How To Get A Float Switch Into An Existing Septic Tank? (Solution found)

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  • Insert the float switch’s wire through the plastic mounting tabs on the mounting clamp. Step 3 Lower the pipe clamp onto the effluent pump’s discharge pipe until it reaches the height specified in the septic design.

Can you add a float switch to a sump pump?

Installing a new float level switch will turn a regular sump pump into an automatic one. You simply need to use a float level sensor with two switch points (High and Low) such as the FLE series, and a powered pump relay such as the inexpensive RCU-7000.

How much does it cost to install a float switch?

What is the cost of a float switch? Float switches are inexpensive to add to your HVAC system. The part itself typically costs less than $50, and your HVAC professional should be able to install it in under a half hour. Your HVAC professional can also determine whether your unit could benefit from a condensate pump.

How long does a float switch last?

If you have an automatic pump with an integral float switch, the switch assembly is malfunctioning, and the switch, switch arm, and case gasket should be replaced. The average switch life is 4-7 years, but it may vary depending on the application.

Can you bypass float switch?

Bypass the circuit on the original float switch and use silicone sealant to thoroughly seal the housing. Loosely attach the replacement switch to the pump housing with a zip tie. Plug the switch into the outlet and plug the bypass plug into the switch. Then tighten the zip tie to secure the new float switch.

Where is the HVAC float switch?

The float switch location depends on the orientation of your HVAC equipment. For horizontal units the float switch will be located in the secondary drain pan. For horizontal units without a secondary drain pan or vertical units, the float switch will be on the drainpipe.

What is a safety float switch?

A safety float switch ensures that such a situation does not occur. Air conditioning is designed to ensure that excess moisture drains outside. If condensation starts to build up in the drainage line a small ball valve in the safety switch floats, signaling the compressor unit to turn off.

How does float switch work?

A float switch detects the level of a liquid in a tank or container. It floats on top of the liquid surface and acts as a mechanical switch as the liquid level goes up or down. They control devices like pumps (pump water in or out), valves (open or close inlet/outlets), or alarms to notify users.

How to Install a Septic Tank Switch

Pump float switches, which are correctly fitted, are required for the operation of effluent pumps. To determine the amount of liquid in septic tanks with pumps, a float switch located within the tank must be activated. As the liquid level in the tank rises, the float switch in the tank raises in response. Float switches turn on and off in proportion to the angle at which they are positioned. The cables that connect the float switches to the pump serve as a connection between them. These wires are stretched or shortened in order to give the appropriate swing to pump a certain amount of liquid.

A float switch that has been improperly fitted might cause damage to a pump or cause a drain field to become hydraulically overloaded.

Step 1

In order to determine the swing length and float switch height parameters, refer to the septic system design.

Step 2

Feed the wire from the float switch through the plastic mounting tabs on the mounting clamp and secure it with the clamp.

Step 3

Reduce the height of the effluent pump’s discharge pipe by lowering the pipe clamp until it meets the height stipulated in the septic design.

Step 4

To loosen the pipe clamp, use a screwdriver to turn it counterclockwise.

Step 5

Hold a tape measure vertically against the effluent discharge pipe to determine the length of the pipe. Change the position of the float switch from the “off” position to the “on” position.

Step 6

Adjust the wire tether on the float switch so that the swing measurement matches the swing measurement specified in the septic design.

Step 7

When the tether has been properly adjusted, use a screwdriver to tighten the metal tether clamp on the harness.

Step 8

Wrap two plastic wire ties around the metal clamp to secure it in place. Tighten the wire tie by inserting the end of the tie into the locking mechanism and tightening. This gives further assurance that the float will remain in place in the event that the metal clamp corrodes and fails.

Warning

When working around septic tanks, always sure to use protective gear.

Choosing A Float Switch – Everything You Need to Know

Because there are so many float switches to pick from, finding the right one for your application may be quite difficult. This is mostly due to the sheer number of options available. We have approximately 20 different float switches in stock at Septic Solutions, and these are merely the most popular types among our customers. In this post, we will go over the process of selecting the appropriate float for your application in further depth. On our website, you will notice the floats branded “PUMP DOWN” or, more rarely, “PUMP UP,” which means that they are in the process of being pumped down.

  • The floats labeled “PUMP DOWN” have contacts that are generally open, which means they are inactive when the float is in the lowered position and active when the float is elevated.
  • The floats labeled “PUMP UP” are on the opposite side of the pool.
  • These can be used for a variety of purposes, including tank filling and low level warnings.
  • Pump Switches and Control Switches are the two primary types of floats that are used in the industry.

Pump switches are intended to be used to turn on and off a submersible pump, whilst control switches are intended to be used in conjunction with a control panel and are primarily intended to be used for high water alerts.

PUMP DUTY SWITCHES

Pump switches are devices that are used to regulate the functioning of a submersible water pump. They have a larger current carrying capacity than control switches. These are often wide angle switches, which means that they must be rotated 90 degrees in order to be switched to the “ON” or “OFF” position. When managing a pump, this is necessary since you must be able to pump out a wide range of water, and it also prevents the float from being stopped by turbulence in the water, which is undesirable.

  • Because the float switch will be the conduit via which the power for the submersible pump will be sent, it must be capable of handling at least that amount of current.
  • It will be necessary to make a choice on how the amperage float will be mounted once you have determined which amperage float will be required for your application.
  • If you get a float switch that comes with a piggy-back connector, the installation is quite straightforward and straightforward.
  • a) Float Switch Installation That is all there is to it; your pump will only activate when the float is in the proper position to permit it.
  • Because floats are always two-wire devices, in order to install one on a pump, the float switch must be spliced into the “HOT” line coming from the power supply.
  • The final choice you have is to choose between mercury and mechanical filtration.
  • Mechanical switches are comprised of a ball bearing mounted on a track that rotates back and forth in both directions.
  • Pump Float Switches may be purchased by clicking here.

CONTROL DUTY SWITCHES

Control switches are intended to be used in conjunction with a control panel, and are mostly used for high and low level alerts. Low amperage and small angle are two characteristics that characterize these switches. When using narrow angle float switches, you must change the switch position by 10 degrees. As a result, they are extremely sensitive to changes in water level, making them ideal for use as high or low level alarms, respectively. Making a decision on which control switch to purchase is significantly less difficult.

  1. Because it will be attached directly to a control panel or alarm box, no control switch will ever be supplied with a plug.
  2. The “PUMP DOWN” variant will be utilized for notifications at the highest level.
  3. To purchase a control float switch, please visit this page.
  4. In the event that one of our floats is not suitable for your use, we have the capability of obtaining many more types and should be able to locate something suitable for your needs.

Furthermore, we can supply most of our floats with cords in a variety of lengths, including 10ft, 15ft, 20ft, 30ft, and 50 feet. If you have any concerns or would like to place a custom order for a float switch, please contact us toll free at 1-877-925-5132.

Septic Tank Float Switch: Functions, Types & Problems

They are intended to be used in conjunction with a control panel, and are often used to detect high or low levels of activity. Low amperage and small angle are typical characteristics of these switches. Moving 10 degrees is required to activate narrow angle float switches on the water. As a result, they are extremely sensitive to changes in water level, making them ideal for use as high or low level alarms in swimming pools. Making a decision on which control switch to purchase is lot less complicated now.

  • Because it will be attached directly to a control panel or alarm box, no control switch will ever come with a plug in it again.
  • It will be necessary to utilize the “PUMP DOWN” variant for HIGH level warnings.
  • Control Float Switches may be purchased by clicking here.
  • In the event that one of our floats is not suitable for your application, we have the capability of obtaining many more types and should be able to locate something suitable for your needs.
  • Please contact us toll free at 1-877-925-5132 with any inquiries or to place an order for a float switch that is not in stock.

Functions of A Septic Tank Float Switch

Some readers may be able to figure out what this item is all about just by looking at its name alone. No need to be concerned or embarrassed if you have no understanding what this is about. There is nothing to be embarrassed about. Isn’t it true that we’re all here to learn? Let’s get into the specifics without further ado. Float switches, in their most basic form, are sensors that signal to your pump when it is essential to turn on or off. It is necessary for the water level to have reached a certain level in order for the pump to be activated.

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All of this is carried out on an automated basis while you go about your everyday tasks.

Types Of Septic Tank Float Switches

In terms of selecting the most ideal float switch for your needs, there are several alternatives available to consider. Submersible sensors, pump duty floats, mechanical sump switches, control duty floats, and horizontal float switches are some of the most common types of float switches available. It is required to provide a more detailed explanation of how each of them functions, however brief, in order to better grasp them.

Submersible Sensors

Submersible sensors are a sort of septic tank float switch that is most commonly used in deep sewage tanks. One of the most advantageous characteristics of submersible sensors is their ability to fit into virtually any place. -Advertisements- To put it another way, this float switch version is suitable for tight places. It is also advantageous to use a submersible sensor since it allows you to obtain continuous level data, as opposed to other types of sensors that only provide point-level observations.

Is this, therefore, the greatest septic tank float switch currently available? After reading through the others, you’ll have to choose a decision.

Mechanical Sump Switches

Mechanical sump switches are also referred to as ball float switches in some circles. This sort of septic tank float switch may be found in a variety of applications, including basement sump pumps and sump pumps. Mechanical sump switches are designed to perform a simple set of functions. Or, to put it another way, the on/off operation or functionality of this septic tank float switch variation is straightforward. -Advertisements – In addition, this float switch may be used to initiate the pumping of wastewater at different rates.

Horizontal Float Switches

The design of the horizontal float switch varies depending on where it is put or positioned on the circuit board. They’re positioned within the septic tank’s walls and rise and fall in response to the amount of sewage present. Because of this movement, it is simple to regulate the water level within the tank.

See also:  Where Do Septic Tank Pumpers Dump The Waste? (Solution found)

Septic Tank Float Switches are Important for the Following Reason…

The septic system, by its very design, provides a crucial function in the treatment of waste water. During the course of a day, when wastewater is discharged into this holding facility, the septic tank allows it to separate into three distinct layers, which are: scum (at the top), effluent (in the middle), and scum (at the bottom). Effluent that has accumulated in the septic tank must now either be evacuated or pumped to a drain field or surface water. A critical component, such as the float switch, must be fitted in order to guarantee that the levels are properly controlled.

When backups occur, the impact of a defective float switch is now felt to the fullest extent.

Common Issues Associated With Float Switch Failure

Float switches fail for a variety of reasons, three of which are discussed here. The existence of moving parts, poor maintenance practices, and selecting the incorrect device or switch for your septic tank are all examples of these issues. Any one of these factors is sufficient to generate issues in its own right.

Presence of Moving Parts

There are certain float switches for septic tanks that contain moving parts. While they may initially operate admirably, the corrosive and toxic nature of the septic tank environment eventually causes them to fail. Consequently, the moving parts become blocked, and the system fails as a result of the accumulation of debris.

Poor Maintenance Habits

When it comes to keeping your float switch in excellent operating order, preventative maintenance is critical. As a result, inadequate maintenance practices will do nothing to assist you in keeping this critical septic tank component operational. Habits of failure result from a pattern of continuous carelessness or inadequate maintenance. Important to remember is that the failure of a single system component, such as the septic tank float switch, can result in extensive damage to the system. This is a circumstance you’d want to stay as far away from as you possibly can.

This technique include identifying any defects that might have an impact on critical components such as the septic tank’s float switch. Repairs and replacements are carried out in order to keep it in working order.

Choosing The Wrong Device For Your Tank

The sort of septic tank float switches that is most appropriate for your individual requirements is influenced by a number of factors, one of which is the purpose of the switch. Seeking expert assistance in the selection of the proper float switch equipment for your septic tank is your best option for success. Septic professionals or technicians have a more in-depth grasp of the components of a septic system. These specialists will often advocate some float changes over others based on their experience.

Septic tank float switches are critical components in septic systems because they help to maintain optimal operating conditions.

More crucial, though, is the requirement for something to operate at peak performance.

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Septic System Alarm / Float Replacement

The replacement of alarms and floats is critical in the monitoring of the efficiency and integrity of any septic system. The operation of sewage ejector pumps is controlled by a simple float control switch. The float switch activates the pump when the amount of wastewater in the septic tank increases to a certain level. When the tank level and the float are at a low enough level, the switch shuts down the pump and turns it off. A redundant remote float control switch is critical since it may alert you as soon as a sewage problem is noticed, which is really useful.

This will avoid an expensive septic system crisis from occurring.

Advantage Septic Service takes pleasure in identifying problems as early as possible so that they may be “detected and remedied” before more damage is done to the system.

How do I troubleshoot my Septic Tank Alert and replace the float switch?

This sounds, to put it mildly, a little strangely wired. While a missing float is one thing, the presence of two distinct breakers for a septic alarm (one connected to the tank, and another to an alarm box inside) is not usual, and you should question your assumptions as soon as you go through the door. An example of normal wiring would be as follows: your alarm box inside receives electricity, some sensor wires (typically low-voltage) travel from your alarm box inside to the float in the tank outside, and if you short the wires (either manually or with a switch), you get an alarm situation.

For this reason, I believe you may need to take a step back and determine which items are associated with each other as well as which items SHOULD be associated with each other There should be wires connected to a float-switch type alarm, and shorting those wires (anywhere) should cause the alarm to sound (if it’s a normally-open-switch type alarm; the converse is true for the other sort of alarm).

Better alarms have a resistor across the switch as well, which may be used to determine whether or not the wires are damaged.

That would just be some things that are not related, and it is possible that they are fully independent.

If you do not see any flashing lights during testing, it is possible that the light bulb has burned out. However, it appears as though your alarm switch is powered by line voltage (which is most likely the case).

Septic Alarms, Control Panels, Pump Float Switch, and Control Float Switch from Septic Solutions, Inc.

All septic tank float switches are shipped out the same day, free of charge.

Junior M-NavigatorMercury Activated Pump Switch

For use in emptying applications, this mercury-activated float pump switch features usually open contacts and is suited for use with mercury. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • For the purpose of emptying applications, this mercury actuated float pump switch features typically open connections. Activation of the switch to “ON” occurs when the switch is lifted. Details about the product

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem20A401 With 20 FOOT CordItem20A413
13 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugControls Pumps Up To 1/2 HP At 120VControls Pumps Up To 1 HP At 240V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position Itis not legal to use mercury float switchesin the statesof Connecticut,Rhode Island, Maine,California, Vermont, Illinois,Minnesota, NewYork,Louisiana, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts.

STOCK CONSTANTLY AVAILABLE

navigator seriesmechanical Pump Switch

In order to facilitate the emptying of float pumps, this mechanical float pump switch features generally open connections. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical pump switch with a 90-degree wide angle
  • 13 amps, 16/2 SJOW wire, 120/240V, no plug
  • 13 amps, 16/2 SJOW wire, 120/240V, no plug Pumps up to 1/2 horsepower at 120V and 1 horsepower at 240V can be controlled
  • The pumping range can be adjusted from 6 to 36 inches
  • The pump may be used in water and sewage applications. Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem20A001 With 20 FOOT CordItem20A013
13 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugControls Pumps Up To 1/2 HP At 120VControls Pumps Up To 1 HP At 240V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

Order online at any time, or call our sales department toll-free at 1-877-925-5132 if you have any questions.

Alderon Big SwitchMechanicalPump fLoat Switch

In order to facilitate the emptying of float pumps, this mechanical float pump switch features generally open connections. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical pump switch with a 90-degree wide angle
  • 15 amps, 120/230VAC, 14/2 SJOW wire, no plug
  • 15 amps, 120/230VAC, 14/2 SJOW wire, no plug Controls Pumps up to 1 horsepower at 120 volts and 2 horsepower at 230 volts
  • Pumping range may be adjusted from 8 to 22 inches. Utilized in potable water and sewage treatment applications ULListed. Contacts that are built to last

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem7368 With 20 FOOT CordItem7061
15 AMP, 120/230VAC, No PlugControls Pumps Up To 1.0 HP At 120V Controls Pumps Up To 2.0 HP At 230V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

STOCK CONSTANTLY AVAILABLE

Alderon Big SwitchMechanicalPump fLoat SwitchWITH 10′ OR 20′ CORD AND PIGGYBACK PLUG

In order to facilitate the emptying of float pumps, this mechanical float pump switch features generally open connections. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical Pump Switch with 90-degree wide angle
  • 15 amps, 120/230VAC, 14/2 SJOW wire, Piggyback Plug
  • Controls Pumps up to 1 horsepower at 120 volts
  • Pumping range may be adjusted from 8 to 22 inches. Utilized in potable water and sewage treatment applications ULListed. Contacts that are built to last

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem7300 With 20 FOOT CordItem7055
15 AMP, 120/230VAC, Piggyback PlugControls Pumps Up To 1.0 HP At 120V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

STOCK CONSTANTLY AVAILABLE

navigator plus seriesmechanical Pump Switch

In order to facilitate the emptying of float pumps, this mechanical float pump switch features generally open connections. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical pump switch with a 90-degree wide angle
  • 15 amps, 14/2 SJOW wire, 120VAC, with a Piggy-Back Plug
  • Controls pumps up to 1 horsepower at 120V
  • UL listed. Pumping range is adjustable from 6 to 36 inches
  • It may be used in both water and sewage applications. SST Pipe mount assembly is supplied, and it is UL Listed as well. CSA Approved

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem20A102 With 20 FOOT CordItem20A114
15 AMP, 120VAC, with PlugControls Pumps Up To 3/4 HP At 120V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

STOCK CONSTANTLY AVAILABLE

a-navigator high ampmechanical Pump Switch

In order to facilitate the emptying of float pumps, this mechanical float pump switch features generally open connections. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • A mechanical pump switch with a 90-degree wide angle
  • A 25-amp, 12-2/SJOW wire, 120V/240V, and a 10-foot chord
  • Pumps up to 1-1/2 horsepower at 120V and 3 horsepower at 240V are controlled. Pumping range may be adjusted from 8 to 28 inches. Designed for use in water and sewage systems
  • Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved
Availability: IN STOCKItem20A301
25 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugControls Pumps Up To 1-1/2 HP At 120VControls Pumps Up To 3 HP At 240V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

SEptic Solutions® offers fast and free shipping on all of their float switches.

Alderon Qwik Pak High AmpMechanical FLoat Switch

All Float Switches from SEptic Solutions® are shipped quickly and for free.

  • Switches pumps up to 25 amps or 3 horsepower at 240V
  • Breaks BOTH lines while operating at 240V
  • Is safe to use with grinder pumps
  • 90 degree wide angle mechanical pump switch Pump is activated by a smart relay, which increases the life of the float switch. Pumping range is adjustable from 8 to 22 inches
  • Includes 5″x2″x2″ NEMA 4X Junction Box
  • Includes Quick Connect Wire Connectors – No Tools Required
  • Includes all necessary Junction Box Cord Connectors
  • Includes all necessary Junction Box Cord Connectors Designed for use in water and sewage systems
  • UL Approved. CSA Approved, Three-Year Limited Warranty
Availability: IN STOCKItem7803
Click To View Larger Image FOR USE WITH GRINDER PUMPS ANDOTHER HIGH HORSE POWER PUMPS25 AMP, 240V,4X Junction BoxControls Pumps Up To 3 HP At 240V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position Qwik Pak Specifications

In addition, floats are available in a variety of various lengths of cable. For further information, please contact us.

double M-NavigatorMechanicalPump Switch

For use in emptying applications, this mechanically operated dual float pump switch includes usually open contacts with normally closed contacts. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Dual float switches, as opposed to a single float switch, provide a more versatile pumping range. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical Pump Switch with a 90-degree wide angle
  • 15 amps, 14/3 SJOW wire, 120VAC or 240VAC
  • 15-foot chord with a Piggy-Back Plug
  • 15-foot cord with a Piggy-Back Plug
  • Pumps up to 1 horsepower at 120V and 2 horsepower at 240V
  • Adjustable pumping range from 2 to 54 inches
  • For use in water and sewage applications Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

See also:  How Often To Pump Grey Water Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)
120V with plugItem20A505 240V with plugItem20A506
15 AMP, 120V or 240V, with PlugControls Pumps Up To 1 HP At 120VControls Pumps Up To 2 HP At 240V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position Dual Floats Allow More Flexible Pumping RangeAdjustable Pumping Range From 2 to 54 inches A Built-In Relay Allows these floats to work in conjunction with one another without the needfor a control panel

Put your trust in the professionals with more than 20 years of expertise in the wastewater business.

v-navigator verticalmechanical Pump Switch

This mechanical float pump switch with usually open contacts is ideal for emptying applications and is made of stainless steel. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Due to the fact that this switch only requires vertical movement to operate, it may be fitted in confined locations. Specifications of the product

  • Vertical mechanical pump switch
  • 10 amps, 120 volts, 16/2 SJOW wire, 10 foot cord with plug
  • Controls a vertical mechanical pump. Pumps up to 1/2 horsepower at 120 volts. This product is intended for use in tight spaces. The pumping range may be adjusted from 1 to 6 inches. To be used in water and sewage treatment applications. Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved
Availability: IN STOCKItem20A201
15 AMP, 120VAC, with PlugControls Pumps Up To 3/4 HP At 120V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

Do you want assistance in selecting a float switch?

Alternatively, you may phone us toll free at 1-877-925-5132. All septic tank float switches are shipped out the same day, free of charge.

m-pilot seriesMercurycontrol switch

It features typically open connections and is intended for use with a mercury actuated float control switch to provide high level notifications. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • For use with a control panel or a high water alarm, this 10 degree narrow angle mercury activated control switch has an 18/2 SJOW wire and operates at 120/240V with no plug. It is suitable for use in water and sewage applications. Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem20A701 With 20 FOOT CordItem20A709
5 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugDesigned For Use With Control Panels and High Water Alarms Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position Itis not legal to use mercury float switchesin the statesof Connecticut,Rhode Island, Maine,California, Vermont, Illinois,Minnesota, NewYork,Louisiana, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts.

Do you require assistance? Please contact us toll free at 1-877-925-5132 for professional assistance.

pilot seriesMechanicalcontrol switch

Normal open contacts are used in this mechanical float control switch, which is intended to provide high level notifications. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • For use with a control panel or high water alarm, this 10 degree narrow angle mechanically activated control switch has a 5 amp rating on 16/2 SJOW wire and operates on 120/240V with no plug. It is suitable for water and sewage applications. Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem20A601 With 20 FOOT CordItem20A609
5 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugDesigned For Use With Control Panels and High Water Alarms Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

Order online at any time, or give us a call at 1-877-925-5132 to place an order over the phone at your convenience.

ALDERON UNIMAX MECHANICAL FLOATcontrol Switch

The Unimax mechanical float control switch features typically open contacts that are intended to be used for high level alerts or to activate a control panel to empty a tank when the switch is in the open position. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical control switch with a 10 degree narrow angle
  • 4 amps, 18/2 SJOW wire, 120/240V
  • For use with a control panel or high water alarm
  • Designed for use in water and sewage systems
  • Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem7202 With 20 FOOT CordItem7221
4 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugDesigned For Use With Control Panels and High Water Alarms Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

All septic tank float switches are shipped out the same day, free of charge.

pilot seriesMechanicalcontrol switch

Normal open contacts are used in this mechanical float control switch, which is intended to be used for low level alerts. When the switch is in the lowered position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical control switch with a 10 degree narrow angle
  • 5 amps, 16/2 SJOW wire, 120/240V, no plug
  • For use with a control panel or high water alarm
  • Designed for use in water and sewage systems
  • Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved
Availability: IN STOCKItem20A603
5 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugDesigned For Use With Control Panels and High Water Alarms Float Activates To ONIn The lowered Position

Put your trust in the professionals with more than 20 years of expertise in the wastewater business. “The good news is that you had a phone number that was easy to remember and a human voice to speak with! These days, it’s difficult to come by. Some businesses believe they are saving money by not including a phone number on their website or by making it difficult to find. They are incurring financial losses. Many individuals, like myself, prefer to locate products on the internet yet place orders over the phone.

SST FLOAT cLAMP ASSEMBLY

Clamp designed to mount any float switch to apipe.Also see the weights below.Availability: IN STOCKWhen Ordered With A Float SwitchItem60A404 SALE $7.95

Do you require assistance? Please contact us toll free at 1-877-925-5132 for professional assistance.

CableWeight for Float Switch Provides a pivot point for suspended floats

Weight with screws provided securely lock float cable intoplace.Availability: IN STOCKWhen Ordered With A Float SwitchItem60A400-WA SALE $9.50

Order online at any time, or give us a call at 1-877-925-5132 to place an order over the phone at your convenience.

Septic Tank Pumping: Ultimate Homeowner’s Guide

Septic systems are built in around one-fourth of all residences in the United States, and they are particularly common in rural regions that are not served by municipal sewer systems. Septic systems, as opposed to conventional sewage systems, pump solid and liquid waste from the house out into a drain field and an underground septic tank instead of into the sewer system for treatment.

What is a Septic Pump?

An aseptic tankpump is a submersible water pump that is often fitted in the last chamber of a septic tank or in another pump tank after the septic tank to remove waste water. A septic tank is used to evacuate sewage from buildings in which the water level in the sewage system is lower than the water level in the sewer line or the water level in the building’s septic tank, as is the case in many urban areas. Essentially, these pumps are tiny electric water pumps that can be submerged in wastewater without damaging them.

When the water chamber is filled with water, the float switch activates, which either turns on or off the pump. Due to the fact that the pump is located at the top, the little pump impeller rotates and forces the water upwards through a pipe attached to the pump and into the reservoir.

How Septic System Works

According to the old-fashioned method of septic system operation, all of the water and waste carried by the water goes via the home’s drainage system before passing through the main sewage line and ending up in the septic tank. The flow of sewage can be accomplished by gravity alone or with the assistance of an electric pump. When the septic tank is full, the solids will settle to the bottom of the tank, while oil, grease and other liquids will float to the top of the tank, resulting in a foam layer at the top.

While the fluids slowly filter through the soil, microorganisms work to break down the pathogens that are there.

Meanwhile, the solids in the tank disintegrate under the action of anaerobic bacteria, resulting in a sludgy substance that gathers at the bottom of the tank.

When the bacterial action is efficient, the volume of solid waste produced by the breakdown of this waste is significantly decreased.

Anatomy of a Septic Tank

The septic tank is a watertight container constructed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene that is placed in the ground in a location close to the house. An intake pipe, through which all waste from the house’s sewage pipe is directed to the tank, and an outlet pipe, through which liquids can be directed to the drain field, are both included in the system. The top of the tank lies just below the level of the earth, and is completely inaccessible except for a couple of inspection pipes and a manhole cover, which is used to pump sludge out of the tank when it is essential to do so.

When to Have Your Septic Tank Pumped?

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) advises that a septic tank be examined every two to three years, with mechanical pumping normally necessary every three to five years to completely empty the tank. Systems that are either too small or subjected to a high volume of consumption may require yearly pumping. Some systems contain electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components that need to be examined more often, generally once a year, to ensure they are functioning properly. Pumping is the process of removing sludge from the bottom of a septic tank, and it must be done before the sludge accumulates to a point where it obstructs the outlet pipe, through which liquids flow into the drainage field.

The frequency with which this must be done is determined by a number of factors, including:

  • Size of the household: Larger homes create more waste than smaller families, which causes the septic tank to fill up more quickly. The amount of wastewater produced is as follows: If there is an excessive amount of wastewater going into the septic tank, it might have an impact on how quickly the tank fills. a) The amount of particles in the wastewater: Households with many toilets or who use garbage disposals frequently are more likely to have a septic tank that is overflowing sooner. Septic tank capacity: bigger tanks can retain more solid sludge and, as a result, require less frequent pumping
  • Septic tank design:

There are a few methods that might assist you in estimating when you should have your tank pumped.

If a normal four-bedroom home has a 1,200-to-1,500 gallon storage tank, and the family of four uses the tank on a regular basis, the tank should be pumped every 3 to 5 years.

How to Install a Septic Tank Pump in a Septic Tank?

Alternatively, septic tanks can be constructed in existing septic tanks or pumping stations can be installed after existing septic tanks. If the septic tank is just one chambered, we do not propose that the pump be installed immediately on top of the tank. Pumping out settled solids is accomplished when the pump is installed in a single-chamber septic tank. These solids have the potential to block either the immersion zone or the penetration zone of a system. For septic tanks with two or three chambers, it is possible to include a submersible pump into the end chamber of one of them.

Otherwise, the tiny particulates might block the pump and cause it to malfunction.

How a Septic Tank Is Pumped?

If you have a septic service expert who inspects your septic tank on a regular basis, they will be able to notify you when it is time to pump out the sludge from the tank and save you the trouble of doing it yourself. Most of the time, this is the case when the floating layer of flotation, which is located between the mud and the floating water, is within approximately 6 inches of the outlet pipe heading to the drainage field. After the lid is removed from the septic tank, the septic service arrives with a huge tank truck equipped with vacuum equipment, and personnel enter a large hose through the manhole into the septic tank.

Pumping a septic tank can cost anywhere from $200 to $500, depending on where you reside and the size of the septic tank in question.

Why Septic Tank pumping?

Owners are responsible for the upkeep of their septic tanks and drain fields, among other things. So, you’re probably wondering how much septic tank pumping costs in the first place. It is necessary to consider a variety of criteria when determining the price for septic tank pumping. A septic tank must be pumped when the top layer of scum (or scum layer) approaches within 6 inches of the exit pipe, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Unfortunately, you may not be aware that your septic tank is full until there is a problem, such as bad odors emanating from your drains or, even worse, a septic system backlog, which can be quite unpleasant.

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The septic tank receives all of the wastewater from the house, which is sent through a pipe.

Since only wastewater is disseminated into the drain field due to the tank architecture, it prevents sludge and scum from escaping the septic tank.

In addition, newer tanks make accessing the septic tank simple since they have risers that extend to ground level and are covered with lids. Septic tank entrances and subterranean access points for older tanks are provided.

Typical problems leading to Septic Tank pumping

A septic tank is typically efficient between each pumping of the tank’s sewage disposal system. Problems, on the other hand, might arise for a variety of causes. Some of the most common septic tank issues are as follows:

  • The septic tank is filled with scum and sludge that has accumulated on the surface. There are clogs or obstructions in the lines connecting the inside fixtures to the septic tank. The levels of scum and sludge in the septic tank are so high that they overflow into the drain field, clogging the drain field and preventing water from penetrating into the earth. Because of significant rainfall or a high water table, the earth has become saturated. Because of breaks in the drainpipe caused by roots or by anything else, an excessive amount of water is spilled into the field area. Because the drainpipe has been smashed, water levels in the septic tank have risen above normal, causing sewage to flow into the home’s drains.

There is little doubt that when you notice a bad stench in your house, it indicates that there is more to the situation than a full septic tank. When a professional does a septic system pumping, he or she is also trained in identifying drain field issues and sewage that is flowing in the other direction of where it should be entering the septic tank.

How Much Does Septic Tank Pumping Cost?

Septic tank pumping may not be the most glamorous of duties, but it is one that must be completed on a regular basis. Septic tanks must be emptied out every two to three years in order to function correctly. The service, which is performed just once, costs an average of $400. However, if left unattended for decades, septic cleaning can morph into septic replacement, which can cost anywhere from $5,000 to $10,000.

How Much Does It Cost to Pump a Septic Tank Per Gallon?

The size of your septic tank will have an impact on the cost of cleaning. Pumping a septic tank costs around $0.30 per gallon on average, and the majority of septic tanks are between 600 and 2,000 gallons in capacity. Due to the fact that larger septic tanks do not require pumping as frequently as smaller ones, the size of your septic tank will also influence the length of time you may go between cleanings. The majority of tanks rely on gravity to function. Sloped pipes transport wastewater from your home to a holding tank that is buried in the ground outside your property.

How Much Does It Cost to Pump a Septic Tank Yourself?

Septic tank pumping is a job that should be left to the specialists. Pumping sludge from your septic system is not only unpleasant, but it also necessitates the use of specialist equipment that you are unlikely to have on hand. Following the removal of waste from the septic tank, it must be transported and disposed of in the appropriate manner. For the majority of homeowners, it is safer and more cost-effective to hire a professional to complete this work. If you’re interested in learning more about your alternatives and receiving a tailored price, contact a local septic tank cleanup.

What Factors Influence the Cost to Pump a Septic Tank?

Septic tank pump out costs are affected by several factors, the most significant of which are as follows.

  • The dimensions of the septic tank
  • The amount of liquid in the tank at the time of septic pumping
  • Preparation activities performed by the homeowner prior to the arrival of the septic pumping service
  • In-field pipe condition
  • Condition of the drain field
  • Older septic tanks do not have risers, therefore they are more difficult to maintain. Geographical location (contractor charges vary depending on region)
  • Contractor selection
  • And

In comparison to the costs of repairing or replacing a septic tank or a drain field, the cost of septic tank pumping can be rather affordable in some situations. The following are the average costs associated with septic pumping:

  • Septic tank pumping costs range from $295 to $610 on average in the United States. Costs for up to 750-gallon tanks range from $175 to $300
  • Costs for up to 1,000-gallon tanks range from $225 to $400
  • Costs for 1,250- to 1,500-gallon tanks range from $275 to $500
  • And costs for 1,250- to 1,500-gallon tanks range from $275 to $500. Large tanks larger than 1,500 gallons cost $600.

Most homeowners will spend between $250 and $500 for a septic system pumping service, depending on the size of their system. Occasionally, a homeowner might save money by prepping the space for the septic tank specialist to work in. For example, the homeowner can make certain that the tank access port is free for the technician to pass through.

5 Tips for Maintaining Septic System

There are a number of proactive actions you can take to ensure that your septic system runs properly and that the frequency with which pumping is required is reduced. These include:

  1. Reduce your water use. Utilizing toilets and faucets with high water efficiency and water conservation may significantly reduce the quantity of water that enters the septic system and causes it to backup. Water leaks and drips should be repaired as soon as possible in order to avoid misuse of water, which can lead to the septic tank filling up faster. Reduce the amount of solid trash produced: Another technique to ensure that the septic system is operating correctly is to keep track of the solid waste that enters it. Trash that is either washed down the drain or flushed down the toilet can cause the septic system to become overburdened. Other than toilet paper, don’t flush anything down the toilet. Also, avoid utilizing a trash disposer that dumps organic food wastes into the septic system, which might cause problems. Even though it takes just a small amount of work, throwing things in the trash makes a significant impact in how well the septic system is managed. Rainwater should be directed away from the drain field. Rain gutters and landscaping grading that direct water into the septic system’s drain field can impair the field’s capacity to distribute water from the septic system.
  2. Hot tubs should not be drained into the sewer system. Water from hot tubs or swimming pools should be discharged onto the yard rather than into the drain field, since this might impose an unnecessary strain on a septic system. It is best not to flush chemicals down the toilet. Avoid flushing chemicals down the toilet because they can interfere with the bacterial process that breaks down solid wastes. There are also several other commercial septic tank additives, which are typically considered to be more harmful than beneficial. Do not use any septic tank chemicals unless they have been suggested by a reputable specialist.

More information may be found at:

  • What Your Septic System Is and Does
  • Septic Tank Maintenance: How to Clean and Maintain It
  • What exactly is a septic tank? – What are the different types and how does it work? What is an Aerobic Septic System and how does it work?

Septic Pump Components

Septic tank alarms and float switches are required if your septic system is equipped with a pump to take wastewater from the tank and discharge it onto a drainage field. When the amount of water in the tank rises over an undesirable level, the float rises with it. If the float flips, an alarm will sound, alerting you that your toilet may overflow if the problem is not treated immediately. It is possible for the float switch to fail and cause the alarm to ring even when the tank is not overflowing.

Troubleshooting probable float switch difficulties includes the following steps:

  1. Check to see if the pump is activated by pressing the on/off switch on the float switch. You may have a faulty pump, or you may have a dead switch
  2. Whichever is the case, you should replace it. Make a visual inspection of all exposed cable or wires for signs of damage. It is possible to connect the pump directly to a power source, bypassing the switch, in some cases. You, on the other hand, are now running the pump in manual mode. The pump will need to be unplugged in order to be turned off, or else it will burn out. If the pump does not turn on when the switch is bypassed and there is power to the pump, there might be a number of various reasons for this. This will be a problem that will need to be resolved. Make a phone call to Lentz Wastewater.

CONTROL PANEL

Pumps of various sizes are controlled through the use of control panels. Simplex Control Panels are used to regulate the operation of a single submersible pump. Simplex panels are equipped with a high water alarm, fuses for the alarm circuit, and circuit breakers, among other features. Residential and business locations with a single pump can benefit from these control panels. Duplex Control Panels are used to regulate the operation of two submersible pumps at the same time. High water alarms, fuses, and circuit breakers are all included in these panels.

The use of a cycled timer in conjunction with time dosing makes it feasible to distribute to a secondary system.

It is necessary to have a control panel for any system that uses a non-automatic pump.

Septic Tank Service in Shamong, NJ

Bob Drayton Inc. is a dependable provider of residential and business septic services in Burlington and the neighboring counties of North Carolina. From unclogging sewage pipes to performing sump pump repairs, our skilled experts are equipped to tackle any septic issue. We may be reached at 609-859-3629 if you want further information about our septic services and repairs.

HIGH-PRESSURE JETTING

In Burlington and the neighboring areas, Bob Drayton Inc. is known for providing dependable residential and commercial septicservices. Sewage difficulties range from clogged septic pipes to sump pump repairs, and our highly trained specialists can handle them all! More information about our septic services and repairs is available by calling 609-859-3629 today.

POWER SNAKING

When a blockage is really persistent, more than a plunger will be required. Tree roots, grease, ancient pipes, and even children’s toys can all contribute to the formation of difficult blockages. Our highly trained technicians can assist you. Our power snake has a reach of up to 125 feet, making it ideal for unclogging drains.

SEPTIC TANK TREATMENT

Bob Drayton Inc.

provides septic tank treatment that reduces smells and digests waste, according to the company’s website. We recommend that a household of four use roughly two ounces of Bio Active Septic Treatment every month to keep their septic tank in good condition and prevent blockage of the drains.

DISTRIBUTION BOXES

Bob Drayton Inc. is the company to call if you want distribution box repair. Our skilled technician will locate your box and thoroughly check it to determine whether or not there are any problems.

SEPTIC PUMPS, FLOATS,ALARMS

Is your alarm set to go off? What kind of noises do you hear coming from the tank? It’s possible that you have an issue with your septic pump. Our highly trained professional and fully supplied repair truck will quickly identify the source of the problem and get you back up and running in no time at all. We exclusively utilize the highest-quality replacement components available; no knock-offs are used.

EFFLUENT FILTERS

Installing effluent filters (also known as septic filters) is an excellent approach to ensure that your drain field has the longest possible life. The filter is installed on the output side of the septic tank and is responsible for capturing minute particles and sediments that would otherwise make their way into the drain field and into the sewer system. The filter is cleaned and maintained on a regular basis. Bob Drayton Inc. may also do routine maintenance on your current filter.

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