

  • Pumping out lagoons is necessary when solids have accumulated to the point where the lagoon is no longer capable of receiving waste or discharging effluent effectively. We can provide estimates for the price of pumping the sludge as well as the number of gallons that will be removed.

Overgrowth

  • It is important to keep trees, bushes, and weeds from developing around the lagoon. When trees and weeds are planted too close together, leaves and other vegetation fall into the lagoon, causing it to overflow and overflow prematurely. Removal of trees within 50 feet of the lagoon is advised to prevent leaf waste from entering, to reduce shadowing the surface, and to aid in the control of tree root systems. When a large number of leaves fall into the lagoon, the pH is lowered, and the biological process is disrupted. It can also produce a foul odor to emanate from the lagoon. The removal of trees and bushes with chainsaws and trimmers, as well as the removal of leaves and trash with our excavator, are all options we may discuss with you. We can also put you on a maintenance plan, where we will come out on a regular basis to trim the banks of the lagoon, remove new saplings, and perform other maintenance tasks.

CattailsFloating Masses

  • Cattails and other plants growing in the lagoon should be removed, as should any floating masses generated by handwipes, oil, or other trash that have accumulated there. Cattails may develop quickly and must be removed in a timely manner. Hand wipes, despite the fact that they are flushable, penetrate the lagoon and form islands where weeds grow, reducing the amount of water surface area available. Cattails and floating masses, once again, are detrimental to the correct biological functioning of your lagoon. It is possible for us to discuss with you the optimal time of year to remove cattails, as well as how to clean out the floating masses using pumps or excavation.

Lagoon Damage

Maintain a close eye out for erosion or burrowing creatures causing harm to the borders of the lagoon. Pumping is frequently required in these types of situations in order to complete necessary repair work on the bank. Our excavator may be put to use in the banking industry to overhaul it. Sometimes the fence around the lagoon has to be fixed so that animals and children playing near the lagoon can’t get on the banks. We may explore the possibility of employing our excavator to dismantle the old fence and replace it if necessary.

  • Call us at (573) 474-5489 right now.
  • We also provide emergency service, and are accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week for your convenience.
  • Occasionally, a brush hog will cause damage to the lagoon’s outlet pipe, which must be repaired.
  • We may talk about making repairs with our excavator and even utilizing our camera to examine the pipes for damage, roots, and other blockages before proceeding.

Forum Topic – Acrylic paint and septic system

Smiling. Dancingwisp. Every brush and palette I’ve ever used has been washed in the kitchen sink or even in the bathtub, thanks to the fact that I’ve had a well and septic system for over 16 years. Acrylic is completely watersoluble, and I’ve never had even the slightest issue with it! What I did learn, on the other hand, was that I should never, ever throw any of those bacteria-cleaning items down the drain in order to “assist” the septic system. It need both good and harmful bacteria to function properly, yet it should be just fine on its own!

  • Only because we experienced post-hurricane floods for an indefinite period of time.
  • Published at 6:05 p.m.
  • Despite the fact that I do not sell my work on Etsy, I paint with acrylics and clean up the same way I would if I had a conventional sewer system.
  • It is also known that they enjoy fat, so when you prepare fries or other fried dishes, allow the oil to cool before pouring it down the sink drain or flushing it.
  • The 19th of January, 2009 Septic systems are always described by ESTI as if they were a chocolate chip milkshake.
  • If the solids are natural, they will go through a natural process and degrade slowly, similar to “danactive” in human systems.
  • All non-natural substances such as paint, laundry softener, powdered detergents, powdered dishwashing detergent, grease, and bleach have the potential to interfere with the biology and liquid absorption of your septic field.

Throwing paint rollers away rather than cleaning them is one example.

Once every two years at the most, at the most.

Published at 6:11 p.m.

The septic system was installed when I moved into my house one and a half years ago.

Published at 6:14 p.m.

My palette is made of wax paper, which I toss in the garbage after use.

The 19th of January, 2009 (Eastern Standard Time).

You have all provided me with a great deal of food for thought.

Pumping on a frequent basis is absolutely in the cards, as is restricting the quantity of “non-breakdown-able” material that enters the system.

Published at 6:26 p.m.

We’re looking forward to purchasing our first house, which will be on a septic system.

It appears that a small amount of paint in moderation will be OK.

At the very least, with oils (which should not be flushed down the toilet), the paint sinks to the bottom and the turpentine can be recycled!

I was intrigued.

Here’s a list of things that the Environmental Protection Agency recommends you shouldn’t flush down the toilet: www.epa.gov/owm/septic/pubs/homeowner guide long.pdf The list may be found on page 8.

Posted by Sep 23, 2009 05:00 EDTBasically, I classify what goes down the drain into three categories: organic material that will break down, material that will not break down (and will remain as solids until it is pumped out), and material that interferes with the breakdown of organic material – cleaners, detergents, and all that other nasty chemical stuff.

However, I guess that incredibly massive volumes of acrylic paint may cover the beneficial bacteria and prevent deterioration, but only in ridiculous quantities.

8:23 p.m. Posted by Sep 23, 2009 EDTSo happy I came upon this post. We recently purchased our first home, which includes a septic system. My spouse is worried, which is understandable given my desire to repaint every room in the house. 8:28 p.m. Posted by 23:00 UTC on September 23, 2009

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