Why Does My Septic Tank Have 3 Lids? (TOP 5 Tips)

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  • Mine has three because it is a Europian style three compartment kind. You shouldnt need to empty a septic tank if it is only being filled from the looit is when people have the bathroom water run into it as well that it needs to be emptied, too much water for the natural break down of the excrements.

How many lids does a septic tank have?

Two or three lids may be included in your system. The average size of a sewage tank is approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. The lid is buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground in most cases.

Why does my septic tank have four lids?

The most common tanks, starting in the 1940s, are concrete, with 3 – 500# lids for a 1000 gallon tank or 4 – 500# lids for a 1500 gallon tank. They allow access to your septic tank by removing 20” green lids. Each lid should be screwed down for safety.

Why do septic tanks have two compartments?

Septic tanks may have one or two compartments. Two-compartment tanks do a better job of set- tling solids and are required for new systems. Tees or baffles are provided at the tank’s inlet and outlet pipes. The inlet tee slows the incom- ing wastes and reduces disturbance of the settled sludge.

Do old septic tanks have lids?

If your septic tank was installed after 1975, it will probably have two polyethylene or fiberglass lids centered at opposite sides of the perimeter. Older tanks will typically have a 24-inch concrete lid right in the center of the tank. Excavate in those locations to reveal the lids.

How many chambers should a septic tank have?

New tanks must have two chambers, while older tanks may have only one. The tank is often made from concrete, but other materials are also used. The tank works by settling and microbial digestion of waste.

How does a multi chamber septic tank work?

Septic tanks work by allowing solids to settle in the bottom of the tank and the liquid to drain out. Multiple chambers make the separation of solids and liquids more effective, with separating out more liquid with each chamber the flow moves through.

What is leaching chamber?

A leaching chamber is a wastewater treatment system consisting of trenches or beds, together with one or more distribution pipes or open-bottomed plastic chambers, installed in appropriate soils. A small portion of the effluent is used by plants through their roots or evaporates from the soil.

What size are septic tank lids?

Available in 12″, 16″, 20″ and 24″ diameters. Green only. 12″ Tall Riser – For septic tanks.

How far apart are septic tank lids from each other?

The distance between lids will be different for each sized tank: 1000 gallon tank = 6-6.5 ft.; 1250 gallon = 7-7.5 ft.; 1500 gallon = 8.5-9 ft.. Dig up the outlet chamber access lid. If you are extraordinarily lucky, the as-built drawing is accurate and you have hit the lids spot on.

Why does my septic tank have 1 lid?

But seeing one lid on the ground doesn’t necessarily mean that you have one lid – the other might be buried few feet away from the one you saw and so you will have to dig to access it. Most septic tank lids are made of concrete. Fiberglass and polyethylene lids are not very popular because they break easily.

How do you know when your septic tank needs to be pumped?

Common Signs You Need Septic Tank Pumping Services

  1. Slow or Frequently Clogged Drains. Since your septic tank is connected to the entire network of drains throughout your home, your sinks, showers, and even toilets can exhibit signs of a problem.
  2. Sewage Backup.
  3. Regular Gurgling Noises.
  4. Strong and Pungent Odors.

Do all septic tanks have filters?

First, not all septic tanks have a filter, especially the older septic tanks. Now many government agencies require or recommend a filter when a septic tank is installed. Cleaning a septic tank filter is different than pumping out a septic tank and cleaning it.

How often should you have your septic tank pumped?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

Common Septic Tank Facts

Septic systems are a low-cost and frequently successful alternative to conventional sewer systems. Concrete tanks have been the most frequent since the 1940s, with 3 – 500lids for a 1000 gallon tank and 4 – 500lids for a 1500 gallon tank being the most typical. Tanks began to be equipped with 16″ square concrete plugs with a lifting bail in the late 1990s, allowing for easier access to both sides of the tank. Many tanks today are made of fiberglass or plastic. Over time, the concrete might degrade, and the lids may develop cracks or possibly shatter completely due to the pressure.

Even broken lids should be replaced for the sake of the public’s safety.

They get access to your septic tank by removing green covers that are 20 inches in diameter.

This is done in order to prevent anyone, especially children, from removing a lid and falling into the container.

  • A typical water level for a tank should be 6″ below the top of the tank, and the tank should be kept completely filled at all times.
  • The level of the water is often a good sign of potential problems.
  • Additionally, it might suggest a clogged intake line, which could be caused by roots, a damaged pipe, or a loose joint.
  • If there has been a lot of rain, the earth may get saturated, making it impossible for any additional water to seep through the soil to the surface.
  • If your tank has allowed particles to enter the field lines, this might cause the openings in the corrugated pipe to get clogged, preventing water from percolating through the soil as effectively as it should be.
  • An output filter may be placed to prevent particulates from entering the field lines, but it would need to be cleaned on an annual basis to ensure that this does not happen.

Tank Types Express Septic Service

Septic tanks should be cleaned every 3 to 5 years, depending on the size of the household and how much water is used. When the septic tank is pump out on a regular basis, it will help to reduce the buildup of scum and sludge layers in the tank. Ideally, the scum layer should not be more than 24 inches thick. If the material is deeper than 24 inches, it will flow down the outflow pipe and into the drainfield, plugging up the drainfield and resulting in drainfield failure. In order to get your septic tank cleaned, you must first locate the main compartment2nd compartment lid of the septic tank and remove it.

The position of a septic tank lid and the number of lids on a tank varies depending on the year it was placed and the manufacturer.

If you prefer not to find and excavate the Septic Tank lids yourself, or if you are unsure of where the lids are placed, Express Septic Service may assist you with this task.

We may request an as-built drawing from the County Health Department on your behalf if one is available (NO CHARGE). When looking at an as-built, keep in mind that it will only show the overall placement of the sewage system components, not the actual location of the septic tanks.

Septic Diagrams:

1000 Gallon Septic Tanks: This tank design, which was in use from around 1976 to present, will have one main lid and two smaller baffle covers on either end of the tank, as seen in the diagram below.

Two Compartment

From late 1976 until the present, a septic tank layout of 1125-1200 gallons was erected. It is possible for this tank to have two main 24′′ lids or two main lids and two little baffle lids at both ends of the tank right above the inlet and output baffles, depending on the manufacturer. If there are risers to the surface of the tank, you will be searching for two lids that look like this. If the tank is not risered, you will discover concrete lids with a diameter of 2-24″, as seen in the figure below.

Holding Tank

a septic tank layout of 1125-1200 gallon capacity that has been in use since late 1976 A 24′′ main lid and two tiny baffle lids at either end of the tank, immediately above the entrance and outflow baffle, can be installed on this tank, depending on the manufacturer. If there are risers to the surface of the tank, you’ll be searching for two lids like this. You will find concrete lids with diameters ranging from 22 to 24 inches in the absence of a riser system. In other cases, riser lids can be found below the surface, in which case they must be located and dug out.

Pump Tank

From late 1976 until the present, a septic tank layout of 1125-1200 gallons has been in place. Depending on the manufacturer, this tank may have two main 24′′ covers or two main lids and two little baffle lids at each ends of the tank right above the input and outflow baffles. If there are risers to the surface of the tank, you will be searching for two lids similar to this. If the tank is not risered, you will discover concrete lids with a diameter of 2-24″, as seen in the photo below. Riser lids can be located below the surface of the ground, which will need the location and excavation of the riser lids.

Aerobic Treatment Unit (ATU)

In some cases, an alternate treatment system may be used in place of a typical septic tank and gravel trenched drainfield, such as in cases of poor soil drainage, small lot size, or environmental concerns. The majority of alternative treatment systems are comprised of a multi compartmented tank known as an Aerobic Treatment Unit, or ATU for short. The majority of ATUs are divided into three compartments: a “waste” compartment, an aeration chamber, and a clarifying chamber. The trash compartment contains solids used in the pretreatment and liquification of garbage, as well as non-waste incidental products that are flushed down the toilet and into the drain.

  1. Clearing the effluent further improves its clarity since the leftover particles are allowed to settle in the clarifying chamber.
  2. These components are intended to kill bacteria and pathogens before the effluent is discharged into the drainfield.
  3. All of these models have undergone extensive testing before being certified.
  4. These can range from gravity to pressure distribution to Glendon mounds to sand filters to drip irrigation.
  5. For any routine operation and maintenance inspections or services, a Health Department Certified Operation and Maintenance Specialist will be required, and some manufacturers may require you to be certified by their firm in order to conduct these services.

As previously said, it is important to have these sorts of systems monitored on a regular basis and fixed as needed in order to maintain correct performance and to keep your system free of problems.

Restaurant Grease Trap

Almost every food service facility that serves food and washes dishes, including restaurants, cafés, coffee shops, delicatessens and bakeries (among others), will have an interior grease trap located near the sinks to collect grease from the sinks. They are available in sizes ranging from 20 to 50 gallons. Fatty acids, oils, and grease (FOG) are prevented from entering your drain pipe by a grease trap, which is a chambered compartment. Grease flows into the trap, enabling the grease to solidify and float to the top of the trap while weighted solids fall to the bottom of the trap, allowing the liquid to flow out via the drain pipes and into the septic tank or into the city sewage.

Grease Tank Interceptor Service

A grease interceptor is a huge tank that may be situated outside of the structure on the ground level. They can range in size from a few hundred gallons to several thousand gallons. You will need two tanks if you have an exterior tank. The first tank will be a grease trap (tank), which will hold grease until it is removed. The garbage from the restrooms will be disposed of in a tank that is specifically dedicated for this purpose; if the facility is on sewer, the waste will be disposed of in the city sewage.

In addition to a simple cleaning rooter service utilizing an electric snake, we also provide hydro-jetting, which uses high pressure water to break away hardened grease and keep the drain from backing up.

Does a septic tank have two lids?

Asked in the following category: General The most recent update was made on July 1, 2020. The majority of the time, there are two lids to open to gain access to your septic tank. When pumping out your septic tank, it is critical that both of these doors are open. Aseptic tanks erected prior to 1975 will have a single concrete cover measuring 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. The lids of a two-compartment tank erected after 1975 will be made of fiberglass or polyethylene, and they will be centered at opposing ends of the tank’s rectangular shape.

  1. Installation of a Pressure Distribution System – This tank will only have one mainlid, which will be located in the center of the tank.
  2. Similarly, how far apart should the two lids of a septic tank be placed?
  3. What is the diameter of thelidson thetank?
  4. What is the optimal number of lids for a concrete septic tank?

Septic tanks are normally rectangular in design and measure roughly 5 feet by 8 feet in size, depending on the manufacturer. Typically, the lid and other septic tank components are placed between 4 inches and 4 feet underground in the majority of situations.

Septic Tank Covers or Lids

  • Send us your question or comment on septic tank covers, including their strength, collapse, or safety issues
  • We’ll get back to you as soon as we can.
See also:  How Much Is A Septic Tank Cost? (Solution)

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Covers and apertures for septic tanks, as well as access ports: We present a guide to septic tank covers, including information on where to obtain them, what they are, and how to keep them secure. Assuring that the septic tank lid is in good working order. Find out where to check for septic tanks, septic tank covers, and septic tank cleanout lids in your home.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Septic Tank Covers

What is the depth of the Septic Tank Cover once the Septic Tank has been identified? Is the cover in good condition?

Septic Tank Cover Depthlocation

Tank Cover Depth: How deep will the septic tank cover be is a question that many people ask. Most of the time, the top of the septic tank is roughly one foot below the level of the ground. However, the depth of the water fluctuates greatly. The septic cover, on the other hand, can be several feet deeper. If you take note of the depth at which the waste line leaves the building foundation wall, for example, 3 ft. below the top of the soil (grade level), and if the site were dead flat and the tank were located 12 feet from the foundation wall, at a typical waste line slope of 1/8″ to 1/4″ per linear foot of run, the septic tank’s entry port for the waste line would have to be approximately 3 ft.

If the site were dead flat and the Obviously, if the site is not flat, these septic tank cover depth estimates would be different than before.

Septic Tank Cover Safety Procedures

Take extreme precautions to ensure that the coverings and cleanout access covers over the septic tank are secure and long-lasting, so that it will be difficult for someone to fall into the tank (which is sometimes deadly), and that children will not be able to remove the cover. If your septic tank is located in a location where vehicles may drive over it, heavy-duty rated covers are available for your convenience. This is something you should discuss with your septic tank contractor. Even if there is the slightest doubt about the condition of the septic tank cover (for example, if there is evidence of subsidence over the tank location), you should cordon off the area and prevent anyone from walking over it, because falling into a septic tank is extremely dangerous and could result in death.

  • Make absolutely ensure that the covers and cleanout access covers over the septic tank are secure and robust, so that it will be difficult for someone to fall into the tank (which is sometimes deadly), and so that a kid will not be able to remove the cover from its position. There are special heavy-duty rated covers available if your septic tank is located in an area where vehicles may drive over it. With your septic tank contractor, discuss the pros and cons of this alternative. Even if there is the slightest doubt about the condition of the septic tank cover (for example, if there is evidence of subsidence over the tank location), you should cordon off the area and prevent anyone from walking over it, because falling into a septic tank is extremely dangerous and could be fatal.

Reader Question: septic tank cover collapse

11/28/2014 The following is what Scott C. said:I have a septic system that is powered by a pump tank.

The weight of the dirt beneath which the lid was buried caused the lid to fall. There were around 3’2″ of them “because of the clay type dirt that the installer used to cover it The thickness of the lid is four millimeters “. Is that up to par for a soil with so much organic matter? –

Reply:

Scott, The collection of data is necessary in order to determine whether or not the cover over a septic tank is adequate. Septic tanks are, in fact, designed to handle a variety of weights and loads. See SPECIFICATIONS FOR SEPTIC TANK DESIGN STRENGTH As previously stated, simply measuring the thickness of the septic tank lid is insufficient to determine whether or not it was adequate; we do not know if it contained steel reinforcement, if it did, at what spacing and with what material; nor do we know the quality of the concrete; nor do we know its history (for example, prior vehicle traffic over the tank); nor do we know the size of the septic tank.

Reader Question about septic tank cover security regulations in Alberta

Scott, A little amount of data is required in order to examine the suitability of a septic tank cover. Weight and load ratings for septic tanks are, in fact, given for different capacities. See DESCRIPTION SPECIFICATIONS FOR SEPTIC TANK DESIGN As previously stated, simply measuring the thickness of the septic tank lid is insufficient to determine whether or not it was adequate; we do not know if it contained steel reinforcement, if it did, at what spacing and with what material; nor do we know the quality of the concrete; nor do we know its history (for example, prior vehicle traffic over the tank); nor do we know the type and size of the septic tank used.

Reply:

STL: Here is an excerpt from the Alberta septic tank code for your information. 3.1.2.3. Lid/Cover Opening with Easy Access 1) All access holes must be provided with a secure lid or cover to prevent unauthorized access. 1 One purpose of this regulation is to promote safety by prohibiting unauthorized or inadvertent entrance into the access aperture of a septic tank or holding tank. Sentence (1) explains how this regulation works. The use of a padlock and a cover that can only be removed with tools are examples of acceptable protective measures, as is the use of a cover that weighs a minimum of 29.5 kg (65 lb).

The following further comments on these techniques is provided in the handbook: It is critical that the lid or cover of the manhole access aperture be securely fastened in order to prevent someone from accidently falling into the tank below.

When the access lid is first installed, it must be secured; it is then the owner’s obligation to ensure that it stays secure on an ongoing basis.

In summary, if the lid over your septic tank can be lifted by a child, the chance of someone falling into the tank is high, as is the possibility of a swift and horrible death. Make certain that the coverings are secure.

  • Source:ALBERTA PRIVATE SEWAGE SYSTEMS STANDARDS OF PRACTICE, 2009 HANDBOOK, obtained on April 30, 2015, and updated on March 18, 2018, from the original source:Public/Documents/PSSSOP Handbook Version 12 Online Feb 21 2012b.pdf

Reader Question: how do I cap this wiring conduit at my septic tank cover?

2013/0318 NT inquired:Our dogs have pulled what looks to be a portion of our septic system that was obstructing electrical wires. What is the best location to look for a replacement? NT, a reader, sent this photograph.

Reply: proper conduit and exterior electrical boxes are required for outdoor septic pump wiring

NT: When I look at your photo (above), the white plastic “tube” appears to be a riser conduit for septic pump or alarm wire. I’m not sure if it’s a product specifically developed for that use or if it’s a homemade couduit produced from downspout material. I would start by contacting your septic installer or maintenance firm to find out what type of material they used. This may save you a lot of time digging around in your yard. In the meanwhile, make sure you cover the top of the conduit with a tarp or other temporary cover to keep rainfall out.

Keep an eye out: I have my doubts about whether or not the conduit utilized was appropriate and certified for electrical wiring.

The figure on the right illustrates what I am referring to: the use of specified components for subterranean and outdoor electrical wiring with a riser that is elevated above the ground.

  • In the book PUMP CONTROL SYSTEMS, FLOATS, PANELS AND INSTALLATION, by Matt Johnson, Chippewa County Health Department, 508 Ashmun Ave., Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783, obtained on 20 March 2018, from the following URL: www.chippewahd.com/cms/lib/MI17000311/Centricity/Domain/105/Control % Matt Johnso is responsible for the installation of the panels and for the installation of the panels.

Reader Q A – also see the FAQs series linked-to below

In the book PUMP CONTROL SYSTEMS, FLOATS, PANELS AND INSTALLATION, by Matt Johnson. Chippewa County Health Department, 508 Ashmun Ave., Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783, obtained on 20-03-18 from the following URL: www.chippewahd.com/cms/lib/MI17000311/Centricity/Domain/105/Control. Matt Johnso is responsible for the installation of the panels and for the installation of the panels and the panels.

Key Septic Tank CoverOpening Articles

  • ACCIDENT REPORTS FOR SEPTIC TANKS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN STRENGTH SPECS
  • SEPTIC TANKS FLOATING UP
  • SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO FIND
  • SEPTIC TANK OPEN, HOW TO
  • PUMPING SCHEDULE FOR SEPTIC TANK
  • SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • SEPTIC

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Septic Tank Lid Safety

Accidental falls into septic tanks do happen from time to time. The majority of the time, the individual who falls in is able to come out without suffering any significant injuries.

However, the terrible loss of a kid serves as a warning to check your septic system for broken or missing lids. To ensure that no one is accidentally thrown into your septic tank, follow these safety procedures.

  • Understand where the lids or coverings for your septic system are situated
  • Check the condition of the lids on a regular basis for any risks or difficulties. Maintain the integrity of the lids by repairing or replacing any broken or missing pieces
  • Bolts, screws, or other locks can be used to fasten the lids and prevent unauthorized entry. Never drive or park a vehicle on top of a septic system since this might cause damage or dislodge the lid. When examining or having your septic system pumped, never leave the lid open while you are working on it. After you’ve finished working on your septic system, check to see that the lids are securely fastened. Children should be taught that septic tank lids should not be played with or opened.

Owners of septic systems are responsible for ensuring that their systems are safe and correctly function, which includes keeping the tanks’ lids securely closed at all times.

Finding Your Septic System

If you are unable to locate the septic tank’s entrance, you should call your local health department. Most likely, they’ve given permits for the system, which may have included a map showing where the septic tank is located. The local health agency may not have a record of the tank; if this is the case, consult with a professional septic system firm, which has expertise discovering difficult-to-find tanks. Furthermore, because many systems are totally underground, it is possible that your system will not have lids at the surface.

More Resources

  • Septic System 101: The Fundamentals of Septic Systems
  • Taking Good Care of Your Septic System
  • A video on how to inspect your septic system yourself
  • Using the Services of a Septic System Professional
  • Symptoms of a Failing Septic System

How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

All septic tanks eventually fill with sediments and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain in excellent functioning order. If the tank’s lid is not on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located. A typical septic tank is 4 inches to 4 feet underground, with all of its components, including the cover, buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underneath. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the surface of the ground.

See also:  How Much To Get A Septic Tank Pumped? (Perfect answer)

Consult A Map

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank. If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your efforts.

Search For A Sign

Initial consideration should be given to the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is documented in most counties’ permission records. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank. If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your effort.

Follow The Pipe

First, go with the simplest choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in the permission records of most counties. Typically, these feature a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as specific dimensions that allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank.

If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record such sites, you may be out of luck. When you acquire a house, a schematic of your septic system may be included as part of the home inspection process.

Locate The Lid

The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 5 feet by 8 feet. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its boundaries and outline the rectangle’s boundary using a pencil. A septic tank that was built before 1975 will have a single concrete lid that is 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. If the tank was built after 1975, it will have two covers made of fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at the ends of the rectangle and centered at the ends of the rectangle.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

Mark The Spot

Make a note on the ground near where the tank was pumped by a professional and the lid was buried to serve as a reference in the future. In order to keep track of where you are, you should choose a hefty circular patio tile that is embedded in the ground. Additionally, draw your own map of the area and store it with your other important papers.

How far apart are septic tank lids?

There is a difference between 4 inches and 4 feet6 and 7 feet. What is the diameter of thelidson thetank? 20 to 24 inches in length. Second, is it possible to use bleach in conjunction with a septic tank? A modest amount of bleach from a load of laundry will have no effect on the bacteria and water in your septic tank, which holds several thousand gallons. With each flush, they emit bleach and other chemicals into the environment, making them unfit for use in septic systems. Never flush uncooked cleaners, bleach, or other home chemicals down the toilet or down the sink.

Your system may have two or three lids, depending on how your septic tank is configured.

Typically, the lid and other septic tank components are placed between 4 inches and 4 feet underground in the majority of situations.

Aseptic tanks erected prior to 1975 will have a single concrete cover measuring 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle.

Safety Tips for Septic Tank Lids

The septic tank lid adds an extremely vital layer of security and safety to a septic system’s overall security and protection. It may also be used to prevent issues from arising in your septic system, in addition to serving as a safety measure. Septic tank lids promote safety by preventing children, animals, rains, and other material from entering the septic tank and clogging it. But, perhaps most critically, septic tank lids prevent gases and smells from escaping the septic tank system. Septic tanks contain potentially dangerous gases and germs that may be damaging to your health if not properly maintained.

It is critical that all manufacturer instructions are followed throughout the installation procedure, and that only a registered septic system specialist open the lid of the tank.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid?

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, these feature a graphic indicating the placement of the tank on the property, as well as certain dimensions that allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank in question.

2. Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land. After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

3. Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard.

4. Visual Search

Pay attention for a circular cover that is roughly two feet in diameter. Septic tank lids are normally constructed of green or black plastic, however they can occasionally be made of concrete.

Here are a few general safety guidelines for septic tank lids.

  • No vehicle should be driven over the septic system, especially not the lid of the system. The septic tank lid is not designed to withstand heavy usage. The lid should be visually inspected immediately if you mistakenly drive over it in order to see whether there is any damage. For the best possible protection of the septic tank lid, always use the nuts and screws suggested by the manufacturer. Never leave a sewage tank that is partially or completely open unattended. Whenever you are installing or doing normal maintenance on your septic system, it is critical not to leave the tank unattended in order to avoid children or animals from entering the tank. Children should be taught that septic tank lids are not to be played with. Use a secondary septic tank cover, such as the Infiltrator Safety Star System, to keep the tank clean. If the primary septic tank lid is accidentally broken or removed, the safety star system offers a powerful second level of protection. Cracks or apparent damage to the septic tank lid should be checked on a regular basis. If you think that your septic tank lid has been damaged, please contact West Michigan Septic Sewer & Drain at 231-739-7423 or send us an online message.

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Over the septic system, especially the lid, should be avoided at all costs. No traffic is permitted on the septic tank lid. The lid should be visually inspected immediately if you mistakenly drive over it in order to detect any damage. For the best possible security of the septic tank lid, always use the bolts and screws specified by the manufacturer. Do not leave an unattended open septic tank. The tank should never be left unattended while installing or doing normal maintenance on the septic system in order to avoid children or animals from accessing the tank.

If the primary septic tank lid is unintentionally broken or removed, the safety star system offers a powerful second level of protection.

Contact West Michigan Septic Sewer and Drain at 231-739-7423 or send us a message online if you think that your septic tank lid has been damaged.

Water is Necessary

Pumping a septic tank removes the solid waste or sludge from the tank’s bottom, allowing it to function properly. Excessive sludge in a septic tank can find its way through the outlet and into the drain field pipes, causing severe flooding in the surrounding area. Not everyone is aware that there is a specified operating level for all septic tanks, which may be found here. 8 to 12 inches from the top of the septic tank’s lid should indicate that the tank is “full.” This might vary based on the size and kind of septic tank used.

When the water level in your tank exceeds the capacity of the pipe, your tank is considered to be overfilled.

It is possible that the high water level is the consequence of a faulty system. You should get your septic system examined and water usage should be restricted until an expert can determine the source of the problem.

What Can Cause Your Septic Tank to Overfill

There might be a variety of factors contributing to your septic tank being overfilled. The presence of an overfilled septic tank is frequently a symptom that your drain field is not operating properly. The drain field is the final fixture in the septic system, and it is responsible for returning treated wastewater to the surrounding soil. When your drain field floods, the water flow becomes obstructed, causing the water level in your septic tank to increase significantly. Plumbing problems and excessive water use are two more prevalent problems.

Excessive water use might cause the septic tank to fill with more contents than it is capable of handling, resulting in a high water level.

Septic Maxx provides high-quality solutions that effectively tackle the problems that afflict septic tanks.

Get in touch with us to talk with a septic specialist right now.

Complete Guide to Your Septic Tank

When sewage exits your home and enters your septic system, the septic tank is the first component that it comes into contact with. Eventually, all of the greywater and waste will fill the tank, and it will then flow out into your absorption area. Although the septic tank is often the most visible structure in your septic system, many people are confused about how it works. If you want to learn further more about septic systems, you can get our ebook by clicking on the link below. It includes information about septic tanks, septic systems, maintenance, and other topics.

How A Septic Tank Works

As soon as you open the lid of a septic tank, you will discover that the tank is completely full of sewage and nearly filled to the top. Typically, the first notion that comes to mind is that the tank is ready for pumping. However, this is the usual operating level at which a tank functions. As the tank fills up, it overflows down the drain field and into the ground. Many people are perplexed as to why the sewage and other trash are not simply discharged into the drain field directly. What’s the point of having tanks to fill if everything just pours out onto the field in the first place?

This may appear inconsequential, yet it is critical to the operation of a functional system.

  1. The floating solids form the topmost layer (or scum). Anaerobic bacteria did not break down any of the oils, fats, greases, or anything else that was present in the wastewater. Sludge can be found at the very bottom of the well. Septic tank pumping is necessary to remove both floating particles and sludge, which are the primary reasons for frequent septic tank cleaning. If such solids and semi-solid sludge are allowed to enter your drain field, the lifespan of your drain field will be significantly reduced. The cleared effluent is found in the space between the sludge and the floating particles. In the tank, this is the only trash that may be discharged onto the field, and it should account for the vast majority of the waste.

The anaerobic bacterium that colonizes the tank is the majority of the population. Anaerobic bacteria are any bacterium that can survive in the absence of oxygen. For this reason, it is still possible to close a septic tank lid while the waste is still able to be broken down. Because of the tank’s construction, waste can flow into the tank, where it will be collected, and then be discharged. The input pipe of a tank is meant to be approximately 3 to 4 inches above the outflow pipe of the tank.

Because of this, the sewage may enter the tank without backing up into the house. In order to ensure that the cleared effluent departs the tank without bringing any floating particles with it, it is necessary to use baffles to accomplish this.

Baffles

Baffles, despite their straightforward design, play a critical role in the long-term performance of your septic system. In your septic tank, there are two baffles to contend with. The entrance baffle is one type of baffle, while the exit baffle is another. This baffle’s duty is to send any waste down into the tank without causing it to stir up the particles already in the tank. It is usually made of metal. This helps the tank to settle and the different layers to grow in a more natural manner.

See also:  How Often Should You Clean Your Septic Tank?

The exit baffle is generally identical in appearance to the inlet baffle, although it serves a somewhat different purpose.

The outside of the baffle will prevent the passage of floating solids, while the effluent will stream out into the drain field.

Inlet Observation Port

The intake observation port is the first component of your tank that you may be able to observe. This is normally a 4 inch pipe with a white cover on the end to protect the end fitting. The mower will locate the item if you haven’t already done so. Despite the fact that they might be a nuisance when mowing, they are beneficial for a variety of reasons.

  1. They serve to identify the location of the tank. The inlet observation port may also be used to return via the house if someone is examining your sewer line and cannot reach it from the house. This saves a significant amount of time when pumping out your tank or inspecting the system. Aside from that, the intake observation port is quite handy for checking for any unneeded trickles into your septic system. Check to see if there are any slow trickles flowing into the septic system after making sure it has been at least 20 minutes since something has drained into it. This is something you should conduct around twice a year to ensure that everything is functioning properly.

Septic Tank Lid

Just beyond your intake observation port will be your septic tank lid, which will be located just beyond that. This covers the manhole in the center of your tank’s interior. This is the location where all pumping should take place. It has a huge aperture ranging in size from 18″ to 24″ and occasionally even greater. Having a septic tank lid on your lawn is something that many people do not enjoy. However, if it is clearly visible, it may save your pumper a significant amount of time and, perhaps, money.

  1. If the lid is too low during a house sale, an inspector will ask that the lid be raised to a level that is closer to the surface of the soil.
  2. This is helpful for maintenance purposes, as well as so that you may divulge their location if you decide to sell your property in the future.
  3. If concrete lids are not set back into place carefully, they may crack.
  4. Over time, this might put additional strain on your drainage system.

Septic Tank Pumping

We often get asked “how often should I pump my tank,” which is another frequently asked topic. The answer is straightforward: at the absolute least, it should be done every two years. When it comes to having your septic tank pumped, there are a few things to keep an eye out for that are very crucial. Remember that the purpose of pumping is to remove the floating particles on top of the water and the sludge at the bottom of the water. In order to accomplish this, a pumper must get access to the manhole in the center of the tank.

The center manhole can also assist them in seeing considerably more of the tank and determining whether or not a significant amount of the solids has been removed.

This can cause your input baffle to become detached, resulting in the pumper being unable to detect the quantity of solids remaining in the tank.

A good pumper will back flush some of the water he has pumped out in order to mix up the sediments in the bottom of the tank, and then vacuum up the remaining water.

After everything has been pumped out, they may look inside the tank with a flashlight to see if there are any fractures, roots, or degeneration below the level of the prior liquid. Please contact us to book an appointment to have a dependable pumper come to your location.

Different Types of Septic Tanks

There is a wide variety of septic tanks that may be provided to customers. Therefore, it is critical to pose the question “What type of septic tank do I have?” before proceeding. Some of the most often encountered are listed below.

Primary and Secondary Tanks

In 1997, the state of Pennsylvania mandated that all new systems be equipped with a secondary settling tank. Therefore, if you were to repair your drainfield and apply for a permit, you would also be required to install a second tank. The reasons behind this was that while the first tank was settling all of the solids, there was still some that was flowing over into the drain field after it was filled. With this second tank, the solids could be settled and more waste could be broken down, resulting in a more efficient treatment process.

The secondary tank is normally situated immediately following the primary tank.

If you had a fully new septic system done after 1997, there is a good chance that your installer selected a less expensive option than two tank installation.

Dual-chamber Septic Tank

Instead of using separate tanks, a dual-chamber tank makes use of chambers. A enormous rectangular tank with a wall in the middle is what you’ll find here. A 1,250-gallon dual-chamber tank is a standard size for this type of tank. The first compartment contains 750 gallons, while the second chamber stores 500 gallons. The most significant advantage of a dual-chamber septic tank is the cost savings associated with its installation. There is only one hole to dig, and only one tank to put in it.

  1. When a new system is installed, these are the first things to look for.
  2. If you have a dual-chamber tank, be sure that both chambers have been drained out before continuing.
  3. The lid of the second chamber is sometimes buried deeper than the lid of the first compartment.
  4. Being aware that you have a dual-chamber tank and that there are two lids will assist you in keeping your system in good working order.

Holding Tank

Many individuals use the phrases “holding tank” and “septic tank” interchangeably when referring to the same thing. There are, nevertheless, significant distinctions between the two. A holding tank is substantially larger and has an usual volume of 2000 gallons. It is used to store waste water. The tank does not have an outlet, thus it “holds” all of the sewage that is introduced into it. Even the smallest amount of wastewater that escapes the home is collected in the holding tank. A float switch is located towards the top of a holding tank.

  • This notifies the homeowner that a pumper will be dispatched to come out and pump the holding tank.
  • A monthly pumping schedule is required if you possess a holding tank, which you should do on an as-needed basis.
  • What are the benefits of using a holding tank?
  • In certain cases, the residence does not have enough space for a septic system and does not have a connection to municipal sewage.

It is the sole option available to a household with a holding tank. A more plausible scenario is that the house is not frequently used. Depending on whether your house is a vacation home or a year-round residence, installing a full septic system may not be worth the investment.

Cesspool

If you have a cesspool, it is possible that you do not have a septic tank. This is due to the fact that a cesspool may serve as both a septic tank and an absorption area. They are a form of septic system that is no longer in use and is considered outdated. Cesspools are created by excavating a large pit. It was assembled into a big cylindrical building with cinder block along the sides and open soil on the bottom, which was constructed by an installer. The cinder blocks are stacked one on top of the other with no mortar in between the layers.

When the dirt at the bottom of the cesspool is unable to drain properly, the cesspool begins to fill.

At this moment, the cesspool is no longer functional due to its deterioration.

Solids will ultimately accumulate in the soil and prevent it from draining properly.

Aerobic Tank

Anaerobic bacteria are present in all of the tanks that we have discussed so far, and these bacteria help to break down waste before it enters the drain field. The aerobic tank is used to treat sewage by introducing aerobic microorganisms into the system. Anaerobic bacteria, as we well know, flourish in an environment where there is no oxygen. Aerobic tanks provide airflow, which allows bacteria that use oxygen (aerobic bacteria) to flourish. Two additional components are included in the tank to facilitate the growth of aerobic bacteria: a system for generating air supply and propagation medium (usually a honeycombed structure).

The air supply is responsible for introducing oxygen into the tank.

The anaerobic bacteria found in conventional systems contribute to sludge formation and have the potential to draw oxygen from the soil, impairing the soil’s capacity to drain.

Septic Tank Problems

Septic tanks are constructed to last for many years. The tank maker pours them so that they are approximately 3 inches thick. There is a 25-year warranty on them, which is a considerable period of time, but not an eternity. Eventually, indicators of degradation begin to appear in the tank’s condition. This can take many different forms, but the following are the most prevalent.

Chemical Reaction

As the bacteria begin to decompose the sewage in the tank, they emit gases that rise beyond the level of the liquid. Those gases are converted to sulfuric acid by the bacteria that live above the liquid level. Over time, the sulfuric acid levels in the concrete rise to the point where the concrete begins to crumble. Because of this response on the top section of the tank, a critical component of checking tanks is examining above the level of the liquid to determine whether there is any structural damage present.

This reaction can not only cause the tank to fail, but it can also serve as the catalyst for the development of subsequent septic tank problems.

Exposed Rebar

The rebar can become exposed as a result of the concrete eroding and revealing the rebar over time. This is a significant red flag for septic inspectors who are looking into the situation. If an inspector notices exposed or corroded rebar in a tank, he or she will declare the tank unacceptable. You can tell that the concrete in the tank has gone mushy and is collapsing when you see the rebar sticking out of it.

Deteriorated Baffles

Many tanks are equipped with concrete baffles that protrude into the tank. As a result of their greater surface area exposed to the chemical reactions induced by bacteria, baffles are typically the first component within the tank to fail. When the baffles fail, you lose the ability to perform critical functions. The output baffle is the most critical of the three. If there is no exit baffle, there is nothing to prevent the sediments from floating out into the drain field and into the environment.

Cracks in the Tank

There may be a few feet of dirt cover on top of the tank when it is installed in the ground by a professional installation company. The earth on top of the tank adds a large amount of weight to the structure. Over time, this weight, along with the chemical reaction in the tank, which weakens the tank’s construction, can cause fractures to appear in the tank’s structure. They often begin at the very top of the tank. The greater the depth to which the tank is buried, the greater the likelihood that a fracture would develop.

Root Intrusion

Planting trees and huge shrubs directly next to sewage tanks is something that many people do on purpose. They may have planted plants to assist beautify their environment, but they may have done so without realizing it, putting the construction of their tanks at risk. The tree roots will begin to burst through the concrete tanks, causing structural damage to the structures beneath. Although it may appear strange, a tree has the ability to cut through thick concrete. However, after time, the thin roots penetrate the tank walls and cause damage.

The development of the roots will result in cracking and, eventually, the tank will collapse.

It is possible to engage a professional to cut the roots and remove them from the tank while they are still thin.

By now, you should have a solid foundation of knowledge about septic tanks under your belt.

This will aid you in the maintenance of your system as well as the purchase or sale of a new property.

If you have a septic system or are planning to purchase one for the first time and would want a solid foundation of information about septic systems and care, click here to learn more about our ebook.

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