How To Locate Septic Tank On A Vacant Lot?

Most septic tanks are around 10-25 feet away from your home, and cannot be closer than five feet. Once you feel the probe striking flat concrete, fiberglass or polyethylene, you will have located your tank. Another way to find the septic tank using the sewer pipe is to go through the pipe itself.

  • To find the septic tank, first check the septic tank map of your property which will have a diagram, with the location of the tank. You can also use a metal detector to detect the metallic rods of the septic tank, or look for visual signs in the yard, ask the neighbors where their tanks are located or follow the septic pipes as they exit from your home as they will eventually end in the septic tank.

How do I find out where my septic tank is located?

Follow the Main Sewer Line Look for a pipe that’s roughly four inches in diameter that leads away from your house. Remember the location of the sewer pipe and where the pipe leaves your home so you can find it outside. The sewer pipes will lead to where your septic tank is located.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

How do you find a septic tank in an old house?

Look for the 4-inch sewer that exits the crawl space or basement, and locate the same spot outside the home. Septic tanks are usually located between ten to 25 feet away from the home. Insert a thin metal probe into the ground every few feet, until you strike polyethylene, fiberglass or flat concrete.

Will a metal detector locate a septic tank?

If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector. Based on your conclusions in Step 3, if your septic tank is likely made from concrete or steel, a metal detector can make the task of locating it much easier. But not just any metal detector will do.

How far is septic tank from house?

Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet from the house, although most are between 10 and 25 feet away.

How do I find out if my septic tank is registered?

Check if your septic tank is already registered You can check if your tank has already been registered by contacting your environmental regulator. If you are unsure then it is best to check and avoid making an unnecessary payment. The NIEA and SEPA have records of all registered septic tanks.

How do I find my septic lateral lines?

Call your local electric utility provider or gas company to locate buried gas or utility lines before digging. A septic tank probe can also help you find the location. Stick the long, thin metal probe into the ground until you feel it hit the tank and feel the edges of the tank.

What is OWTS?

An Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTS) is a privately owned and maintained sewage disposal system. They are commonly referred to as septic systems. All OWTS have two basic components: a two-compartment septic tank and a disposal field.

Can you use a metal detector to find sewer lines?

Using a Plumbing Pipe Detector to Locate Underground Pipes. As a property owner there will be times when, for a variety of reasons, you will need to locate underground metal objects. For example, using a pipe locator metal detector you can easily pinpoint leaking underground pipes quickly.

Are septic tanks made of metal?

The majority of septic tanks are constructed out of concrete, fiberglass, polyethylene or coated steel. Typically, septic tanks with a capacity smaller than 6,000 gallons are pre-manufactured. Larger septic tanks are constructed in place or assembled on-site from pre-manufactured sections.

How To Find Septic Tank Location: A Guide for Property Owners

The majority of individuals prefer to relax on their back patio or porch and take in the scenery rather than worrying about where their septic tank could be. When you know exactly where your septic tank is, it will be much easier to schedule routine sewer line cleanouts and repair appointments. Continue reading to find out more about how to locate your septic tank.

Follow the Main Sewer Line

Purchase a soil probe that you may use to probe into the earth in order to locate the underground sewage line and septic tank in your property. Find the main sewage line that leads to your septic tank by going to your basement or crawl space and digging about down there. Look for a pipe with a diameter of around four inches that is leading away from your home or building. Keep a note of the position of the sewer pipe and the point at which the line exits your home so that you can locate it outdoors.

If you have a drain snake, you may use it to try to follow the approximate course of the pipes in your home.

Since the majority of states require at least five feet between a home’s septic tank and its foundation, with many tanks located between 10 and 25 feet away, you may have to probe a bit further out before striking the tank.

Inspect Your Property

Purchase a soil probe that you may use to probe into the earth in order to locate the underground sewage line and septic tank in your yard. Find the main sewage line that leads to your septic tank by going to your basement or crawl space and digging about in it. Look for a pipe with a diameter of around four inches that is leading away from your home or business. Recall where your sewer pipe is located, as well as where it exits your home, in order to locate it while you are out in the field.

If you have a drain snake, you may use it to try to follow the approximate course of the pipes in your house.

Since the majority of states require at least five feet between a home’s septic tank and its foundation, with many tanks located between 10 and 25 feet away, you may need to probe a bit further out before striking the tank.

  • Paved surfaces
  • Unique landscaping
  • Your water well, if you have one
  • And other features.

If you are still having trouble locating your septic system, you might inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tank on their land. Finding out how far away their septic systems are will help you figure out where yours might be hidden in your yard or garden.

Check the Property Records

Are you unsure about how to obtain this? Simply contact your county’s health department for further information. Check with your local health agency to see if they have a property survey map and a septic tank map that you can borrow. Perhaps you will be shocked to learn that there are a variety of options to obtain information about your property without ever leaving the comfort of your own residence. Building permits, for example, are frequently found in county records, and they may provide schematics with specifications on how far away from a septic tank a home should be, as well as other important information such as the size of the tank.

Most counties, on the other hand, keep records of septic tank installations for every address. For further information on the placement of your septic tank, you can consult your home inspection documents or the deed to the property.

Don’t Try to Fix Septic Tank Issues Yourself

Septic tank problems should be left to the specialists. The Original Plumber can do routine maintenance on your septic tank and examine any problems you may have once you’ve located the tank. It is not recommended to open the septic tank lid since poisonous vapors might cause major health problems. Getting trapped in an open septic tank might result in serious injury or death. While it is beneficial to know where your septic tank is located, it is also beneficial to be aware of the potential health dangers associated with opening the tank.

Schedule Septic Tank Maintenance

The maintenance of your septic tank on a regular basis helps to avoid sewer backups and costly repairs to your sewer system. You should plan to have your septic tank pumped out every three to five years, depending on the size of your tank and the number of people that reside in your home. The Original Plumber offers skilled septic tank and drain field maintenance and repair services at competitive prices. While it is useful to know where the septic tank is located, it is not required. Our team of skilled plumbers is equipped with all of the tools and equipment necessary to locate your tank, even if you have a vast property.

We are open seven days a week, twenty-four hours a day.

Frequently Asked Questions

A septic system is a system for the management of wastewater. Simply said, wastewater will exit your home through pipes until it reaches your septic tank, which is located outside your home. Septic tanks are normally located beneath the surface of the earth. Solids and liquids will separate in the septic tank as a result of the separation process. Eventually, the solids will fall to the bottom of the tank and the liquids will run out onto your leach field.

How do I know if I have a septic tank?

Even if there are no obvious signs of a septic tank in your yard – such as uneven landscaping – there are a few techniques to assess whether or not your home is equipped with an onsite sewage system. Checking your property records is the most reliable technique to ensure that you are utilizing the correct system. When you acquired your house, you should have received a copy of the septic system map with the property documents as well. Checking your electricity statement is another way to determine this.

If you’re also using well water, it’s possible that you won’t receive one at all.

What do I do once I locate my septic tank?

Once you’ve discovered where your septic tank is, there are a few things you should do. It is critical to clearly mark the position of your septic tank. With our inspection, pumping, and repair services, you can save time whether you need a sewer line cleanout or a septic tank maintenance job completed quickly. Make a note of the location of your tank so that you can find it again if necessary. It should be heavy enough so that it does not fly away in windy conditions. A creative approach to accomplish this without having an unattractive flag or marking in your yard is to use garden décor or a potted plant.

This way, you’ll have it for future reference and will be able to quickly locate the exact position if necessary.

Then contact The Original Plumber to have your septic system maintained on a regular basis. Preventing worse problems and the need for costly repairs down the line may be accomplished via proper septic system maintenance. All of the heavy lifting has been delegated to our team of professionals.

Septic Tank Location – A Guide to Visual Clues that Help find a Septic Tank

  • Once you’ve located your septic tank, there are a few things you should do. It’s critical to mark the position of your septic tank. Using our inspection, pumping, and repair services, you can save time if you ever require a sewer line cleanout or septic tank maintenance. Clearly mark the location of your tank so that you can easily locate it again. In windy conditions, it should be heavy enough to prevent it from blowing away. It is possible to accomplish this without having an unattractive flag or marking in your yard by utilizing garden décor or a potted plant. If you did not obtain a septic tank map when you acquired your house, you should develop one as soon as possible after closing. As a result, you’ll have it for future reference and will be able to locate the specific area more readily in the future. If you ever decide to sell your house, you will be able to pass it on to the future owner. To keep your sewage system in good working order, contact The Original Plumber. Preventing worse problems and the need for costly repairs down the line may be accomplished via regular septic system maintenance. All of the heavy lifting has been delegated to our team of experts.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. The following are the instructions for locating the septic tank: A video tutorial on how to locate hidden septic tanks in order to check, test, clean, or repair the septic system is available online for free. This article describes how to discover the septic tank on a property in detail, including a step-by-step approach for finding any septic tank.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Video + Visual Outdoor Clues Can Tell The Septic Tank Location

A guide on discovering a septic tank may be found here. We present tips and techniques for locating a septic tank. It will be less expensive for the septic tank to be pumped when it has to be pumped, which is a routine maintenance activity, if the property owner has discovered the septic tank’s location and, if possible, has discovered the septic tank pumping access cover. The septic tank can also be located for a variety of other purposes, such as checking and testing septic systems when purchasing a property, or for safety considerations, such as ensuring that the septic tank cover is in excellent shape.

  1. SEPTIC VIDEOS has further videos on septic system installation and maintenance.
  2. For example, in this winter scene, a depression near the home indicates the location of the septic tank cleanout, which in this case was rather close to the surface.
  3. Another comparable hint may be found in melting depressions in the snow cover, which can be used to detect septicleach field lines on the same land.
  4. Look for the circular silver perforated “thing” that’s to the left of the chimney and below that window, which you can see if you look closely.
  5. The location of the main waste pipe exiting the house was known to us without having to walk inside and examine!

Here are Visual Clues at that can Locate Septic System Components at a Homesite

  • A former building owner may have left stones, slates, stakes, or other markings to indicate the position of a septic tank pumpout access cover
  • However, this is not always the case. In some cases, pipes protruding from the ground, perhaps 10 to 20 feet from the house and especially if they are 4–6 inches wide and made of cast iron, white or black plastic, may indicate the location of waste vents or cleanouts on the waste line that connects the building and septic tank, or they may indicate the location of the tank itself. The installation of a 6″ top 8″ “riser” pipe with a cap near to ground level (which may be painted green by the homeowner) by certain septic pumping firms is used as a rapid access port to pump the septic tank. If one removes the pipe cap and glances inside, maybe with a torch, it is simple to determine whether or not one of these ports is directly above the tank. Keep an eye out for: NOTE FOR SAFETY: Do not cross or go near septic tanks if there are indicators of impending collapse, such as sinking of the soil
  • In certain septic systems, electrical boxes protruding from the ground may serve as a visual cue to indicate the position of electrical connections feeding electrical components. Examples include septic tanks that use effluent pumps to transfer effluent to an uphill position, pumping chambers that use sewage grinder pumps to send sewage to an uphill septic tank and drainfield, and drainfields that use effluent pumps to move effluent to an uphill location. A video demonstrating a septic tank with a pumping station and its electrical connections can be seen atSeptic 101 part 1: Septic Tanks and Pumping Stations. How to locate the septic system in this video
  • Large rectangular depressions, maybe 4 feet by 8 feet in size. On the other hand, it is possible that soils have settled away from the septic tank and created an elevated rectangular area on rare occasions. One of our sites experienced this because the bottom of the septic tank was situated on bedrock, and after backfilling, certain soils around the tank settled and compacted, but the tank itself did not move
  • A rectangular region with minimal grass growth indicates that the tank is not very deep below and that there is less dirt over it. If the tank is leaking or backing up and spewing effluent around itself, the grass will grow more lushly in the vicinity of the tank. It is possible that a prior excavation for tank pumping left depressions in the earth of around 2 square feet. Snow melt: In regions where snow falls, portions of melted snow may be seen at the top of the septic tank’s tank wall (or areas of a failing leach field). Photograph of this clue, which shows drainfield trenches as depressions in the snow, may be found on the websiteVisualClues to Location. A septic tank location drawing or sketch can occasionally be discovered in a building’s basement or crawl space, scribbled on a surface around the point where the main waste pipe exits the structure, indicating where the tank is located. Of course, a conscientious previous owner may have left a sketch on a piece of paper for the new owners to find. AtRECORDS to LOCATE the DRAINFIELD, an example of a drawing for finding septic system components can be found. Wet spots on the ground that may indicate a clogged drainfield. Pipes ending in streams, lakes, or swamps, or at the boundary of a property, may indicate an overflow drain that was installed to deal with a malfunctioning septic system. Septic smells may also indicate an overflow drain. This is a shot of one of these that is most likely found in a DRAINFIELD
  • The following is a response to Donica Ben, who pointed out the danger of digging into underground electrical lines (11/11/07), which we will explore further at SEPTICCESSPOOL SAFETY PROCEDURES
  • A clogged drain diagnosis will determine if the problem is with a septic system or with the building drain system. SEPTIC TANK SAFETY: Safety Warnings for Septic Inspectors, Septic Pumpers, and Homeowners Regarding Septic Systems, Septic Tanks, and Cesspools
  • THE CONDITION OF SEPTIC TANKS- How to Inspect Septic Tanks and Evaluate the Septic Tank Condition, including the condition of the baffles and sludge levels, as well as any signs of septic failure Form OF SEPTIC DRAINFIELD: factors for the shape and placement of a septic drainfield or leaching bed
  • LOCATION OF THE SEPTIC DRAINFIELD: where to look for the septic drain field or leaching bed
  • DRAINFIELD INSPECTION PROCEDURESeptic Leach Fields – how to inspect and diagnose septic drainfield failures
  • Septic Leach Fields – how to inspect and diagnose septic drainfield failures
See also:  How Long Does It Take Bacteria To Liquify Sludge In Septic Tank? (Best solution)

. Continue reading at this website. WHO KNOWS WHERE THE SEPTIC LOCATION IS? Alternatively, choose a topic from the closely related articles listed below, or browse the entireARTICLE INDEX.

Alternatively, see HOW TO FIND A SEPTIC TANK IN YOUR HOME SEPTIC VIDEOS that demonstrate how to locate a septic system, septic tank, and septic drainfield are available. LOCATION OF SEPTIC DRAINFIELD- HOW TO FIND THE LEACH FIELD SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Tank Location Articles

  • DISTANCES OF SEPTIC CLEARANCE
  • LOCATION OF SEPTIC DRAINFIELD
  • SIZE OF SEPTIC DRAINFIELD
  • LEVELS OF SEPTIC SYSTEM INSPECTION
  • WHERE TO FIND SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • HOW TO FIND A SEPTIC TANK
  • THE DISTANCE TO THE SEPTIC TANK
  • FIND THE MAIN WASTE LINE EXIT
  • POSSIBLE SEPTIC TANK LOCATIONS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK LOCATING EQUIPMENT
  • SEPTIC TANK LOCATION SKETCH
  • SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • SEPTIC TAN
  • Mistakes made during septic tank pumping
  • SEPTIC TANK PUMPING SCHEDULE
  • SEPTIC TANK RAISERS
  • And more.

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Looking for Your Septic Tank? Here’s How to Find It

“It’s 9 o’clock, do you know where your septic tank is?” says the interrogator. Maybe this is a little over the top, but it’s a question that many of our clients have asked over the years. In particular, new homeowners who are unfamiliar with the inner workings of their home or who haven’t needed septic tank servicing yet should be aware of the risks involved. Knowing where your septic tank is located is essential for routine maintenance and when you wish to add additional landscaping to your property.

Why you need to know where your septic tank is located

If your house does not have access to municipal sewage services, it is almost inevitable that you have a septic tank to redirect and store all of your wastewater someplace on your property’s subterranean drainage system. While a septic system is trustworthy and cost-effective, it does not operate without some kind of upkeep. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, a septic tank should be examined at least once every three years and drained every three to five years at the absolute least.

In either of these scenarios, you’ll need to know the location of your septic tank so that you can arrange for it to be serviced.

How to find your septic tank

  1. Inquire with your neighbors– If you have a septic tank, it’s possible that your neighbors have, too. Perhaps you’ll be fortunate enough to come across someone who knows where your tank is or who can assist you in narrowing down your search
  2. Obtain information from public records– It is possible that your local county or municipality has an existing septic tank map on file, which contains a schematic and the measurements of your property. Examine the home inspection report you received when you purchased your house to see if there is any mention of the presence of a septic tank and the location of the tank before going to your local records office. Start in the basement and discover the sewer pipe that leaves the house if you have to locate the tank by yourself. Pipe with a diameter of four inches is usual for this application. After that, go outside and around to the opposite side of the wall. Then, using a metal soil probe to poke small holes in various locations around your property, trace the pipe’s course until you reach the tank. When you strike the flat top surface of the tank with the probe, you’ll notice a distinct change. Consider your surroundings– If you have a huge property, locating a needle in a haystack might seem like a daunting task. To make your search more efficient, you can eliminate locations near structures, paved surfaces, the water well, and, ideally, regions with extensive trees or landscaping from consideration. Another possibility is that you may notice a patch of grass that is a little greener or that is growing more quickly around the tank. Locate the septic tank lid– Regardless of how you pinpoint the position of the tank, you may need to perform a little digging in order to expose the lid. You may use the soil probe to determine the perimeter of the tank – most tanks will be around 5 7 feet in length and width. As soon as you’ve outlined the edges, start shoveling in the middle and working your way around the perimeter until you reach the lid. However, unless you’re servicing the tank immediately away, there’s no reason to lift the top and let the noxious odors out into the environment.

After you’ve located your septic tank, make a note of the position on a map or mark it on your GPS device for future reference. This will assist you in avoiding the construction of structures or the planting of deep-rooted plants in the vicinity of the sewage line and septic tank. When it comes to selling your house, a map or handwritten diagram may also be beneficial. If you want plumbing assistance in New Haven or Fairfield County, Rick’s Plumbing is the brand you can rely on. In order to obtain expert assistance, please send us a message or phone us at (203) 874-6629.

  • The post was published on July 16, 2019 under the category Septic Tank System.

How to Find a Septic Tank With a Metal Detector

For sewage treatment in the United States, around 48% of households in rural and outlying regions depend on septic tanks or septic systems. Many of these systems have been operating without regular maintenance for many years.

It is necessary to locate your septic tank in the event that sewage is backing up into your home or if your main drain line has become obstructed. Throughout this post, we’ll go over the basics of how septic systems function before showing you how to identify your septic tank in six simple stages.

How do septic systems work?

A septic system is made up of two parts: the septic tank and the drain field (or leach field).

Septic Tank

Waste from toilets, sinks, and showers is sent down a main sewage line and into a holding tank known as the septic tank. A septic tank is a large, subterranean container that acts as the initial stage of a home’s sewage treatment system by collecting and treating sewage. Watertight containers such as concrete, steel, plastic, and fiberglass are used to construct the tank. Until the particles and liquids separate into three different layers, sewage is allowed to remain in the septic tank. This picture shows how sewage from the home drains into a two-compartment underground septic tank.

The liquid wastes are subsequently discharged into the drain field.

The bacteria produce a sludge that is “digested” and stays in the tank until it is drained.

This stratum is referred to as effluent in most circles.

Drain Field

Drain fields are composed of layers of gravel and dirt that allow liquid sewage to flow down. It eventually becomes part of the groundwater supply. Aerobic bacteria (bacteria that require oxygen to survive) and other microbes decompose the organic debris that remains.

What happens if a septic tank gets too full?

In the event that your septic tank becomes overflowing, sewage may back up into your home. It is more difficult to breakdown sludge than it is to collect it. If the sludge isn’t cleaned, the solids will build up until they overflow into the drain field, causing the drain to back up. This has the potential to clog pipes and produce a backup. The sludge must be cleared on a regular basis in order to avoid this. Many households only get their tanks emptied after the system malfunctions. Waiting until that stage can result in repair expenses in the tens of thousands of dollars.

6 Steps to Locate a Septic Tank

Water from your toilets, sinks, and showers is collected in a main drain pipe and disposed of properly. This line departs your home and enters your septic tank through the basement or crawl area where it was installed. Find the line in question. Afterwards, walk outside and look for the identical location on the opposite side of the wall. Make a note of this spot since you’ll need it in a moment.

2. Check Permits and Public Records

The majority of county health agencies keep public records of septic system installation permits on their websites. These permits must be accompanied by a schematic or design depicting the proposed location of the septic tank and drainage field systems. They also give a description of the tank’s dimensions and construction material. Having this information can be quite beneficial when trying to locate a submerged tank lid. In some cases, depending on the age of your septic system and the digitization efforts of your county’s health department, you may be able to do a public records search online.

Alternatively, you can make a public records request for a modest charge with the appropriate authorities. If you live in Colorado, we’ve provided links below that will allow you to check septic records in a few different areas.

  • Colorado’s counties of Adams, Arapahoe, and Douglas Colorado Septic Records Search
  • Colorado Permits Search
  • El Paso County Records Search
  • Jefferson County Septic Records Search
  • Jefferson County Records Search
  • Mesa County Septic Systems Search
  • Pueblo County Records Search. Colorado Septic Records Search
  • Pueblo County Records Search
See also:  How Often Do You Maintain A Septic Tank? (Solution)

3. Determine Septic Tank Material

If you’ve located your septic permit, you’ll find information about the size, shape, and material of your septic tank there as well. But don’t be concerned if your septic data aren’t readily available. We can perform some basic detective work to determine what material your septic system is built of. Let’s start with a look at the materials.

Types of Septic Tank Materials

Construction of septic tanks is mostly done using four types of materials: concrete, steel, fiberglass, and polyethylene plastic. Until the 1880s, the most extensively used septic tank material was concrete, which was then replaced by steel. These tanks have a lifespan of around 40 years and are built to last. They are susceptible to cracking, however, in locations where temperature variations are strong and frequent. Concrete tanks are frequently required by municipalities that have strict requirements on septic system construction.

  1. Steel septic tanks begin to corrode within 20 to 25 years of installation in most regions.
  2. If a human or animal walks across the weakened tank, it may collapse under the weight of the person or animal.
  3. They will not break or corrode, however, in contrast to concrete or steel tanks.
  4. PlasticSeptic tanks made of polyethylene have been in use since the 1980s.
  5. They are not susceptible to rusting and are less prone to break when compared to concrete.
  6. Because of the weight of the earth above them, or because a vehicle passes over the area where they are buried, plastic tanks are susceptible to collapse.

How Old is Your House?

Next, let’s determine the approximate age of your home. In some cases, all you need to do is take a glance at the house’s façade to get an idea of how old it really is. However, you may examine the tax assessor’s records in your county to get a more precise assessment. Similarly to searching for septic records, your mileage may vary depending on which county’s digitized documents you are searching for. Let’s go over an example search utilizing Boulder County’s Property Search tool so that you can have a better sense of what you should be looking for.

  1. Look up your home address on the internet. When searching for a home, some programs provide separate areas for your address and street name, while others (such as Boulder County) merge the two into a single search box. Look for information on Deeds and/or Sales Records in the public domain. You’ll find a list of transactions here, with dates showing when the property was purchased and sold. Find the transaction that occurred on the earliest possible date. This is most likely the year in which your home was constructed.

This information allows you to make an informed guess regarding the sort of material that your septic tank is built of.

4A. If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector

After coming to the conclusion that the tank is most likely built of concrete or steel in Step 3, a metal detector may be used to make the work of locating it much simpler. But not just any metal detector will do. It must be the right one. Standard metal detectors have a depth range of 6 – 8″ (15 – 20 cm) below the surface of the ground. As previously stated, the majority of septic tanks are placed 1′ to 3′ (0.3 m to 1 m) underground, putting them outside of the acceptable range. An advanced sort of metal detector known as a Magnetic Locator, which can detect objects as deep as 16′ (4.8 m), is available for purchase.

Due to the fact that it exclusively detects iron and steel, it is perfect for finding the iron handles and reinforcing bars in concrete septic tanks, as well as the walls of steel tanks.

How to Use a Metal Detector to Search for a Septic Tank

If you have a septic permit record, you may refer to it to figure out how far you need to go to install a septic tank. Start at the point where the drain line meets the home and work your way out to where the septic tank is shown on the diagram. Keep in mind that this graphic depicts the proposed installation area and may not accurately depict the actual ground conditions on the site. We’ll have a look at the illustration below. One inch (2.5 centimeters) is equivalent to fifty feet (50 meters).

By using a ruler to measure the design, we’ve determined that the septic tank should be roughly 13′ (3.96 m) away from the home.

  1. To begin, start at the location you highlighted in Step 1 where the sewage drain line leaves the home. From here, you may switch on the locator and adjust the gain to a high setting. Walking over the search area, sweep the locator from left to right, as if looking for anything. As you go, make a note of the regions with the strongest signal strength. It is most likely that the tank-iron lid’s handles will be located in one of these positions
  2. As soon as you’ve exhausted the search region in one direction, sweep over it perpendicularly and make note of the spots with the strongest signal strength. Continue on to Step 5

4B. If it’s Plastic or Fiberglass, Probe Gently

Septic tanks made of plastic or fiberglass are typically buried one to two feet (0.3 to 0.91 m) below ground level. They feature circular covers made of green or black plastic that are roughly two feet (0.91 m) wide and have a diameter of around two feet (0.91 m). Due to the fact that these tanks are totally made of plastic, a metal detector will not be of use in locating them. In this situation, a soil probe is really useful. An inexpensive soil sampling instrument, soil probes are comprised of a 4′ (1.2 m) metal rod with a pointed tip on one end and are used for soil sample.

Gently poke the earth with a soil probe every 2 to 3 feet, using a light touch (0.61 to 0.91 m).

The use of a soft touch is essential here, since the metal tip of the probe can cause damage to plastic septic tanks (and sewage lines) if too much force is used.

5. Time to Dig

Following the placement of an amagnetic locator (or the probing of the ground) to record the places with the highest signal strength, you are ready to begin digging. Septic tank lids can be located anywhere from 4″ (10 cm) to 4′ (1.2 m) below the surface of the ground.

6. Mark the Location for Future Maintenance

Having discovered your septic tank, you’ll want to ensure that it can be readily detected and accessed in the event that it has to be repaired or replaced. You may accomplish this by installing a septic tank riser. Sewage Tank Risers are devices that provide for easy access to the septic tank from the ground. They are shafts made of plastic or concrete that link the top of the tank to the surface of the ground below the tank. The tank lid will no longer require you to dig to access it whenever maintenance is required.

Buying Vacant Land: Will You Need a Septic System?

Have you discovered the ideal plot of land on which to construct your dream home? Great! Although you may be satisfied to use an outhouse, you should investigate if a sewer system is already in place on the land, or whether you will be required to establish a sewer system.

The response will have an impact on not just your overall plans for the property, but also on your building timetable and budget, among other things.

Is the Property Served by a Sewer?

The first question to ask is whether or not the property is already served by a sewer system. A septic system will be required in this case. The simplest approach to find out is to speak with the seller of the land or, if there is a real estate agent involved, ask them. If no one is immediately accessible to inquire, you can hunt for hints on your own if no one else is. Given that municipal water is readily available on the property, it’s likely that the property is also served by a sewage collection and treatment system.

Consequently, if the property is located in a city, township, or a densely populated region, a public sewer system is most likely available.

Aside from that, if the property is huge and spread out over many acres (for example, land suited for a ranch or a farm), it will almost certainly require its own septic system.

Costs of Connecting to and Using an Existing Sewer System

If the property is served by a sewage system, the process is quite straightforward. As a landowner, your primary responsibility is to establish the link between the new residence and the main system of distribution. If you wish to build your own septic system or alternative wastewater treatment system, you will very certainly be denied permission to do so. An competent general contractor or plumber should be able to provide you with an estimate of the time and money that will be required. Typically, the cost is less than the cost of constructing a standard septic system, which is a significant savings (and much less than to construct an alternative septic system, described further below).

Once you’ve been connected, your service provider will charge you a quarterly sewer use fee, which will most likely be added to your monthly water bill.

Depending on whether or not a sewer system is available, municipal rules may require you to pay sewer connection costs before you can be awarded a building permit.

If the Property Isn’t Served by a Sewer: Regulations on Septic Systems

If you are required to establish a septic system (since there is no sewer system available on the property), this will take more time and money than just connecting to a sewage system. The construction and maintenance of septic systems are governed by state and municipal legislation in nearly every jurisdiction since failed septic systems are a major source of water contamination (as a result of germs invading adjacent water supplies). Before you can establish a septic system, you must first verify that you are in compliance with all applicable regulations.

A site evaluation is typically necessary prior to the issuance of a septic permit.

Topography and soils testing are required as part of nearly all site evaluations, regardless of the kind of site being evaluated (including a percolation or “perc” test). A professional site evaluator or engineering company may do them for you, or the local health agency can do it for you.

What the Site Evaluation Will Tell You

It will be determined by the findings of the site evaluation whether you will be able to construct a conventional (gravity-fed) septic system or whether an alternative system will be necessary. Alternative septic systems are basically modified versions of conventional septic systems that are particularly designed to operate with the soils and terrain present on a particular site. Alternative septic systems are also known as bioretention systems. As a consequence of the site evaluation, if the results indicate that your property is inappropriate for a traditional septic system, an engineer or an expert in septic design will need to develop an alternate system.

It is possible that alternative systems will be many times more expensive than a traditional system.

Make Sure You Have Enough Room Left for the Home

Septic rules also dictate where a septic system may be placed on a property and how large the system can be. It is required that septic systems be placed back a specific amount of distance from wells and other sources of water as well as from roads, driveways, buildings, and other structures as well as from property borders. These limitations might have a significant influence on where you can build your house. You must guarantee that there will be enough space to put the septic system in a good place, as well as a well (if necessary), and that there will be enough space to build the size of home you wish in an acceptable location when all of this is completed.

Protecting Your Interests Within the Purchase Contract

A site evaluation may have a significant influence on how much money a property is worth, thus it is smart to condition the acquisition of any unoccupied land without sewage connection on having an approved site report. Having the option to negotiate the purchase price or even cancel the contract if the findings of the site evaluation are unsatisfactory will be important to your success. The inclusion of such a contingency in your purchase contract should be made possible by the assistance of an expert real estate attorney.

How Do I Find My Septic Tank

What is the location of my septic tank? Natalie Cooper is a model and actress who has appeared in a number of films and television shows. 2019-10-24T 02:52:07+10:00

How Do I Find My Septic Tank

Whether or not my property has a septic tank is up in the air. If you live on an acreage or in a rural region, it is highly probable that you have a septic tank or a waste water treatment system in your home. What Is the Appearance of a Septic Tank? The great majority of septic tanks are 1600L concrete tanks, which are common in the industry. They feature a spherical concrete top with a huge lid in the center and two little lids on the sides. They are made out of concrete. Although the lids of these tanks may have been removed or modified on occasion, this is a rare occurrence.

A tiny proportion of septic tanks have a capacity of 3000L or more.

Our expert lifts the hefty lid of a 3000L septic tank and inspects the contents.

If you have discovered a tank or tanks that do not appear to be part of a waste water treatment plant system, it is possible that you have discovered a septic tank system. To learn more about our wastewater treatment plant, please visit our Waste Water Treatment Plant website.

How Can I Find My Septic Tank?

According to standard guidelines, the septic tank should be positioned close to the home, preferably on the same side of the house as the toilet. It can be found on the grass or within a garden bed, depending on its location. Going outdoors to the same side of the home as the toilet and performing a visual check of the septic tank is a smart first step to taking in order to discover where your septic tank is. The location of the toilets from outside can be determined if you are unfamiliar with the location of the toilets (for example, if you are looking to purchase a property).

See also:  How To Locate Septic Tank In Barrow County Ga? (Solution found)

Unfortunately, the position of septic tanks can vary widely and is not always easily discernible from the surrounding landscape.

In cases where the septic tank is no longer visible, it is likely that it has become overgrown with grass, has been buried in a garden or has had a garden built over it, that an outdoor area has been added and the septic tank has been paved over, or that a deck has been constructed on top of the tank.

  • They should indicate the position of your septic tank, as well as the location of your grease trap and greywater tank, if any.
  • Alternatively, if we have previously serviced the property for a different owner, our helpful office staff can examine our records to see if there are any notes pertaining to the site.
  • A specific gadget is used to locate the location of the septic tank, and our professional will mark the location of the tank so that it may be exposed and cleaned out.
  • Using an electronic service locator, you may locate a septic tank.
  • In the event that you’re not experiencing any problems, the toilets are flushing normally, and there are no foul odors, you may ponder whether it’s best to leave things alone rather than attempting to locate and unburden a hidden septic tank.
  • Although you could wait until there is a problem, this would almost certainly result in a significant amount of additional charges.
  • Does it make sense for me to have many toilets and also multiple septic tanks?

It is decided by the number of bedrooms, which in turn determines the number of people who are anticipated to reside in the house, that the size of the septic tank should be. The following is the relationship between septic tank volumes and the number of bedrooms:

  • There are three sizes of sewer tanks available: 3000L for three bedrooms, 3500L for four bedrooms, and 4000L for five bedrooms.

The most typical septic tank size is 1600L, although there are also some 3000L septic tanks available on the market. It is possible to have septic tanks with capacities as large as 3500L or 4000L, although they are not as popular, and most residences that require these capacities have numerous septic tanks in order to meet the septic litre requirements for each bedroom. Using the septic tank lid as a test, you may quickly determine whether all of the toilets in your home are linked to the same septic tank.

Check the rest of the toilets in the home by repeating the procedure.

Please call us immediately to have your septic tank pumped out or to schedule a free septic tank test when we are next in your area.

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Where’s my septic tank?

There are a few solutions available if the previous homeowner failed to supply this critical information or if you have misplaced your original copy:

  • Your local DHEC office may have a copy of your building permit on file if your house was built within the last five years or fewer, according to the DHEC. A copy of a septic tank permit can be obtained from the local office by any individual or group, regardless of whether or not they own the land in question. Because of this, it is highly recommended that you have as much of the following information as possible ready at the time of your request.
  • Number of the tax map
  • Lot number
  • Block number
  • Address in the physical world
  • When the system was installed or when the house was built (if this information is available)
  • Name of the original permit holder (if any information is available)
  • Name of the subdivision (if the property is located within a subdivision)
  • You may also submit a request for a copy of the permission through our Freedom of Information office, although this is not mandatory. To obtain a copy through the Freedom of Information Office, please complete and submit a copy of the DHEC FOI form. Instructions are given with the application. If feasible, please include the information about the property that is stated above. When looking around your yard, search for manhole covers or lids that have been buried by grass or leaves if your house was constructed before 1990.

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HOW TO SAFELY ABANDON AN OLD SEPTIC TANK ON YOUR PROPERTY

If you’ve recently purchased an older house, it’s possible that a septic tank is located on the property. This is true even if your home is currently linked to the municipal water and sewer systems. A prior owner may have abandoned the ancient septic system and connected to the city sewage system when it became accessible at some time in the past. Despite the fact that there are standards in place today for properly leaving a septic tank, it was typical practice years ago to just leave the tanks in place and forget about them.

  • The old tank may either be demolished or filled with water to solve the problem.
  • It is possible that permits and inspections will be required.
  • They are dangerous because curious children may pry open the lid and fall into the container.
  • Falls into a septic tank can be lethal owing to the toxicity of the contents and the fact that concrete can collapse on top of you while falling into a tank.
  • Eventually, this approach was phased out due to the fact that the steel would corrode and leave the tank susceptible to collapse.
  • When it comes to ancient septic tanks, they are similar to little caves with a lid that might collapse at any time.
  • The old tank is crushed and buried, or it is removed from the site.

If it is built of steel, it will very certainly be crushed and buried in its current location.

After that, the tank can be completely filled with sand, gravel, or any other form of rubble and buried.

Tanks can either be entirely dismantled or destroyed and buried in their original location.

The abandonment has been documented and plotted on a map.

It’s possible that you’ll forget about the tank once it’s been abandoned.

As a result, you might wish to sketch a map of the area where the old tank used to stand.

If you can demonstrate that an old septic tank was properly decommissioned, you may be able to increase the value of your property, and the new owners will enjoy knowing that large chunks of concrete are buried underground before they start digging in the yard to put something in it.

It may take some detective work to discover about the history of your land and what may be lying beneath the surface of the earth.

Upon discovering an old septic tank on your property that is no longer in service, contact Total Enviro Services for propertank abandonment procedures that meet with local standards and protect your family, pets, and farm animals from harm or death.

Septic Systems-What To Ask Before You Buy Land

Articles on Septic Systems Testing of the Soil and Perc What a Septic System Is and How It Works Septic System Upkeep and Repair NEW! Septic Systems that are not conventional See Also: Septic System Frequently Asked Questions See all of our LAND BUYING articles In order to buy land in the country if you’re from an urban or suburban region, you’ll need to become familiar with wells and septic systems. For city dwellers, water arrives out of nowhere at the faucet, and wastewater travels off to a distant location just as effortlessly.

Problems with either the well or septic systems can result in major health consequences as well as significant repair costs.

HOW A SEPTIC SYSTEM WORKS

In locations where there are no municipal sewage systems, each residence is responsible for treating its own sewage on its own property, which is known as a “on-site sewage disposal system,” sometimes known as a septic system. Septic systems are typically comprised of a waste pipe from the home, a big concrete, fiberglass, or plastic septic tank, and an aleach field, among other components. One of the most frequent types of leach fields is composed of a succession of perforated distribution pipes that are placed one after another in a gravel-filled absorption trenches.

SEPTIC SYSTEM CAREMAINTENANCE

Many individuals don’t pay attention to their septic system until they experience difficulties, such as slow drains or backups of sewage. If the drain field is entirely blocked by that time, it may be beyond repair and may require replacement. Fortunately, basic care and affordable maintenance may keep your system functioning for decades without requiring any major repairs. click here to find out more

SOIL AND PERC TESTING

Traditional septic systems can only function properly if the soil in the leach area is sufficiently porous to allow the liquid effluent flowing into it to be absorbed by the soil. There must also be at least a few feet of decent soil between the bottom of the leach pipes and the rock or impermeable hardpan below, or from the bottom of the leach pipes to the water table. Depending on the municipality, particular criteria may differ, however any of these qualities may exclude the installation of a basic gravity-fed septic system.

ALTERNATIVE SEPTIC SYSTEMS

If your lot does not pass the perc test, some towns may enable you to construct an engineered system as a backup plan if the perc test fails. Because a “mound” system functions similarly to a normal system, with the exception of the fact that the leach field is elevated, it is frequently used when the issue soil is too thick (or, in certain situations, too permeable), too shallow (over bedrock or hardpan), or the water table is too high. The mound is comprised of a network of tiny distribution pipes that are embedded in a layer of gravel on top of a layer of sand that is normally one to two feet deep.

Whether or not alternative septic systems are permitted.

Is It Possible for Septic Systems to Last a Lifetime? How Much Slope Do You Need for a Septic Line? Performing an Inspection on a Septic System When Is the Best Time to Take a Perc Test? Should I use a Sand Filter with my existing septic system? Testing for the presence of WellSeptic

Reader Interactions

Are you on the verge of locating the ideal piece of real estate on which to make an offer? Prepare yourself by asking yourself the following ten questions: What utilities are available for this home, and how can I get them? Check to see what services are available from the county (such as electricity, water, sewage removal, and gas) and what services you may need to make arrangements for on your own. You may need to be prepared to drill a well, establish a septic system, or acquire a gas tank and connect it to a gas line in order to complete your construction.

Locate and confirm the identity of the state provider or local electric membership cooperative (EMC) for the property.

2) Is the land suitable for construction?

It is possible to measure the rate at which water drains through soil using a percolation test.

If your soil does not pass a perc test, it might result in excessive expenditures for preparing the site for construction or perhaps the inability to construct at all.

Additionally, if the land is sloping or has elevation fluctuations, this might have an impact on your capacity to construct a structure.

Make a determination on the type and extent of the property’s access.

Physical pathways should be available and free of any barriers, if possible.

The lot is located on a publicly-maintained road, isn’t it?

Legal access includes entry points that come from permitted frontage roads (for example, no driveway off of a bypass) as well as crossings across land formations such as streams and marshy regions that are under the jurisdiction of the state.

4) What are the boundaries of the land and what is going on in the surrounding area?

In order to finance the land, the majority of banks demand a survey.

After that, try to locate the property lines with the help of the survey.

If the lines are not clearly delineated, a surveyor should be hired to permanently mark them.

Is there a strategy for future development?

Know what to expect if you decide to purchase and relocate to the property.

Even if you believe you have located the perfect house online, make sure you physically see the property before making a purchase.

Is the drive up to the property or the entry to the property exactly how you imagined it?

With the owner, take a walk around the property.

Pay attention to regions that are flooded, hilly, or degraded.

What is the condition of any ponds or streams that may be present on the property?

The zoning and rules that apply to the property are listed in question 6.

Do you want to build a home, a shed, a barn, a fence, or anything else on your property?

Some properties are subject to special covenants that have been imposed by the seller or former owner.

The yearly property tax liabilities for the land are listed in item #7.

Taxes on agricultural land are often lower than on non-agricultural land.

Check with the county tax assessor’s office to see how your land is zoned and/or to submit an application for rezoning.

Additionally to the purchase price of the land, you may need to budget for additional expenditures involved with preparing your land for the use for which it has been purchased.

The cost of each of these varies depending on the county and state in which you live.

9) Is there any monetary value to the timber on the property?

A merchantable wood tract is normally 25 acres in size, with the maximum size being 100 acres.

A timber cruise, which is carried out by a forester, can be used to estimate the present worth of standing timber.

To locate a forester, contact your state’s environmental agency, the Association of Consulting Foresters, or the Georgia Forestry Commission, among other organizations.

A land purchase is comparable to getting a home loan in that the down payment is greater (15–20 percent), the interest rate is higher, and the loan duration is shorter (15–20 years).

Some banks will not lend on raw land acquisitions, thus it is important to locate a lender in advance.

In the event that you require a lender who is experienced in land finance, please let us know.

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