How Find Septic Tank Over Flow Tank Lid? (Perfect answer)

  • You can locate the lid of your septic tank by poking the ground every few feet with a metal probe. Lids can be buried up to a foot deep on average, so be sure to investigate any bumps that may indicate something is buried underneath. You can also use a metal detector, as most lids have a metal handle or fastener on them to keep the lid closed.

How do I know if my septic tank has two lids?

You will be looking for 2 lids like these if there are risers to surface on the tank. If the tank is not risered, you will find 2-24” diameter concrete lids like the picture below. Riser lids the can be below the surface which will require locating and digging the riser lids as well.

Does a septic tank have an overflow pipe?

Most residential septic systems are designed with two tanks. The first tank, a smaller tank, holds solids. There is an overflow pipe, which leads to a second larger tank. The larger tank holds overflow of fluids.

How far down is septic tank lid?

Often, septic tank lids are at ground level. In most cases, they have buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

Will metal detector find septic tank?

If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector. Based on your conclusions in Step 3, if your septic tank is likely made from concrete or steel, a metal detector can make the task of locating it much easier. But not just any metal detector will do.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

How many lids are on a septic tank?

In order to make repairs or perform regular maintenance or cleaning/pumping of the tank, access must be provided. There are usually two lids located at the top of the septic tank-one located over the inlet “T” and one located over the outlet “T” (see “Septic Components: Septic Tanks”).

Why do septic tanks have two covers?

In most cases there are two lids to access your septic tank. Both of which are important to have open when pumping out your septic tank. An outdoor septic smell can be harder to pin point. Ensure that all accesses to the septic system are sealed.

How do you fix a septic tank that backs up when it rains?

After a major rain event, the only way to relieve pressure on the system is by using it less. If possible, reduce or eliminate water going down the drains until the drainfield dries out. An emergency septic service cleaning can provide temporary relief, but this is often a futile exercise in battling mother nature.

What are the symptoms of a full septic tank?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

How can you tell if a septic tank collapse?

The first signs of a failing septic system may include slow draining toilets and sinks, gurgling noises within the plumbing, sewage odors inside, continuing drainage backups, or bacteria in the well water. If any of these symptoms exist, check for more pronounced indications of a septic system failure.

Do all septic tanks have two lids?

A septic tank installed before 1975 will have a single 24-inch concrete lid in the center of the rectangle. A two-compartment tank installed after 1975 will have two lids of either fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at opposite ends of the rectangle.

How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

All septic tanks eventually fill with sediments and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain in excellent functioning order. If the tank’s lid is not on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located. A typical septic tank is 4 inches to 4 feet underground, with all of its components, including the cover, buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underneath. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the surface of the ground.

Consult A Map

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank. If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your efforts.

Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land. After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if it is there. Locate the same spot outside and make a note of it. Insert a thin metal probe into the earth, identify the 4-inch sewage line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the property. Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet apart from the home in all states except Alaska.

Whenever the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene it indicates that the tank has been located.

Locate The Lid

The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 5 feet by 8 feet. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its boundaries and outline the rectangle’s boundary using a pencil. A septic tank that was built before 1975 will have a single concrete lid that is 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. If the tank was built after 1975, it will have two covers made of fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at the ends of the rectangle and centered at the ends of the rectangle.

It should be possible to uncover the lid or lids by digging with a spade in specific spots, depending on when year the tank was constructed.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

Mark The Spot

Make a note on the ground near where the tank was pumped by a professional and the lid was buried to serve as a reference in the future. In order to keep track of where you are, you should choose a hefty circular patio tile that is embedded in the ground. Additionally, draw your own map of the area and store it with your other important papers.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid

Previous PostNext PostWhether you realize it or not, it is critical that you be aware of the position of your septic tank lid and the septic tank itself. Despite the fact that septic tanks are fairly huge, they can be difficult to identify, particularly if they have not been properly maintained over time. Continue reading to find out how to locate your septic tank lid.

Why It’s Good to Know Where to Find Your Septic Tank Lid

Knowing the location of your septic tank is a fantastic approach to spot septic tank problems as soon as they occur. Consider the following scenario: If you saw water near your septic tank lid, you would know right away that you could have a problem with your system being overloaded with waste. Furthermore, by understanding where your septic tank is located, you may avoid parking cars on top of it, which might cause the tank to collapse and create flooding. You’ll also be able to point service personnel in the right direction for septic tank services, which will eventually save them time and money while also saving you money.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Opening

Knowing how critical it is to know where your septic tank lid is located, it’s time to go out and find one for yourself. Keep an eye out for a circular lid that is roughly two feet in diameter during your quest. Septic tank lids are normally constructed of green or black plastic, however they can occasionally be made of concrete. It is not always simple to locate the septic tank lid, however, because untidy vegetation, mud, or debris might obscure the lid’s location. If you live in a snowy climate, seek for a spot of lawn where the snow melts more quickly than it does anywhere else on the property.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid as a New Homeowner

During the process of purchasing your house, you should have been provided with a map of your property that showed the location of your septic tank. This is normally included as a part of your home inspection service package. All you have to do from there is compare the diagram to your land, find the septic tank location, and potentially dig around it to check whether the lid has been hidden by vegetation or other obstructions.

People have been known to place an object such as a huge rock on top of the septic lid, so be sure to look beneath landscaping stones as well.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid as an Existing Homeowner

Still having trouble locating your septic tank lid? There’s a good chance it’ll end up in the ground. The pipes coming from your basement should be followed, as they will take you in the direction of your septic system, which is what we propose. Then, once you’ve determined the correct direction, check for any high or low points in the yard that might reveal the location of your septic tank. You can find the lid of your septic tank by probing the ground with a metal probe every few feet with the probe.

Because most lids have a metal handle or fastener on them to hold the lid closed, you may also use a metal detector to find them.

The majority of lids are buried up to a foot deep, but some lids might be buried as deep as four feet in extreme cases!

How to Maintain Your Septic Tank Lid

Following the discovery of your septic tank lid, keep it in good condition to avoid damage and ensure simple access for future septic tank maintenance, such as pumping your septic tank every three- to five-year period. Here are some pointers for keeping your septic tank lid in good working order:

  • Keeping the grass around the septic tank lid regularly mowed is important. Remove any dirt or debris that may have accumulated on your septic tank lid
  • Mark the area to ensure that no one parks or constructs structures there. It is possible to do this using a flag, garden décor, or ornamental pebbles.

Professional Septic Tank Services

Keeping the grass around the septic tank lid in good condition is essential. Cleaning the septic tank lid of any dirt or debris is important. It’s important to clearly mark the area so that no one parks or constructs structures on it. Make use of a flag, garden décor, or ornamental pebbles to do this; otherwise,

What Causes a Septic Tank to Overflow? – Septic Maxx

Septic systems are most commonly seen in rural locations where there is no municipal sewer system. Trash from all of the dwellings is channeled through plumbing pipes and into the septic tank, where solid waste settles at the bottom and liquid waste, known as effluent, is discharged through the outflow. The treated wastewater is sent to a drain field, where it is re-distributed back into the surrounding environment. A structural or functional fault at any point throughout this process might induce a blockage in the system, resulting in the septic tank overflowing.

Insufficient Maintenance

A flourishing, fully functioning septic system need the regular maintenance of its components. Septic tank owners should have their tanks pumped on a regular basis in order to empty the tank of solid waste that might cause system disruption. According to research conducted by the University of Georgia, you should pump your septic system once every three to five years. When it comes to determining when to pump your septic tank, factors such as tank size and water use might be helpful. When you fail to attend to septic pumpings, you are permitting sludge to seep into drain field pipes.

Sludge will normally settle to the bottom of the tank, but an ongoing flow of water in an overflowing tank will force the sediment upward and toward the exit. It doesn’t take long for solid waste to clog the perforated drain field pipes and cause the entire system to get clogged and stop working.

Bacterial Deficiency

A flourishing, fully functioning septic system need the regular maintenance of its parts. Pumping septic tanks on a regular basis is recommended to ensure that solid waste does not accumulate in the tank and cause system disruption. According to research conducted by the University of Georgia, you should pump your septic system once every three to five years at the absolute least. Sewage tank size and water use are two factors that might assist you choose whether to pump your septic system. When you fail to attend to septic pumpings, you are permitting sludge to accumulate in the drain field pipes.

See also:  What Why Does The Grass Turn Brown Over The Septic Tank?

Within minutes, solid waste has accumulated in the perforated drain field pipes, causing the entire system to become clogged.

Clogged Drain Lines

Maintaining a robust, well operating septic system on a regular basis is critical. Septic tank owners should have their tanks pumped on a regular basis in order to empty the tank of solid waste that might cause system failure. According to research conducted at the University of Georgia, you should pump your septic system once every three to five years. Septic tank size and water use are two factors that might assist you choose when to pump your tank. By disregarding septic pumpings, you are allowing sludge to seep into drain field pipes and cause blockages.

Within minutes, solid waste has clogged the perforated drain field pipes, causing the entire system to become backed up.

How Do I Find My Septic Tank

What is the location of my septic tank? Natalie Cooper is a model and actress who has appeared in a number of films and television shows. 2019-10-24T 02:52:07+10:00

How Do I Find My Septic Tank

Whether or not my property has a septic tank is up in the air. If you live on an acreage or in a rural region, it is highly probable that you have a septic tank or a waste water treatment system in your home. What Is the Appearance of a Septic Tank? The great majority of septic tanks are 1600L concrete tanks, which are common in the industry. They feature a spherical concrete top with a huge lid in the center and two little lids on the sides. They are made out of concrete. Although the lids of these tanks may have been removed or modified on occasion, this is a rare occurrence.

A tiny proportion of septic tanks have a capacity of 3000L or more.

Our expert lifts the hefty lid of a 3000L septic tank and inspects the contents.

If you have discovered a tank or tanks that do not appear to be part of a waste water treatment plant system, it is possible that you have discovered a septic tank system. To learn more about our wastewater treatment plant, please visit our Waste Water Treatment Plant website.

How Can I Find My Septic Tank?

Is There a Septic Tank on My Property? It is extremely possible that you have a septic tank or a waste water treatment system if your home is situated on an acreage or in a rural location. In what shape and size does the septic tank come in? Typical 1600L concrete septic tanks account for the great majority of installations. A spherical concrete top with a large lid in the center and two smaller lids on either side is used to hold the items. Although the lids of these tanks may have been altered or modified on occasion, this is not always the case with these tanks.

Three-thousand-liter (3,000-liter) capacity septic tanks are available.

We have a 3000L septic tank, and our expert is opening the hefty lid.

A waste water treatment plant system may be present if you have discovered a tank or tanks that do not look like the ones shown in these photographs.

  • Is there a septic tank on my property? If you live on an acreage or in a rural region, it is extremely possible that you have a septic tank or a waste water treatment system. How Does a Septic Tank Appear? The vast majority of septic tanks are 1600L concrete tanks that are typical in size. They feature a spherical concrete top with a large lid in the center and two little lids on the sides. They are made of concrete. Occasionally, though, the lids of these tanks may have been altered or modified. It is possible to cover them with a square of checkerplate that has been fastened down or with another form of customized lid. A tiny fraction of septic tanks have a capacity of 3000 liters or more. The tanks have a similar appearance to the 1600L tanks, however the lids are bigger. The hefty lid of a 3000L septic tank is opened by our expert. There are also several extremely ancient septic tanks with enormous rectangle concrete covers that are still in use. If you have discovered a tank or tanks that do not appear to be part of a waste water treatment plant system, it is possible that you have discovered a sewage treatment system. For additional information, please see our Waste Water Treatment Plant website.

The most typical septic tank size is 1600L, although there are also some 3000L septic tanks available on the market. It is possible to have septic tanks with capacities as large as 3500L or 4000L, although they are not as popular, and most residences that require these capacities have numerous septic tanks in order to meet the septic litre requirements for each bedroom. Using the septic tank lid as a test, you may quickly determine whether all of the toilets in your home are linked to the same septic tank.

Check the rest of the toilets in the home by repeating the procedure.

Please call us immediately to have your septic tank pumped out or to schedule a free septic tank test when we are next in your area.

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Replacing Your Septic Tank Access Cover

Most septic tanks are 1600L in capacity, although there are also 3000L septic tanks on the market as well. It is possible to have septic tanks with capacities as large as 3500L or 4000L, although these are not as popular, and most residences requiring these capacities have numerous septic tanks in order to meet the septic litre requirements for each bedroom. An easy approach to determine if all toilets in the house are linked to the same septic tank is to open the septic tank lid and then have someone inside the house flush the toilet to confirm.

Check the toilets in the rest of the home by repeating the procedure.

When we are next in your area, please get in touch with us to have your sewer tank pumped out or to arrange for a free septic tank test. We can also do additional services on your property, such as grease trap cleaning or a water tank pumping out. a link to the page load

When Should You Replace Your Septic Tank Access Cover?

Septic tank lids serve two functions: they prevent sewage from spilling into the tank and they prevent objects from falling into the tank. They are made of plastic or metal. Because the access cover for your septic tank is visible, it is critical that your septic tank lid be solid, durable, and correctly affixed to the tank, especially if your tank is on risers. Small animals and even children can become entangled if this is not prevented. As an added precautionary measure, leaks or breaks in the lid of your septic tank can cause an overflow of wastewater or sewage onto your yard, posing health dangers and creating an unsightly messe.

Additionally, bear in mind that your tank may be overflowing as a result of an overdue pumping session.

How to Replace Your Septic Tank Access Cover

So, how do you go about replacing a septic tank lid that has damaged or is leaking? Take the actions outlined below.

Locate your septic tank lid.

If your septic tank’s lid is on risers or if you have already had your septic tank pumped, this step is straightforward because you already know where your septic tank is located. When it comes to finding your septic tank if it is buried someplace in your yard and cannot be discovered, the task becomes a little more difficult to do. First, try contacting the folks who previously owned the land where you live. If you can’t get in touch with them, you might look for your property’s papers at the local health department.

You may either use a metal detector (and hope that the lid is made of metal!) or track the drain pipes that go away from your house if none of the other methods are successful.

Wait for the trail to come to an end, then probe about until you come upon the septic tank cover.

Fortunately, you only have to go through this process once!

Determine what type of access cover you need for the replacement.

Always keep in mind that septic tank lids are available in a number of materials, which means that they vary in terms of both durability and cost. Despite the fact that concrete is reasonably inexpensive and surely durable, it is difficult to remove for routine maintenance and septic tank pumping. PVC or polyethylene covers, on the other hand, are more expensive, but they offer a greater degree of ease. Lids made of metal or fiberglass are also available. In addition to personal preferences, consider variables such as the placement of the septic tank, the amount of weight that will be placed on it, and so on.

Measure the current access cover.

Be sure to carefully measure the previous lid before making your final purchase to guarantee that you obtain the right size lid.

The majority of lids are between 21″ and 25″ in height.

If the lid is not on risers, use a shovel to dig around it.

Remove the soil from the top of the septic tank and use a shovel to loosen the corners of the lid so that you can easily remove it. Remove the soil from the bottom of the septic tank.

Lift the old lid off the tank.

This phase might be simple or complex, depending on the sort of lid you’re working with. For a heavier lid, such as one constructed of concrete, you will almost certainly want the assistance of another pair of hands. If the lid is constructed of a lighter material with fasteners, carefully remove the bindings and pull it out of the way. Make sure that any children or pets are kept inside throughout the replacement procedure to avoid anyone falling in during the operation. Watch your own feet, as well.

Install the new one using the existing fasteners.

Once you have removed the old, leaking lid, carefully replace it with the new one, making sure that it is aligned with the rest of the container and that it fits tightly.

Re-bury the lid, or ensure its security if it is on risers.

Once you’re finished, either set the soil back on top of the lid or tighten the cover to ensure it’s snug and secure.

How Can Norway Septic Help?

Located in Norway, Indiana, Norway Septic Inc. is a customer-focused company devoted to delivering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to homes and business owners in the Michiana area. We take great delight in finishing the task that others have left unfinished. For more information on purchasing a new effluent filter or scheduling a septic tank cleaning with one of our specialists, please contact us right now.

My Tank is Overflowing: What Now?

Norway Septic Inc. is a customer-focused company that is committed to offering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to households and business owners in the Michiana community. We take great delight in completing the tasks that others have left unfinished or incomplete. Make an appointment with us immediately if you require a new effluent filter or want to arrange a septic tank cleaning with one of our experienced technicians.

The First Thing You Should Do

It is important to cease using your household water as soon as possible. Please double-check that all of the faucets and showers have been turned off, and that no one has flushed the toilet! You want to avoid the possibility that even more water may enter the system, causing an even bigger overflow than what already exists. Following the completion of this task, you can take a big breath and evaluate the situation. Discovering the root cause of the overflow can assist you in determining the best course of action to take next.

See also:  How Fare From Tolit To Septic Tank Can I Be? (Perfect answer)

What’s Causing the Overflow?

Identifying the root cause of overflowing septic systems is critical for homeowners who want to get a grasp on the problem. By understanding the signs and symptoms of likely causes, you can resolve the problem more quickly and get your house back in working condition more rapidly. In a nutshell, there are various factors that might be contributing to your septic tank overflowing:

Higher Than Usual Water Usage

Your home’s septic system has been built to handle a specific number of gallons per day in order to prevent overflowing. Additionally, if you exceed this quantity on a daily basis, it may result in an overflow of the toilet. This is especially prevalent during holiday holidays, when more people than normal use the shower, the bathroom toilet, and the faucet, resulting in higher water usage than usual for these facilities.

In the same way, significant seasonal rainfalls might cause water to escape from your yard into the tank, resulting in an overflow.

Heavy Rainfall

Your septic system is a complicated, linked system that relies on the cooperation of all of its parts in order to function effectively. The drainage field is responsible for absorbing and disposing of incoming wastewater underground. When there is excessive rainfall, the drainage field, on the other hand, is at risk of being oversaturated. A drainage field that has become oversaturated can result in severe overflow and obstructions, which can have a detrimental impact on your property and the surrounding environment.

Fortunately, there are strategies that you may employ to assist in the resolution of these issues.

Irregular Maintenance Routines

Because your septic system operates like a well-oiled machine, it requires you to undertake regular preventive maintenance in order to keep it operating at peak performance. Once every one to three years, it is suggested that you get your system pumped. A reputableseptic pump provider should be able to come out and pump your system if you have an infrequent maintenance schedule. Septic system pumping may be done swiftly and safely by a qualified crew like as that found at Delaware Valley Septic and SewerStorm, who can come to your house and pump your system for you.

Improper Chemical Use Killing Helpful Bacteria

Because your septic system operates like a well-oiled machine, it requires you to undertake regular preventive maintenance in order to keep it operating at peak performance. Once every one to three years, it is suggested that you get your system pumped out. In the event of infrequent maintenance procedures, having a reputable septic pump business come out and pump your system should be beneficial to your circumstances. A qualified crew, such as the one found at Delaware Valley Septic, SewerStorm, can come to your home and pump your septic system swiftly and safely, allowing you to go back to your life.

What Can I Do to Fix the Problem?

That is dependent on the situation. If you are correctly managing your septic system, then there must be another factor at play, such as a blockage or something in the surrounding environment. However, while there are steps you can do to assist prevent difficulties in the future, a professional septic tank service will be necessary to service your tank as soon as possible. Relax for the time being, and if you want more assistance, contact Chester, Delaware’s premier septic installation staff!.

To acquire a quote, please contact us right away!

3 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT SEPTIC TANK BAFFLES

Depends on the circumstance. Unless you are neglecting your septic system, it is likely that another factor is at play, such as a blockage or something in the surrounding area. While there are steps you may do to assist prevent future problems, a professional provider will be necessary to service your septic tank as soon as possible. Rest assured that you may reach out to Chester, Delaware’s premier septic installation staff if you want assistance.

This team of septic tank specialists specializes in septic tanks, sewers, and storm inspections for your property in the Delaware Valley area. To acquire a quote, please contact us right away.

How to Find a Septic Tank With a Metal Detector

For sewage treatment in the United States, around 48% of households in rural and outlying regions depend on septic tanks or septic systems. Many of these systems have been operating without regular maintenance for many years. It is necessary to locate your septic tank in the event that sewage is backing up into your home or if your main drain line has become obstructed. Throughout this post, we’ll go over the basics of how septic systems function before showing you how to identify your septic tank in six simple stages.

How do septic systems work?

A septic system is made up of two parts: the septic tank and the drain field (or leach field).

Septic Tank

Waste from toilets, sinks, and showers is sent down a main sewage line and into a holding tank known as the septic tank. A septic tank is a large, subterranean container that acts as the initial stage of a home’s sewage treatment system by collecting and treating sewage. Watertight containers such as concrete, steel, plastic, and fiberglass are used to construct the tank. Until the particles and liquids separate into three different layers, sewage is allowed to remain in the septic tank. This picture shows how sewage from the home drains into a two-compartment underground septic tank.

The liquid wastes are subsequently discharged into the drain field.

The bacteria produce a sludge that is “digested” and stays in the tank until it is drained.

This stratum is referred to as effluent in most circles.

Drain Field

Drain fields are composed of layers of gravel and dirt that allow liquid sewage to flow down. It eventually becomes part of the groundwater supply. Aerobic bacteria (bacteria that require oxygen to survive) and other microbes decompose the organic debris that remains.

What happens if a septic tank gets too full?

In the event that your septic tank becomes overflowing, sewage may back up into your home. It is more difficult to breakdown sludge than it is to collect it. If the sludge isn’t cleaned, the solids will build up until they overflow into the drain field, causing the drain to back up. This has the potential to clog pipes and produce a backup. The sludge must be cleared on a regular basis in order to avoid this.

Many households only get their tanks emptied after the system malfunctions. Waiting until that stage can result in repair expenses in the tens of thousands of dollars. Every three to five years, we suggest that you have your septic tank pumped.

6 Steps to Locate a Septic Tank

Water from your toilets, sinks, and showers is collected in a main drain pipe and disposed of properly. This line departs your home and enters your septic tank through the basement or crawl area where it was installed. Find the line in question. Afterwards, walk outside and look for the identical location on the opposite side of the wall. Make a note of this spot since you’ll need it in a moment.

2. Check Permits and Public Records

The majority of county health agencies keep public records of septic system installation permits on their websites. These permits must be accompanied by a schematic or design depicting the proposed location of the septic tank and drainage field systems. They also give a description of the tank’s dimensions and construction material. Having this information can be quite beneficial when trying to locate a submerged tank lid. In some cases, depending on the age of your septic system and the digitization efforts of your county’s health department, you may be able to do a public records search online.

If you live in Colorado, we’ve provided links below that will allow you to check septic records in a few different areas.

  • Colorado’s counties of Adams, Arapahoe, and Douglas Colorado Septic Records Search
  • Colorado Permits Search
  • El Paso County Records Search
  • Jefferson County Septic Records Search
  • Jefferson County Records Search
  • Mesa County Septic Systems Search
  • Pueblo County Records Search. Colorado Septic Records Search
  • Pueblo County Records Search

3. Determine Septic Tank Material

If you’ve located your septic permit, you’ll find information about the size, shape, and material of your septic tank there as well. But don’t be concerned if your septic data aren’t readily available. We can perform some basic detective work to determine what material your septic system is built of. Let’s start with a look at the materials.

Types of Septic Tank Materials

Construction of septic tanks is mostly done using four types of materials: concrete, steel, fiberglass, and polyethylene plastic. Until the 1880s, the most extensively used septic tank material was concrete, which was then replaced by steel. These tanks have a lifespan of around 40 years and are built to last. They are susceptible to cracking, however, in locations where temperature variations are strong and frequent. Concrete tanks are frequently required by municipalities that have strict requirements on septic system construction.

  • Steel septic tanks begin to corrode within 20 to 25 years of installation in most regions.
  • If a human or animal walks across the weakened tank, it may collapse under the weight of the person or animal.
  • They will not break or corrode, however, in contrast to concrete or steel tanks.
  • PlasticSeptic tanks made of polyethylene have been in use since the 1980s.

They are not susceptible to rusting and are less prone to break when compared to concrete. They are, however, not quite as long-lasting. Because of the weight of the earth above them, or because a vehicle passes over the area where they are buried, plastic tanks are susceptible to collapse.

How Old is Your House?

Next, let’s determine the approximate age of your home. In some cases, all you need to do is take a glance at the house’s façade to get an idea of how old it really is. However, you may examine the tax assessor’s records in your county to get a more precise assessment. Similarly to searching for septic records, your mileage may vary depending on which county’s digitized documents you are searching for. Let’s go over an example search utilizing Boulder County’s Property Search tool so that you can have a better sense of what you should be looking for.

  1. Look up your home address on the internet. When searching for a home, some programs provide separate areas for your address and street name, while others (such as Boulder County) merge the two into a single search box. Look for information on Deeds and/or Sales Records in the public domain. You’ll find a list of transactions here, with dates showing when the property was purchased and sold. Find the transaction that occurred on the earliest possible date. This is most likely the year in which your home was constructed.

This information allows you to make an informed guess regarding the sort of material that your septic tank is built of.

4A. If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector

After coming to the conclusion that the tank is most likely built of concrete or steel in Step 3, a metal detector may be used to make the work of locating it much simpler. But not just any metal detector will do. It must be the right one. Standard metal detectors have a depth range of 6 – 8″ (15 – 20 cm) below the surface of the ground. As previously stated, the majority of septic tanks are placed 1′ to 3′ (0.3 m to 1 m) underground, putting them outside of the acceptable range. An advanced sort of metal detector known as a Magnetic Locator, which can detect objects as deep as 16′ (4.8 m), is available for purchase.

How to Use a Metal Detector to Search for a Septic Tank

If you have a septic permit record, you may refer to it to figure out how far you need to go to install a septic tank. Start at the point where the drain line meets the home and work your way out to where the septic tank is shown on the diagram. Keep in mind that this graphic depicts the proposed installation area and may not accurately depict the actual ground conditions on the site. We’ll have a look at the illustration below. One inch (2.5 centimeters) is equivalent to fifty feet (50 meters).

By using a ruler to measure the design, we’ve determined that the septic tank should be roughly 13′ (3.96 m) away from the home.

  1. To begin, start at the location you highlighted in Step 1 where the sewage drain line leaves the home. From here, you may switch on the locator and adjust the gain to a high setting. Walking over the search area, sweep the locator from left to right, as if looking for anything. As you go, make a note of the regions with the strongest signal strength. It is most likely that the tank-iron lid’s handles will be located in one of these positions
  2. As soon as you’ve exhausted the search region in one direction, sweep over it perpendicularly and make note of the spots with the strongest signal strength. Continue on to Step 5

4B. If it’s Plastic or Fiberglass, Probe Gently

Septic tanks made of plastic or fiberglass are typically buried one to two feet (0.3 to 0.91 m) below ground level. They feature circular covers made of green or black plastic that are roughly two feet (0.91 m) wide and have a diameter of around two feet (0.91 m). Due to the fact that these tanks are totally made of plastic, a metal detector will not be of use in locating them. In this situation, a soil probe is really useful. An inexpensive soil sampling instrument, soil probes are comprised of a 4′ (1.2 m) metal rod with a pointed tip on one end and are used for soil sample.

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Gently poke the earth with a soil probe every 2 to 3 feet, using a light touch (0.61 to 0.91 m).

Make a note of any areas where you encounter resistance and continue exploring around in your search area. The use of a soft touch is essential here, since the metal tip of the probe can cause damage to plastic septic tanks (and sewage lines) if too much force is used.

5. Time to Dig

Following the placement of an amagnetic locator (or the probing of the ground) to record the places with the highest signal strength, you are ready to begin digging. Septic tank lids can be located anywhere from 4″ (10 cm) to 4′ (1.2 m) below the surface of the ground.

6. Mark the Location for Future Maintenance

Having discovered your septic tank, you’ll want to ensure that it can be readily detected and accessed in the event that it has to be repaired or replaced. You may accomplish this by installing a septic tank riser. Sewage Tank Risers are devices that provide for easy access to the septic tank from the ground. They are shafts made of plastic or concrete that link the top of the tank to the surface of the ground below the tank. The tank lid will no longer require you to dig to access it whenever maintenance is required.

What do I do if My Septic Alarm is Going Off?

In the event that your septic alarm goes off, it may surely create some anxiety and uncertainty; and if you happen to be experiencing this right now, then you’ve arrived to the correct location! Don’t be concerned; it does not necessitate urgent action. Instead, take your time to go through this full essay so that you will be prepared to act now or in the future if the situation arises. What Septic Systems Are and How They Work The alarm works in conjunction with the septic system to alert you when the water level within the pump tank has increased to an unsafe level or has decreased to an unsafe level.

  • The timer is in charge of regulating the time intervals during which the pump is permitted to pump wastewater into the drainage system.
  • Thus, during periods of excessive water use, the drain field is kept from getting overflowing, which might cause damage to the drainage system.
  • A large amount of water is injected into the system in between pumping cycles for whatever cause, and the water has nowhere else to go but back into the system’s pump tank.
  • Depending on how much water was and continues to be put into the system and how the pump is set up to operate on a timer, it may take many pumping cycles until the water levels are returned to normal.
  1. There is an excessive amount of water being put into the septic system. This is the result of excessive water use, which might be caused by multiple loads of laundry, an excessive quantity of dishwashing, or a disproportionate number of long showers.
  1. Somehow, groundwater is making its way into the system. If there is an excessive amount of standing water surrounding the septic tanks, whether generated by rain or another source, the water may seep into the tanks and cause the internal water level to rise.
  1. In some way, groundwater is making its way into the system, which is a problem. If there is an excessive amount of standing water surrounding the septic tanks, whether due to rain or another source, the water may seep into the tanks and cause the internal water level to rise.

The Best Thing to Do If Your Alarm Goes Off Alternatively, if you hear an alert, you should press the red button or turn on the alarm box. The alarm will be turned off as a result of this action. There should be a red light and a green light on the alarm box, which should be situated someplace on the unit. The green light indicates that the alarm is operational and should be left on at all times. It is shown by a red light if the alarm is getting a signal from the pump tank indicating that the water level is increasing above or decreasing below what is expected.

  • If the breaker occurs to be tripped, look around the septic tanks to see if there is any standing water.
  • It is possible that the red light on the alarm box will go out on its own after allowing the septic system to operate for a couple of pump cycles (which should take approximately 10-15 hours).
  • If the red light turns off, it signifies that the system is operating properly and that it only needs to catch up with the extra water that has overflowed into the storage tank.
  • To be clear, an alarm signal from the septic system does not always imply that sewage is about to back up into the house right away.
  • Do you require septic system repair on a regular basis or emergency service?

To arrange an appointment, please call (804) 581-0001 or send us an email through our contact page. Want to learn more about septic systems? Explore our septic system web sites by clicking on the “Septic” navigation option in the top navigation bar.

What Are the Causes of an Overflowing Septic Tank?

Home-Maintenance Septic systems are used to dispose of home waste in locations where there are no municipal sewage systems. These facilities are comprised of a big storage tank and a surrounding drainage field, which is constructed of subterranean trenches. In order to get waste out of the house, it has to go through a number of pipes before it can go to the septic tank. if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.removeChild(sources); then this.onerror = null; this.src = fallback; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace; (//$/, “), ‘/public/images/logo-fallback.png’) (//$/, “), ‘/public/images/logo-fallback.png’) ” loading=”lazy”> ” loading=”lazy”> Septic tanks are being installed beneath the ground surface.

During the waste disposal process, solid trash descends to the bottom of the tank, while liquid waste and effluent move into drainage fields, where they are slowly absorbed into the ground.

By determining the root reason of an overflow, you may identify the most effective method of repairing your system and restoring its normal performance.

Inadequate Maintenance

The nonbiodegradable components in waste move through the septic tank and sink to the bottom of the tank as it goes through it. Some solid waste also ends up at the bottom of the tank, and the level of sludge in the tank increases over time as a result. In order to eliminate sludge and prevent overflow, the University of Georgia recommends that septic tanks be cleaned out every three to five years. The amount of time that should elapse between septic tank cleanings is determined by the size of the tank and the amount of waste produced.

When it comes to a four-person family, a 1,500-gallon tank only has to be pumped out every four years or so.

Bacterial Deficiency

Biologically active bacteria found naturally in a septic tank assist in the breakdown of waste and the passage of waste to the drainage field. Solids will not break down if bacteria levels are low, and they will accumulate much more quickly than they would otherwise. This can cause the tank to overflow, as well as obstructions in drainage lines and trenches, among other things. According to Thomas Refuse, any cleaning solution that is hazardous to humans may also be poisonous to the beneficial microorganisms in a septic system, causing the system to malfunction.

Clogs and Design Flaws

As liquids and partially digested solids escape the tank, they are channeled via a network of pipes and into an underground drainage system. If the tank overflows, you’ll notice that the ground immediately above this drainage region is quite damp and spongy. Poor drainage system design or broken drain pipes are the most common causes of this sort of overflow. If tree roots penetrate the walls of a pipe, the walls of the pipe may collapse, preventing normal drainage from occurring. Overflows can also be caused by clogged or damaged pipes.

The Purdue University School of Engineering states that drainage pipes must have a slope of between 1 and 2 percent in order for garbage to drain adequately. It is possible that the slope is too shallow, and that materials will not flow as intended, resulting in the need to replace the pipe.

Can Your Drive a Truck Over a Septic Tank?

Is it possible for you to drive a truck over a septic tank? Is it possible to drive over a septic tank?

Can you drive a truck or vehicle over a septic tank? The answer is you technically can, but you shouldn’t, and you should familiarize yourself with the risks in doing so.

Is it possible to drive over a septic drainage field? There is no official numerical value that specifies the maximum amount of weight that an underground septic tank can withstand. You should be aware, however, that it is strongly advised that you avoid driving or parking vehicles or heavy machinery on or near a septic system system area. Subjecting your septic tank to significant weight from trucks, automobiles, or tractors, among other things, and doing so for an extended length of time, increases the risk of damage to the system.

  1. It brings with it a full slew of pricey septic system issues to deal with.
  2. As a result of the weight of some golf carts, especially those that are filled with people, your septic tank may experience excessive stress.
  3. The act of driving over your septic tank, septic pipe, or drain field can do significant damage to your septic system, not to mention the fact that it is dangerous.
  4. Should You Park Your Car on Top of a Septic Tank?
  5. Under no circumstances should sewage disposal tanks be constructed beneath garages or driveways.
  6. If at all feasible, delineate the region beneath which your septic tank will be installed.
  7. Indeed, parking or driving over a septic tank must be avoided at all costs, and this is especially true during periods of heavy rainfall.

What If You Built Structures or Have Existing Structures Built On Your Septic Tank?

access to a septic tank for the purpose of pumping The construction of any form of building over any section of your septic tank is never a wise decision. Due to the restricted access to the septic tank, the most common difficulty this causes is that septic maintenance (such as regular pumping) and repair become more difficult or time-consuming to do. A significant number of homeowners and business owners have their sewage-disposal tanks concealed beneath wood decks, pool patios, driveways, or other construction annexes.

Building over your septic tank may be remedied by installing removable boards or trap doors, which allow for practical access to the septic tank while yet maintaining aesthetic appeal.

While your drain field takes use of the soil surrounding it to purify the flow from the septic tank, your septic tank does not.

The fact that you would be constructing over a large area that includes sewage water, which is exceedingly unsanitary, has not yet been brought up in conversation.

Ensure that you have easy access to the tank since it is required for periodic inspections and upkeep, as well as for emergency repairs.

It is not only impractical, but it is also prohibitively expensive.

It is exceedingly detrimental to the health of humans and animals if harmful gases leak out of the sewage treatment system and into the environment.

Building on top of your drain field condenses the soils and can cause damage to the below-ground system, which can result in a septic tank failure.

No, driving across your septic drain field is also not suggested under any circumstances.

When necessary, you should drive over your septic leach field to ensure that no long-term harm is done.

If you were to drive over it on a regular basis, the fill level in the system would certainly decrease, and the air movement in the system would be compromised.

As a general safety precaution, keep in mind that driving or parking an automobile on a drain field can impair the performance of the drain field due to compaction of the soil and the lack of proper air movement due to the increased surface area.

South End is a neighborhood in the heart of the city.

So keep in mind that we are only a click away.

We also specialize in leak detection; please contact us for more information. South End Plumbing is one of the few organizations that will provide you with a no-obligation quote. To book a visit, please call us at 704-919-1722 or complete the online form.

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