What Breaks Down Sewage In A Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

A septic tank works by the simple process of biological decomposition and distribution drainage. Bacterial microorganisms break down the waste inside a septic tank which can then be safely redistributed or disposed off.

How do you break down solids in a septic tank?

  • So, how to break down solids in a septic tank? Rotten tomatoes are an excellent choice for breaking down solids, so is active dry yeast. However, for stubborn solid waste you may need to pump the tank, followed by a couple of rounds of backflushing.

How do you dissolve waste in a septic tank?

Here are a few things you can do to help you break down the solid waste in your septic tank:

  1. Active Yeast. Add ¼ to ½ cup of active dry yeast to your toilet bowl and flush it down your toilet.
  2. Rotten Tomatoes.
  3. Hydrogen Peroxide.
  4. Inorganic Acids.
  5. Chemicals.
  6. Pumping.

What to put in septic tank to break up solids?

Yeast helps actively breaks down waste solids when added to your septic system. Flush ½ cup of dry baking yeast down the toilet, the first time. Add ¼ cup of instant yeast every 4 months, after the initial addition.

What will dissolve roots in septic tank?

Flush 2 pounds of granular copper sulfate down the toilet for every 300 gallons of water that the septic tank holds. Copper sulfate kills and dissolves tree roots as they absorb the tank’s water. After entering a tank, the majority of copper sulfate settles in tank, and little passes into the leach bed line.

What enzymes break down poop?

Proteases break down protein-based soils including blood, urine, food, feces, wine and other beverages. Lipases break down fat molecules like oils and grease. Amylases break down starch molecules like eggs, sugars, sauces, ice cream, gravy.

What eats sludge in septic tank?

One example of a homemade remedy is to flush ¼-½ a cup of instant yeast down your toilet. The yeast eats away at the sludge and helps loosen it, breaking it down so that wastewater can get through.

Can you pour peroxide in septic system?

You May Interfere with the Drainfield The hydrogen peroxide found in some additives may be harmful to the soil in the drainfield. This can cause the drainfield to be less effective at purification. The hydrogen peroxide may also harm the bacteria found in the septic system.

What is the best thing to put in septic tank?

The products below represent some of the best septic tank treatments available in their respective categories.

  • BEST OVERALL: Cabin Obsession Septic Tank Treatment.
  • BEST BUDGET: Green Gobbler Septic Saver Bacteria Enzyme Pacs.
  • BEST FOR CLOGS: Instant Power 1868 Septic Shock.

How long does it take for poop to break down in a septic tank?

The bacteria take 2-4 hours to germinate and then begin to break down solid waste. If the temperature and conditions are favorable, then the bacteria will multiply to the maximum level that the environment will allow in about 2-4 days.

Is baking soda good for septic tanks?

Will baking soda hurt a septic system? Baking soda and other common household solutions such as vinegar are not harmful to your septic system. Harsh chemicals such as bleach and ammonia can disrupt the good bacteria in your septic tank and should not be used as part of a septic treatment.

Can you put root killer in septic tank?

Root Killer is non-corrosive and safe for all types of plumbing and will not harm surrounding trees, ground cover, or the natural bacteria content in septic tanks and cesspools.

Can you put root killer directly into septic tank?

RootX root killer can also be added directly to the septic tank at a rate of 8 pounds per 1,000 gallons of septic tank capacity. If you have roots in your leach field system review our guidelines for treating roots in leach field.

What kills roots in drain field?

Copper sulfate can be injected into the drain field (past the tank) to kill roots.

How do you break down fecal matter?

Household Bleach Use bleach just in case when your toilet is clogged severely. You will need to pour two to three cups of household bleach to the bowl. Wait until it dissolves the poop, and then flush the toilet a few times.

Can you put baking soda and vinegar down your toilet?

If the clog is severe, pour up to one-half a cup of baking soda in the toilet. Pour the baking soda first, then pour an equal amount of vinegar. As they combine, you’ll start to see them fizzing. The fizzing will build up right away, but it should subside just as quickly.

How do you break down human feces?

When using a twin bucket system, feces can be covered with a carbon material, such as sawdust, wood chips, coffee husk chaff, or very finely shredded paper. This will help to manage odors and help the feces to break down, and is a convenient alternative to bagging and removing waste after each use.

What breaks down sewage in a septic tank

Aseptic tanks, which are commonly used in rural areas without access to centralized sewer systems, are essentially an underground chamber constructed of concrete, fiberglass, or plastic that breaks down waste matter through the processes of decomposition and drainage. Aseptic tanks are commonly used in rural areas without access to centralized sewer systems. Diagram of a Septic Tank A septic system is typically composed of the following functional components:

  1. A septic tank can be used for all of the wastewater generated by a residence, or it can be used simply for toilet output. It is also possible to have a single tank or a multi chamber septic system as part of your septic system. A septic waste disposal location, which is often a sand mound or a trench since septic waste should not be discharged above ground
  2. When it comes to commercial food business, a grease trap is a device that prevents oil and grease from flowing down the drain. Pipes for drainage

Do you require assistance with your septic system? Allow our septic system professionals to assist you.

How does a Septic Tank break down sewage?

A septic tank functions by a straightforward process of biological breakdown and distribution drainage, as described above. Biological microbes break down waste in a septic tank, allowing it to be properly redistributed or disposed of when it has been decomposed.

Septic Tanks and the sewage process

  1. The septic tank is the final destination for all waste. This might contain all wastewater from a residence, or it can be limited to solely toilet discharge. After a significant amount of trash has accumulated in the tank, aerobic microorganisms begin to decompose the organic stuff. Materials that have been broken down sink to the bottom of the tank, forming a sludge layer composed of organic solids and remnants of bacterial decomposition at the bottom of the tank. Some of the stuff (such as grease and fats) floats to the top of the tank and forms a scum layer
  2. However, most of the matter (such as grease and fats) sinks to the bottom of the tank. The majority of particles are prevented from entering the exit pipe by a filter. Each time new waste water is introduced into the tank, it displaces the existing stuff in it. It is this water that drains from the septic tank and into the drain field. The drain field is constructed of perforated pipes that are buried in gravel-filled pits. In the drain septic field pipe, there are small holes that allow the liquid waste to seep gently into the surrounding gravel. It is possible for water to seep into the soil and oxygen to reach microorganisms when gravel surrounds pipes. Biological breakdown of trash by aerobic bacteria in gravel and soil is complete. Clean water penetrates into the groundwater and aquifer below the surface.

References

What is responsible for the breakdown of sewage in a septic tank? Allow our professionals to assist you.

How to Break Down Solids in A Septic Tank [6 Quick Hacks]

Your septic tank is one of the last things you want to have to think about when you’re trying to relax. Many people are intimidated and perplexed when it comes to understanding how to properly break down solid waste in a septic tank. For those who live in homes equipped with sewage systems, however, there are several things you should be aware of in order to avoid worse difficulties down the road.

How Do I Know If I Have a Septic Tank?

This information would have been provided to you as part of the inspection process when you purchased your house. If it’s been a while and you’re not sure where you reside, take a look around your surroundings. Homes in rural regions are frequently equipped with a septic system and septic tank. You can also do the following:

  • Take a glance around your yard and see if there are any strange peaks in the horizon
  • Find out if any of your neighbors have one and where it is positioned in their yard by speaking with them. Consider looking at your water bill
  • If you don’t have one from the county, you’re very certainly on a septic system. If you want a copy of your property records, you should contact your local government.

In this blog post, you will learn more about how to determine if you have a septic tank.

How Do I Take Care of My Septic System?

Following your discovery of the presence of a septic tank and its location, you’re undoubtedly asking how to properly maintain the tank. The naturally present bacteria in your septic tank are responsible for dissolving and consuming the solid waste in your tank. This is the type of beneficial bacteria that you require to keep your septic tank system operating correctly. Once this happens, the liquid in your tank flows into your drain field through small holes in the pipes. An examination of your septic tank will be one of the first things you’ll want to conduct after you’ve moved in.

  1. You’ll also want to make certain that you’re utilizing goods that are safe for your system to utilize.
  2. This toilet paper has been specially engineered to break down quickly and efficiently in your septic system.
  3. You should avoid flushing any inorganic items down the toilet, regardless of how little they are.
  4. Things like diapers, feminine hygiene items, and excessive toilet paper can cause a septic backlog if they are flushed down the toilet.

It is effective at destroying bacteria on your hands, but if you flush too much of it down the toilet, it can kill the beneficial bacteria in your septic system. Septic systems rely on a healthy population of bacteria to break down the solid waste that is introduced into the tank.

How Do I Break Down the Solids in My Septic Tank?

In order to properly size a septic tank, you must first determine its capacity. It is important to know the size of your tank in order to ensure that you are utilizing the proper quantity of septic tank treatment for your septic tanks. It is possible to damage the healthy bacterial environment that is necessary for your septic system to work efficiently when you use dangerous chemicals for septic tank treatment in bigger septic tanks. Additionally, employing a treatment that is intended for smaller septic tanks will not produce the results you are looking for.

  • The majority of septic tank treatments are recommended to be performed once a month.
  • Please keep in mind that we are not discussing drain cleaners here, but rather treatments.
  • When it comes to keeping the amount of solids in your septic tank stable, the bacteria that live in your septic tanks are critical.
  • It can also cause problems with your pipes, drain field, scum layer, and the entire septic system if not handled properly.
  • Some things you may do to assist in the breakdown of solid waste in your septic tank are as follows:

Active Yeast

Using your toilet bowl as a vessel, add 14 to 12 cup of active dry yeast and flush it down the toilet. It is important for your pipe yeast to have time to sit in order for it to function properly, so avoid doing things like running your dishwasher or having a shower that will wash the yeast down too soon. Yeast is beneficial in septic systems since it helps to keep the bacteria and enzymes happy.

Rotten Tomatoes

It may sound a little unusual, but they contain proteins called pectinase that help them digest food. These substances degrade pectin and the cell walls of plants. All of this contributes to the breakdown of solid waste and the recycling of waste plant components, which are all beneficial to your septic system. Reduce the size of your rotting tomatoes to little bits and flush them via your waste disposal. Make careful to run some water down the drain as well to avoid clogging your pipes with debris.

Hydrogen Peroxide

This used to be a typical tip for helping to break down the particles in your septic tank, but it is no longer recommended. It takes some time to ensure that the solution is suitably diluted before using it. This isn’t something you see recommended very frequently anymore because it may be quite detrimental to the soil and cause problems with your drain field.

Inorganic Acids

While they are quite effective at clearing obstructions, they can be detrimental to your septic tank’s health.

The bacteria in your tank can be killed by them, resulting in raw sewage leaks and a far more serious issue down the road. It is also possible that these strong chemicals will cause damage to the pipes and walls of your sewage system.

Chemicals

If you want to aid in the breakdown of solid waste in your septic tank, you can purchase chemicals to add to your tank. Make sure you follow the instructions on the label to avoid causing any harm to your septic system.

Pumping

One approach to ensure that the particles in your septic tank are being removed is to have a professional come pump your septic tank. Pumping your septic tank can be a time-consuming task that should be done as part of your overall septic tank maintenance plan. Prepare for the possibility of having your septic tank pumped. During the process of extracting the garbage and sludge, there is an unpleasant odor. In order to maintain your septic tank operating effectively, periodic pumping can be an excellent component of your septic tank treatment strategy.

See also:  How Far Is Septic Tank From House? (Solution)

What Happens When My Septic Tank is Full?

Due to the inability to view your septic tank, you may be wondering how you will be able to tell when your septic tank is full. It’s not one of those things that you can just put behind you and forget about. Plan to have your septic tank cleaned out every three to five years, as recommended by the EPA. This reduces the likelihood of a sewage backlog occurring. The Environmental Protection Agency has also issued a similar rule in this regard. It’s critical to cooperate with certified specialists to ensure that your septic tank, drainage field, or septic system is not damaged in the process.

As disgusting as it may sound, this is a standard technique of keeping your septic system in good working order.

In addition, our staff will come out to empty your septic tank.

We can also plan your septic tank pumping in the Atlanta region to ensure that your septic system is operating correctly at all times.

How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Prior to discharging wastewater into the environment, several alternative systems are designed to evaporate or disinfect the effluent.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. All of the water that leaves your home drains down a single main drainage pipe and into a septic tank. An underground, water-tight container, often composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, serves as a septic system’s holding tank. Its function is to retain wastewater for a long enough period of time to allow particles to sink to the bottom and form sludge, while oil and grease float to the surface and produce scum. Sludge and scum are prevented from exiting the tank and moving into the drainfield region by compartments and a T-shaped outlet. After that, the liquid wastewater (effluent) exits the tank and flows into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered hole dug in unsaturated soil that serves as a drainage system. Porous surfaces are used to release pretreated wastewater because they allow the wastewater to pass through the soil and into the groundwater. In the process of percolating through the soil, wastewater is accepted, treated, and dispersed by the soil, finally discharging into groundwater. Finally, if the drainfield becomes overburdened with too much liquid, it can flood, causing sewage to flow to the ground surface or resulting in toilet backups and sink backups. Finally, wastewater percolates into the soil, where it is naturally removed of harmful coliform bacteria, viruses, and nutrients. Coliform bacteria are a kind of bacteria that may be found in the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals, with humans being the most common host. As a result of human fecal contamination, it is a sign of this.

The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has built an animated, interactive model of how a residential septic system works, which you can view here.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • You make use of well water. In your home, the water pipe that brings water into the house does not have a meter. In the case of a water bill or a property tax bill, you will see “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” It is possible that your neighbors have a septic system

How to find your septic system

You can locate your septic system once you have confirmed that you have one by following these steps:

  • Taking a look at the “as constructed” drawing of your house
  • Making a visual inspection of your yard for lids and manhole covers
  • Getting in touch with a septic system service provider for assistance in locating it

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly. Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

Understanding Your Septic Tank’s Bacteria and Enzymes

Your septic tank is home to an entire ecosystem of living creatures that assist it in performing its essential functions. As living things, the bacteria in your tank may require a little assistance from time to time in order to carry out their functions. If you understand how things should occur in your septic tank, you will be more equipped to recognize when the bacteria in your tank are causing problems. What Bacteria and Enzymes Do to Assist in the Function of Your Septic Tank The presence of large colonies of bacteria and enzymes in your septic tank prevents the tank from backing up or becoming overfilled.

  • Under optimal conditions, the bacteria and enzymes in your tank will seldom require assistance in carrying out their functions.
  • In addition to eating the garbage, microorganisms are responsible for converting vast amounts of it into liquids and gases.
  • The Things That You Can Do to Affect the Septic Tank’s pH Balance These live colonies are responsible for keeping your septic tank in balance, but they are also vulnerable to a variety of factors that might weaken them or reduce their efficacy.
  • People, on the other hand, have the ability to quickly disturb that equilibrium in a variety of ways.
  • Solid waste can only be consumed by the bacteria in your tank at a certain rate.
  • Instead than memorizing all of the items that should not be flushed down the toilet, focus on learning what is safe for your plumbing and septic system.
  • Anything else should be avoided.

The number and types of sediments that you drain or flush should be limited, to name a few considerations.

Putting things down the drain that will destroy bacteria is not a good idea.

If the bacteria in the tank die, there will be nothing left in the tank to break down waste.

It is common for germs to be destroyed when poisonous goods or powerful cleansers are used and allowed to enter your drains.

You can use your cleaning supplies, but you should use caution when doing so.

Medicines can potentially have negative interactions with the bacteria and enzymes in your tank, causing them to die.

What Contributes to the Health of Your Septic Tank Bacteria Even if you pay attention to what you do, the bacteria in your septic tank may require assistance from time to time.

A correctly provided additive can assist to strengthen microorganisms, aid in the removal of difficult substances, and promote the proliferation of these organisms.

Contacting a professional provider is the most effective approach to deal with any septic tank problem you may be encountering. At Walters Environmental Services, we can perform septic tank inspection, cleaning, diagnosis, and repair. If you have any septic tank issues or queries, call us today.

How to Break Down Poop in a Septic Tank

A septic tank is a tank that breaks down waste. Image courtesy of shayneppl/iStock/Getty Images. Homes that are located apart from municipal plumbing systems rely on their own septic systems to handle waste. It is necessary to do regular maintenance on septic systems in order for them to function at their peak performance levels. Maintaining your septic tank will guarantee that it breaks down feces as effectively and as hygienically as it possibly can.

Using Treatments for Septic Tanks

There are a variety of store-bought septic tank treatments available that can aid in the breakdown of the contents of your tank and, as a result, reduce the accumulation of debris over time. Every month, one of your toilets will need to be flushed with one of these formulas. With a solution like RID-X, you can help avoid the accumulation of sludge that can cause your septic tank to clog by treating it on a consistent basis. Keeping your septic tank clear of obstructions will assist to guarantee that it is more effective and hygienically safer, as well as more efficient.

  1. In addition to breaking down toilet paper and certain food stuff, lipase also breaks down lipids, protease breaks down proteins, and amylase breaks down starches and starch-based carbohydrates.
  2. It is possible to use these solutions to prevent septic tank blockages from occurring in the first place, as well as to maintain a balanced bacterial environment in your septic tank.
  3. Considering that septic tanks require frequent treatment, the financial commitment required to utilize a store-bought solution might be substantial.
  4. According to the Farmer’s Almanac, for example, baker’s yeast can aid in the breakdown of septic waste solids by promoting the breakdown of lactic acid bacteria.
  5. Repeat this method with 1/4 cup of instant yeast at least once every four months after that, which can assist you in maintaining a healthy bacterial level in your septic tank.
  6. Because of this, you do not want to dilute your septic tank while the treatment is in progress.
  7. There are a number of other recommendations that you may follow to ensure that your septic tank operates as efficiently as possible.
  8. Wipes, hygiene goods, and food for garbage disposals should all be handled with extra caution since they all have the potential to block a septic tank.
  9. Septic tanks depend on their bacterial balance to break down solid wastes, which includes feces, and any disruption of this equilibrium might result in problems.

Finally, it’s critical to have your septic tank examined and pumped out by a professional service provider every three to five years to ensure that it’s operating properly.

DIY Septic Tank Treatment

Septic tank systems are notoriously difficult to maintain and may be quite expensive when they fail. Over the course of almost two decades, we’ve only had to pump our septic tank once. Here’s how we maintain our system running smoothly: DIY Septic Tank Treatment

Natural Enzyme Action

Having a backed-up septic tank system may be a frustrating and costly experience. We’ve only had to pump our septic tank once in over 20 years, and this is the DIY Septic Tank Treatment that we use to keep our system running smoothly!

DIY Septic Tank Treatment

It is simple and inexpensive to treat a septic tank with DIY solutions. We “feed” our septic tank 3-4 rotting tomatoes every 3 months or so, which we do through our garbage disposal. The idea is to make sure that you split up the tomato and pass only half a tomato or so at a time through the water while it is running to ensure that it is properly flushed out. As an alternative, if you don’t have access to a garbage disposal, you may throw two or three large rotting tomatoes in a bag (chances are they’re already packed away in a bag in your refrigerator and starting to liquefy anyway!).

Dump them into a toilet (but don’t use bleach!) and flush them away.

Normally, having rotten tomatoes every few months isn’t a big deal because the garden overproduces in the spring, summer, and fall, and there are always a few extras available.

At the very least, they aren’t going to waste completely.

Toilet Paper No-No’s

The one time in 20+ years that we DID have our septic system pumped we were told that it absolutely didn’t need it, the system was running very well and looked great. The fellow told us several absolute horror stories of systems he’s seen in his work where the families used “fluffy” toilet paper. You know the one. they have cute little bears in their commercials who are proud of themselves for not having lint left behind. or the ones that could double as a bedspread made by grandma because the quilted pattern is the same!

It breaks down quickly and doesn’t “glop” into a line plugging mess.

How to Clean Septic Tank Naturally

Yeast and sugar are excellent natural septic tank cleaners, and here’s an easy method for using them.

Septic Tank Cleaner

2 cups granulated sugar 5 cups of hot water (optional) 3 tbsp.

active dry yeast Sugar and yeast should be dissolved in water. Pour the mixture into a toilet (that does not contain bleach!) and flush it. This is best done at night so that the yeast may continue to work throughout the night; do not flush for at least 3 hours after completion.

Additional Tips:

1Avoid flushing raw or cooked meat down the toilet, down the garbage disposal, or any other form of introducing meat into your septic system; meat is NEVER a helpful bacterium. 2. Never add oils, grease, or fat in any form (solid or liquid) to your tank. This includes, but is not limited to, cooking oils, bacon grease, meat grease from draining ground beef/turkey, and other fat-containing foods. 3Avoid flushing anything other than garbage and toilet paper down the toilet; this means that feminine products should be disposed of in the trash, baby diapers and wipes should be disposed of in the trashcan, and so on.

See also:  How Often Should You Clean Your Septic Tank?

Have you tried the rotten tomato technique yet?

Love this DIY Septic Tank Treatment Idea? Pin it!

If you rely on a personal septic tank to filter and treat your wastewater, it is critical that you keep it in good working order at all times. Having to deal with clogged drains and sludgy tanks is not pleasant. Maintaining the right level of solids in your septic system is one method of keeping it in good working order. If your tank becomes overflowing, you’ll have a messy situation on your hands. Is it possible to break up particles in your septic tank on your own, and when should you hire a professional to do so?

Ways to Break Up Solids in Your Septic Tank

Keep in mind that there is no substitute for regular septic pumpings in most cases. When the time comes to service the system, we recommend that you use a qualified technician. When we talk about breaking up solids in your tank, we are simply referring to the process of occasionally breaking up the bottom layer of sludge to ensure that everything runs the way it should. If your tank is in in need of a rapid treatment, consider one of the options listed below.

Storebought Remedies

The sludge that accumulates in your toilet tank may be eaten away by items that you can flush down the toilet. However, it is recommended that you run these goods by a septic system servicing specialist first because not all tanks are made same. Some additives can actually be damaging to your tank, thus it is critical that you only use things that are safe and beneficial to your tank.

At-Home Remedies

Likewise, while at-home remedies are frequently less expensive than store-bought alternatives, they should still be used with caution. If you want to try a DIY treatment, you may try flushing 14-12 cup of quick yeast down the toilet. In order for wastewater to pass through, the yeast eats away at the sludge and aids in its loosening, allowing it to break down. Avoid running your washer, dishwasher, or shower for a few minutes after using a store-bought or home-made cleaning solution. This will allow the solution to do its job before being rinsed away.

Backflushing

Backflushing is the process of sucking wastewater out of your tank using a wet vacuum and then spraying it back into the tank.

Most of the time, the power of the water is sufficient to break up some of the solids. Of course, if you don’t have the proper equipment, you might as well hire a professional to perform a septic tank pumping for you.

Septic Stirring

Although it may seem disgusting, “septic stirring” is merely the process of breaking up sediments using a long stick or other long implement. This treatment is often most effective for modest accumulations. Although it is possible to avoid your septic sludge from becoming overly comfortable, you must be committed to doing so on a regular basis.

Regular Tank Pumping

Of course, even if all else fails, you should continue to schedule professional pumpings on a regular basis. Removing excess particles from your septic tank is the most effective strategy to extend the life of your system and avoid costly problems from developing.

How Often Should You Have Your Septic Tank Pumped?

When your tank reaches 25 percent capacity (in other words, when one-fourth of your tank is full with sludge), it’s time to start thinking about hiring a professional to pump it out. The length of time required depends on the size of your system, the number of people that reside in your house, the total load placed on the tank, and other factors. However, in general, most tanks require professional septic pumping every two to three years, depending on the circumstances. Keep your tank’s capacity below 50% at all times.

Take the essential steps to keep your septic tank running well, and never flush anything other than toilet paper down the toilet.

How Can Norway Septic Help?

Located in Norway, Indiana, Norway Septic Inc. is a customer-focused company devoted to delivering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to homes and business owners in the Michiana area. We take great delight in finishing the task that others have left unfinished. For more information on purchasing a new effluent filter or scheduling a septic tank cleaning with one of our specialists, please contact us right now.

How Does My Septic System Work?

Septic systems are marvels of contemporary science, allowing us to take use of the comfort of indoor plumbing without having to worry about how to dispose of our home waste in an effective and safe manner, which is a major benefit. Is it true that you are completely unaware of how your septic system functions? Understanding the operation of your septic system is essential to ensure that it is appropriately utilized and maintained in the future. Continue reading to find out more about what your septic system is and how it works:

Common Parts of a Septic System

A septic system is not necessary a complicated system, and each of its components works together to ensure that the waste generated by your family is properly kept and disposed of as soon as possible.

Septic Tank

Located beneath the earth on your property, a septic tank is a huge rectangular or cylindrical container composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene that collects and treats waste. They are used for homes that do not have access to a sewer system, which is most frequent in rural regions.

Drainfield

Septic tank sewage is channeled into your yard by a network of pipework known as the drainfield. Wastewater is normally held in the septic tank for two days before being discharged to the drainfield in the yard. This section of your septic system consists of lengthy lengths of pipe, referred to as “drainpipes,” that are punctured with small holes to allow for the release of waste. In the event that sediments accumulate in drainfields and are not adequately pushed away, the drainfield may get clogged.

It is possible that these obstructions are produced by an inadequately sized septic tank, infrequent pumping of the septic tank, or by a large amount of water. If you find any of the following, your drainfield may be clogged:

  • The presence of greener grass over the drainfield
  • Unusual scents in your yard
  • And plumbing backups a squishy or muddy surface

If your drainfield becomes clogged, your complete septic system will be unable to work correctly. It is preferable to hire skilled underground service specialists to take care of the problem.

Pump Tanks

Even though pump tanks are not a required component of your septic system, they are highly suggested in order to guarantee that the system operates and maintains itself properly. Pump tanks are made up of the following components:

  • Pumping of effluents It catches sediments before they leave the tank, preventing them from being discharged into the drainfield, which helps to keep the drainfield from being clogged. Control floats in mid-air. It is connected to a control panel and sends signals to tell the panel when to turn the pump on and off. A high-water alarm has been activated. When the pump fails to function properly, this feature is activated to signal an excessive volume of waste in the septic tank. In most cases, it is found under the kitchen sink or in the garage.

The best course of action for homeowners who have a high-water alarm activated is to conserve water and have a professional septic system specialist assess the water levels.

Distribution Box

The distribution box, which is positioned between the septic tank and the drainfield, is meant to transport wastewater evenly across the drainfield lines, which are connected to the septic tank.

Leach Drain Field

Often referred to as the septic field, the leach field is a component of your septic system that accepts wastewater from the septic tank. It refers to the network of drainpipes, stones, and a layer of unsaturated soil that make up the drainage system. It moves trash into the soil, where it is eventually re-circulated back into the groundwater supply.

How a Septic System Works

All of these components work together to securely remove wastewater from your house and disperse it into the surrounding environment. Specifically, it accomplishes this by relying on naturally occurring bacteria to break down the materials that are dumped into the septic tank. All of the things that you flush down the toilet or rinse down the drain fall into one of three categories:

  1. Sludge is a term that refers to heavy things (such as solid food waste, excrement, and toilet paper) that collect at the bottom of a tank and accumulate there. Natural bacteria break down the particles in the tank over time, allowing them to be drained out of the tank as scum. These are lighter items (soaps, oils, and grease) that float to the surface of the septic tank
  2. Liquid (Effluent) wastewater
  3. And solid (Sludge) wastewater. Water that remains in the tank is pumped to the drainfield, which is located in the centre of the tank.

In the end, everything that goes into your septic tank will decompose and produce effluent wastewater, which will then be discharged into your drainfield. This wastewater has been processed (thanks to the bacteria) and is released down the drain pipes before being filtered by the soil. The wastewater is subsequently absorbed, treated, and dispersed by the soil until it finally seeps into the groundwater table. As a natural filter, the soil eliminates dangerous germs and viruses while also absorbing nutrients.

Septic System Issues

As previously stated, septic systems are susceptible to high water levels as well as clogged drainfields and leach fields. There are, however, several other septic-related considerations to bear in mind:

  • Clogs. The system between your house and the tank might get clogged for a variety of reasons, including clogs in the drainage pipes themselves. During this time, you’ll observe sluggish drainage and sewage backups in your home. The roots of a tree. Tree roots will naturally grow in the direction of water and moisture, and they will tend to wrap around or bore through any obstructions that stand in their way. There may be harm to your septic system if there are trees growing on or around it
  • This includes damage to the tank and pipes. Detergents are products that remove dirt and grime. Certain detergent solutions that contain high amounts of phosphate can foster the growth of algae in your tank, which can subsequently cause the perforations in the drain pipes to get clogged with algae.

In order to avoid problems with your septic system, it is important to be aware of the substances and products that you are releasing into your home’s plumbing system at all times. It is preferable to use phosphate-free detergents and cleaning products that are specifically intended for septic systems. These products degrade more quickly and will help to keep your system from being blocked in the future. Also, be mindful of what you are flushing down the toilet. Everything plastic and non-biodegradable, such as paper towels and sanitary tampons, is not intended to break down in a septic tank and should be avoided.

A regular pumping and maintenance schedule is a certain method to keep your septic system operating at full efficiency.

If you need your septic system maintained or repaired by professionals, please call Peak SewerUnderground Services. We are accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week to answer your inquiries and handle your issues! Get in Touch With Us

Signs of Septic System Problems

It is important to have a well-designed septic system in order to ensure that wastewater from your property is disposed of properly and effectively. However, like with every part of your home’s operation, there is the possibility that components can become damaged and cease to perform properly. How will you know if you have an issue with your septic system? Here are several warning indicators that your septic system may be malfunctioning, as well as some simple preventative actions you may take.

1. Sewage Backup

There are a variety of reasons why you may detect water or an odorous black liquid draining from your home’s drains at different times of the day. Your septic tank or drain field is overflowing, or there is a clog in the system. If your septic tank is functioning properly, waste from your house will separate into three different kinds of materials: sludge (heavier items that sink to the bottom), scum (lighter materials that float to the top), and wastewater (which is released into the drainfield).

Alternatively, if your tank gets a big volume of water in a short period of time, the tank may become overwhelmed and cause a backup within your house.

It is possible to avoid these problems by lowering your water consumption.

Be aware of the contents that you flush as well; for example, do not flush paper towels, diapers, feminine products, grease, or leftover meals down the toilet.

2. Slow Drainage

Slow drainage in your home might also be an indication of a blockage, which is most often seen in the line that leads to the septic tank. Keep in mind that strong chemicals might degrade your pipes and harm the healthy bacteria in your tank that helps to break down waste before you go for the Draino to solve your problem! Make an effort to stick with natural products that make use of microorganisms and enzymes. As a bonus, not only will this clear your pipes, but it will also assist in breaking down waste in your septic tank.

3. Pooling Water in Yard

A significant rainstorm or a high water table might cause the septic tank to get clogged and prevent it from emptying correctly. As a result, your yard may become flooded in certain parts. This problem, on the other hand, might be caused by a leak in your septic line. If you feel the problem is the result of heavy rainfall, reduce your use of your septic system to give it a chance to catch up with drainage. Any pooling water in your yard, on the other hand, should be investigated by a septic system professional.

See also:  How Often Do You Service A Septic Tank? (Question)

4. Greener Grass Around the Septic Tank

While you may believe that the lush and green grass around your septic tank is a harbinger of good things to come, it is really a symptom that sewage may be leaking into your yard from the surrounding area. Because the dirt on top of your septic tank is not as deep as the soil on the rest of your lawn, it is usual for the grass on top of your sewage tank to get dry.

As a result, if the grass appears to be flourishing in that region, it might indicate that effluent (liquid wastewater) is leaking from the tank before it has a chance to reach the drainfield. This is due to the fact that the effluent serves as a fertilizer for the lawn.

5. Trees or Shrubs Near Septic System

While many homeowners place a strong focus on their landscaping, you must exercise caution when deciding where trees and bushes should be planted on your property. Tree roots are naturally attracted to water and moisture sources, and this behavior is normal. Nothing will stand in their way of getting there. In order to reach a water supply, roots will wrap around or dig through any impediments in their path. These individuals may cause harm to your septic tank as well as other components of your sewage system as a result of their actions.

Whether you notice any of these signs, look around to see if there are any trees or bushes growing close to the irrigation system.

Knowing how tall they will grow to be when they reach maturity allows you to put them as far away from your septic system as possible.

6. Pungent Smells

It is possible that the stench of septic gas is caused by a variety of conditions, including a dried-out wax seal on your toilet or a dry trap in your floor drain. The first step to taking care of persistent odors in your house is to thoroughly inspect all of your fixtures to rule out any potential internal problems. If all other possibilities have been checked out, it is possible that there is a leak in your septic line. By ensuring that surface drainage, as well as roof runoff, is diverted away from the septic tank and drainfield, you may minimize the likelihood of your septic system leaking.

Be Proactive

By paying close attention to the operation of your septic system, you will be able to detect issues as soon as they arise. One of the most effective ways to avoid significant problems with your septic system is to have it checked once each year, and then pumped out every 3-5 years. This will aid in the detection of issues such as leaks, corrosion, and overflows before they need costly repairs or perhaps the replacement of the entire system. Peak SewerUnderground Services’ highly skilled septic tank specialists are on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week for all of your septic system needs.

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How Does a Septic Tank Work?

Mr. Fix-It-Up-For-The-Family You may save a lot of money if you understand how a sewage treatment system works—and what can go wrong—so that you can handle your own septic system maintenance.

How does a septic tank work?

Pumping the tank on a regular basis eliminates sludge and scum, which helps to keep a septic system in good working order. It is possible for a well-designed and well built septic system to last for decades, or it might collapse in a matter of years. It is entirely up to you as long as you can answer the question of how do septic tanks function. Healthy septic systems are very inexpensive to maintain, but digging up and replacing a septic system that has completely collapsed may easily cost tens of thousands in labor and material costs.

It’s critical to understand how a septic tank works in order to maintain one.

Let’s take a look below ground and observe what happens in a properly operating septic system, shall we? After that, I’ll explain why things go wrong and offer you some tips on how to keep your system in peak operating condition.

Understand that a septic system is a cafeteria for bacteria

Bacteria are responsible for the proper operation of a septic system. They decompose garbage, resulting in water that is clean enough to safely trickle down into the earth’s surface. The entire system is set up to keep bacteria healthy and busy at all times. Some of them reside in the tank, but the majority of them are found in the drain field. 1. The septic tank is the final destination for all waste. 2. The majority of the tank is filled with watery waste, referred to as “effluent.” Anaerobic bacteria begin to break down the organic matter in the effluent as soon as it enters the system.

  1. A layer of sludge settles to the bottom of the container.
  2. 4.
  3. Scum is mostly constituted of fats, greases, and oils, among other substances.
  4. Grease and oils float to the surface of the water.
  5. (5) A filter stops the majority of particles from reaching the exit pipe.
  6. The effluent is discharged into the drain field.
  7. Effluent is allowed to leak into the surrounding gravel because of holes in the drain septic field pipe.
  8. The garbage is completely decomposed by aerobic bacteria found in gravel and dirt.
  9. Potable water seeps into the groundwater and aquifer system from the surface.

Septic Tank Clean Out: Don’t abuse the system

Septic systems that have been correctly planned and constructed require just occasional ‘pumping’ to remove the sludge and scum that has built up inside the tank. However, if you don’t understand how a septic tank works, you may unintentionally hurt or even destroy the system.

  • Drains are used to dispose of waste that decomposes slowly (or not at all). Cigarette butts, diapers, and coffee grounds are all known to cause issues. Garbage disposers, if utilized excessively, can introduce an excessive amount of solid waste into the system. Lint from synthetic fibers is emitted from washing machine lint traps. This substance is not degraded by bacteria in the tank and drain septic field. Bacteria are killed by chemicals found in the home, such as disinfecting cleansers and antibacterial soaps. The majority of systems are capable of withstanding limited usage of these goods, but the less you use them, the better. When a large amount of wastewater is produced in a short period of time, the tank is flushed away too quickly. When there is too much sludge, bacteria’s capacity to break down waste is reduced. Sludge can also overflow into the drain field if there is too much of it. Sludge or scum obstructs the flow of water via a pipe. It is possible for tree and shrub roots to obstruct and cause harm to a drain field. Compacted soil and gravel prevent wastewater from seeping into the ground and deprive germs of oxygen. Most of the time, this is caused by vehicles driving or parking on the drain field.

Get your tank pumped…

Your tank must be emptied on a regular basis by a professional. Pumping eliminates the accumulation of sludge and scum that has accumulated in the tank, which has caused the bacterial action to be slowed. If you have a large tank, it may be necessary to pump it once a year; but, depending on the size of your tank and the quantity of waste you send through the system, you may go two or three years between pumpings. Inquire with your inspector about an approximate guideline for how frequently your tank should be pumped.

…but don’t hire a pumper until you need it

Inspections and pumping should be performed on a regular basis. However, if you’re not afraid of getting your hands dirty, you may verify the sludge level yourself with a gadget known as The Sludge Judge. It ranges in price from $100 to $125 and is commonly accessible on the internet. Once you’ve verified that your tank is one-third full with sludge, you should contact a professional to come out and pump it out completely.

Install an effluent filter in your septic system

Garbage from your home accumulates into three distinct strata.

The septic filter is responsible for preventing blockage of the drain field pipes.

Septic tank filter close-up

The septic tank filter is responsible for capturing suspended particles that may otherwise block the drain field pipes. Obtain an effluent filter for your tank from your contractor and place it on the outflow pipe of your tank. (It will most likely cost between $50 and $100, plus labor.) This device, which helps to prevent sediments from entering the drain field, will need to be cleaned out on a regular basis by a contractor to maintain its effectiveness.

Solution for a clogged septic system

If your septic system becomes clogged and you find yourself having to clean the filter on a regular basis, you might be tempted to simply remove the filter altogether. Hold on to it. Solids, wastewater, and scum are separated into three levels in septic tanks, which allows them to function properly (see illustration above). Solids sink to the bottom of the container, where microbes breakdown them. The scum, which is made up of trash that is lighter than water, rises to the surface. In the drainage field, the middle layer of effluent leaves the tank and goes through an underground network of perforated pipes to the drainage field.

  1. Keep the effluent filter in place since it is required by your state’s health law.
  2. Waste particles might flow through the filter and clog the perforated pipes if the filter is not used.
  3. Your filter, on the other hand, should not require cleaning every six months.
  4. A good chance is high that you’re flushing filter-clogging things down the toilet, such as grease, fat, or food scraps.
  5. A garbage disposal will not be able to break down food particles sufficiently to allow them to flow through the septic tank filtration system.
  6. Plastic items, disposable diapers, paper towels, nonbiodegradable goods, and tobacco products will clog the system if they are flushed through it.
  7. More information on removing lint from your laundry may be found here.

Get an inspection

Following a comprehensive first check performed by an expert, regular inspections will cost less than $100 each inspection for the next year. Your professional will be able to inform you how often you should get your system inspected as well as how a septic tank functions. As straightforward as a septic system appears, determining its overall condition necessitates the services of a professional. There are a plethora of contractors who would gladly pump the sludge out of your tank, but many, in my experience, are unable to explain how a septic system works or how it should be maintained.

A certification scheme for septic contractors has been established in certain states; check with your state’s Secretary of State’s office to see whether yours is one of them.

Also, a qualified inspector will be able to tell you whether or not your tank is large enough to accommodate your household’s needs, as well as the maximum amount of water that can be passed through it in a single day.

You may be able to boost the performance of your system by using a product such as RID-X to introduce bacteria into the system. As you learn more about how a septic tank works, your professional should be able to tell you whether or not your system will benefit from this treatment.

Alternatives to a new drain field

If an examination or a sewage backup indicate that your drain field is in need of replacement, the only option is to replace it completely. As a result, it’s important to talk with a contractor about other possibilities before proceeding with the project.

  • Pipes should be cleaned. A rotating pressure washer, used by a contractor, may be used to clean out the drain septic field pipes. The cost of “jetting” the pipes is generally around $200. Chemicals should be used to clean the system. A commercial solution (not a home-made one) that enhances the quantity of oxygen in the drain field should be discussed with your contractor before installing your new system. Septic-Scrub is a product that I suggest. A normal treatment will cost between $500 and $1,000. Make the soil more pliable. The practice of “terra-lifting,” which involves pumping high-pressure air into several spots surrounding the drain field, is authorized in some regions. Some contractors use it to shatter compacted dirt around the pipes. Depending on the circumstances, this might cost less than $1,000 or as much as $4,000 or more.

Protect your drain septic field from lint

When this device is in place, it inhibits lint from entering the system, especially synthetic fibers that bacteria are unable to digest. One of these filters, which I’ve designed and termed theSeptic Protector, was invented by me. An additional filter is included in the price of around $150 plus delivery. Learn more about how to filter out laundry lint in this article.

Don’t overload the septic system

Reduce the amount of water you use. The volume of water that flows into your tank, particularly over a short period of time, can be reduced to avoid untreated waste from being flushed into your drain field. Replace outdated toilets with low-flow ones, install low-flow showerheads, and, perhaps most importantly, wash laundry throughout the week rather than just on Saturday mornings to save water.

Meet the Expert

Septic systems, according to Jim vonMeier, are the solution to America’s water deficit because they supply cleaned water to depleted aquifers, according to vonMeier. He travels the country lobbying for septic systems, giving lectures, and giving testimony. For septic system inquiries, as well as information on the operation of the septic tank, contact him by email.

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