How To Dig Up Tank For Septic Tank Pumping? (Solution found)

  • Carry a shovel or a similar tool to help excavate the ground once you’ve located the tank. Apart from the small seam around it, the lid should be completely flat against the tank. Dig up at least 16 inches of ground on all sides around the lid to prevent dirt from falling and sliding down onto it.

What hole do you pump a septic tank?

The septic tank must be pumped through the two large central access ports (manholes), not the small inlet or outlet inspection ports located above each baffle. Pumping a tank through the baffle inspection ports can damage the baffles and yield incomplete removal of sludge and scum.

How often does a 2000 gallon holding tank need to be pumped?

How often does my holding tank need to be pumped? A holding tank may need to be pumped every 30 to 90 days depending on how much waste is generated and the size of the tank.

How often does a 1000 gallon septic tank need to be pumped?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

How often should a 5000 gallon septic tank be pumped?

A: As a general rule, a septic tank should be pumped and emptied every 3 to 5 years. Homes outside a city may rely on septic tanks since they don’t have access to city sewer lines.

What needs to be uncovered to pump septic tank?

Tank cleaning does not require the technicians to uncover the entire tank. A technician may have to dig to uncover the lids if they are not on risers that bring the lid above the ground. A technician will use a prod to search the yard for the location of the tank and only remove the earth immediately above the lids.

How deep are septic tank lids?

Often, septic tank lids are at ground level. In most cases, they have buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

How do you know when your septic tank is full?

Pooling around the grass over the septic tank area is an innocuous sign of a septic tank that may be full. If you notice standing water when it has not rained, this probably means the tank is at capacity, and some of the wastewater may be coming out of the tank and reaching the surface.

How do I know when my holding tank is full?

You can tell when the gray water tank has reached it’s max capacity by looking in the shower, if you have water in the bottom of the shower and it won’t go down your gray water tank is full. If you flush the commode and it doesn’t go down, well you waited just a little to long to dump.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

What to do after septic is pumped?

After you have had your septic tank pumped by a trusted septic company, there are some things you can and should do as the septic system owner.

  1. 1) Get on a Schedule.
  2. 2) Take Care of the System.
  3. 3) Know the Parts of Your System.
  4. 4) Check Other Possible Issues.

Can a septic tank never be pumped?

What Are the Consequences of Not Pumping Your Tank? If the tank is not pumped, the solids will build up in the tank and the holding capacity of the tank will be diminished. Eventually, the solids will reach the pipe that feeds into the drain field, causing a clog. Waste water backing up into the house.

How do I clean my septic tank naturally?

You can mix about a 1/4 cup of baking soda with 1/2 cup of vinegar and 2 tablespoons lemon to make your own natural cleaning agent. The baking soda will fizz up to help get the dirt and grime in your tub and drains. It’s a great cleaner and your septic system will thank you!

How long can a septic tank go without being pumped?

You can wait up to 10 years to drain your tank provided that you live alone and do not use the septic system often. You may feel like you can pump your septic tank waste less frequently to save money, but it’ll be difficult for you to know if the tank is working properly.

Can you pump a septic tank too often?

If your septic tank is pumped too often, that bacteria will have no place to go but out into the drain field, which can lead to clogs and failures. So unless your septic tank’s sludge and scum levels reach certain thresholds, it’s actually beneficial to leave the septic tank alone.

How often should a septic tank be emptied?

How Often Should I Empty My Septic Tank? To keep your sewage system running correctly, your septic tank needs to be pumped out or desludged every 1 -2 years. It is extremely important to keep your septic tank maintained.

Septic Tank Pumping Procedure – Pumping out the Septic Tank

  • Fill out the form below to ask a question or to make a comment on the stages and procedures involved in pumping out and cleaning a septic tank

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Details on how to pump out or clean a septic tank may be found here. In this septic tank pumpout article series, you’ll learn how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks, as well as how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks using photos. In addition to septic pumping tank truck operators, this guideline is meant to provide basic information to homeowners and septic service providers that are concerned about septic system maintenance.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Pumping Out the Septic Tank – how the solidswaste are removed from a septic tank

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Details on how to pump out or clean a septic tank may be found here. In this septic tank pumpout article series, you’ll learn how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks, as well as how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks using photos. In addition to septic pumping tank truck operators, this guideline is meant to provide basic information to homeowners and septic service providers that are concerned about septic system maintenance.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Reader CommentsQ A

Last month, our septic system overflowed into two bathrooms, which was a nightmare. According to the report, the circuit breaker had tripped and the sump pump was not operating properly. Because it had been 5 years since the tank had been filled, I phoned a local pumper to empty it. Surprisingly, they just opened the overflow tank and pumped the contents of it. That is something I have never seen before. We’ve always had the septic tank itself opened and pumped, which is a good thing. When I questioned the pumper, they said that pumping the auxiliary/overflow tank was standard procedure.

  1. Is it possible that we were duped?
  2. When the tank’s inlet and exit baffle conditions are checked, the task is done better, and providing a second access point may make cleaning sludge and crud at that end easier to reach.
  3. In the intake end of the tank, I’ve drilled a hole and exposed one at a depth of around 13 inches.
  4. Thank you in advance for any advise you may provide!
  5. It is dependent on the pumping machinery used by the individual pumper truck, as well as the horizontal and vertical lift lengths involved.
  6. During this section, we will discuss the limitations of septic tank pumper trucks in terms of both horizontal distance and vertical lift.

There you’ll discover particular examples that will help you solve the question. In order to pump out the septic tank, how near does the truck need to get to the tank?

Question: pumper said can’t pump septic tank because of hair

A photo shows evidence that some buildings may really be exposed to significant amounts of hair: thick clumps of dog hair were dragged into this water heater draft hood, causing the heater to become dangerous and putting the occupants at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning On May 24, 2020, a hair in a septic tank stated: I had a septic tank pumping business come out to my house. This is something I do every three years (1000 gallon tank). The operator informed me that he would be unable to pump it because I had an excessive amount of hair in the machine.

He stated that he would consult with his supervisor, but that he would consider a chemical therapy and retrying in three months.

I’m happy I did, because some of these therapies may be really hazardous to your health.

Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

Moderator reply: Problems Caused by Hair in the Septic Tank?

Unusual circumstances, such as finding so much hair in a sewage tank that the tank cannot be drained, require more inquiry. It is also necessary to clarify that the hair is indeed hair, and to provide an explanation. You may want the services of a septic pumping contractor who is equipped with a reliable grinder pump. But first and foremost, we must determine whether or not there is a blocking item in your septic tank, and if there is, how it got there and what exactly it is. When it comes to septic tank hair, don’t rely on chemical treatments to “fix” the problem.

Is it conceivable that roots have infiltrated your septic tank and caused damage?

Details: hair may clog traps and drains, but a clogged septic tanks such that it can’t be pumped would be unusual.

I was taken aback by your remark that there is so much hair in your septic tank that it is impossible to clean the tank properly. It is not possible for hair to disintegrate in the drain system or in the septic tank, whether it comes from people or pets. Although the regular amounts of hair entering the building drain/waste pipe system from routine family washing and bathing do not generally cause problems in the septic tank, they can cause clogging at the drain or trap of a sink, shower, or bathtub.

Large amounts of hair can potentially clog a septic pump or a lift pump, depending on their design.

Having that much hair in a sewage tank that it prevents the tank from being pumped by the septic pumping truck would be an unusual and difficult thing to explain to others.

A hair will normally float and adhere to the floating scum and grease layer in the septic tank, but hair may also settle to the tank bottom and become part of the settled organic matter in the tank on rare occasions.

Septic pumper trucks can usually handle hair as well as floating scum and settled sludge

In most cases, the hose on a septic tank pumper truck is three inches in diameter, and the pumps on septic tank pumper trucks are powerful enough to suck up tiny boulders as well as remove the floating scum layer and settled sludge layer from a septic tank. In reality, while researching and producing the septic pump vacuum pump article I referenced above, we discovered that the word “hair” did not appear in any of the septic pumper truck pump specs or descriptions. See the website for further information.

  1. In most cases, the pumper can pump through even the thickest hardened floating scum layer or settled sludge layer that has accumulated.
  2. On rare occasions, a pumper may actually add water to the septic tank in order to aid in the breakdown of solids prior to pumping.
  3. That advice, in my opinion, may imply that the person who is proposing it has a limited grasp of how septic systems operate and must be corrected.
  4. As soon as someone runs ANY plumbing fixture in the building, the chemical, which has already been diluted by the liquid volume of the septic tank, is pushed out into the drainfield.
  5. 2.
  6. Insist on having your septic tank inspected by a qualified septic tank cleaning specialist and report back to us with the results.
  7. Continue reading atINSPECT the SEPTIC TANK DURING PUMPING, or choose a topic from the closely-related topics listed below, or see the completeARTICLE INDEX for a comprehensive list of articles.

Septic Tank Pumping Articles

  • PUMPER TRUCK VACUUM PUMPS
  • HOW TO FIND A SEPTIC TANK
  • SEPTIC TANK LEVELS OF SEWAGE
  • SEPTIC TANK PUMPING MISTAKES
  • ERRORS IN THE TIMING OF THE SEPTIC TANK’S PUMPOUT
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM BACK-PUMPING-consumer warning
  • SEPTIC TANK OBJECTIVE INFORMATION
  • SEPTIC TANK PUMPOUT TIMING ERRORS
  • WHEN SHOULD A SEPTIC TANK BE CLEANED
  • WHEN SHOULD A SEPTIC TANK NOT BE PUMPED
  • SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION PROCEDURE
  • SEPTIC TANK LEVELS OF SEWAGE
  • PUMPER TRUCK OPERATION PROCEDURE
  • PUMPING THE SEPTIC TANK
  • CLEANING SEPTIC TANKS
  • WHEN TO CLEAN THE SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN NOT TO PUMP A SEPTIC TANK
  • FINDING THE SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO
  • HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC
  • BEFORE PUMPING, INSPECT THE SEPTIC TANK
  • AFTER PUMPING, INSPECT THE SEPTIC TANK
  • CLOSE THE SEPTIC TANK
  • INSPECT THE SEPTIC TANK
  • NOTE THE LOCATION OF THE SEPTIC TANK AND THE CONCLUSIONS OF THE SEPTIC PUMPING.
  • Reasons for Septic Tank Pumping
  • Septic Tank Pumping Schedule
  • Septic Tank Safety
  • Septic Tank Chemicals
  • Septic Tank Pumping Reasons

Suggested citation for this web page

PUMPING THE SEPTIC TANKatInspect A pedia.com is an online encyclopedia of building and environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue avoidance guidance for the construction industry.

See also:  How To Find The Location Of My Septic Tank With The County? (Best solution)

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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Ask a Question or Search InspectApedia

If you have any questions, answers, or comments concerning the methods and procedures involved in pumping out and cleaning a septic tank, please post them here. We encourage you to use the search box just below, or if you prefer, you may make a question or remark in theCommentsbox below and we will get back to you as soon as possible. InspectApedia is a website that allows you to search for things.

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Technical ReviewersReferences

Citations can be shown or hidden by selecting Show or Hide Citations. InspectApedia.com is a publisher that provides references. Daniel Friedman is an American journalist and author.

Procedure for Opening Septic Tanks

  • ASK a question or make a comment about how to open a septic tank safely and properly for inspection or cleaning.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Instructions on how to open the septic tank. The location of the septic tank cleanout or cover, as well as the access and opening processes. We discuss some of the things to look for before opening the septic tank, such as subsidence, indications of recent work, and septic tank coverings that are not suitable to use. Then we demonstrate how to remove the septic tank lid or the access port cover from the tank.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Procedures for Safe Opening of a Septic Tank, Cesspool, or Drywall for Inspection or Cleaning

The following are the contents of the article:

  • How to remove the lid from a septic tank
  • When it comes to pumping out the septic tank, which septic tank entrance should be used? Why

In this septic tank pumpout article series, you’ll learn how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks, as well as how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks using photos. In addition to septic pumping tank truck operators, this guideline is meant to provide basic information to homeowners and septic service providers that are concerned about septic system maintenance.

  • There is a risk of dangerous, perhaps deadly collapse due to subsidence (depressions or low regions in the earth) near the location of the septic tank. Evidence of recent construction activity that may necessitate further investigation in order to determine the status of the septic system
  • Backup or effluent breakout at the surface of the ground in the septic tank region.
  • Here is an example of a septic tank cover that was discovered atop an unstable home-made collection of concrete blocks that had been piled by the owner to serve as an access well to his septic tank. Because the masonry blocks were misaligned and loose, and because the tank aperture into which the cover opened was bigger than the cover, there was a serious collapse risk that may have resulted in a deadly hazard. We covered the area with plywood and roped it off, and we quickly informed the residents and the property owner of the situation, both verbally and in writing

Procedure for Opening the Septic Tank Pumping Access Port

It is necessary to clean the septic tank using a cleanout port, which is normally positioned in the center of the tank. A small access opening, such as one over an intake or outlet baffle, does not provide enough space for adequate sludge removal from the septic tank bottom, and it increases the likelihood of future clogging of the tank’s inlet or outlet due to partially removed floating scum that has not been completely removed from the tank bottom. In this particular scenario, we already had the measurements to the exact placement of the septic tank cleanout cover due to previous work.

A wrecking bar is set to be used to remove the cover from the vehicle.

Reader CommentsQ A

@Ron, In order for a concrete septic tank lid to be correctly erected, it must feature both access openings and cast in iron loops to which a hoist may be attached. Alternatively, if your septic tank cover does not have those points of purchase for lifting, you will require a flat bar and a larger wrecking bar to pry up the excavated lid from the septic tank sufficiently to allow you to put a chain around the lid, most likely two Chainz, and lift the lid with a hoist and tripod mechanism or you will use an on-site motorized hoist.

  1. 1/2 x 27/4 removing the top of a septic tank @Phil, Although what you describe is theoretically doable, it may be less expensive and more rational to do so in a different way.
  2. This is due to the fact that just stitching a circular hole does not ensure that I am creating a hole through which the lid will not be dropped.
  3. Edge My concrete septic tank, which was constructed when the home was built in 1979 and does not have any manholes or openings for pumping out, is in poor condition.
  4. Is it feasible to cut two manholes using a concrete saw that are 20″/24″ in diameter and then build risers and a cover on top of them?
  5. Could you please share a picture of the tank top?
  6. It is common for the concrete top to be tapered; nevertheless, it may just be trapped by effloresent salts and filth.
  7. I have a feeling that simply tugging will not be effective.

This would have stopped leaks but would have made it extremely difficult to open the tank for the next person who needed to open the tank.

Repeat this process many times all around the cover’s perimeter.

For me, this has worked almost every time in the past.

It is recommended that you build a septic tank riser that is sealed to the tank top, as well as a new secure cover on top of the riser if your septic tank lid is not near to the ground level.

Never work on your own.

I’ve erected two wood 4x4s on top of the lifting ring to provide additional support.

All I’ve done three times is shattered those 4x4s.

Do you have any recommendations?

A septic tank pumping provider can remove plastic bags, tiny pebbles, and other debris from your tank, as well as the sediments, scum, and sludge that has accumulated there.

What is the best way to get them out?

When the septic tank is drained out, would it make sense to place a plastic bag over the top hole of the tank to keep the odors contained?

Gerard A plastic bag as a sewer line cap doesn’t seem right to me – it’s not durable, it’s the incorrect material if a cover is required, and if it’s a vent rather than an access pipe, the vent must be open to the atmosphere and protected from animal intrusion.

What is the function of this item?

A typical septic tank is equipped with clean out access covers that are strategically placed.

Maybe something as basic as a flat piece of concrete or stone will be sufficient, or maybe something more complex.

To be quite honest, I would have expected the contractor who dug the hole to be accountable for ensuring that the system was repaired and safe.

What should I do to solve it?

What store would I go to in order to acquire septic tank covers?

A few years ago, I had a beautiful new house built for me.

I have three plastic polylok lids, one of which is above ground and is for the pump.

I’d like to purchase risers so that I may build all three at a depth of around 6 inches below ground level.

What are the advantages and disadvantages.

Do you have any other suggestions?

I apologize for the lengthy post.

Sorry, but “True Bolt” isn’t a phrase I’m familiar with or associate with septic tank lids in any way.

Although this is not always the case, Mary, as the pumper may be able to access the entire tank bottom from a single opening depending on the tank’s size and shape; however, if your pumper is unable to do so from a single opening, you may want both openings opened to inspect the condition of the tank baffles.

There are two holes in my septic tank. Is it necessary to open both doors for a pump out?

Question:cannot find the manhole cover of the septic tank

(8th of August, 2014) “We’ve located the cesspool concrete lid (about 12 foot diameter), but after digging a 2 foot perimeter, we were unable to locate the manhole cover, which was required for an inspection.” vicki levin stated Help? My husband is becoming increasingly upset with the digging!

Reply:

If it’s a cesspool, rather than a septic tank, and it’s spherical, the access lid is normally located in the center of the container.

Question: how do i remove septic tank lid that is stuck

The entrance lid would normally be in the center of the cesspool, if it is in fact a cesspool rather than a septic tank, and it is spherical.

Reply:

Anon:WARNING: If the septic tank cover, lid, or access aperture has partially caved in or sank into the tank, the condition is extremely dangerous – an unsecure cover implies that someone might fall into the tank, which is generally lethal very quickly. Please keep everyone away from the septic tank area until such time as you have had the tank inspected and opened for additional inspection by a professional. Depending on the tank type and condition, lifting the lid may necessitate the use of a pry bar or wrecking bar, as well as a small portable winch (which is unusual).

Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Pumping ProcedurePumper Truck Operation Articles

  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION
  • MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • HOW TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN NOT TO PUMP A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO FIND A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK
  • INSPECT THE SEPTIC TANK BEFORE PUMPING
  • SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION PROCEDURE
  • SEPTIC TANK LEVELS OF SEWAGE
  • PUMPER TRU

Suggested citation for this web page

HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK at Inspect a Tank An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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Ask a Question or Search InspectApedia

We encourage you to use the search box just below, or if you prefer, you may make a question or remark in theCommentsbox below and we will get back to you as soon as possible. InspectApedia is a website that allows you to search for things. Please keep in mind that the publication of your remark below may be delayed if it contains an image, a web link, or text that seems to the program to be a web link. Your submission will appear when it has been reviewed by a moderator. We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience.

Technical ReviewersReferences

Citations can be shown or hidden by selecting Show or Hide Citations. InspectApedia.com is a publisher that provides references. Daniel Friedman is an American journalist and author.

How to Care for Your Septic Tank

Septic systems are built in around one-fourth of all residences in the United States, and they are particularly common in rural regions that are not served by municipal sewer systems. In contrast to conventional sewage systems, which pump solid and liquid waste from the home into sewer mains and then to a centralized sewage treatment plant, septic systems pump waste from the house out into a drain field and an underground septic tank.

How Septic System Works

The water and wastes carried by the water in a standard septic system go down the home’s drain system and through a single main sewer pipe to the septic tank, where they are treated. It is possible for wastewater to flow only by gravity or with the aid of an electric pump. However, this is not always the case. The septic tank is designed to store waste material for an extended period of time, allowing solids to sink to the bottom while oil, grease, and liquids – later known as scum — float to the top.

As bacterial activity breaks down the pathogens, the liquids slowly trickle down through the soil and into the groundwater.

Between times, the solids in the tank degrade under the influence of anaerobic bacteria and form an oily substance that settles at the bottom of the tank.

Anaerobic bacteria are responsible for this decomposition. If the bacterial action is efficient, the volume of these solid wastes is significantly decreased as they decompose. Margot Cavin’s The Spruce is a novel about a woman who grows up on a spruce grove.

Anatomy of a Septic Tank

All of the water and waste that is carried by the water run down the home’s drain system and into a single main sewer pipe that leads to the septic tank in a classic septic system. In some cases, the flow of wastewater is simply dictated by gravity, while in others, it is aided by a mechanical pump. When the septic tank is full, the solids settle to the bottom and the oil, grease, and liquids — which eventually become the scum — rise to the top of the tank, where they are discarded. At maximum capacity, liquids on top of scum run via porous pipes and into an adjacent drain field, which has been prepared with gravel and other particles in order to aid in the dispersion of the liquid waste.

See also:  How To Calculate Loads On A Concrete Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

It is almost sterile by the time liquid waste makes its way down to groundwater sources.

Anaerobic bacteria are responsible for this decomposition.

Margot Cavin’s novel The Spruce

When to Have Your Septic Tank Pumped

An inspection of a septic tank should be performed every two to three years, with mechanical pumping necessary every three to five years to empty the tank, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Pumping may be required on a yearly basis for systems that are inadequate or that receive a lot of demand. System components such as electrical float switches, pumps, and mechanical components must be examined more frequently, generally once a year, in certain cases. When you pump your septic tank, you’re getting rid of sludge from the bottom of the tank, and you need to do it as soon as possible since sludge can build up to the point where it stops the outflow pipe, which allows liquids to flow into the drain field.

  • Typical for larger houses, waste generation increases, causing the septic tank to fill up more quickly
  • Size of the household The amount of wastewater produced is as follows: If there is an excessive amount of wastewater going into the septic tank, it might have an impact on how quickly the tank fills. The amount of particles included in the wastewater is as follows: Households with a large number of toilets or who often use garbage disposals have a tendency to fill their septic tanks more quickly. Septic tank capacity: Larger tanks can retain more solid sludge and, as a result, will need to be pumped less frequently.

There are a few methods that might assist you in estimating when you should have your tank pumped. For example, a typical four-bedroom house may have a 1,200 to 1,500 gallon tank, and if you have a family of four, you may expect to have the tank pumped every 3 to 5 years under normal circumstances.

How a Septic Tank Is Pumped

The expert who inspects and services your septic tank will notify you when it is necessary to pump out the sludge from the tank, if you have a septic service professional who does so on a regular basis. This occurs when the floating scum layer that exists between the sludge and the floating water is within approximately 6 inches of the outflow pipe leading to the drain field. Septic service specialists arrive in a huge tanker truck with vacuum equipment, and when the lid has been removed from the septic tank, they introduce a large hose into the tank through the manhole they have created.

This helps to break up the particles and mix them with the liquid material, which helps the pumping process run more efficiently. Pumping a septic tank can cost anywhere from $200 to $500, depending on where you reside and the size of the septic tank in question.

Tips for Maintaining Septic System

There are various proactive actions you can take to ensure that your septic system runs properly and that the frequency with which it must be pumped is reduced. These include the following:

  • Reduce your water use. Utilizing toilets and faucets with high water efficiency and water conservation may significantly reduce the quantity of water that enters the septic system and causes it to backup. Water leaks and drips should be repaired as soon as possible in order to avoid misuse of water, which can lead to the septic tank filling up faster. Reduce the amount of solid trash produced: Another technique to ensure that the septic system is operating correctly is to keep track of the solid waste that enters it. Trash that is either washed down the drain or flushed down the toilet can cause the septic system to become overburdened. Other than toilet paper, don’t flush anything down the toilet. Also, avoid utilizing a trash disposer that dumps organic food wastes into the septic system, which might cause problems. Even though it takes just a small amount of work, throwing things in the trash makes a significant impact in how well the septic system is managed. Rainwater should be directed away from the drain field. Rain gutters and landscaping grading that direct water into the septic system’s drain field can impair the field’s capacity to distribute water from the septic system.
  • Hot tubs should not be drained into the sewer system. Water from hot tubs or swimming pools should be discharged onto the yard rather than into the drain field, since this might impose an unnecessary strain on a septic system. It is best not to flush chemicals down the toilet. Avoid flushing chemicals down the toilet because they can interfere with the bacterial process that breaks down solid wastes. There are also several other commercial septic tank additives, which are often more harmful than beneficial. Use of septic tank chemicals is not recommended unless it has been prescribed by a trustworthy specialist.

What you should expect when your septic tank needs pumping

The following are general recommendations: It is advised that you pump your septic tank every two to three years. The frequency with which you pump is determined by the volume of water you utilize. Generally speaking, the more individuals that use your septic system, the greater the increase in water flow. As a result, your septic tank will fill up more quickly, necessitating more regular pumping. It is likely that the septic tank will need to be pumped more frequently than every two to three years.

Choosing a certified pumper

We recommend that you identify your septic tank before contacting a pumping company. Here is a list of questions you should ask the pumper about their services that we recommend you ask:

  1. What is the approximate cost of the pump-out
  2. And Will additional gallons be charged if the septic tank has a capacity more than 1,000 gallons? Is it included in this price the expense of excavating to expose the septic tank lid(s)
  3. If not, do you charge by the foot or by the meter? How much do you charge to dig you out if you don’t have one
  4. Is there a charge for dumping costs included? Was it determined that this fee includes a visual check of the septic tank’s entrance and exit baffles? Do you charge an additional fee for cleaning the filter baffle? If a tank has not been properly maintained, is there an additional price for the additional water and time necessary to pump it out? (for example, pumped on a regular basis)
  5. Please specify the distance and elevation to where the Pumper’s vehicle will be stationed if you have a long distance to pump or if you will be pumping up a steep hill (for example, in your driveway or in the yard). The Pumper will decide whether or not the vehicle is capable of providing this sort of service. Is pumping the pump tank a frequent component of your routine maintenance? What is the cost of providing this service? It is recommended that a pump tank be pumped in addition to the septic tank, cleaned with water, and then dried with a blow dryer. If the pump tank is extremely full, you may be subject to an additional price.

Locating the septic tank

Once you’ve decided on a Pumper, you’ll need to locate the septic tank on your property. Most Pumpers will charge you for the time it takes to locate the tank and open the septic tank lid (s). You can perform the necessary work to expose the septic tank lid(s) prior to the arrival of the Pumper. In order to make septic tank pumping and inspection trips easier and less time-consuming, the Ohio Department of Public Health advises that you install “risers.” With locking gas tight lids linked to both the tank and the riser and access raised to the surface, there is no digging required every time the septic tank needs to be pumped.

  1. The majority of septic system pumpers will be able to do this service for you.
  2. Both compartments must be examined and pumped in order to meet the requirements.
  3. The location of your septic tank will be straightforward if you have an as-built (a map of your septic system) for your system.
  4. The following talents will be required by you or your Pumper if an as-built is not available: investigation
  • If there is a crawl space, you may be able to locate the tank by determining where the plumbing exits the foundation wall and then using a probing bar to locate it. If you have a fiberglass or polyethylene tank, a probe bar is not suggested unless extreme caution is exercised when using the probe bar. Probing will only be effective if the tank is not more than 1 to 2 feet below the surface of the ground
  • If there is no crawl space available, you may occasionally discover the tank by looking for the plumbing vents in the roof. A person who is walking behind the home and coming from a restroom can find themselves at the exit point of the sewage line that connects to the septic tank

Using an electronic detecting equipment may be essential if none of the above mentioned approaches prove successful. Some rental services contain a transmitter that may be flushed down the toilet and is detected by a receiving unit, which can be found in some rental services. In certain cases, drainfield location is the specialty of septic system contractors. See a list of septic system installers who are certified.

As long as the tank is exposed, sketch a map depicting the location of the septic tank lid(s) in relation to the home and make a copy of the map for your records. Photographs of the surrounding region, including the home, can also be useful for future pumping operations.

Pumping the septic tank

Before the Pumper begins the process of pumping out the tank, you may request that he measure the thickness of the scum and sludge layer layers on the inside of the tank. Using this method, you can determine the pace at which the particles collect in the tank, which will assist you in determining when it is necessary to have the septic tank pumped again. Pumping frequency will be in the range of 2 to 3 years for the vast majority of families. It doesn’t matter how often you pump your septic system; frequent inspections will provide you peace of mind that everything is in working order inside those tanks.

The septic tank Pumper should present you with a receipt that details the services that were done to your tank.

  • The company’s name, address, and phone number
  • Pumper’s certification number
  • Number of gallons that were pumped in an approximate manner the number of compartments that have been pumped In good working order, the tank baffles In-tact condition of the septic tank
  • Provide specifics on any work performed on baffles or access lids. This information should be included on the pump receipt if the scum and sludge layers were measured. Any work done on the septic tank or pump tank should be documented. Any additional service work that is completed

Dig the Correct Cover

Here are a few pointers to assist you in locating and digging the proper cover for your septic tank:

  • Locate the 4′′ sewage pipe that runs from your toilet and shower to the exterior wall of your home. It should be visible. Most of the time, your tank is 8 to 15 feet from the place where the sewer pipe exits
  • Perhaps you have seen an area outdoors where snow melts each winter
  • Most of the time, this location is within the 8 to 15-foot range. This is an excellent place to begin. To identify the four corners of the tank, probe the ground with an abar and mark the locations. A septic tank measures roughly 8 feet long by 5 feet broad and is covered with three different types of coverings. Some tanks, on the other hand, are longer and made of plastic, making them more difficult to spot. Our company, Maine SepticPumping, requests that you find and excavate the center cover in order for us to thoroughly clean and remove any sediments from your tank. If you have a septic system that includes a pump, you should exercise caution. Unground electrical wire will be present, and it is possible that it could pose a hazard. You should also find and dig the cover for your pump chamber so that it can be pumped at the time of our service
  • If you are experiencing sluggish drains and the digging is relatively simple, you can try excavating all of the tank covers. All of the covers being removed would allow us to inspect your input region and eliminate any sediments that may be blocking the passage of the water. This also allows us to view your outlet baffle clearly, allowing us to ensure that it is secure. If you have any questions when trying to locate your tank, please contact our office. MaineSepticPumping can also assist you in locating and digging your cover.

Blog-Item-Do-These-4-Things-Before-Getting-Your-Septic-Tank-Pumped

To begin, identify the location of your septic tank. If we don’t know where your septic tank is, we won’t be able to pump it. As a result, when scheduling service, be as specific as possible about where your tank is located. If you are present when we arrive to pump out your septic tank, please direct our pumper to the exact location of the tank. Especially critical if this is our first time working on your property. How can I know where my septic tank is, though, if I have no idea where it is?

  1. It’s not something to be ashamed of at all.
  2. Our professionals are well-equipped to locate your septic tank, thanks to the use of cutting-edge electronic locators.
  3. 2.
  4. We must remove the cover from your septic tank and pump the waste out of the tank through an access point in order to remove it from the property.
  5. Inquire with us if the lids of your septic tank are being blocked by anything, such as dirt, a deck, or a sidewalk.
  6. You must dig up your septic tank lids if they are buried in order for us to have access to your tank.
  7. Inquire with us about building a riser so that you won’t have to dig up your lids every time your tank has to be emptied out again.
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The distance between your driveway and septic tank should be measured as well.

If your tank is more than 150 feet away from a safe parking area in your driveway or on the road, you must notify us so that we can carry additional lengths of hose to your location.

4.

Is your septic system backed up into your home?

Please notify us if you are experiencing any difficulties with your septic system.

Many common problems may be resolved by pumping the septic tank, but certain difficulties need additional investigation. As much information as possible when scheduling service will assist our professionals in assessing the situation and arriving at your home fully equipped to tackle the problem.

How Does a Septic Tank Work?

Determine where your septic tank is located. Unless we know exactly where your septic tank is, we cannot pump it. When scheduling service, make every effort to clearly describe the location of your tank. Please direct our septic tank pumper to the precise location of your septic tank if you are home when we arrive to pump it. This is especially crucial if this is our first time working on your property. How can I know where my septic tank is, though, if I have no idea? It is not need to be concerned.

  1. Please notify us so that we may supply the appropriate equipment to assist you with your location needs.
  2. Consider making extensive notes or perhaps a drawing of your sewage system once you’ve determined where your tank is located.
  3. Check to see if the septic tank’s lid is easily opened and shut.
  4. A minimum of 18 inches in diameter is required for this access point so that our pumper may move the hose around to remove all of the sediments from the tank as quickly as possible.
  5. For the most part, it is usual for the lids of sewer tanks to be buried in earth, ranging from few inches to several feet deep.
  6. Let us know when you plan to come so that we can allot enough time and bring the necessary equipment to uncover your lids if you are unable to dig them up on your own.
  7. A riser pipe raises the access port of your tank to the surface of the ground, allowing it to be reached without the need for digging.
  8. If your tank is more than 150 feet away from a safe parking spot in your driveway or on the side of the road, you must notify us so that we can bring additional lengths of hose to your location.
  9. In the event that you are experiencing septic system issues, please notify us.
  10. There is a puddle in your yard, do you know where it is.
  11. Many common problems can be resolved by pumping the septic tank, but some issues will necessitate further investigation and treatment.

You will assist our technicians in assessing the situation and arriving at your home prepared to resolve it if you provide as many details as possible when you schedule service.

How does a septic tank work?

Pumping the tank on a regular basis eliminates sludge and scum, which helps to keep a septic system in good working order. It is possible for a well-designed and well built septic system to last for decades, or it might collapse in a matter of years. It is entirely up to you as long as you can answer the question of how do septic tanks function. Healthy septic systems are very inexpensive to maintain, but digging up and replacing a septic system that has completely collapsed may easily cost tens of thousands in labor and material costs.

It’s critical to understand how a septic tank works in order to maintain one.

Let’s take a look below ground and observe what happens in a properly operating septic system, shall we?

Understand that a septic system is a cafeteria for bacteria

Bacteria are responsible for the proper operation of a septic system. They decompose garbage, resulting in water that is clean enough to safely trickle down into the earth’s surface. The entire system is set up to keep bacteria healthy and busy at all times. Some of them reside in the tank, but the majority of them are found in the drain field. 1. The septic tank is the final destination for all waste. 2. The majority of the tank is filled with watery waste, referred to as “effluent.” Anaerobic bacteria begin to break down the organic matter in the effluent as soon as it enters the system.

  • A layer of sludge settles to the bottom of the container.
  • 4.
  • Scum is mostly constituted of fats, greases, and oils, among other substances.
  • Grease and oils float to the surface of the water.
  • (5) A filter stops the majority of particles from reaching the exit pipe.
  • The effluent is discharged into the drain field.
  • Effluent is allowed to leak into the surrounding gravel because of holes in the drain septic field pipe.
  • The garbage is completely decomposed by aerobic bacteria found in gravel and dirt.
  • Potable water seeps into the groundwater and aquifer system from the surface.

Septic Tank Clean Out: Don’t abuse the system

Septic systems that have been correctly planned and constructed require just occasional ‘pumping’ to remove the sludge and scum that has built up inside the tank.

However, if you don’t understand how a septic tank works, you may unintentionally hurt or even destroy the system.

  • Drains are used to dispose of waste that decomposes slowly (or not at all). Cigarette butts, diapers, and coffee grounds are all known to cause issues. Garbage disposers, if utilized excessively, can introduce an excessive amount of solid waste into the system. Lint from synthetic fibers is emitted from washing machine lint traps. This substance is not degraded by bacteria in the tank and drain septic field. Bacteria are killed by chemicals found in the home, such as disinfecting cleansers and antibacterial soaps. The majority of systems are capable of withstanding limited usage of these goods, but the less you use them, the better. When a large amount of wastewater is produced in a short period of time, the tank is flushed away too quickly. When there is too much sludge, bacteria’s capacity to break down waste is reduced. Sludge can also overflow into the drain field if there is too much of it. Sludge or scum obstructs the flow of water via a pipe. It is possible for tree and shrub roots to obstruct and cause harm to a drain field. Compacted soil and gravel prevent wastewater from seeping into the ground and deprive germs of oxygen. Most of the time, this is caused by vehicles driving or parking on the drain field.

Get your tank pumped…

Your tank must be emptied on a regular basis by a professional. Pumping eliminates the accumulation of sludge and scum that has accumulated in the tank, which has caused the bacterial action to be slowed. If you have a large tank, it may be necessary to pump it once a year; but, depending on the size of your tank and the quantity of waste you send through the system, you may go two or three years between pumpings. Inquire with your inspector about an approximate guideline for how frequently your tank should be pumped.

…but don’t hire a pumper until you need it

It is essential that you have a professional pump out your tank at least once a month. In addition to removing sludge and scum, pumping helps to keep the tank’s bacterial activity running at its optimal level. Depending on the size of your tank and the quantity of waste you send through the system, you may need to pump your tank once a year, but it is possible to go two or three years without pumpings. For an approximate advice on how often to have your tank pumped, consult your inspector.

Install an effluent filter in your septic system

Garbage from your home accumulates into three distinct strata. The septic filter is responsible for preventing blockage of the drain field pipes.

Septic tank filter close-up

The septic tank filter is responsible for capturing suspended particles that may otherwise block the drain field pipes. Obtain an effluent filter for your tank from your contractor and place it on the outflow pipe of your tank. (It will most likely cost between $50 and $100, plus labor.) This device, which helps to prevent sediments from entering the drain field, will need to be cleaned out on a regular basis by a contractor to maintain its effectiveness.

Solution for a clogged septic system

If your septic system becomes clogged and you find yourself having to clean the filter on a regular basis, you might be tempted to simply remove the filter altogether. Hold on to it. Solids, wastewater, and scum are separated into three levels in septic tanks, which allows them to function properly (see illustration above). Solids sink to the bottom of the container, where microbes breakdown them. The scum, which is made up of trash that is lighter than water, rises to the surface. In the drainage field, the middle layer of effluent leaves the tank and goes through an underground network of perforated pipes to the drainage field.

  1. Keep the effluent filter in place since it is required by your state’s health law.
  2. Waste particles might flow through the filter and clog the perforated pipes if the filter is not used.
  3. Your filter, on the other hand, should not require cleaning every six months.
  4. A good chance is high that you’re flushing filter-clogging things down the toilet, such as grease, fat, or food scraps.
  5. A garbage disposal will not be able to break down food particles sufficiently to allow them to flow through the septic tank filtration system.
  6. Plastic items, disposable diapers, paper towels, nonbiodegradable goods, and tobacco products will clog the system if they are flushed through it.

For additional information on what should and should not be flushed down the toilet, contact your local health authority. More information on removing lint from your laundry may be found here.

Get an inspection

Following a comprehensive first check performed by an expert, regular inspections will cost less than $100 each inspection for the next year. Your professional will be able to inform you how often you should get your system inspected as well as how a septic tank functions. As straightforward as a septic system appears, determining its overall condition necessitates the services of a professional. There are a plethora of contractors who would gladly pump the sludge out of your tank, but many, in my experience, are unable to explain how a septic system works or how it should be maintained.

A certification scheme for septic contractors has been established in certain states; check with your state’s Secretary of State’s office to see whether yours is one of them.

Also, a qualified inspector will be able to tell you whether or not your tank is large enough to accommodate your household’s needs, as well as the maximum amount of water that can be passed through it in a single day.

As you learn more about how a septic tank works, your professional should be able to tell you whether or not your system will benefit from this treatment.

Alternatives to a new drain field

If an examination or a sewage backup indicate that your drain field is in need of replacement, the only option is to replace it completely. As a result, it’s important to talk with a contractor about other possibilities before proceeding with the project.

  • Pipes should be cleaned. A rotating pressure washer, used by a contractor, may be used to clean out the drain septic field pipes. The cost of “jetting” the pipes is generally around $200. Chemicals should be used to clean the system. A commercial solution (not a home-made one) that enhances the quantity of oxygen in the drain field should be discussed with your contractor before installing your new system. Septic-Scrub is a product that I suggest. A normal treatment will cost between $500 and $1,000. Make the soil more pliable. The practice of “terra-lifting,” which involves pumping high-pressure air into several spots surrounding the drain field, is authorized in some regions. Some contractors use it to shatter compacted dirt around the pipes. Depending on the circumstances, this might cost less than $1,000 or as much as $4,000 or more.

Protect your drain septic field from lint

When this device is in place, it inhibits lint from entering the system, especially synthetic fibers that bacteria are unable to digest. One of these filters, which I’ve designed and termed theSeptic Protector, was invented by me. An additional filter is included in the price of around $150 plus delivery. Learn more about how to filter out laundry lint in this article.

Don’t overload the septic system

Reduce the amount of water you use. The volume of water that flows into your tank, particularly over a short period of time, can be reduced to avoid untreated waste from being flushed into your drain field. Replace outdated toilets with low-flow ones, install low-flow showerheads, and, perhaps most importantly, wash laundry throughout the week rather than just on Saturday mornings to save water.

Meet the Expert

Septic systems, according to Jim vonMeier, are the solution to America’s water deficit because they supply cleaned water to depleted aquifers, according to vonMeier. He travels the country lobbying for septic systems, giving lectures, and giving testimony. For septic system inquiries, as well as information on the operation of the septic tank, contact him by email.

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