How To Open An Old Septic Tank? (Question)

How to Open a Septic Tank Lid

  1. Locate the septic tank. Most codes call for the tank to be a minimum of 10 feet from the house foundation.
  2. Excavate the dirt from the top of the tank.
  3. Push the screwdriver into the seam around the lid.

How does an old style septic tank work?

Septic tanks work by allowing waste to separate into three layers: solids, effluent and scum (see illustration above). The solids settle to the bottom, where microorganisms decompose them. The scum, composed of waste that’s lighter than water, floats on top.

How do you crush an old septic tank?

Usually an old septic tank is broken up in-place using a backhoe. The backhoe operator may pull in the tank sides, crush them, and push the whole steel tank to the bottom then back-fill with soil and rubble. In a DIY project we might use a heavy steel wrecking bar to just punch holes in the old steel tank bottom.

Do all septic tanks have two lids?

A septic tank installed before 1975 will have a single 24-inch concrete lid in the center of the rectangle. A two-compartment tank installed after 1975 will have two lids of either fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at opposite ends of the rectangle.

What to do after septic is pumped?

After you have had your septic tank pumped by a trusted septic company, there are some things you can and should do as the septic system owner.

  1. 1) Get on a Schedule.
  2. 2) Take Care of the System.
  3. 3) Know the Parts of Your System.
  4. 4) Check Other Possible Issues.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

What to put in septic tank to break down solids?

Yeast helps actively breaks down waste solids when added to your septic system. Flush ½ cup of dry baking yeast down the toilet, the first time. Add ¼ cup of instant yeast every 4 months, after the initial addition.

What were old septic tanks called?

This treatment chamber became known as the septic tank. Note that the septic tank has a baffle at each end to help keep waste in the tank. The original pit remained as the part of the system that returned “clarified” wastewater to the ground. It now became known as a drywell.

Should old septic tanks be removed?

Septic tanks are decommissioned for safety reasons. If a tank is not going to be used any longer, the best decision is to render it inoperable. Tanks that were well constructed, as well as those that are surrounded by excellent soil for the drain field, can have a lifespan of 50 years.

Can you sell a house with an old septic tank?

If you’re selling a property with a septic tank, then you must be transparent with buyers about the fact the property uses a one and provide a detailed specification of the system. In fact, You are required by law to inform a buyer in writing about the presence of a septic tank.

What were old septic tanks made of?

Many of the first septic tanks were concrete tanks that were formed out of wood and poured in place in the ground and covered with a concrete lid or often some type of lumber.

How deep are septic tank lids?

Often, septic tank lids are at ground level. In most cases, they have buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

What is the life of a septic tank?

On average, a new septic system will last for 20-30 years. But this figure is not cast in stone. How long a septic system lasts is influenced by a variety of factors. For starters, durable septic systems are those that were properly built and are well maintained.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

How to Open a Septic Tank Lid

Find the location of the septic tank. The tank must be at least 10 feet away from the house foundation, according to most building rules. The location and direction of the drain as it exits the house should offer a good indication of the tank’s location and direction. For the purpose of locating the tank, it may be required to drill a number of test holes.

Step 2

Remove the dirt off the top of the tank using a shovel. The lid of the septic tank will be a square piece of concrete that will be installed at the center of the tank’s interior. Depending on the kind of tank you have, it will be around 18 inches square at the most. Remove the dirt from the lid’s edges as much as possible, and try to slant the sides of the hole to assist prevent dirt from moving and sliding down the sides of the hole. After you have removed all of the loose dirt, whisk away any leftover dirt.

Step 3

Make a small indentation with the screwdriver in the seam surrounding the lid. As soon as the seam begins to open slightly, insert one edge of the pry-bar into it and pry it upwards. Because the lid may be fairly heavy, you should have a companion nearby to assist you in removing it from the hole. Keep an eye out for any cracks or chips in the tank’s borders or the lid itself when doing this procedure. It is critical to have a tight, smooth seal between the lid and the tank when using this method.

Tip

In order to avoid accidentally back-filling the hole when the repairs are finished, make a note on it. It is best to indicate the placement of the tank lid with a tiny stepping stone that is flush with the surface of the ground. If you need to re-open the tank in the future, you will save time and effort by doing so now.

Warning

Never go into a septic tank or allow anybody else to get into one. Suffocation and death can occur quickly as a result of the gases and lack of oxygen.

Procedure for Opening Septic Tanks

  • ASK a question or make a comment about how to open a septic tank safely and properly for inspection or cleaning.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Instructions on how to open the septic tank. The location of the septic tank cleanout or cover, as well as the access and opening processes. We discuss some of the things to look for before opening the septic tank, such as subsidence, indications of recent work, and septic tank coverings that are not suitable to use. Then we demonstrate how to remove the septic tank lid or the access port cover from the tank.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page. Use the SEARCH BOX to discover the information you’re looking for quickly.

Procedures for Safe Opening of a Septic Tank, Cesspool, or Drywall for Inspection or Cleaning

The following are the contents of the article:

  • How to remove the lid from a septic tank
  • When it comes to pumping out the septic tank, which septic tank entrance should be used? Why

In this septic tank pumpout article series, you’ll learn how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks, as well as how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks using photos. In addition to septic pumping tank truck operators, this guideline is meant to provide basic information to homeowners and septic service providers that are concerned about septic system maintenance.

  • There is a risk of dangerous, perhaps deadly collapse due to subsidence (depressions or low regions in the earth) near the location of the septic tank. Evidence of recent construction activity that may necessitate further investigation in order to determine the status of the septic system
  • Backup or effluent breakout at the surface of the ground in the septic tank region.
  • Here is an example of a septic tank cover that was discovered atop an unstable home-made collection of concrete blocks that had been piled by the owner to serve as an access well to his septic tank. Because the masonry blocks were misaligned and loose, and because the tank aperture into which the cover opened was bigger than the cover, there was a serious collapse risk that may have resulted in a deadly hazard. We covered the area with plywood and roped it off, and we quickly informed the residents and the property owner of the situation, both verbally and in writing

Procedure for Opening the Septic Tank Pumping Access Port

It is necessary to clean the septic tank using a cleanout port, which is normally positioned in the center of the tank. A small access opening, such as one over an intake or outlet baffle, does not provide enough space for adequate sludge removal from the septic tank bottom, and it increases the likelihood of future clogging of the tank’s inlet or outlet due to partially removed floating scum that has not been completely removed from the tank bottom. In this particular scenario, we already had the measurements to the exact placement of the septic tank cleanout cover due to previous work.

A wrecking bar is set to be used to remove the cover from the vehicle.

Reader CommentsQ A

@Ron, In order for a concrete septic tank lid to be correctly erected, it must feature both access openings and cast in iron loops to which a hoist may be attached. Alternatively, if your septic tank cover does not have those points of purchase for lifting, you will require a flat bar and a larger wrecking bar to pry up the excavated lid from the septic tank sufficiently to allow you to put a chain around the lid, most likely two Chainz, and lift the lid with a hoist and tripod mechanism or you will use an on-site motorized hoist.

  • 1/2 x 27/4 removing the top of a septic tank @Phil, Although what you describe is theoretically doable, it may be less expensive and more rational to do so in a different way.
  • This is due to the fact that just stitching a circular hole does not ensure that I am creating a hole through which the lid will not be dropped.
  • Edge My concrete septic tank, which was constructed when the home was built in 1979 and does not have any manholes or openings for pumping out, is in poor condition.
  • Is it feasible to cut two manholes using a concrete saw that are 20″/24″ in diameter and then build risers and a cover on top of them?
  • Could you please share a picture of the tank top?
  • It is common for the concrete top to be tapered; nevertheless, it may just be trapped by effloresent salts and filth.
  • I have a feeling that simply tugging will not be effective.

This would have stopped leaks but would have made it extremely difficult to open the tank for the next person who needed to open the tank.

Repeat this process many times all around the cover’s perimeter.

For me, this has worked almost every time in the past.

It is recommended that you build a septic tank riser that is sealed to the tank top, as well as a new secure cover on top of the riser if your septic tank lid is not near to the ground level.

Never work on your own.

I’ve erected two wood 4x4s on top of the lifting ring to provide additional support.

All I’ve done three times is shattered those 4x4s.

Do you have any recommendations?

A septic tank pumping provider can remove plastic bags, tiny pebbles, and other debris from your tank, as well as the sediments, scum, and sludge that has accumulated there.

What is the best way to get them out?

When the septic tank is drained out, would it make sense to place a plastic bag over the top hole of the tank to keep the odors contained?

Gerard A plastic bag as a sewer line cap doesn’t seem right to me – it’s not durable, it’s the incorrect material if a cover is required, and if it’s a vent rather than an access pipe, the vent must be open to the atmosphere and protected from animal intrusion.

See also:  How Far Should Septic Tank Be From A Domestic Well? (Solution)

What is the function of this item?

A typical septic tank is equipped with clean out access covers that are strategically placed.

Maybe something as basic as a flat piece of concrete or stone will be sufficient, or maybe something more complex.

To be quite honest, I would have expected the contractor who dug the hole to be accountable for ensuring that the system was repaired and safe.

What should I do to solve it?

What store would I go to in order to acquire septic tank covers?

A few years ago, I had a beautiful new house built for me.

I have three plastic polylok lids, one of which is above ground and is for the pump.

I’d like to purchase risers so that I may build all three at a depth of around 6 inches below ground level.

What are the advantages and disadvantages.

Do you have any other suggestions?

I apologize for the lengthy post.

Sorry, but “True Bolt” isn’t a phrase I’m familiar with or associate with septic tank lids in any way.

Although this is not always the case, Mary, as the pumper may be able to access the entire tank bottom from a single opening depending on the tank’s size and shape; however, if your pumper is unable to do so from a single opening, you may want both openings opened to inspect the condition of the tank baffles.

There are two holes in my septic tank. Is it necessary to open both doors for a pump out?

Question:cannot find the manhole cover of the septic tank

(8th of August, 2014) “We’ve located the cesspool concrete lid (about 12 foot diameter), but after digging a 2 foot perimeter, we were unable to locate the manhole cover, which was required for an inspection.” vicki levin stated Help? My husband is becoming increasingly upset with the digging!

Reply:

If it’s a cesspool, rather than a septic tank, and it’s spherical, the access lid is normally located in the center of the container.

Question: how do i remove septic tank lid that is stuck

The entrance lid would normally be in the center of the cesspool, if it is in fact a cesspool rather than a septic tank, and it is spherical.

Reply:

Anon:WARNING: If the septic tank cover, lid, or access aperture has partially caved in or sank into the tank, the condition is extremely dangerous – an unsecure cover implies that someone might fall into the tank, which is generally lethal very quickly. Please keep everyone away from the septic tank area until such time as you have had the tank inspected and opened for additional inspection by a professional. Depending on the tank type and condition, lifting the lid may necessitate the use of a pry bar or wrecking bar, as well as a small portable winch (which is unusual).

Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Pumping ProcedurePumper Truck Operation Articles

  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION
  • MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • HOW TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN NOT TO PUMP A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO FIND A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK
  • INSPECT THE SEPTIC TANK BEFORE PUMPING
  • SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION PROCEDURE
  • SEPTIC TANK LEVELS OF SEWAGE
  • PUMPER TRU

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HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK at Inspect a Tank An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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HOW TO SAFELY ABANDON AN OLD SEPTIC TANK ON YOUR PROPERTY

If you’ve recently purchased an older house, it’s possible that a septic tank is located on the property. This is true even if your home is currently linked to the municipal water and sewer systems. A prior owner may have abandoned the ancient septic system and connected to the city sewage system when it became accessible at some time in the past. Despite the fact that there are standards in place today for properly leaving a septic tank, it was typical practice years ago to just leave the tanks in place and forget about them.

  1. The old tank may either be demolished or filled with water to solve the problem.
  2. It is possible that permits and inspections will be required.
  3. They are dangerous because curious children may pry open the lid and fall into the container.
  4. Falls into a septic tank can be lethal owing to the toxicity of the contents and the fact that concrete can collapse on top of you while falling into a tank.
  5. Eventually, this approach was phased out due to the fact that the steel would corrode and leave the tank susceptible to collapse.
  6. When it comes to ancient septic tanks, they are similar to little caves with a lid that might collapse at any time.
  7. The old tank is crushed and buried, or it is removed from the site.

If it is built of steel, it will very certainly be crushed and buried in its current location.

After that, the tank can be completely filled with sand, gravel, or any other form of rubble and buried.

Tanks can either be entirely dismantled or destroyed and buried in their original location.

The abandonment has been documented and plotted on a map.

It’s possible that you’ll forget about the tank once it’s been abandoned.

As a result, you might wish to sketch a map of the area where the old tank used to stand.

If you can demonstrate that an old septic tank was properly decommissioned, you may be able to increase the value of your property, and the new owners will enjoy knowing that large chunks of concrete are buried underground before they start digging in the yard to put something in it.

It may take some detective work to discover about the history of your land and what may be lying beneath the surface of the earth.

Upon discovering an old septic tank on your property that is no longer in service, contact Total Enviro Services for propertank abandonment procedures that meet with local standards and protect your family, pets, and farm animals from harm or death.

How to Remove a Septic Tank Lid

A septic tank lid is the section of the sewage tank that is located at the top of the tank. This lid must be removed at least once every several years in order to completely empty the tank. Every three to five years, depending on the size of the tank, a homeowner will need to have the septic tank pumped out and cleaned. Avoid allowing the tank to become overflowing, causing it to begin backing up into the home or overflowing out of the opening. The tank suffers serious damage as a result of this.

Step 1 – Locate Septic Tank

A septic tank lid is the section of the sewage tank that is located at the top of the tank. This lid must be removed at least once every several years in order to completely empty the tank. Every three to five years, depending on the size of the tank, a homeowner will need to have the septic tank pumped out and cleaned. Avoid allowing the tank to become overflowing, causing it to begin backing up into the home or overflowing out of the opening. The tank suffers serious damage as a result of this.

Step 2 – Dig Up Septic Tank Lid

A septic tank lid is the section of the sewage tank that is located at the top of the tank. This lid must be removed at least once every several years in order to completely empty the tank. Every three to five years, depending on the size of the tank, a homeowner will need to have the septic tank pumped out and cleaned. Avoid allowing the tank to become overflowing, causing it to begin backing up into the home or overflowing out of the opening. The tank suffers serious damage as a result of this.

Step 3 – Pry Off Septic Tank Lid

The lid of the septic tank might be rather hefty, depending on the size of the tank. On all sides, it is a solid block of concrete that is perfectly flat. It could have a handle that you can pull on. Pry bars are required to remove the majority of septic tank lids from their resting positions. Set the prybar in the seam and push it down until it is secure. As the lid begins to rise out of the hole, have someone assist you in moving it to the side. Place the lid on the ground’s surface so that it is not in the path of the pumping vehicle.

How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

All septic tanks eventually fill with sediments and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain in excellent functioning order. If the tank’s lid is not on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located.

A typical septic tank is 4 inches to 4 feet underground, with all of its components, including the cover, buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underneath. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the surface of the ground.

Consult A Map

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank. If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your efforts.

Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land. After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if it is there. Locate the same spot outside and make a note of it. Insert a thin metal probe into the earth, identify the 4-inch sewage line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the property. Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet apart from the home in all states except Alaska.

Whenever the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene it indicates that the tank has been located.

Locate The Lid

The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 5 feet by 8 feet. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its boundaries and outline the rectangle’s boundary using a pencil. A septic tank that was built before 1975 will have a single concrete lid that is 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. If the tank was built after 1975, it will have two covers made of fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at the ends of the rectangle and centered at the ends of the rectangle.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

See also:  How To Tell If The Septic Tank Needs Inspection? (Best solution)

Mark The Spot

Make a note on the ground near where the tank was pumped by a professional and the lid was buried to serve as a reference in the future.

In order to keep track of where you are, you should choose a hefty circular patio tile that is embedded in the ground. Additionally, draw your own map of the area and store it with your other important papers.

How to Remove Septic Tank Lid: The Ultimate Step-by-Step Guide!

Sewage tank maintenance is made easier by understanding how to remove a septic tank lid properly. Fortunately, the removal process is pretty basic and, in the majority of cases, does not necessitate the use of a professional’s assistance. This tutorial is meant to assist homeowners with removing the lid from their septic tank in a correct and safe manner. Let’s get this party started!

How to Remove Septic Tank Lid

Removing the cover of a septic tank is a pretty simple procedure. Because most septic tank lids do not come with a lock, they may be opened at any time with the proper tools and materials.

You’ll Need:

  • Screwdriver, shovel, pry bar, metal detector (optional), broom, and other tools

Step 1: Locate the Septic Tank

In most areas, septic tanks must be located at least 10 feet away from the house’s foundation in order to function properly. It is possible to monitor their whereabouts by tracing the path of the drain as it leaves the residence. It’s possible that you’ll need to call your local health department instead if you can’t follow it down through the drainage system. If they’ve given permits for the system, it’s probable that they have a record of the location of the septic tank. If they don’t, get in touch with a reputable septic system company and inquire as to where it could be hidden or hidden from view.

It is possible to locate the approximate position of the septic tank using a metal detector if the tank is buried underground.

As a result, a metal detector will undoubtedly assist you in your hunt.

If it makes contact with something substantial, you’ve discovered your container.

Step 2: Dig Up the Lid

Septic tanks are often located beneath ground level. A covering of dirt or grass is frequently placed on top of them to prevent mishaps and odors from escaping because they require little care aside from the biannual or triennial pumping. Bring a shovel or other digging instrument with you to assist you in excavating the earth once you’ve discovered the tank. The lid should be perfectly flat on the tank, with the exception of a little seam around the edge. Prevent dirt from dropping and sliding down onto the lid by digging out at least 16 inches of earth on all sides and around the top of it.

Most tanks feature two or three lids, depending on their size.

Step 3: Remove the Lid

Due to the fact that septic tank lids are often built of concrete or steel, they are extremely tough to force apart and remove. The handles on some tank lids are built in, whilst others need the use of a pry bar to raise them open completely. If the lid has handles, enlist the help of a friend or family member to assist you in removing the lid from the container. If it doesn’t, put a screwdriver into the seam surrounding the lid and the pry bar into the space created by the screwdriver. Then press the button all the way down.

  1. Use caution when doing so to avoid damaging the lid.
  2. Keep in mind that septic tanks with concrete lids weigh significantly more than those with steel covers.
  3. In such instances, it is preferable to employ a contractor to remove the lid on your behalf in order to avoid injuring the lid itself.
  4. That’s all there is to it!
  5. When the pumping or repairs are finished, replace the cover on the hole in the right manner.
  6. Then you can either cover the lid with dirt or plant grass on top of it to finish it off.

The position of the tank should also be marked with a sign or a beautiful stepping stone to make it easier to find afterwards. You will avoid having to deal with the trouble of moving the tank’s cover in the future if you do this.

Septic Tank Lid Safety and Precautions

Approximately 80% of all septic tank accidents are the result of improperly shut lids. Unfortunately, not everyone who accidently falls in is able to walk away without injury. Prevent a catastrophe from occurring by taking some of the following precautions:

  • Check the condition of the tank’s lids on a regular basis. Bolts, screws, and other locks should be used to secure the lids to prevent unauthorized entry. It is never safe to leave an open lid alone, even while it is being pumped or fixed. After working on the septic system, always double-check that the tank lids are properly closed and secure. Educate young children on the importance of not opening or playing with septic tank covers. Understand the exact location of the septic tank lids on your property
  • Vehicles and heavy gear should never be driven or parked on top of septic systems, since this may cause the lid to become dislodged or damaged. Stay away from the septic tank’s entry since the gases might knock you out. If you’re near a septic tank, don’t burn a cigarette or do anything else that may cause a fire. Septic tanks emit methane gas, which is very flammable and explosive. Whenever you are excavating outside, keep an eye out for hidden mechanical or electrical wires. No matter how precious something may appear to be, it is never safe to remove anything from a tank. Instead, you should hire an expert to collect it on your behalf. If someone falls into the tank, do not go in after them unless you are equipped to do so safely and effectively. Please dial 911 as soon as possible, and make sure the individual does not drown by placing a floating device in the tank.

Final Thoughts

We hope this tutorial was useful in assisting you with the procedure of lifting the lid of your septic tank! Allow us to conclude this piece with a final word of caution: until absolutely essential, leave the maintenance of your septic system to the experts. Open the lid only when you need to monitor the level of the tank’s liquids or gases. Wishing you the best of luck!

There’s An Old Septic Tank On Your Property: Now What? – Troubleshooting Septic Systems

Published on: December 14, 2020 Septic systems are a straightforward, cost-effective, and ecologically beneficial means of waste disposal. They are also easy to maintain. These systems are common in rural regions, although the definition of what constitutes a rural area varies frequently throughout time. As cities grow, so do their municipal sewage systems, which are becoming increasingly complex. After much deliberation, many homeowners decide to connect their homes to city utilities. However, what happens to the existing septic system?

  1. Even worse, new owners may not be aware that they are purchasing a home with an ancient septic system on the premises.
  2. Being Aware of the Situation Even properly decommissioned septic systems may leave traces of their presence on a property’s grounds.
  3. For steel tanks, this frequently entails dismantling the tank (in order to avoid the formation of a potentially dangerous void beneath your home) and re-inserting it into the earth.
  4. When it comes to finding evidence of an old septic system, it’s only a problem if you feel the previous owners did not properly decommission the system once it was decommissioned.
  5. In the event that you are able to open a hatch and see into an old tank on your property, you almost probably have an issue on your hands.
  6. Despite the fact that septic tanks can endure for decades, they will ultimately break.
  7. The concern with ancient tanks is not so much ground pollution as it is the dangers linked with their collapse, which is surprising.

When the walls fail, parts of your property might collapse into the tank in a matter of minutes.

“Floating” is another possible problem for tanks made of lighter materials like steel or plastic.

Even tanks that have been properly guarded may become unlocked after a sufficiently lengthy time of inactivity.

Decommissioning Your Out-of-Date Storage Tank If you have an outdated septic tank on your property, you will need to hire a professional septic tank servicing business to take care of it.

It is possible that you will have to transfer plastic tanks off-site since they will not biodegrade.

If you are experiencing any issues with your septic tank on your property, contact a company such as Autry’s BackhoeSeptic Service. Share

Why Your Old Septic Tank Needs to be Removed, Now

An ancient, collapsing septic tank has caused a sinkhole in the backyard. Abandoned mobile homes are one of the things we encounter around our area. Those homes that were built before our community was established are about 60 years old, and so are the septic systems that served them. In truth, the old mobile house has been demolished just a few yards away, but the septic tank, which is in dire need of replacement, remains in the ground. These outdated septic tanks are a health hazard! To avoid a possibly dangerous situation if a loved one or a pet falls into an unattended septic tank in your yard, you must take immediate action to remedy the issue.

The age and type of tank will determine whether or not you should fill it with water or whether or not you should remove it altogether.

To be clear, this information also applies to anybody who has an old cesspool on their land).

Why Are Old Septic Tanks Dangerous?

An ancient, collapsing septic tank is to blame for a sinkhole in your backyard. We notice abandoned mobile homes all around our town, which is unusual. Most of the homes in our neighborhood are more than 60 years old, as are the septic systems that served them in the past. The old mobile home has been removed from the property just down the road from us, but the septic tank, which is in bad shape, remains in the ground. There’s something wrong with these antiquated septic systems. To avoid a potentially dangerous situation if a loved one or a pet falls into an unattended septic tank in your yard, you must take immediate action to address the problem.

The age and type of tank will determine whether or not you should fill it with water or whether or not you should remove it altogether.

To be clear, this information also applies to anyone who has an old cesspool on their property.

What Are My Options with an Old Septic Tank?

No matter whether you’re legally leaving your own operating septic tank because you’re being connected up to a sewer line, or if you discover an old septic tank on your land, you basically have two options: you can either fill it with water or you may dig it out. The specific regulations for abandoning your septic tank will be established by the county or state in which you live, however the following is the general procedure: 1. Hire a septic pumping firm to pump out and properly dispose of the contents of your septic tank.

  1. Disconnect and remove any electrical or mechanical components, such as a pump or an alarm system, from the system (if applicable) Cutting the septic sewage line from the home to the tank is the third step to take.
  2. A possible explanation is that the home was changed from septic to sewer during the conversion process).
  3. Removing the tank involves digging a trench around it or crushing and collapsing it into the earth.
  4. Backfill the hole with the proper material.

Crush and collapse the tank, leaving the debris on the ground, then backfill with gravel and fill dirt. 2)

What About the Leach Field?

Even when a septic tank is being abandoned, the leach lines and drain field are not necessarily required to be removed. Once again, this is something that should be confirmed with your county.

How Much Does it Cost to Abandon an Old Septic Tank?

The cost of removing or filling an old septic tank will vary depending on a variety of factors, as it will with most things:

  • Geographical location
  • Ease of access to the tank
  • Size of the tank
  • Whether you can do the most of the deconstruction and filling yourself or if you must employ a contractor removing an old tank from the site or deconstructing it in place The type and cost of fill materials
  • Who is responsible for filling the hole
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Here are some very preliminary estimations, which may vary significantly depending on the above-mentioned conditions, but they should give you a general sense.

  • For a normal 1,000 – 1,500 gallon septic tank, the cost is $300 – $400
  • Fill dirt is $225 based on 15 yards at $15/yd
  • And installation of a new septic tank costs $300 – $400. Backhoe and operator – $500, based on a rate of $250 per hour for two hours (including travel and other expenses)
  • TOTAL VERY BRIEF ESTIMATE:$1225 to properly abandon your septic tank and obtain certification of such from your county
  • (this will increase if your leach field lines need to be removed as well)
  • TOTAL VERY BRIEF ESTIMATE:$1225 to properly abandon your septic tank and receive certification of such from your county

Concrete septic demolition is carried out with the use of (small) heavy equipment.

Can I Remove a Septic Tank Myself?

It’s probable that you’ll be able to do everything alone, with the exception of pumping out the tank. Septic pumping should be conducted by an appropriately certified septic pumping business, and you will need to provide proof of this pumping to your county in order to receive your certification of abandonment. Please check with your county to see whether or not you are legally permitted to remove or refill your tank yourself. You may be able to complete the filling in or removal yourself, after which you may call the county to examine and provide you with the required paperwork of the abandoned property.

That being said, many individuals out there would sneer and scoff at the prospect of paying $1000 or more merely to remove an old septic tank, and they are determined to finish the project on their own time and with their own resources.

  1. Methane gas can be found in sewage treatment plants. Being trapped inside a tank filled with methane gas will kill you – how quickly it will kill you will depend on the amount of methane present and the length of time you are exposed to it. Old steel septic tanks are rusted and have sharp edges, which should be avoided. Consider tetanus. Septic tanks hold biological waste that is teeming with bacteria. Keep an eye out for any open wounds you may have.

Financial Help – Loans for Septic Tank Repair, Replacement and Removal

We understand that money is limited for many families, and that paying to have your septic tank abandoned may not be a viable financial option. The good news is that there are loans and other financial programs available to help with septic system repair, replacement, and removal costs. Because these loans are dependent on geography, the terms and conditions will differ from county to county and state to state. Try searching for “Septic System Loans” or “Septic Tank Financing” on the internet, making sure to include your state or county in the search, and you should be able to discover at least one option that works for you.

Final Thoughts

A decaying septic tank may cost anywhere from $1000 to $3000 or more to repair or replace, and this is especially true if you haven’t had any difficulties with it in the past. However, there is a very real danger hiding underground that is becoming more severe by the day. It is possible that you will not even be aware of a threat until it is too late. Homeowners may see a depression in their yard beginning to form, which might be a sign of a septic sinkhole forming, or it could be fill from a prior fill-in that has settled in.

Don’t let the expense of resolving the problem before it becomes a problem deter you from taking action. Your family is way too valuable for such a thing!

3 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT SEPTIC TANK BAFFLES

By Admin on November 12, 2020 Your efforts to live as environmentally conscious as possible, as a responsible homeowner, are likely already underway, with practices such as recycling, composting, and purchasing energy-efficient equipment among your list of accomplishments. As a septic tank owner, you want to be sure that anything you put into your tank and septic field is causing the least amount of ground contamination as is reasonably practicable. Fortunately, there are a number of modest improvements you can do immediately to make your septic system even more ecologically friendly than it already is.

  1. Have your septic tank inspected and pumped on a regular basis.
  2. A bigger septic tank with only a couple of people living in your house, for example, will not require pumping as frequently as a smaller septic tank or as a septic tank that must manage the waste products of multiple family members will require.
  3. When in doubt about how often to pump your septic tank, consult with a professional for advice.
  4. In addition to locating and repairing any damage, a professional can ensure that the septic field is in good working order and that your septic tank is functional, large enough to handle your family’s waste, and not causing any unwanted pollution in nearby ground water.
  5. Avoid flushing non-biodegradable items down the toilet or down the toilet.
  6. Items that are not biodegradable are unable to properly decompose in the septic tank and might cause the system to get clogged.
  7. In addition to causing issues in your house, septic system backups can damage ground water in the area surrounding your septic field.

Towels made of paper Products for feminine hygiene Grease or fats are used in cooking.

grinds from a cup of coffee Even if you have a trash disposal, the food scraps that you flush down the drain and bring into your septic system may cause unanticipated harm to your plumbing system.

Food scraps can enhance the amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus in the wastewater, which can disturb the natural bacterial balance of the septic tank, among other things.

Water conservation should be practiced.

Exceedingly large amounts of water use will interfere with the normal flow of wastewater from your home into your septic tank.

Limiting the amount of time you spend in the shower and turning off the faucet while brushing your teeth, as well as purchasing a smaller dishwasher and washing machine that use less water, are all simple strategies to reduce water use in your home.

The following are some basic steps you can take to make your septic system more ecologically friendly: save water, maintain your septic system and tank, and recycle wastewater. To get answers to any of your septic tank-related issues, get in touch with the experts at Upstate Septic Tank, LLC.

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Over time, all septic tanks become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to continue functioning properly. Septic tank lids are frequently located at ground level. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. In the event that you have recently purchased a property and are unsure as to where your septic tank is located, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank. Noteworthy: While every property is unique, septic tanks are usually typically huge and difficult to build.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the municipal records. The most straightforward method of locating your septic tank is to review the building plans for your home that were approved by the local government. You should have received an application from the business that installed the septic tank, which should contain schematics and specifications that will help you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was installed. 2. Look for highs and lows in your data. The majority of septic tanks are constructed in such a way that they are barely noticeable.

  • 3.
  • Almost usually, your septic tank will be constructed near where the main sewage line exits your property.
  • Septic tanks are typically positioned between ten and twenty-five feet away from a home’s foundation.
  • When you do, that’s when your septic tank comes into play!
  • Look for the Lid.
  • You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and installed after 1975.
  • Those areas should be excavated in order to disclose the lids.
  • Get in touch with the pros.
  • Lifting concrete lids will necessitate the use of specialized equipment.
  • A fall into an unprotected septic tank has the potential to be lethal.
  • Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you may file away with your other important house paperwork.

That’s all there is to it! If you’ve been wondering where your septic tank is, you now have five alternatives to choose from, which should make finding it easier than ever. To book a plumbing service in Bastrop County, please contact us now!

How to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the local government. To locate your septic tank, it is most likely the most straightforward method of looking through the building blueprints for your home that were prepared by the town. This application, which should include schematics and dimensions that will assist you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was built, should have been filed by the business that installed the septic tank in question. Find the highs and lows of your experience. In order to be unobtrusive, the majority of septic tanks are placed in a discreet manner.

  • Follow the rules.
  • Be a good sport.
  • Track down and mark the location of the 4-inch sewer that exits the crawl space or basement, and the same location outside the house.
  • Every few feet, insert a tiny metal probe into the earth, continuing until you reach polyethylene, fiberglass, or flat concrete.
  • The Lid may be found in Step 4.
  • You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and is older than that.
  • In order to disclose the lids, you must excavate in specific areas.

Get in touch with the professionals.

Using special lifting gear to lift heavy concrete lids will be necessary.

It is possible to die after falling into an open septic tank.

Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you can file away with your other important house documentation.

That’s it!

The good news is that you now have five alternatives for locating your septic tank, making it easier than ever to discover your tank.

  • Rubble buried in the ground (not to be confused with Barney Ruble)
  • SepticDrywell
  • An old foundation
  • In case you happen to live in a cemetery (which is spooky), you may use a grave vault to keep your belongings safe.

After a few hours of hopelessly digging about in your yard, it will be time to eat your hoagie and take a little sleep. Following that, it will be necessary to rent or borrow a metal detector. In the event that your next-door neighbor loves Star Wars action figures or has more than three unidentified antennae on his roof, there is a significant probability that you can borrow his metal detector. If you’re lucky, the metal detector will really assist you in finding your septic tank, rather than simply a bunch of old buried automobile parts.

According to local legend, a pumper known as “Zarzar The Incredible” can locate sewage tanks using a metal measuring tape spanning 30 feet in length.

Continue to press your commode (“commode” sounds sophisticated) tape deeper and farther down the pipes until he “feels” the bottom of the tank with his tape.

I recently acquired locate equipment that can be used to locate septic tanks, and I’m excited about it.

For further information, please contact me at 574-533-1470.

After that, you may have a movie of the inside of your sewer pipes created!

Related: Visit our Septic System Maintenance page for more information.

Related: Dry well, dosing tank, and distribution box are all included. Services provided by Meade Septic Design Inc. Observe Meade Septic Design, Inc.’s Commercial Website. Both Clients and Projects are included. Do you have any queries about septic systems? Send me an email!

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