How To Knock Out The Inlet Plug On A Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

  • Lift the lid and hold it over the hole leading into the septic tank. Slowly lower the lid down so it covers the hole completely and doesn’t move around. If you haven’t cleared the clog, leave the lid off so you can insert a mechanical auger. Never leave the septic tank open while you’re not working on it so nothing can fall in.

Where is the inlet baffle in a septic tank?

The inlet baffle is situated at the junction between the septic tank and the main sewer line leading from the house. It’s designed to help wastewater flow smoothly into the tank without disturbing the scum layer.

What is the purpose of an inlet baffle in a septic tank?

Inlet baffles perform an important function in the operation of a septic tank. They direct wastewater received from the house downward to the level of the clear zone, dissipating the energy of the incoming flow to prevent turbulence and disruption of the segregation of the scum and sludge layers in the tank.

What is the function of inlet and outlet pipe of a septic tank?

The inlet pipe is used to transport the water waste from the house and collect it in the septic tank. It is kept here long enough so that the solid and liquid waste is separated from each other. The second pipe is the outlet pipe. It can also call the drain field.

How do I know if my septic line is clogged?

Signs of Septic System Clogging: Water and sewage from toilets, drains and sinks backing up into your home. Bathtubs, showers, and sinks draining slowly. Gurgling sounds present in the plumbing system. Bad odors coming from the septic tank or drain field.

What do you do if your sewer line is clogged?

What to Do When Your Sewer Line Is Clogged

  1. Turn Off the Water. First of all, turn off the water in your home. This step is important because it keeps the situation from getting worse.
  2. Call a Plumber. It’s technically possible to clear out some small sewer line clogs yourself, but this is rarely advisable.

How long should an inlet baffle be?

The inlet baffle should extend at least 6 inches, but no more than 12 inches into the liquid level of the tank. The inlet baffle should extend 12 inches above the liquid level of the tank. This is a total baffle length of 18 to 24 inches.

How long do septic baffles last?

Inspectapedia estimates that a steel tank baffles will rust out in 15 to 20 years and may collapse if driven over, but a concrete tank will last 40 years or more as long as the wastewater is not acidic. It’s important to consider the life expectancy of a drain-field, too.

How much does it cost to replace a baffle in a septic tank?

Repairing a baffle costs $300 to $900 on average. You may pay more if it’s tough to access. The baffle helps to prevent buildup in the incoming or outgoing pipes of the tank.

How much lower should the outlet be than the inlet on a septic tank?

Generally speaking, the outlet on a septic tank should be around 4–6″ lower than the inlet, depending on the size of the tank. The tank itself, when set in place, should be as level as possible. The height difference from inlet to outlet is accounted for in the tank’s manufacture.

What floats on top of septic tank?

Heavy solids, such as dirt and digested waste, will sink to the bottom of the tank to form the sludge layer. Meanwhile, solids that are lighter than water, such as grease, hair, and toilet paper, will float to the top to form the scum layer.

How to Connect Pipes to a Septic Tank

Septic tanks are connected to dwellings by four-inch pipes. Image courtesy of dit26978/iStock/Getty Images. Most contemporary septic tanks, whether constructed of concrete or plastic, are divided into two compartments by an internal baffle and equipped with an intake and output port. In most cases, when you first install the tank, each port has a preinstalled 4-inch sanitary tee fitting. You connect the waste line from the building to the inlet fitting and the drain line to the outlet fitting either by gluing it or by using a mechanical flexible coupling to connect the two lines (often referred to as aFernco coupling).

Septic tanks used to have only one chamber in the olden days.

The scum layer contains greases, oils, and other lighter-than-water contaminants that could clog the soil.

Whatever your feelings about the necessity of the tees, they serve as an insurance policy against the failure of the septic tank baffles, and it is smart to have them installed.

In order to keep debris out of the pipes, some plumbers put grates on the top portions of tees.

How to Install Septic Tees

The installation of the tees on the septic tank must be done from the inside of the tank if the tees do not come with the tank. A 4-inch tee is normally firmly secured by predrilled or, in the case of concrete tanks, preformed holes in the tank’s inlet and outflow holes. A bead of butyl or silicone caulk around the perimeter of the tee on both sides of the tank will enough in most cases, but it’s not a terrible idea to apply some in case you do need glue. The top of the tee should have a short piece of tubing attached to it to allow the aperture to extend over the scum layer in the tank, while the bottom of the tee must extend below the scum layer, or around 2 feet below the tee, to allow for proper drainage.

Connecting Inlet and Outlet Pipes

The waste and drain pumps are located in trenches that slope toward and away from the tank, respectively, with a slope ranging between 2 and 10 percent. For a modest slope, it’s fine to glue the pipes straight to the tee; but, if the slope is steep, you need glue a 22 1/2-degree bend onto the tee to make the glue connection completely waterproof. If necessary, the bend can be configured such that it faces upward on the input side and downward on the outflow side. Despite the fact that the pipes fit firmly in the fittings, it is necessary to glue them together.

If you don’t, the tee may become disconnected and fall into the tank, necessitating the need of expert services to repair. A septic tank may be deadly, and falling into one or even peering into one too closely can be fatal. Never attempt to do this repair yourself.

Procedure for Opening Septic Tanks

  • ASK a question or make a comment about how to open a septic tank safely and properly for inspection or cleaning.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Instructions on how to open the septic tank. The location of the septic tank cleanout or cover, as well as the access and opening processes. We discuss some of the things to look for before opening the septic tank, such as subsidence, indications of recent work, and septic tank coverings that are not suitable to use. Then we demonstrate how to remove the septic tank lid or the access port cover from the tank.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Procedures for Safe Opening of a Septic Tank, Cesspool, or Drywall for Inspection or Cleaning

The following are the contents of the article:

  • How to remove the lid from a septic tank
  • When it comes to pumping out the septic tank, which septic tank entrance should be used? Why

In this septic tank pumpout article series, you’ll learn how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks, as well as how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks using photos. In addition to septic pumping tank truck operators, this guideline is meant to provide basic information to homeowners and septic service providers that are concerned about septic system maintenance.

  • There is a risk of dangerous, perhaps deadly collapse due to subsidence (depressions or low regions in the earth) near the location of the septic tank. Evidence of recent construction activity that may necessitate further investigation in order to determine the status of the septic system
  • Backup or effluent breakout at the surface of the ground in the septic tank region.
  • Here is an example of a septic tank cover that was discovered atop an unstable home-made collection of concrete blocks that had been piled by the owner to serve as an access well to his septic tank. Because the masonry blocks were misaligned and loose, and because the tank aperture into which the cover opened was bigger than the cover, there was a serious collapse risk that may have resulted in a deadly hazard. We covered the area with plywood and roped it off, and we quickly informed the residents and the property owner of the situation, both verbally and in writing

Procedure for Opening the Septic Tank Pumping Access Port

It is necessary to clean the septic tank using a cleanout port, which is normally positioned in the center of the tank. A small access opening, such as one over an intake or outlet baffle, does not provide enough space for adequate sludge removal from the septic tank bottom, and it increases the likelihood of future clogging of the tank’s inlet or outlet due to partially removed floating scum that has not been completely removed from the tank bottom. In this particular scenario, we already had the measurements to the exact placement of the septic tank cleanout cover due to previous work.

A wrecking bar is set to be used to remove the cover from the vehicle.

Reader CommentsQ A

@Ron, In order for a concrete septic tank lid to be correctly erected, it must feature both access openings and cast in iron loops to which a hoist may be attached. Alternatively, if your septic tank cover does not have those points of purchase for lifting, you will require a flat bar and a larger wrecking bar to pry up the excavated lid from the septic tank sufficiently to allow you to put a chain around the lid, most likely two Chainz, and lift the lid with a hoist and tripod mechanism or you will use an on-site motorized hoist.

  • 1/2 x 27/4 removing the top of a septic tank @Phil, Although what you describe is theoretically doable, it may be less expensive and more rational to do so in a different way.
  • This is due to the fact that just stitching a circular hole does not ensure that I am creating a hole through which the lid will not be dropped.
  • Edge My concrete septic tank, which was constructed when the home was built in 1979 and does not have any manholes or openings for pumping out, is in poor condition.
  • Is it feasible to cut two manholes using a concrete saw that are 20″/24″ in diameter and then build risers and a cover on top of them?
  • Could you please share a picture of the tank top?
  • It is common for the concrete top to be tapered; nevertheless, it may just be trapped by effloresent salts and filth.
  • I have a feeling that simply tugging will not be effective.

This would have stopped leaks but would have made it extremely difficult to open the tank for the next person who needed to open the tank.

Repeat this process many times all around the cover’s perimeter.

For me, this has worked almost every time in the past.

It is recommended that you build a septic tank riser that is sealed to the tank top, as well as a new secure cover on top of the riser if your septic tank lid is not near to the ground level.

See also:  How Do You Know When Your Septic Tank Is Backed Up? (Solution found)

Never work on your own.

I’ve erected two wood 4x4s on top of the lifting ring to provide additional support.

All I’ve done three times is shattered those 4x4s.

Do you have any recommendations?

A septic tank pumping provider can remove plastic bags, tiny pebbles, and other debris from your tank, as well as the sediments, scum, and sludge that has accumulated there.

What is the best way to get them out?

When the septic tank is drained out, would it make sense to place a plastic bag over the top hole of the tank to keep the odors contained?

Gerard A plastic bag as a sewer line cap doesn’t seem right to me – it’s not durable, it’s the incorrect material if a cover is required, and if it’s a vent rather than an access pipe, the vent must be open to the atmosphere and protected from animal intrusion.

What is the function of this item?

A typical septic tank is equipped with clean out access covers that are strategically placed.

Maybe something as basic as a flat piece of concrete or stone will be sufficient, or maybe something more complex.

To be quite honest, I would have expected the contractor who dug the hole to be accountable for ensuring that the system was repaired and safe.

What should I do to solve it?

What store would I go to in order to acquire septic tank covers?

A few years ago, I had a beautiful new house built for me.

I have three plastic polylok lids, one of which is above ground and is for the pump.

I’d like to purchase risers so that I may build all three at a depth of around 6 inches below ground level.

What are the advantages and disadvantages.

Do you have any other suggestions?

I apologize for the lengthy post.

Sorry, but “True Bolt” isn’t a phrase I’m familiar with or associate with septic tank lids in any way.

Although this is not always the case, Mary, as the pumper may be able to access the entire tank bottom from a single opening depending on the tank’s size and shape; however, if your pumper is unable to do so from a single opening, you may want both openings opened to inspect the condition of the tank baffles.

There are two holes in my septic tank. Is it necessary to open both doors for a pump out?

Question:cannot find the manhole cover of the septic tank

(8th of August, 2014) “We’ve located the cesspool concrete lid (about 12 foot diameter), but after digging a 2 foot perimeter, we were unable to locate the manhole cover, which was required for an inspection.” vicki levin stated Help? My husband is becoming increasingly upset with the digging!

Reply:

If it’s a cesspool, rather than a septic tank, and it’s spherical, the access lid is normally located in the center of the container.

Question: how do i remove septic tank lid that is stuck

The entrance lid would normally be in the center of the cesspool, if it is in fact a cesspool rather than a septic tank, and it is spherical.

Reply:

Anon:WARNING: If the septic tank cover, lid, or access aperture has partially caved in or sank into the tank, the condition is extremely dangerous – an unsecure cover implies that someone might fall into the tank, which is generally lethal very quickly. Please keep everyone away from the septic tank area until such time as you have had the tank inspected and opened for additional inspection by a professional. Depending on the tank type and condition, lifting the lid may necessitate the use of a pry bar or wrecking bar, as well as a small portable winch (which is unusual).

Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Pumping ProcedurePumper Truck Operation Articles

  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION
  • MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • HOW TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN NOT TO PUMP A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO FIND A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK
  • INSPECT THE SEPTIC TANK BEFORE PUMPING
  • SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION PROCEDURE
  • SEPTIC TANK LEVELS OF SEWAGE
  • PUMPER TRU

Suggested citation for this web page

HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK at Inspect a Tank An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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How to Remove a Septic Tank

  • Find the location of the septic tank. The majority of new tanks will have access or inspection openings on the surface, which will make this work quite straightforward. If the tank is more than a decade old, this process may be a little more difficult. Make a mark on the ground where the main drain line departs the house and draw an imaginary line out roughly 15 feet. If possible, this should be exactly above the tank. Dig a test hole to ensure that the placement is correct. Locate the tank and mark its location with the little marker flags after it has been located. if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.removeChild(sources)
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  • ” loading=”lazy”> Using the backhoe, dig all the way down to the septic tank. Remove the whole top of the tank, including the access hatch, and set it aside for later. Discontinue the excavation and arrange for the tank to be pumped out by a certified expert who will have the necessary equipment as well as the necessary licenses to properly dispose of the waste materials Dig around the tank’s perimeter on all four sides. Backhoe bucket width or less will suffice for this project. The hole must be dug to a depth sufficient to allow for the excavation of the septic tank’s bottom. In order to prevent breaking the pipes, the backhoe operator will need to use extreme caution when excavating around the inlet and outlet pipes. Remove both pipes as far as possible from the septic tank. Cap each of these lines as soon as possible to prevent any water or garbage that may have remained in the lines from draining into the pit in which you will be working. The two portions of pipe should be removed from the septic tank and thrown away. Feed the log chains into the tank through the inlet hole and guide them out through the outlet port to complete the cycle. Bring the chains up over the septic tank and tie them to the bucket of the backhoe or the crane, if one is available. Then, after the chains are in place, go to a safe distance and wait for the backhoe to raise and remove it from within the hole. Following the removal of the septic tank, backfill the hole or replace the tank as soon as possible to avoid further damage. You should make sure that the hole’s border is barricaded to prevent someone from accidently falling in if it will be kept open for an extended period of time.

septic tank connection

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septic tank connection
Author:tpc1 (TN)I am building a detached garage which has a sink in it.The septic tank is between the house and the garage.I have plumbed a drain line through the brick to drop down and run directly to the septic tank. The drain from the house is on the other side of the septic tank.Is there a hole on all four sides of a septic tank to run a line through?Can I simply drill through the top side wall of the septic tank?How can I connect this drain to my septic tank without going around to the other side? Please help.Any information is greatly appreciated.
Post Reply
Re: septic tank connection
Author:Septic Tank Yank (CO)tpcl,Typically, precast concrete septic tanks have one 4-inch inlet hole and one 4-inch outlet hole.For the installation of this new sink drain to be perfectly correct, you should go ahead and dig the trench that additional 10 feet or so, and then connect the new drain pipe to the 4-inch sewer pipe coming from the house.Cut in a 4-inch wye fitting into the 4-inch sewer pipe and then use the appropriate reduction fittings to accept the new drainpipe.Use a 4-inch Fernco coupling and a close nipple to insert the wye into the existing sewer pipeline.This approach is easier than trying to punch a small hole through the 3 or 4-inch thick concrete sidewall.Depending upon the condition and quality of the concrete in your tank, you may end up making a larger hole than needed.Pounding on the side of the tank with a hammer and chisel or even an impact hammer-drill could collapse the sidewall.If this happens, you will find yourself in “deep do do.”You may have to replace the septic tank.This is a lesson that was learned the hard way.If you decide to punch a hole in the side of the tank to insert the new drainpipe and if your septic tank has two compartments, be sure to locate the new hole so that the water will enter the first compartment of the tank.Good Luck!Post Edited
Post Reply
Re: septic tank connection
Author:hj (AZ)You can’t. You have to connect to the pipe from the house. Most septic tanks have a 6″ baffle pipe that the house sewer feeds into. Making a second inlet hole anywhere in the tank would bypass that baffle and create a lot of problems with the tank in the future.
Post Reply
Re: septic tank connection
Author:Septic Tank Yank (CO)Additional comment:hj is correct regarding the presence of the inlet baffle.Typically, modern concrete tanks are fitted with a 4-inch sanitary tee which acts as the inlet baffle.The importance of the inlet baffle in the performance of the septic tank, however, is a matter of debate.In my view, the only reason to install an inlet baffle is because most septic system regulations require an inlet baffle.I believe that directing the incoming sewage toward the bottom of the tank creates turbulance that resuspends already settled solids and therefor increases the suspended solids concentration in the effluent.If the inlet pipe just enters the tank horizontally above the scum layer, the scum layer dissipates the inrush turbulance and the sewage settles to the bottom of the tank gently.The septic tank that serves my home does not have an inlet baffle, and my system has been performing perfectly for 22 years.I removed the sanitary tee from the inlet pipe just as the health department inspector signed the final inspection line on my permit.He was aware of my action and was interested in knowing the validity, or lack thereof, of the theory.With the advent of septic tank effluent filters, the issue of the importance of the inlet baffle is moot.So if you wish to risk poking another hole into the side of the septic tank and create an additional sewage inlet in the first compartment, go for it.If you wish to comply with the septic system regulation in regard to the inlet baffle, then cement a tee on the end of the inlet pipe and then cement the pipe so that it extends 8 to 10-inches below the liquid level of the tank.Keep in mind that working inside of the septic tank is a nasty and dangerous proposition.
Post Reply
Re: septic tank connection
Author:tpc1 (TN)Thank you for all of your responses.I will run my drain around to the other side and connect it to the inlet line.
Post Reply
Re: septic tank connection
Author:hj (AZ)The purpose of the inlet baffle and it does not go down to the bottom of the tank is to create a “no flow” zone above that level. The influent enters the tank through the baffle and the heavier material settles to the bottom, but the lighter materials, i.e., grease and soap float to the top. The “clearer” water layer in the center is what will exit the tank as effluent. It is exactly like a very large grease interceptor, and the largest interceptors are actually a version of a septic tank.
Post Reply
Re: septic tank connection
Author:Septic Tank Yank (CO)hj, tpc1 has stated that he intends to connect his sink drain in the proper manner.Thank you tpc1 for acknowledging our responses and informing us of your intended course of action.I wish to continue our discussion of the importance and purpose of the inlet baffle in a septic tank.The original septic tanks, manufactured in the late 1800’s, mostly were single compartment tanks.Inlet baffles were designed for these tanks to prevent or reduce the potential for short-circuiting untreated sewage through the tank just as you have described.When two compartment tanks became the norm, the need for the inlet baffle became obsolete.The center baffle then provided and greatly expanded the “no flow” zone of which you speak.Single compartment tanks were the norm for many years so the requirement of the inlet baffle was important and was codified in The Manual of Septic Tank Practice, authored by engineers with the US Public Health Service (USPHS) in the 1940’s.Virtually all of the state septic system regulations are based on The USPHS Manual of Septic Tank Practice.When two compartment tanks became the required design, the “need” for the inlet baffle was removed but the “requirement” for the baffle remained in the regulations.I am aware that the bottom of the inlet baffle does not extend to the bottom of the tank, but when low profile tanks are used, the bottom of the inlet baffle is only 24-inches from the bottom of the tank.As the sludge accumulates, this distance slowly becomes diminished.As the sewage from a clothes washer, a dishwasher, a sewage ejector pump, or a modern large volume bathtub/spa flows into the septic tank, it will come into the tank at a greater velocity and volume than the sewage from toilets, showers, and lavatories.If the sewage is directed down toward the bottom of the tank through a 4-inch pipe, the inflow turbulence will resuspend already settled solids that will be carried into the second compartment of the tank, and possibly through the outlet tee of the tank. The suspended solids in the effluent will be applied to the leach field and will increase the formation of the clogging mat.If the leach field consists of a single trench or bed design, the leach field service life is quickly reduced.
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3 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT SEPTIC TANK BAFFLES

By Admin on November 12, 2020 Your efforts to live as environmentally conscious as possible, as a responsible homeowner, are likely already underway, with practices such as recycling, composting, and purchasing energy-efficient equipment among your list of accomplishments. As a septic tank owner, you want to be sure that anything you put into your tank and septic field is causing the least amount of ground contamination as is reasonably practicable. Fortunately, there are a number of modest improvements you can do immediately to make your septic system even more ecologically friendly than it already is.

  • Have your septic tank inspected and pumped on a regular basis.
  • A bigger septic tank with only a couple of people living in your house, for example, will not require pumping as frequently as a smaller septic tank or as a septic tank that must manage the waste products of multiple family members will require.
  • When in doubt about how often to pump your septic tank, consult with a professional for advice.
  • In addition to locating and repairing any damage, a professional can ensure that the septic field is in good working order and that your septic tank is functional, large enough to handle your family’s waste, and not causing any unwanted pollution in nearby ground water.
  • Avoid flushing non-biodegradable items down the toilet or down the toilet.
  • Items that are not biodegradable are unable to properly decompose in the septic tank and might cause the system to get clogged.
  • In addition to causing issues in your house, septic system backups can damage ground water in the area surrounding your septic field.

Towels made of paper Products for feminine hygiene Grease or fats are used in cooking.

grinds from a cup of coffee Even if you have a trash disposal, the food scraps that you flush down the drain and bring into your septic system may cause unanticipated harm to your plumbing system.

Food scraps can enhance the amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus in the wastewater, which can disturb the natural bacterial balance of the septic tank, among other things.

Water conservation should be practiced.

Exceedingly large amounts of water use will interfere with the normal flow of wastewater from your home into your septic tank.

Limiting the amount of time you spend in the shower and turning off the faucet while brushing your teeth, as well as purchasing a smaller dishwasher and washing machine that use less water, are all simple strategies to reduce water use in your home.

The following are some basic steps you can take to make your septic system more ecologically friendly: save water, maintain your septic system and tank, and recycle wastewater. To get answers to any of your septic tank-related issues, get in touch with the experts at Upstate Septic Tank, LLC.

COMMON PROBLEMS — JT’s SEPTIC

You should examine the sewer cleanout on the exterior of the home if you are hearing gurgling and all of the house fixtures are clogged. This is often a black 3-4 in color “inch ABS pipe with a threaded cap is available. Remove the cap (WARNING: BE CAREFUL! (WARNING: IT MAY CONTAIN SOME PRESSURE!) : Assuming the sewage line is completely dry, you will have a clog inside the home plumbing, directly in front of the cleanout valve. Make a phone call to a plumber and have them rooter the line. Sewer line cameras are available from several rooter/plumbing businesses.

  1. You have two options at this point: call your preferred septic provider or pull up the tank lids yourself and check the water level and solids content in the tank yourself.
  2. Most tanks erected after January 2001 include a filter that has to be cleaned at least once a year (we clean filters—please call us).
  3. We’ll even notify you once a year when it’s time to clean your filters!).
  4. It’s likely that you have a blockage in your sewage system.

GURGLES

Whenever you flush the toilet, the water gurgles, the toilet takes an unusually long time to flush, or the water in the shower turns brownish after you have done the laundry, you are receiving a subtle indication that trouble is brewing. In order to determine when the tank was last pumped, look through your records and then contact your preferred septic provider for assistance.

ODORS

If you are experiencing unpleasant odors within your home, such as rotten eggs, it is likely that a trap or vent inside your home is not venting correctly. Call your plumber right away since these gases are harmful to both people and animals!

ODORS OUTSIDE IN THE YARD

At times, the smells emanating from the roof vents will seep into the yard due to meteorological conditions. Make use of a plumber to elevate the roof vents and/or to place a charcoal filter in the vents, as needed. It’s important to remember that your septic tank is vented via the roof.

SURFACING IN THE YARD

If you notice effluent appearing in your yard, contact your septic service provider immediately. If you see this, it indicates that your leach line has failed and you should get help right away.

HEAVY SOLIDS- OVERDUE FOR PUMPING

Contrary to common perception, you DO need to have your septic tank pumped on a regular basis. Pumping maintenance should be performed on a regular basis, otherwise your system will get overwhelmed with solid waste and eventually cause damage to your leach lines.

DON’T MAKE THIS HAPPEN TO YOU! This is an extreme example of a tank that is overflowing. There is sewage flowing from the tank access holes and into the yard!

grease build up in sewer pipes

You DO need to pump your septic tank on a regular basis, contrary to common perception. Unless you do regular pump maintenance, your system will get overwhelmed with solid waste, which will eventually cause your leach lines to clog and fail completely. THIS SHOULD NOT HAPPEN TO YOU. In this situation, the tank is completely overfilled. There is sewage flowing from the tank access ports and into the yard!

crushed or settled pipe

This is the second most prevalent problem we notice in septic systems that are less than 10 years old. In addition to blocking flow, loose fill soil surrounding the tank is causing a backup into the house since it is pulling the pipe with it as it settles. We have even observed instances when contractors installing new systems do not correctly pack the fill earth below the pipe, resulting in pipe settlement on systems that have not been utilized or have only been used for a short length of time (see below for an example).

SEWER OUTLET PROGRESSION

When it comes to modern septic systems, this is the most typical issue we encounter. Take note of the fact that the unsupported outlet pipe is being driven down by settling dirt. Watch as the water level in the tank rises, forcing the flow of water in the inflow sewage line to slow. This will eventually result in a clog in the inflow sewer line at some point. The solids flowing down from the house will not be able to enter the tank correctly because of the high water level.

examples of settled sewer pipes:

INSTALLATION OF A TANK AND/OR REPAIR OF SEWER PIPESTHE “POLY” PIPEIMAGES BELOW PROVIDE AN EXAMPLE OF WHAT PIPENOTTO USES WHEN INSTALLING A TANK AND/OR REPAIR OF SEWER PIPES However, despite the fact that this grade of sewer pipe is less expensive at the time of purchase, it might end up costing you a lot of money in the long run!

settled inlet sewer pipe on unused system:

Even if the septic system has not been utilized in some time, it is conceivable that problems will be discovered during the inspection process. Pipes might settle on unoccupied ground and in yards as a result of faulty installation and/or automobiles and/or ATVs running over the pipes without realizing they are there. It may be beneficial to all parties to have a skilled inspector take a look at the system and diagnose any concerns, even though the County does not require an examination on an underused system before transferring ownership.

Roots growing in and around the septic tank:

In addition to disrupting the system by clogging or destroying drainage and distribution lines, tree roots can also enter the tank, causing it to leak. Foul odors, poor drainage, and patches of vegetation in the leach field are just a few of the signs that you may have a root problem.

ERODED BAFFLES

Branches and roots may wreak havoc on the system, clogging or even damaging drainage and distribution lines, and they can even penetrate the tank in some cases.

Foul odors, poor drainage, and patches of greenery in the leach field are just a few of the signs that your root system is failing.

orangeburg sewer pipes

Orangeburg pipe was made in Orangeburg, New York, from 1860 to 1970, and was utilized to plumb numerous septic and wastewater systems throughout Yavapai County during that time period. Orangeburg pipe is produced from rolled tar paper (wood pulp that has been sealed with hot pitch) and was considered a low-cost alternative to metal, particularly after World War II, because of its flexibility and durability. In fact, the pipe itself is so soft that professionals might cut it with a knife during the installation process!

Orangeburg, on the other hand, is known for degrading over time (it has a 50-year lifespan at the most) and deforming when subjected to pressure.

If the septic system is approved, Orangeburg will normally be stated on the permits as the material for the inlet and/or outflow pipe material, respectively.

Installing Access Risers

In order to perform fundamental septic system maintenance, you must first evaluate the condition of your septic tank and pump chamber (if you have one), which can be time-consuming and labor-intensive if you do not have access ports known as risers. Consider the prospect of having to dig through two feet of dirt to check the oil on your vehicle. Installing septic tank risers for an off-site septic system is broken down into four steps, which are outlined below. Please keep in mind that the currentWashington State Coderequiresrisers for all septic systems, which means you may be forced to install one if you are asking for a construction permit, land division, or any other type of official action in the state.

A few safety tips before you get started:

  • It is necessary to do routine septic system maintenance to assess the condition of your septic tank and pump chamber (if you have one), which can be time consuming and labor difficult in the absence of access ports, known as risers. It’s difficult to imagine having to dig through two feet of dirt to check the oil level on your automobile. For an off-site septic system, the following four-step procedure will walk you through the process. Please keep in mind that the currentWashington State Coderequiresrisers for all septic systems, which means you may be compelled to install one if you are filing for a construction permit, land division, or any other type of governmental action in the future.

Gather all the MaterialsTools You will Need

Fundamental septic system maintenance entails examining the condition of your septic tank and pump chamber (if you have one), which may be time consuming and labor involved if you do not have access ports known as risers. Imagine having to dig through two feet of dirt to check the oil on your automobile! Installing septic tank risers for an off-site septic system follows a four-step procedure shown below. Please keep in mind that the currentWashington State Coderequiresrisers for all septic systems, and you may be forced to install one if you are asking for a construction permit, land division, or any other type of governmental action.

  1. Tank Adapter Ring (TAR)
  2. Riser Adapter Ring Kit
  3. Butyl Rope
  4. Risers
  5. Domed Lid OR Flat Lid
  6. Stainless Steel Screws

The following materials will be required for digging up your septic tank(s):

  1. As-built condition of the sewage treatment system The following items are required: sketch on paper, measuring tape, shovel, probing instrument, eye protection, and work gloves.

To cut risers to the proper size, the following tools are required:

  1. Circular saws, saber/jig saws, and hand saws
  2. Raspor file
  3. Marking pen
  4. Tape measure
  5. Drill with a 1/4″ bit

Materials required to seal the risers to the tank include:

  1. High-strength concrete patch mix
  2. A small bucket
  3. A mixing stick
  4. And gloves

Follow the four simple procedures shown below to install access risers on your septic components, or download and print a copy of theSeptic Tank Manhole and Access Riser Installationbrochure from Thurston County Environmental Health to get started right now.

Step 1: LocateYour Septic Tank(s)

When looking for your underground septic tank or tanks, it is essential to consult the ‘As-built’ Record Drawing linked with your septic system for assistance. Essentially, this is a plot diagram that shows where your septic system was put on your property, as well as distances between septic components and notable landmarks. The Online Permit System will guide you through the process of locating septic-related documentation if you do not have a “as-built” document. It is possible that you may need to contact Environmental Health to examine the paper records or seek a specialist to find your tank if an as-built is not accessible.

Probing the area around the septic tank with the probing instrument until you contact concrete should be done lightly.

The presence of underground electricity or other utility lines and cables might put your septic tank in danger.

Call 1-800-424-5555 or 811 or go online to make sure that any electrical utilities are found before you begin digging before you begin digging.

Step 2: Uncover Your Septic Tank (s)

Once you’ve discovered your septic tank, you may start digging about. The tank is typically 6 feet wide by 8 feet long, with the width being the largest size. Remove all of the pebbles and debris from around the tank’s lid openings and dig out the whole top of the tank. You will want to clean out any dirt that has accumulated on the surface of your septic tank. This will assist you in ensuring that you generate a high-quality seal. You should have two openings: one over the inlet (which comes from the home) and another over the outlet (which comes from the yard) (into the drainfield or pump chamber).

  1. You’ll need a riser for each of the doors you open.
  2. Typically, the inlet side is the one that is nearest to the home.
  3. When cleaning the tank, it is beneficial to remove the complete top of the tank.
  4. Risers must be modified in order to be correctly installed, and all manholes (holes 24 inches or bigger in diameter or square in shape) must also be updated, as well as the tankinlet and outlet baffle covers (if separate from the manholes).
  5. If you discover one – and only one – riser already installed, it is most likely for the pump chamber, which only requires a single riser to provide access to the pump to function properly.
  6. Remove the concrete lids so that they may be disposed when the project is completed.
  7. Consult your’As-built’Recorddrawing to establish whether you have a distribution box (D-box), which you will also need to unearth and place a riser on if you have a typical gravity system.
  8. Once the lids have been removed, proceed with caution around the tank.
  9. Inform someone of your whereabouts in case you are involved in an accident.

You should be aware that exposure to sewage can result in serious sickness, so make sure you wear gloves and thoroughly wash your hands afterward with soap and water. It is also recommended that you wear eye protection in the event that debris falls into a tank and splashes back at you.

Step 3: Fit Risers to Component Openings

In accordance with the diameter of the septic tank manholes, huge risers will either sit on top of the septic tank or will fit down into the aperture of the tank by 1-3 inches. It’s important to keep this in mind while calculating the height of the riser. The surplus can be easily removed; nevertheless, it is difficult to add a few inches to the length. Take the following measurements of the manhole cover’s diameter:

  • Theriser will fit into the tank hole if the aperture is between 26 and 29 inches in diameter. Measure the distance from the ground to the top of the septic tank and multiply the measurement by three inches. The following is required if the aperture is greater than 29 inches: a 3-foot square fiberglass plate (with a 22-inch hole in the middle) is required. In this case, it lies above the manhole and narrows the aperture, allowing a 24-inch riser to be utilized instead of a more expensive 30-inch riser, saving money.

The distance between the ground and the top of the fiberglass plate should be measured. You may choose to place the risers so that they are level with the surface of the ground, or you may want them to stand out a few inches above the ground (if a riser is above ground make sure you are careful when mowing). Tips: To shorten a big riser with ribs, drill a 1/4-inch hole between the ribs above the cut line and finish the cut by following one of the grooves between the ribs with a saber/jig saw to finish the cut.

By eliminating one of the ribs from the largeriser, it may be made to fit more snugly into a smaller manhole entrance.

Step 4: Attach Risers toSeptic Tank (s)

It is recommended to pump out an old septic tank that is 20 years or older in order to check its structural integrity and water-tightness before using it again. If the tank requires extensive repairs, it is preferable to replace it with a new septic tank that includes risers as part of the installation. A permit from the local health department is required for the replacement of a septic tank. Remove any dirt and debris from the tank’s surface by cleaning it off. Using the butyl rope, construct the components of the risers in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

Jet-Set, Rapid-Set, Thorough-Set, and Perco-Plug are just a few of the brand names available.

NOTE: For optimal results, just a little amount of concrete patch should be mixed at a time.

The patch mix should be used to seal the riser to the septic tank.

If you want to avoid a safety danger, make sure you properly attach theriser lid using the screws that come with it!

Risers for inlet or outlet apertures that are smaller than the openings should have the bottom few inches sanded with rough sandpaper to allow a firmer connection between the two surfaces.

A useful source of information on correct installation of risers on septic tanks may be found at your local hardware store where you purchased the risers and covers.

Thurston County Environmental Health is should be commended for providing the foundation for this documentation.

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