What Are The Dimensions Of A Septic Tank? (Question)

A typical residential septic tank is usually about 4.5 feet wide x 8.0 feet long x 6 feet tall. Your septic tank may be a different size however. Best practice is to find and measure your septic tank for accurate calculations.

What determines the size of your septic tank?

  • The size of your septic tank will be determined by state and local regulations. The precise size of the septic tank you’ll need will depend on state and local regulations. Local authorities typically use the number of bedrooms to determine the amount of wastewater a residence will generate.

What should be the length and width of septic tank?

The code recommended that a septic tank serving 10 people should have a dimension of 2.032m (length), 0.457m (width) and 1.22m (depth) giving a total volume of 1.13m3. This implies that the tank will need desludging about every two years.

How deep and wide is a septic tank?

Septic tanks are typically rectangular in shape and measure approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter.

How do I determine the size of my septic tank?

Consider the Size of Your Property The larger your home, the larger the septic tank you’re going to need. For instance, a house smaller than 1,500 square feet usually requires a 750 to 1,000-gallon tank.

How often does a 1000 gallon septic tank need to be pumped?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

How much does a 1000 gallon concrete tank cost?

A 1,000-gallon precast concrete tank — adequate for a 3-bedroom home — generally costs $600 to $1,000.

What is the average size of a home septic tank?

Common residential septic tanks range in size from 750 gallons to 1,250 gallons. A septic tank is a self-contained unit designed to hold residential wastewater. The system is comprised of two main components: the tank and the drain, or soil absorption field.

How do I calculate the size of my septic drain field?

Drainfield Size

  1. The size of the drainfield is based on the number of bedrooms and soil characteristics, and is given as square feet.
  2. For example, the minimum required for a three bedroom house with a mid range percolation rate of 25 minutes per inch is 750 square feet.

How deep should a septic tank be in the ground?

The general rule of thumb is that most septic tanks can be buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

How often should a septic tank be pumped?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

Septic Tank Sizes Chart: Common Tank Capacities and Measurements

High density polyethylene, abbreviated HDPE, is the most often used material for modern septic tanks, with concrete being the second most common material. HDPE is a heavy-duty grade polyethylene that is used to manufacture a variety of items, including septic tanks, which are available in both underground and above-ground configurations. Because of the robustness and adaptability of HDPE, plastic septic tanks are available in a broad range of volume capacities and measurement measurements to suit any application.

Plastic septic tanks are less expensive than concrete tanks, they are easier to carry and install, they are more resistant to cracking and weathering, and they are available in a variety of forms, volumes, and sizes to satisfy the exact demands of every application.

Our septic tank sizes chart contains the most often used tank capacity and measurements, which should be of assistance.

Underground Septic Tank Specifications Chart — Standard Septic Tanks

The following chart provides an overview of the requirements for conventional septic tanks.

Volume (Gallons) Dimensions (L x W x H) Compartments Liquid Surface Area (Sq. Ft.) Manufacturer
500 Gallons 101″ L x 51″ W x 47″ H 1 35.77 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
750 Gallons 96″ L x 48″ W x 63″ H 1 32.00 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
750 Gallons 70″ L x 60″ W x 60″ H 1 29.16 Sq. Ft. Ace Roto Mold
1000 Gallons 102″ L x 60″ W x 63″ H 1 42.5 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1000 Gallons 102″ L x 60″ W x 63″ H 2 42.5 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1000 Gallons 101″ L x 60″ W x 60″ H 1 42.08 Sq. Ft. Ace Roto Mold
1000 Gallons 101″ L x 60″ W x 60″ H 2 42.08 Sq. Ft. Ace Roto Mold
1250 Gallons 116″ L x 55″ W x 70″ H 1 44.30 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1250 Gallons 116″ L x 55″ W x 70″ H 2 44.30 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1250 Gallons 118″ L x 58″ W x 72″ H 1 47.53 Sq. Ft. Ace Roto Mold
1250 Gallons 118″ L x 58″ W x 72″ H 2 47.53 Sq. Ft. Ace Roto Mold
1500 Gallons 135″ L x 55″ W x 70″ H 1 51.56 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1500 Gallons 135″ L x 55″ W x 70″ H 2 51.56 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1500 Gallons 137″ L x 58″ W x 72″ H 1 55.18 Sq. Ft. Ace Roto Mold
1500 Gallons 137″ L x 58″ W x 72″ H 2 55.18 Sq. Ft. Ace Roto Mold
2000 Gallons 126″ L x 98″ W x 51″ H 1 85.75 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
2500 Gallons 159″ L x 99″ W x 51″ H 1 109.31 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
3525 Gallons 211″ L x 102″ W x 51″ H 1 149.46 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
5025 Gallons 211″ L x 102″ W x 73″ H 1 149.46 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
10000 Gallons 356″ L x 101″ W x 107″ H 2 249.69 Sq. Ft. Norwesco

Underground Septic Tank Specifications Chart — Low Profile Septic Tanks

The low profile septic tank parameters shown in the accompanying chart provide a general overview.

Volume Dimensions (L x W x H) Compartments Liquid Surface Area (Sq. Ft.) Manufacturer
500 Gallons 97″ L x 48″ W x 42″ H 1 32.33 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
750 Gallons 92″ L x 60″ W x 51″ H 1 38.33 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
750 Gallons 92″ L x 60″ W x 51″ H 2 38.33 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1000 Gallons 127″ L x 60″ W x 51″ H 1 52.92 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1000 Gallons 127″ L x 60″ W x 51″ H 2 52.92 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1250 Gallons 157″ L x 60″ W x 51″ H 1 65.42 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1250 Gallons 157″ L x 60″ W x 51″ H 2 65.42 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1500 Gallons 157″ L x 69″ W x 51″ H 1 75.23 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1500 Gallons 157″ L x 69″ W x 51″ H 2 75.23 Sq. Ft. Norwesco

Underground Septic Tank Specifications Chart — Septic Pump Tanks

The following chart provides an overview of the specs for septic pump tanks.

Volume (Gallons) Dimensions (L x W x H) Liquid Surface Area (Sq. Ft.) Manufacturer
200 Gallons 47″ L x 47″ W x 56″ H 15.34 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
225 Gallons 47″ L x 47″ W x 56″ H 15.34 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
300 Gallons 48.5″ L x 48.5″ W x 53″ H 16.34 Sq. Ft. Snyder
300 Gallons 54″ L x 54″ W x 55″ H 20.25 Sq. Ft. Ace Roto Mold
300 Gallons 54″ L x 54″ W x 54″ H 20.25 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
300 Gallons FL Approved 54″ L x 54″ W x 54″ H 20.25 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
500 Gallons 60″ L x 60″ W x 63″ H 25.00 Sq. Ft. Snyder
500 Gallons 63″ L x 63″ W x 74″ H 27.56 Sq. Ft. Ace Roto Mold
500 Gallons 64″ L x 64″ W x 67″ H 28.44 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
525 Gallons FL Approved 64″ L x 64″ W x 67″ H 28.44 Sq. Ft. Norwesco

Above Ground Septic Tank Specifications Chart – Septic Holding Tanks

The following chart provides an overview of the many types of above-ground septic tanks that are currently available, as well as their specs.

Volume (Gallons) Dimensions (L x W x H) Liquid Surface Area (Sq. Ft.) Manufacturer
250 Gallons 69″ L x 49″ W x 19.5″ H 23.48 Sq. Ft. NTO
250 Gallons 84″ L x 40″ W x 17″ H 23.33 Sq. Ft. Quadel
300 Gallons 95″ L x 56″ W x 16″ H 36.94 Sq. Ft. Ace Roto Mold
300 Gallons 95″ L x 56″ W x 16″ H 36.94 Sq. Ft. NTO
350 Gallons 88″ L x 44″ W x 25″ H 26.88 Sq. Ft. Quadel
440 Gallons 91″ L x 72″ W x 16″ H 45.50 Sq. Ft. NTO
500 Gallons 130″ L x 52″ W x 22″ H 46.94 Sq. Ft. Norwesco
1000 Gallons 136″ L x 91″ W x 20″ H 85.94 Sq. Ft. NTO

Due to the possibility of change as well as variation in pricing as a result of sales prices, septic tank costs are not included in these table calculations. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you require any assistance or have any concerns regarding septic tank specifications, shipping, modifications, or anything else. We at the National Tank Outlet are always here to assist you with your liquid handling and transportation requirements. Alek Eccles is a technical writer and professional content developer that works in the technology industry.

Alek’s goal is to promote awareness of technological, chemical, and biological industries, systems, and ideas, as well as rainwater harvesting, plastics/thermoplastics, and containers used for general storage, handling, and transportation, among other things.

Sizes of Septic Tanks & Shapes

Most septic tanks are built of fiberglass, plastic, or reinforced concrete, with certain exceptions. Metal tanks are also available, but because of their tendency to corrode quickly, they are not normally advised.

Septic tanks are available in a variety of shapes, including rectangular, round, and oval, however the design of a septic tank does not normally alter its operation. When selecting a septic tank, the most critical consideration is ensuring that the tank is the appropriate size for your home’s needs.

Concrete Tank Construction

Concrete septic tanks are large and heavy, and their form is commonly rectangular. They’re often built in one of three ways: with a mid-seal, a top-seal, or a monolithic construction. Mid-seal tanks are made up of two sections that are bonded together with mastic sealant to form one unit. A top-seal tank is a one-piece tank with a concrete cover that is attached to the tank. Monolithic cast tanks are constructed in a factory as a single unit, making them more waterproof than other forms of concrete tanks, but they are also more expensive than other types of concrete tanks.

Fiberglass and Plastic Tanks

In circular or capsule-like designs, fiberglass and plastic tanks have a nearly impenetrable waterproof seal and are therefore ideal for use in the marine environment. The cost of these tanks is more than that of concrete units, but because they are manufactured as a continuous piece, there are no seams. They are also lighter and more resistant to impact cracks than concrete tanks.

A Range of Tank Sizes

Septic tank capacities are measured in gallons, and are determined by the quantity of sewage that the tank can contain in total. It is necessary for septic tanks to store at least two days’ worth of sewage from your residence in order for the solids to be adequately separated from the liquids before the liquids are allowed to enter the absorption area. The size of the tank is determined by the number of bedrooms in your home. Standard tank sizes are generally 1,000, 1,250, and 1,500 gallons, and they are sufficient for the majority of residences in the United States.

A four-bedroom home requires a tank with a minimum liquid capacity of 1,250 gallons, while a five-bedroom residence requires a tank with a minimum liquid capacity of 1,500 gallons.

Estimating Your Needed Tank Size

The size of the tank is computed using a straightforward formula, while other considerations, such as the soil type, must be taken into consideration. Therefore, it is important to have a professional analyze the site and your property in order to decide the optimal size of tank for your needs and requirements. The minimum size necessary for your home may be estimated by multiplying 150 gallons per bedroom by two, and then multiplying that figure twice more than the amount of time needed to retain the water (48 hours).

Assuming your property has more than six bedrooms, or five bedrooms plus a hot tub, you would multiply 150 times 6, and the resultant figure (900) would be increased by two to give you a minimum liquid capacity of 1,800 gallons.

Concrete Septic Tanks Are Probably The Best Option — Build With a Bang

Concrete Septic Tank with a Capacity of 1000 Gallon When it comes to septic systems, whether you’re in the market for a new system or just need a replacement tank, you’ve arrived to the perfect location. As part of our recent investigation into different types of septic systems that are available for your house, we decided that it would be a good idea to also investigate the many types of septic tanks now available on the market.

The following are the three most common types of septic tanks that are easily accessible for installation:

When constructed properly and maintained on a regular basis, the majority of concrete septic tanks may endure for up to 40 years. No matter which option you choose, keep in mind that a home’s septic system should be cleaned, examined for leaks, and professionally maintained every 3-6 months in order to keep it healthy and running correctly for the homeowner. Waste flow, home size, square footage, number of bedrooms, number of bathrooms, and a few other factors are taken into consideration in septic tank size recommendations and charts.

  1. Septic tanks are available in a variety of sizes, and you can even obtain tanks that are smaller than 1000 gallons; however, we recommend that you go with a tank that is at least 1000 square feet in size.
  2. Consult with a licensed expert before purchasing or installing any equipment if you’re going to install a new septic tank or septic system for the first time.
  3. ” A few of states are now requiring 1000 gallon tanks as the minimum size requirement.
  4. The popularity of the concrete septic tank can be attributed to its strength, weight, and longevity.
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Check out these 6 septic systems available for your home.

Nowadays, most concrete septic tanks are sold with a two compartment design, as opposed to the earlier style one compartment tank that was more common previously. Two compartment tanks tend to perform a better job of filtering and separating waste than one compartment tanks, which is why septic experts advocate them over a single compartment tank. All compartments are constructed with access for cleaning and pumping, regardless of the number of compartments in the system. Because it can readily handle most 0-3 bedroom dwellings, a 1000 gallon septic tank is the standard size for domestic applications.

Heavy Duty Options

Many tanks are also available in “high duty” configurations, which generally have a reinforced top and bottom. Purchasing the heavy-duty version may be a wise decision in the case that a vehicle, agricultural equipment, or other large piece of heavy machinery passes over the tank area.

Installation Requirements

Because of the size and weight of concrete septic tanks, they must be installed by a qualified specialist. These tanks are constructed of the hardest materials available, and while they are extremely durable, their installation necessitates the use of enormous, heavy machinery. If the intended or present site of your concrete septic tank does not allow for heavy machinery access, you may want to investigate a fiberglass or plastic (polyethylene) tank.

Due to the fact that the majority of concrete tanks are precast, their sizes, weights, and dimensions are all different. However, keep in mind that all of these specs are approximations and are subject to change depending on state and local regulations.

Lifespan and Durability

The method by which the concrete septic tank was constructed will have an impact on its long-term function. High-quality concrete, adequate water sealing, and the use of structural steel goods such as mesh and rebar will provide additional support, strength, and structural integrity to the structure. Keep in mind that concrete septic tanks are more prone to cracking and leaking than their plastic and fiberglass equivalents when exposed to exceptionally cold temperatures and pressures. Most concrete septic tanks have a lifespan of up to 40 years if they are constructed properly and serviced on a regular basis.

1000 Gallon Concrete Septic Tank

Septic tanks of 1000 gallon capacity or larger are the most typical size for household usage, as they can readily fit most 0-3 bedroom dwellings. Size Weight: The weight of each concrete tank is different. Some of the most common 1000 gallon concrete precast tanks are around 5′ 1″ X 8′ 2″ X 5′ 8″ in size and weigh almost 9,000 lbs. Others are approximately 5′ 1″ X 8′ 2″ X 5′ 8″ in size and weigh almost 9,000 lbs. Here are some examples of Jensen Precast projects completed in various cities around the United States.

1250 Gallon Concrete Septic Tank

Generally speaking, a 1250 gallon tank is a good choice for mid-size homes with 3-4 bedrooms. Size and weight: The sizes and weights of all concrete tanks are different. 1250 gallon concrete precast tanks are typically 5′ 9″ x 8′ 6″ x 5’8″ in size, with some of the more common models being 5′ 9″ x 8′ 6″ and others measuring 5′ 8″. The typical weight of a 1250 gallon concrete tank is 11,000 lbs, however this might vary depending on the distributor. Approximately 11 1/2 feet in depth, however this varies according on the distributor, state, and local statutes.

1500 Gallon Concrete Septic Tank

Generally speaking, a 1500-gallon tank is the most popular size for large homes with five or more bedrooms. Size and weight: The sizes and weights of all concrete tanks are different. The dimensions of some of the most common 1500 gallon concrete precast tanks are around 6′ x 10′ 9″ x 5′ 5″ in length and width. The typical weight of a 1500 gallon concrete tank is 12,000 lbs, which is rather heavy. Approximately 12 feet in depth, however this varies according on the distributor, state, and local statutes.

Inlet Baffles

When installing a septic tank, an inlet baffle should be put on the inlet part closest to the point at which the sewer tank joins from the house structure to the tank.

Due to the fact that it prevents scum and oils from blocking the entrance pipe, the inlet baffle is critical to the overall health and effectiveness of the septic system. The intake baffle is a bottle neck that is especially designed to do the following:

  • In order to prevent the breakdown process from being disrupted, it is necessary to slow the effluent entering the septic tank. A fast rate of inflow of effluent might cause problems by mistakenly combining the settled solid waste with oils, scum, and effluent. Make sure no sewage gases are allowed to enter the sewer line. These gases have the potential to infiltrate back into a home or structure, generating a foul odor.

Outlet Baffles

Every septic tank should be equipped with an exit baffle that is connected to the discharge line. The outlet baffle functions as a bottle neck in the same way as the inlet baffle, but in the opposite direction. It is meant to:

  • Preserving the septic tank by keeping scum, oils, and solid waste contained inside
  • It is necessary to prevent the discharge of waste items other than wastewater into the output pipe, drain field, and leach field.

All effluent from the septic tank must be clear of solid waste before it may be discharged. Other than that, the solids and oils will pollute the drain field/leach field and result in backups and pollutants entering the surrounding environment. Ensure that your baffles are correctly built and that they are not in need of repair by consulting with a licensed septic technician before doing anything else. Septic tanks made of fiberglass or polyethylene (polyethelyene) are also a suitable option, especially if your location has specialized environmental requirements.

Mobility

In contrast to concrete septic tanks, which normally need a vehicle equipped with a crane and boom, fiberglass and polyethylene septic tanks are quite simple to transport. Therefore, fiberglass and plastic tanks are frequently employed in places where concrete septic tank delivery vehicles are unable to reach the tanks. The majority of fiberglass and plastic septic tanks weigh roughly 300 pounds or more, however concrete septic tanks can weigh up to 20-30 times as much.

Cost Effectiveness

If you’re seeking for a less expensive alternative to concrete, fiberglass and polyethylene (polyethylene) are excellent choices. The majority of fiberglass and plastic septic tanks are thousands of dollars less expensive than concrete septic systems.

Durability

When compared to a concrete septic tank, both plastic and fiberglass septic tanks have a lower likelihood of breaking. Furthermore, because fiberglass and plastic are nonporous materials, there is typically no problem with tree or bush roots growing into the tank and generating leaks as a result of root damage. Having said that, due to the tank’s smaller profile and lighter material composition, caution must be used during installation because heavy gear might easily harm it. Tanks made of fiberglass or plastic can be destroyed in the same way as concrete tanks can if too much weight is placed on the surface above them.

Despite the fact that plastic and fiberglass tanks are quite resilient, they can nonetheless leak under specific circumstances.

The size of the lot, the position of the tank, the amount of ground water, and the weather can all influence the selection.

Float

Plastic and fiberglass have a number of advantages, but they can also be troublesome. Yes, the lightweight character of these materials makes them perfect for installation, but same lightweight nature also results in a high level of buoyancy in the final product. It is possible that during a storm, a plastic or fiberglass tank can get dislodged from its couplings, causing considerable damage to the septic system and the homeowner’s property, with repair costs in the hundreds of dollars. A simple solution is to place a concrete slab on top of the tank to help weigh it down.

If you reside in an area with a high groundwater table, consult with a specialist to ensure that the higher water table will not cause harm to your fiberglass or plastic tank.

Septic Tanks

Listed below is a list of the septic tanks, chlorine contact tanks, and siphon dose tank packages thatCamden Supplyoffers, along with detailed descriptions of their features and specifications. Please call Camden Supply and chat with one of our staff if you require further information on a certain product.

Single Compartment Septic Tanks

A one-compartment steel-reinforced concrete septic tank, according to the script. Lower part is cast as a single piece, with no seams that come into touch with effluent or other contaminants. Specifications:

  • Overall height is 56 inches
  • Overall length is 79 inches
  • Overall width is 48 inches
  • Height to center line of inlet is 48 inches
  • Height to center line of outflow is 45 inches
  • Weight is 5,000 pounds.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.Options:Plastic or concrete riser sections.


600 Gallon Single Septic Tank

Specifications:

  • Overall height is 62 inches
  • Overall length is 79 inches
  • Overall width is 48 inches
  • Height to center line of inlet is 52 inches
  • Height to center line of outflow is 49 inches
  • Weight is 5,000 pounds.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.


1000 Gallon Single Septic Tank

Septic tank with a single compartment made of steel reinforced concrete (SRC). Lower part is cast as a single piece, with no seams that come into touch with effluent or other contaminants. Specifications:

  • Overall height is 60 inches
  • Overall length is 96 inches
  • Overall width is 67 inches
  • Height to center line of inlet is 52 inches
  • Height to center line of exit is 49 inches
  • Weight is 8,000 pounds.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.Options:Plastic or concrete riser sections.


1250 Gallon Single Septic Tank

A one-compartment steel-reinforced concrete septic tank with the lower portion cast as a single piece so that there are no seams that come into touch with effluent. Specifications:

  • Overall height is 60 inches
  • Overall length is 117 inches
  • Overall width is 68 inches
  • Height to center line of inlet is 52 inches
  • Height to center line of exit is 49 inches
  • Weight is 10,400 pounds.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psiApplications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.Options:Plastic or concrete riser sections.


1500 Gallon Single Septic Tank

Specifications:

  • Overall height is 60 inches
  • Overall length is 150 inches
  • Overall width is 67 inches
  • Height to center line of inlet is 52 inches
  • Height to center line of exit is 49 inches
  • Weight is 11,700 pounds.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.


25003500Gallon Single Septic Holding Tanks

Single Septic Holding Tank with a capacity of 2500 gallonsSpecifications:

  • Overall height is 68 inches
  • Overall length is 144 inches
  • Overall width is 78 inches
  • Height to center line of intake is 61 inches
  • Height to center line of outflow is 61 inches
  • Weight is 16,000 pounds.

Single Septic Holding Tank with 35 00 Gallon CapacitySpecifications:

  • Overall height is 98 inches
  • Overall length is 144 inches
  • Overall width is 78 inches
  • Height to center line of intake is 91 inches
  • Height to center line of exit is 91 inches
  • Weight is 20,000 pounds.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.


Dual Compartment Septic Tanks

Description:Two-compartment tank with solids separator between the first and second compartments, holding 500 gallons and 500 gallons, respectively. Lower part is cast as a single piece, with no seams that come into touch with effluent or other contaminants. Specifications:

  • Overall height is 60 inches
  • Overall length is 96 inches
  • Overall width is 67 inches
  • Height to center line of inlet is 52 inches
  • Height to center line of exit is 49 inches
  • Weight is 10,000 pounds.
See also:  How Often Should You Get Your Septic Tank Pumped? (Question)
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.Options:Plastic or concrete riser sections.


1250 Gallon Dual Septic Tank

Description:Two-compartment tank with a solids separator between the first and second compartments, holding 625 gallons and 625 gallons. Specifications:

  • Overall height is 60 inches
  • Overall length is 117 inches
  • Overall width is 67 inches
  • Height to center line of inlet is 52 inches
  • Height to center line of exit is 49 inches
  • Weight is 10,700 pounds.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.Options:Plastic or concrete riser sections.


1500 Gallon Dual Septic Tank

Description:Two compartment system with a capacity of 1000 gallons in the first compartment and 500 gallons in the second compartment. The dosage pump portion is usually found in the second compartment. Lower part is cast as a single piece, with no seams that come into touch with effluent or other contaminants. Specifications:

  • Overall height is 60 inches
  • Overall length is 150 inches
  • Overall width is 67 inches
  • Height to center line of inlet is 52 inches
  • Height to center line of exit is 49 inches
  • Weight is 11,700 pounds.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.Options:Plastic or concrete riser sections.


Triple Compartment Septic Tanks

Description:Three-compartment system with a solids separator between the first and second compartments. Each compartment holds 500 gallons. The dosage pump segment is usually found in the third compartment. Lower part is cast as a single piece, with no seams that come into touch with effluent or other contaminants. Specifications:

  • Overall height is 60 inches
  • Overall length is 150 inches
  • Overall width is 67 inches
  • Height to center line of inlet is 52 inches
  • Height to center line of exit is 49 inches
  • Weight is 12,000 pounds.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.Options:Plastic or concrete riser sections. Available with pre-wired pump packages, complete with alarm, floats, and pump pad, with horse powers from 1/3 to 1.5, with up to 135 feet of total head capacity.


Chlorine Contact Tanks

Specifications:

  • Overall height is 56 inches
  • Overall length is 79 inches
  • Overall width is 48 inches
  • Height to center line of inlet is 48 inches
  • Height to center line of outflow is 45 inches
  • Weight is 5,000 pounds.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.500_gallon_chlorine_contact_or_grease_interceptor.pdfDownload File


Siphon Dose Tank Packages

Specifications:

  • It measures 56 inches in height, 79 inches in length, 48 inches in width, 48 inches in height from center line of intake, 48 inches in height from center line of outlet, and 5,000 pounds in weight. It is equipped with an indoor alarm and alarm float.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.


1000 Gallon Siphon Tank Package

Specifications:

  • It measures 60 inches in height, 102 inches in length, and 67 inches in width. It measures 52 inches in height from the center line of the inlet and 52 inches in height from the center line of the outlet. It weighs 10,000 pounds. It comes with an indoor alarm and an alarm float.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.

1250 Gallon Siphon Tank Package

Specifications:

  • It measures 60 inches in height, 117 inches in length, and 68 inches in width. It measures 52 inches in height from the center line of the inlet and 52 inches in height from the center line of the outlet. It weighs 10,400 pounds. It comes with an indoor alarm and an alarm float.
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.

1500 Gallon Siphon Tank Package

Specifications:

  • Overall height is 60 inches
  • Overall length is 150 inches
  • Overall width is 67 inches
  • Height to center line of intake is 52 inches
  • Height to center line of exit is 52 inches
  • Weight is 13,000 pounds
  • Includes indoor alarm and alarm float
Materials of construction:Steel reinforced concrete, minimum compression strength, 4000 psi.Applications:Residential septic applications, single and multifamily dwellings.

What size of septic tank do I need?

Probably one of the last things on your mind when you are constructing a new house is the location of your septic system. After all, shopping for tanks isn’t nearly as entertaining as shopping for cabinetry, appliances, and floor coverings. Although you would never brag about it, your guests will be aware if you do not have the proper septic tank placed in your home or business.

septic tanks for new home construction

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size. Of course, all of this is dependent on the number of people who live in the house as well as the amount of water and waste that will be disposed of through the plumbing system.

For the most accurate assessment of your septic tank needs, you should speak with an experienced and trustworthy sewer business representative. They can assist you in planning the intricacies of your septic system, including which sort of septic system will be most beneficial to you.

planning your drainfield

Here are some helpful hints for deciding where to locate your drainfield when you’re designing it.

  • Vehicles should not be allowed on or around the drainfield. Planting trees or anything else with deep roots along the bed of the drain field is not recommended. The roots jam the pipes on a regular basis. Downspouts and sump pumps should not be discharged into the septic system. Do not tamper with or change natural drainage features without first researching and evaluating the consequences of your actions on the drainage field. Do not construct extensions on top of the drain field or cover it with concrete, asphalt, or other materials. Create easy access to your septic tank cover by placing it near the entrance. Easy maintenance and inspection are made possible as a result. To aid with evaporation and erosion prevention, plant grass in the area.

a home addition may mean a new septic tank

Do not make any big additions or renovations to your house or company until you have had the size of your septic system assessed. If you want to build a house addition that is more than 10% of your total floor space, increases the number of rooms, or necessitates the installation of new plumbing, you will almost certainly need to expand your septic tank.

  • For a home addition that will result in increased use of your septic system, your local health department will require a letter from you that has been signed and authorized by a representative of your local health department confirming that your new septic system is capable of accommodating the increase in wastewater. It is not recommended that you replace your septic system without the assistance of a certified and competent contractor.

how to maintain your new septic system

Septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services are provided by Norway Septic Inc., a service-oriented company devoted to delivering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to households and business owners throughout the Michiana area. “We take great delight in finishing the task that others have left unfinished.” “They pump, we clean!” says our company’s motto. Septic systems are something we are familiar with from our 40 years of expertise, and we propose the following:

  • Make use of the services of a qualified specialist to develop a maintenance strategy. Make an appointment for an annual examination of your septic system. Utilize the services of an effluent filter to limit the amount of particles that exit the tank, so extending the life of your septic system. Waste items should be disposed of properly, and energy-efficient appliances should be used. Make sure you get your septic system professionally cleaned every 2 to 3 years, or more frequently if necessary, by an experienced and qualified expert
  • If you have any reason to believe that there is an issue with your system, contact a professional. It is far preferable to catch anything early than than pay the price later. Maintain a record of all septic system repairs, inspections, and other activities

common septic questions

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions by our septic customers.

How do I determine the size of my septic tank?

If you have a rectangular tank, multiply the inner height by the length to get the overall height of the tank. In order to find out how many gallons your septic tank contains, divide the number by.1337.1337

How many bedrooms does a 500-gallon septic tank support?

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size.

How deep in the ground is a septic tank?

Your septic system is normally buried between four inches and four feet underground, depending on the climate.

Septic Tank Size: What Size Septic Tank Do You Need?

Septic tanks are used for wastewater disposal and are located directly outside your home. Private wastewater management is becoming increasingly popular in the United States, with more than 30 percent of newly constructed residences incorporating on-site wastewater management. Do you require septic tank installation and are unsure of the amount of septic tank you require? When establishing a septic tank, the most important element to consider is the type and size of septic tank that you will be installing.

A number of factors influence the size of a septic tank, which are discussed in this article.

Basics of Septic Tanks

Your septic system is a self-contained chamber that is designed to retain the wastewater generated by your home. A septic system is comprised of two major components: the soil absorption area or drain, and the holding tank. Septic tanks absorb solid waste when wastewater is discharged into them, resulting in the formation of an asludge layer at the septic tank’s base. A layer of soap residue, grease, and oil forms on the top of the water. The effluent or wastewater is contained within the intermediate layer.

During the filling process, the wastewater is released from the tank and is directed to the drain field, where it is absorbed into the soil. To discover more about how a septic tank works, check out our page that goes into further detail on how a septic tank functions.

The Main Types of Septic Tanks

Before you start thinking about septic tank sizes, it’s important to understand the many types of septic tanks that exist.

  • Septic tanks made of fiberglass
  • Septic tanks made of plastic
  • Septic tanks made of concrete

Concrete septic tanks are the most prevalent variety, but since they are so massive, you will need big and expensive equipment to build them. Fiberglass and plastic septic tanks are lighter than concrete and are therefore more suited for difficult-to-reach and distant locations. Before purchasing a septic tank, you should check with your local building department to learn about the rules and guidelines governing private wastewater management. You may also be interested in:Do you have a septic tank?

Why Septic Tank Sizes is Important

If the capacity of your home’s septic tank is insufficient to satisfy your requirements, it will be unable to handle the volume of wastewater generated by your home. As a result, a wide range of annoying difficulties can arise, including bad smells, floods, and clogs. Nonetheless, the most common consequence of a septic tank that is too small is that the pressure that builds up will cause the water to be released before it has had a chance to be properly cleaned. This suggests that the solid waste in the septic tank will not be sufficiently broken down, and will thus accumulate more quickly, increasing the likelihood of overflows and blockages in the system.

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A septic tank that is too large will not function properly if it does not get the required volume of wastewater to operate.

What Determines Septic Sizes?

Here are some of the elements that influence septic tank sizes; keep them in mind when making your purchase to ensure that you get the most appropriate septic tank for your property.

Consider Your Water Usage

The most accurate and practical method of estimating the appropriate septic tank size for your property is to calculate the quantity of water you use on a regular basis. The size of the septic tank required is determined by the amount of water that can be held in it before being drained into the soil absorption field. In many places of the United States, the smallest capacity of septic tank that may be installed is 1,000 gallons or less. The following are the suggested septic tank sizes for your household, which are based on your household’s entire water use.

  • A septic tank with a capacity of 1,900 gallons will handle less than 1,240 gallons per day
  • A septic tank with a capacity of 1,500 gallons will handle less than 900 gallons per day. A septic tank with a capacity of 1,200 gallons is required for less than 700 gallons per day
  • A septic tank with a capacity of 900 gallons is required for less than 500 gallons per day.

Consider the Size of Your Property

Another factor to consider when determining the most appropriate septic tank size for your home is the square footage of your home. The size of your home will determine the size of the septic tank you will require. For example, a dwelling with less than 1,500 square feet typically requires a tank that holds 750 to 1,000 gallons. On the other side, a larger home of around 2,500 square feet will require a larger tank, one that is more than the 1,000-gallon capacity.

The Number of Bedrooms Your Property Has

An additional issue to consider is the amount of bedrooms in your home, which will influence the size of your septic tank.

The size of your septic tank is proportional to the number of bedrooms on your home. The following table lists the appropriate septic tank sizes based on the number of bedrooms.

  • In general, a 1-2 bedroom house will require a 500 gallon septic tank
  • A 3 bedroom house will demand 1000 gallon septic tank
  • A 4 bedroom house will require 1200 gallon septic tank
  • And a 5-6 bedroom house would require a 1500 gallon septic tank.

The Number of Occupants

In general, the greater the number of people that live in your home, the larger your septic tank must be. In the case of a two-person household, a modest septic tank will be necessary. If your house has more than five tenants, on the other hand, you will want a larger septic tank in order to handle your wastewater more effectively and hygienically. When determining what size septic tank to purchase, it is important to remember that the size of your septic tank determines the overall effectiveness of your septic system.

As a result, it is critical that you examine septic tank sizes in order to pick the most appropriate alternative for your property in order to avoid these difficulties.

1250 Gallon Septic Tanks: Precast Concrete

Precast concrete tanks, such as our 1250-gallon tank, are a suitable traditional septic tank size for a four-bedroom home. New Hampshire concrete tank sizes are most commonly found in this configuration.

1250 Gallon Septic Tank

Each 1,250 gallon septic tank that A.J. Foss creates from precast concrete is intended to hold up to 1,250 gallons of liquid waste, which is the maximum amount of liquid waste that can be contained in one tank. Our tanks meet or exceed all of the ASTM C 1227NPCA best-practice criteria. This sort of mid-seam styleconcrete septic tankallows the pipe from the home to be routed to either of the tank’s side or center intake locations. The same choice is available for the tank’s outlet drainage pipe, which may be extended out to the leach field from either the tank’s side or middle outlet drainage pipe.

If you have any questions regarding the broad selection of sizes and styles of one and two-compartment septic tanks and accessories that we produce at our state-of-the-art plant, please contact one of our knowledgeable septic specialists at A.J Foss.

1250 Gallon Septic Tank Details
Tank dimensions 8’ Long5’8” wide6’ Tall
Number of bedrooms supported Up to 4 – Minimum size now required
Pre-assembled Yes
Ideal for high water table No but our 1500 gallon monolithic septic tank is.
Average retail cost $1250
Number of tank lids (covers) 2
Can come in traffic rated (H20) capacity Yes
Concrete strength 5,000 PSI
What are its gallons per vertical inch 23
Weight 11,500 lbs.
Fiber reinforced Yes
Number of inlets boots (Up to schedule 40pipe can slide through) 3
Height of inlet from bottom of tank to bottom of pipe 63”
Number of outlets boots (Up to schedule 40 pipe can slide through) 3
Height of outlet from bottom of tank to bottom of pipe 60”
Required height of inlet baffle (20% of liquid level) 12”
Required height of outlet baffle (40% of liquid level) 23”

Septic tank made of precast concrete and fitted with plastic risers for a water-tight seal. It is brand new and never used.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Systems that are more traditional in nature include Concrete Chamber Systems (for anaerobic systems), Mound Septic Systems (an above-ground septic system with a drain field mound), Sand Mound or Sand Filter Septic System, Gravity Septic System (needs a gradual slope), and others.

What is the average cost of a 1250 gallon precast concrete septic tank?

Answer:In terms of septic tank prices, the typical retail price for a 1,250-gallon system is $1250 on the open market. The most important factors that influence the average price of residential septic tanks are the size of the house and the amount of water used per day (or the consistency of the flow of wastewater), which influences the gallons capacity of water flow dependent on the amount of water consumed.

A five- or six-bedroom house will require at least a 1,500 gallon tank, if not a bigger tank; in contrast, a two- or three-bedroom house will require a smaller tank and, as a result, cheaper tank pricing.

What affects the average price of septic system installation by professional installers?

The following are some of the factors that might influence the typical price of septic tank installation costs:

  • Choosing the right septic tank (for example, precast concrete vs lighter fiberglass tanks)
  • A drainage field or absorption field of a certain size (which might have an impact on labor expenses)
  • It is necessary to consider the presence of adjacent water sources (which may need the conversion of traditional septic system designs to alternative systems). Norweco Singlair Wastewater Treatment Systems, for example, are aerobic systems that employ aerobic microorganisms to treat waste water.

Soil testing to establish the soil conditions is an additional cost of installation issue to take into consideration. Get in touch with skilled specialists to acquire reliable pricing estimates for your unique tank requirements.

What is the most common septic tank size?

In New Hampshire, the septic tank with a capacity of 1250 gallons is used. Among septic designers, it is the tank that is most frequently specified and used. It is the smallest tank permitted by the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, and it may accommodate a dwelling with up to four bedrooms. Extra bedrooms would require an additional 250 gallons per bedroom. As a result, a septic tank of 1500 gallons would be required for a five-bedroom house.

Can you drive over a 1250 gallon size septic tank?

When it comes to driving cars or heavy machinery over a tank, the design rating is what decides whether you can. A.J. Foss makes three different types of septic tank installations: H-10 is designed for pedestrian activity and has a live load of 300 pounds per square foot plus a burial depth of 3 feet. HD is intended for burial depths up to 5 feet. The H-20 rating is for vehicular drive-over traffic up to a maximum burial depth of 6′ in the ground.

Is it ideal for high water table areas?

Answer:Our regular 1,250-gallon septic tank is constructed in two parts, with the seam running along the centre of the tank. Because the seam is located at the very top of the septic tank, our 1250 gallon monolithic septic tank is perfect for use in areas with a high water table or near bodies of water. Because the liquid sits underneath the cover, there is no risk of anything leaking in or out.

How much does a 1250 gallon concrete septic tank weigh?

In response to your question, our 1,250-gallon concrete septic tanks weigh about 11,500 pounds. Based on the specifications, wall thickness, floortop thickness, and rebar reinforcement used by different precast manufacturers, weights might vary somewhat.

How many bedrooms does a 1250 gallon septic tank support?

According to the state of New Hampshire, a 1250 gallon tank can maintain a four-bedroom house. Since the regulations were updated in 2012, it is the smallest tank size that may be specified on new designs for the first time.

  • A 1250 gallon septic tank is utilized in systems with up to four bedrooms. The most often encountered tank size in New Hampshire
  • The smallest tank we propose for use as a septic tank is the following: It is shipped pre-assembled to make installation as simple as possible

Why are steel tanks or plastic tanks generally not recommended?

Because it is durable, practical, and long-lasting, precast concrete continues to be the most popular material for septic tanks and systems. Plastic tanks and fiberglass tanks, which are made of lighter materials than concrete and appear to be a more cost-effective choice, might be damaged during the installation process. In the case of structural damage to a plastic or fiberglass septic tank, the tank may need to be completely replaced. Septic tanks made of plastic are only recommended for use with alternative sewage systems, such as Norweco Singulair aerobic septic systems, which use oxygen-loving bacteria in conjunction with an aerator to break down solid waste and produce cleaner wastewater effluent that can be discharged to a drain field.

Features/Details*

  • A 1250 gallon septic tank is utilized in systems with up to four bedrooms. The most often encountered tank size in New Hampshire
  • The smallest tank we propose for use as a septic tank is the following: It is shipped pre-assembled to make installation as simple as possible

* The information displayed is unique to New Hampshire; for information on the standards of other states, please contact us.

You might also be interested in these widely used precast concrete septic tanks if you like what you see.

  • The following sizes are available: Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 1000 Gallon
  • Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 1250 Gallons Monolithic
  • Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 1500 Gallons Monolithic
  • Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 1600 Gallons
  • Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 1600 Gallons Monolithic
  • Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 2000 Gallons
  • Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 2000 Gallons Monolithic
  • Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 2000 G Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 1025/275 Gallons
  • Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 1250/350 Gallons
  • Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 1250/350 Gallons Monolithic
  • Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 1250/500 Gallons
  • Precast Concrete Septic Tank – 1500/500 Gallons Monolithic

a little about the author: The Andrew J. Foss, Inc. precast concrete firm was founded by my father in 1963 when he was just 19 years old. My precast education began at a very young age for myself. Everything I know about producing high-quality precast concrete goods, from septic tanks to concrete headwalls, was passed down to me by him. He also taught me that in order to be successful in business, you must provide a superior product and treat your customers the way you would like to be treated yourself.

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