How To Remove A Septic Tank?

  1. Locate the septic tank.
  2. Dig down to the septic tank using the backhoe.
  3. Dig out on all four sides of the tank.
  4. Cut both pipes well away from the septic tank.
  5. Feed the log chains through the inlet hole in the tank and guide it out the outlet port.

Can you leave an old septic tank in the ground?

Tanks can be completely removed or they can be destroyed and buried in place. The decision depends on if you plan to use the land for something else, such as a home addition or pool, and need the remains of the tank out of the way.

How do you crush an old septic tank?

Usually an old septic tank is broken up in-place using a backhoe. The backhoe operator may pull in the tank sides, crush them, and push the whole steel tank to the bottom then back-fill with soil and rubble. In a DIY project we might use a heavy steel wrecking bar to just punch holes in the old steel tank bottom.

How do you decommission a septic tank UK?

Septic Tank Decommissioning

  1. Pump Out The Tank. It is important to pump the wastewater, as it contains bacteria and viruses that could make you or your family ill.
  2. Fill. Fill in the tank with sand or gravel and put the access lid back in place or demolish the tank in situ.
  3. Send Proof.

Can you sell a house with an old septic tank?

If you’re selling a property with a septic tank, then you must be transparent with buyers about the fact the property uses a one and provide a detailed specification of the system. In fact, You are required by law to inform a buyer in writing about the presence of a septic tank.

What does a buried septic tank look like?

Septic tanks are typically rectangular in shape and measure approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

Can septic tanks collapse?

Septic tanks can collapse for a variety of reasons. This is one of the most serious septic tank problems that can occur. Once a tank is emptied of water, it is much more prone to collapse. That is because the pressure of the surrounding soil is no longer counter-acted by the water inside the tank.

What were old septic tanks made of?

Many of the first septic tanks were concrete tanks that were formed out of wood and poured in place in the ground and covered with a concrete lid or often some type of lumber.

Do I need to change my septic tank?

Under the new rules, if you have a specific septic tank that discharges to surface water (river, stream, ditch, etc.) you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

Does a septic tank need a certificate?

The General Binding Rules were designed to simplify the regulation of small sewage discharges. Septic tanks and small sewage treatment plants no longer need to be registered and there is no legal requirement to keep records of maintenance (although this is advisable).

When did septic tank regulations come in?

The General Binding Rules Regulations for small sewage discharges from Septic Tanks and Sewage Treatment Plants. New septic tank rules for small sewage discharges came into force on 1 January 2015. If your septic tank system was installed and in use before 31 December 2014, it is classed as an ‘existing discharge’.

Do I need consent to discharge septic tank?

You will require a ‘Permit to Discharge’, however you may qualify for an exempt status if your system meets certain requirements such as amount of discharge, septic tank or sewage treatment plant model (only EN 12566-3 2005 Certified plants accepted), plant location, intended discharge point, installation and

Who is responsible for a septic tank?

Homeowners. If you’re an owner-occupier and your property has a septic tank, it’s very straightforward: you are fully responsible for your septic tank. If there are any issues with it, it is up to you to fix them.

Do septic tanks lower property value?

The research shows that having a septic system as opposed to a standard sewage system does not increase or decrease the value of your home, although there are some things about that septic system that can affect resale.

HOW TO SAFELY ABANDON AN OLD SEPTIC TANK ON YOUR PROPERTY

If you’ve recently purchased an older house, it’s possible that a septic tank is located on the property. This is true even if your home is currently linked to the municipal water and sewer systems. A prior owner may have abandoned the ancient septic system and connected to the city sewage system when it became accessible at some time in the past. Despite the fact that there are standards in place today for properly leaving a septic tank, it was typical practice years ago to just leave the tanks in place and forget about them.

The old tank may either be demolished or filled with water to solve the problem.

It is possible that permits and inspections will be required.

They are dangerous because curious children may pry open the lid and fall into the container.

  1. Falls into a septic tank can be lethal owing to the toxicity of the contents and the fact that concrete can collapse on top of you while falling into a tank.
  2. Eventually, this approach was phased out due to the fact that the steel would corrode and leave the tank susceptible to collapse.
  3. When it comes to ancient septic tanks, they are similar to little caves with a lid that might collapse at any time.
  4. The old tank is crushed and buried, or it is removed from the site.
  5. If it is built of steel, it will very certainly be crushed and buried in its current location.
  6. After that, the tank can be completely filled with sand, gravel, or any other form of rubble and buried.
  7. Tanks can either be entirely dismantled or destroyed and buried in their original location.

The abandonment has been documented and plotted on a map.

It’s possible that you’ll forget about the tank once it’s been abandoned.

As a result, you might wish to sketch a map of the area where the old tank used to stand.

If you can demonstrate that an old septic tank was properly decommissioned, you may be able to increase the value of your property, and the new owners will enjoy knowing that large chunks of concrete are buried underground before they start digging in the yard to put something in it.

It may take some detective work to discover about the history of your land and what may be lying beneath the surface of the earth.

Upon discovering an old septic tank on your property that is no longer in service, contact Total Enviro Services for propertank abandonment procedures that meet with local standards and protect your family, pets, and farm animals from harm or death.

Septic Tank Removal Cost Guide: Pricing Information You Should Know

The need to have your septic tank removed might be for a variety of reasons, and no matter why you’re considering having it removed, the expense of doing so is something you’re sure to be concerned about. We at Hometown recognize that receiving the greatest pricing and excellent customer service for your tank removal is vital to you, and we want to do everything we can to guarantee that you receive exactly what you want. This expense guide will cover the following topics:

  • The average cost of septic tank removal
  • The factors that influence the pricing of septic tank removal
  • How to Select the Most Appropriate Septic Tank Removal Contractor

Find septic tank removal experts in your hometown

Typically, the cost to remove and dispose of a septic tank ranges between $5,000 and $6,000, including disposal fees. Depending on the situation, septic tank removal expenses might range from a few thousand dollars to more than ten thousand dollars or more. Depending on a variety of circumstances, the cost of your tank removal process might be higher or less than this average. More information may be found at:

  • Is it necessary to remove an oil tank? Begin by visiting this page. Keep an eye out for these five signs of an impending oil tank disaster.

Factors That Affect Septic Tank Removal Pricing

The cost of removing a septic tank varies greatly depending on the numerous aspects that are taken into consideration. There are several elements taken into consideration when a contractor prepares an estimate for septic tank removal. The following are the most prevalent factors that influence the overall cost of septic tank removal:

  • The tank’s dimensions and kind
  • The tank’s overall condition
  • Whether the tank is underground or above ground, and how easy it is to get to it. Fees for pumping and waste disposal on a local level Who you employ to complete the task

Natural law dictates that the larger and heavier your tank is, the higher the expense of removing it will be. In the same way, if your tank is underground, it will cost more to remove it than it would to remove a tank that is above ground. Underground tank removal takes far more effort in order to be done properly, and the additional labor costs more money. Septic tanks that have been damaged or compromised must be emptied and properly prepped for excavation before they may be excavated. Similarly, the fees charged by your municipality for disposal and pumping will have an impact on your costs.

Each contractor provides a unique degree of customer care as well as a unique set of pricing, and not all contractors are made equal.

This will assist you in receiving a competitive pricing for your septic tank removal process, as well as excellent customer service.

How to Find the Right Septic Tank Removal Contractor

Changing the location of storage tanks is quite risky, and you should always hire a trained contractor to conduct the job. A qualified expert should be recruited to properly remove the septic tank and dispose of any residual liquids. This is necessary since septic tanks and the improper treatment of them can cause environmental damage. Hiring an expert tank removal contractor to handle your septic tank removal job is critical for a variety of reasons, but most importantly, it is necessary for your own safety as well as the protection of the surrounding environment.

See also:  How Often Do You Need To Pump A 1000 Gallon Septic Tank? (Solution found)

A skilled tank removal contractor will carefully assess the best technique to remove the tank without causing any harm to the surrounding area and surroundings.

This is why we recommend that you use a septic tank removal company that you are familiar with and that is licensed and insured.

This enables you to have a better understanding of what constitutes a good deal and who is the most qualified contractor for the work.

Hometown makes it simple to locate contractors in your neighborhood, check customer reviews, and obtain quotations from as many contractors as you’d like without having to leave your house.

Find tank removal experts in you town

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Why Your Old Septic Tank Needs to be Removed, Now

An ancient, collapsing septic tank has caused a sinkhole in the backyard. Abandoned mobile homes are one of the things we encounter around our area. Those homes that were built before our community was established are about 60 years old, and so are the septic systems that served them. In truth, the old mobile house has been demolished just a few yards away, but the septic tank, which is in dire need of replacement, remains in the ground. These outdated septic tanks are a health hazard! To avoid a possibly dangerous situation if a loved one or a pet falls into an unattended septic tank in your yard, you must take immediate action to remedy the issue.

The age and type of tank will determine whether or not you should fill it with water or whether or not you should remove it altogether.

To be clear, this information also applies to anybody who has an old cesspool on their land).

Why Are Old Septic Tanks Dangerous?

You could assume that an outdated septic tank isn’t a health hazard. At the end of the day, it’s just an underground tank, right? Is it true that out of sight, out of mind? That may be true for a short period of time. Even over a lengthy period of time. years and years. However, ancient septic tanks that are no longer in use (or even old tanks that are still in use!) can pose a serious threat to the health of your family and pets in your yard. Someone walking over the sinkhole faces the risk of being sucked into a disgusting and potentially fatal tangle of sewage and choking methane fumes, which may result in their death.

  • An all-steel box with a stainless steel cover.
  • And what do we know about metal that has been buried for a long period of time and has been regularly exposed to water?
  • Steel septic tanks are subjected to the same fate.
  • until one day you or your child is walking through it and the lid and the ground above it give way.
  • A decaying septic tank top gives way, resulting in a sinkhole and a potentially perilous situation for anyone around it.
  • But it gets worse.
  • Septic tanks made of steel typically last for 25 years or more in most cases.
  • It is necessary to remove a steel septic tank from a house in Door County, Wisconsin.
  • However, up to 90 percent of steel septic tanks are now in need of replacement.

The covers on these tanks are susceptible to crumbling and collapsing, which might result in a septic sinkhole in your yard.

What Are My Options with an Old Septic Tank?

No matter whether you’re legally leaving your own operating septic tank because you’re being connected up to a sewer line, or if you discover an old septic tank on your land, you basically have two options: you can either fill it with water or you may dig it out. The specific regulations for abandoning your septic tank will be established by the county or state in which you live, however the following is the general procedure: 1. Hire a septic pumping firm to pump out and properly dispose of the contents of your septic tank.

  • Disconnect and remove any electrical or mechanical components, such as a pump or an alarm system, from the system (if applicable) Cutting the septic sewage line from the home to the tank is the third step to take.
  • A possible explanation is that the home was changed from septic to sewer during the conversion process).
  • Removing the tank involves digging a trench around it or crushing and collapsing it into the earth.
  • Backfill the hole with the proper material.
  • Crush and collapse the tank, leaving the debris on the ground, then backfill with gravel and fill dirt.

What About the Leach Field?

Even when a septic tank is being abandoned, the leach lines and drain field are not necessarily required to be removed. Once again, this is something that should be confirmed with your county.

How Much Does it Cost to Abandon an Old Septic Tank?

The cost of removing or filling an old septic tank will vary depending on a variety of factors, as it will with most things:

  • Geographical location
  • Ease of access to the tank
  • Size of the tank
  • Whether you can do the most of the deconstruction and filling yourself or if you must employ a contractor removing an old tank from the site or deconstructing it in place The type and cost of fill materials
  • Who is responsible for filling the hole

Here are some very preliminary estimations, which may vary significantly depending on the above-mentioned conditions, but they should give you a general sense.

  • For a normal 1,000 – 1,500 gallon septic tank, the cost is $300 – $400
  • Fill dirt is $225 based on 15 yards at $15/yd
  • And installation of a new septic tank costs $300 – $400. Backhoe and operator – $500, based on a rate of $250 per hour for two hours (including travel and other expenses)
  • TOTAL VERY BRIEF ESTIMATE:$1225 to properly abandon your septic tank and obtain certification of such from your county
  • (this will increase if your leach field lines need to be removed as well)
  • TOTAL VERY BRIEF ESTIMATE:$1225 to properly abandon your septic tank and receive certification of such from your county

Concrete septic demolition is carried out with the use of (small) heavy equipment.

Can I Remove a Septic Tank Myself?

It’s probable that you’ll be able to do everything alone, with the exception of pumping out the tank. Septic pumping should be conducted by an appropriately certified septic pumping business, and you will need to provide proof of this pumping to your county in order to receive your certification of abandonment. Please check with your county to see whether or not you are legally permitted to remove or refill your tank yourself. You may be able to complete the filling in or removal yourself, after which you may call the county to examine and provide you with the required paperwork of the abandoned property.

That being said, many individuals out there would sneer and scoff at the prospect of paying $1000 or more merely to remove an old septic tank, and they are determined to finish the project on their own time and with their own resources.

If you are a “DIY Dave” and want to undertake your own septic tank removal or filling, keep the following factors in mind:.

  1. Methane gas can be found in sewage treatment plants. Being trapped inside a tank filled with methane gas will kill you – how quickly it will kill you will depend on the amount of methane present and the length of time you are exposed to it. Old steel septic tanks are rusted and have sharp edges, which should be avoided. Consider tetanus. Septic tanks hold biological waste that is teeming with bacteria. Keep an eye out for any open wounds you may have.

Financial Help – Loans for Septic Tank Repair, Replacement and Removal

We understand that money is limited for many families, and that paying to have your septic tank abandoned may not be a viable financial option. The good news is that there are loans and other financial programs available to help with septic system repair, replacement, and removal costs. Because these loans are dependent on geography, the terms and conditions will differ from county to county and state to state. Try searching for “Septic System Loans” or “Septic Tank Financing” on the internet, making sure to include your state or county in the search, and you should be able to discover at least one option that works for you.

Final Thoughts

A decaying septic tank may cost anywhere from $1000 to $3000 or more to repair or replace, and this is especially true if you haven’t had any difficulties with it in the past. However, there is a very real danger hiding underground that is becoming more severe by the day. It is possible that you will not even be aware of a threat until it is too late. Homeowners may see a depression in their yard beginning to form, which might be a sign of a septic sinkhole forming, or it could be fill from a prior fill-in that has settled in.

Don’t let the expense of resolving the problem before it becomes a problem deter you from taking action.

How do you remove an old septic tank?

How to Remove a Septic Tank (with Pictures)

  1. Determine the location of the septic tank. Excavate around the tank on all four sides
  2. Remove both pipes from the septic tank as far as possible. Make sure you feed the log chains through the tank’s inlet hole and guide them out via the outlet port. After the tank has been removed, backfill the hole or replace the septic tank as soon as feasible.
Average Range
Cost $500 based on 1 project 500 – 500 based on 1 project

In addition to the aforementioned, how do you dig out a septic tank? TheLids Should Be Dug Up The majority of septic tank components, including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet beneath the surface of the earth. Use a metal probe to detect the boundaries of the object and mark the perimeter. If you are unable to locate the lid by probing, shallow excavation with a shovel along the tank’s perimeter should be sufficient to locate it. In light of this, how do you fill a septic tank that has been abandoned?

  1. Remove the tank and dispose of it at a location that has been permitted (often a landfill). Backfill the tank when it has been totally crushed. It is necessary to break the bottom in order for the water to drain
  2. The tank should be filled with granular material or another inert, flowable substance such as concrete.
See also:  What Can You Put On Top Of A Septic Tank? (Correct answer)

Is it permissible to keep an old septic tank in the ground? When wastewater disposal systems are abandoned, the sewage from the aseptic tank and seepage pit must be removed by an aseptic tankpumper, and the tanks and seepage pits must be crushed in place or completely filled with compacted soil, concrete, or other approved material, as required by the Uniform Plumbing Code.

How to Remove a Septic Tank Lid

A septic tank lid is the section of the sewage tank that is located at the top of the tank. This lid must be removed at least once every several years in order to completely empty the tank. Every three to five years, depending on the size of the tank, a homeowner will need to have the septic tank pumped out and cleaned. Avoid allowing the tank to become overflowing, causing it to begin backing up into the home or overflowing out of the opening.

The tank suffers serious damage as a result of this. Removing the lid is a simple procedure that may be completed before the pumping service arrives or whenever you wish to examine the contents of the container.

Step 1 – Locate Septic Tank

A septic tank lid is the section of the sewage tank that is located at the top of the tank. This lid must be removed at least once every several years in order to completely empty the tank. Every three to five years, depending on the size of the tank, a homeowner will need to have the septic tank pumped out and cleaned. Avoid allowing the tank to become overflowing, causing it to begin backing up into the home or overflowing out of the opening. The tank suffers serious damage as a result of this.

Step 2 – Dig Up Septic Tank Lid

A septic tank lid is the section of the sewage tank that is located at the top of the tank. This lid must be removed at least once every several years in order to completely empty the tank. Every three to five years, depending on the size of the tank, a homeowner will need to have the septic tank pumped out and cleaned. Avoid allowing the tank to become overflowing, causing it to begin backing up into the home or overflowing out of the opening. The tank suffers serious damage as a result of this.

Step 3 – Pry Off Septic Tank Lid

The lid of the septic tank might be rather hefty, depending on the size of the tank. On all sides, it is a solid block of concrete that is perfectly flat. It could have a handle that you can pull on. Pry bars are required to remove the majority of septic tank lids from their resting positions. Set the prybar in the seam and push it down until it is secure. As the lid begins to rise out of the hole, have someone assist you in moving it to the side. Place the lid on the ground’s surface so that it is not in the path of the pumping vehicle.

Abandoning Septic Tanks and Soil Treatment Areas

A steel tank that has been abandoned while a system repair is being carried out.

Interested in Septic Tanks?

Receive articles, stories, and videos about septic tanks delivered directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Septic Tanks and More Receive Notifications When a septic tank is no longer in use (for example, due to a new connection to the city sewer system, tank replacement during a system upgrade or repair, or other reasons), the tank must be properly abandoned. Specifically, this includes ancient cesspools, leaching pits, dry wells, seepage pits, vault privies, and pit privies that are no longer in use.

In order to do this, the piping must be removed or the end of the supply pipe must be filled with grout.

It is advised that the following processes be followed if there are no explicit code requirements.

A vacuum truck driven by a suitably licensed expert who will properly dispose of the septage must first be used to thoroughly empty the tank of its contents, which must then be refilled with fresh water. The following are three popular procedures for coping with an empty tank:

  1. Remove the tank and dispose of it at a location that has been permitted (often a landfill). Backfill the tank when it has been totally crushed. It is necessary to break the bottom in order for the water to drain
  2. The tank should be completely filled with granular material or with any other inert, flowable material, such as concrete. No collapse or confined-space danger should exist in the abandoned tank.

If the soil treatment and dispersal systems are removed, the contaminated materials must be handled in a safe manner such that no human contact is made with them. In addition to distribution media and soil or sand located within roughly 3 feet of the system bottom, contaminated materials also include distribution pipes, tank linings, and contaminated soil surrounding leaking tanks. Any soil that has been contaminated by sewage as a result of a surface collapse is considered contaminated material.

  1. Typically, the soil treatment area is kept in place; however, if it is removed, care must be made to ensure that humans do not come into touch with any contaminated materials.
  2. All separation lengths required for a septic system, including well and property line setbacks as well as your vertical separation distance from saturated soil or bedrock, must be met at the stockpile site prior to use.
  3. If there are any extra or harsher ordinance requirements, the appropriate local unit of government should be consulted.
  4. In order to properly dispose of contaminated pipe, geotextile fabric, or other materials, they must be dried and then disposed of in a mixed municipal solid waste dump.
  5. The pump tanks are abandoned in the same manner as the other tanks, as previously explained.
  6. The ancient floats, if they were made of mercury, must be handled as a hazardous substance.
  7. All of the wire should be removed; the conduit can be left buried, but it should be capped to prevent it from being exposed.
  8. She has a master’s degree in civil engineering and a doctorate in environmental engineering.
  9. Her responsibilities include serving as the education chair for the Minnesota Onsite Wastewater Association and the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association, as well as serving on the National Science Foundation’s International Committee on Wastewater Treatment Systems.

Send an email to [email protected] if you have any concerns concerning septic system care and operation. Heger will respond as soon as possible.

Septic Tank Abandonment

“Whenever the use of an onsite sewage treatment and disposal system is discontinued as a result of connection to a sanitary sewer, as a result of condemnation or demolition, as a result of removal or destruction of a building or property, as a result of discontinuing use of a septic tank and replacement with another septic tank, the system shall be abandoned within 90 days and any subsequent use of the system for any purpose shall be prohibited.” THE ABANDONMENT OF THE SEPTIC TANK MUST BE COMPLETED WITHIN 90 DAYS OF THE CONNECTION TO THE PUBLIC sewage system.

The following are the procedures that homeowners must complete in order to abandon their system:

  • STEP 1: Get in touch with the utility’s customer service department to find out about sewer connection permits and hookup regulations.
  • STEP 2: Submit an application for an abandonment permission and wait for approval. There is a fee of $100.00 for the permission. It is possible to mail us the check for $100.00 in addition to the completed application for processing
  • We will call you by phone when it is available for pickup.
  • Staging the tank for pumping out by a licensed septage hauler and posting a copy of the receipt for this service along with the permit board in a protective plastic bag is the third step to taking care of the tank. The receipt will be collected by the Environmental Health Specialist at the time of the inspection.
  • STEP 4: Crush or collapse the tank in such a way that it will not be able to contain water any more, such as by punching a hole in the bottom of the tank or collapsing the tank’s sides. Owners (if they are still living in the house), certified septic installers, and licensed plumbing contractors are the only ones who may perform this service.
  • To avoid a safety danger, fill the leftover hole with clean sand or other acceptable material. Then grade and stake the tank location.
  • STEP 6: Once all of the above steps have been completed, please contact Environmental Health at 690-2100 to schedule an inspection or for further information about the procedures.

While using a commercial septic system, grease traps will continue to function as part of the building’s sewerage system and will not be removed from service.

How to Safely Dispose of a Septic Tank

Have you ever found yourself in the position of having to dispose of a septic tank? Possibly, you want to connect your plumbing to the city’s main sewer system. You may have recently purchased a property that has an old, unused septic tank that has to be removed and disposed of. Whatever the situation, it is critical to properly dispose of the old septic tank in order to avoid property damage, injuries, and even death.

Why is it important to safely remove a septic tank?

  1. A septic tank that has been abandoned might constitute a threat to persons and animals who are in the vicinity. Older sewage tanks may not be recorded, even though septic tanks installed nowadays are routinely documented. For this reason, if you are the new owner of an older property, you should consult with an expert to determine whether any tanks have been left on the property. Septic tanks degrade with time, and they can become a source of possible cave-ins when the materials used in their construction decay. Its construction is generally made of steel or concrete, and the contents of the tank might be poisonous, making it a potentially hazardous situation. Children who are curious about the septic tank may come upon a cover that has been wrongly closed and fall into it. It will be a selling feature for those who may later be interested in purchasing the property if the old septic tank is properly disposed of.
See also:  How Far Septic Tank From House? (Correct answer)

Permits or Inspections

Be careful to check with your local authorities about any permissions or inspections that may be required before beginning the removal procedure. They may also have particular regulations for how your tank should be disposed of or what material should be utilized to replace your tank. Because septic tanks are underground and “out of sight, out of mind,” some communities take the time to map out where they are in case they need to be found again.

Disposing of your septic tank

You will need to have your septic tank emptied of of its contents prior to the actual removal of the tank. To securely dispose of the contents of your septic tank, contact a professional septic tank business. Keep in mind that septic tank waste is extremely hazardous, and you should avoid attempting to remove it yourself. Immediately following the pumping of the tank, it will need to be evacuated in such a way that it does not create a huge hole that might cause the tank to collapse. The material of the tank, as well as the planned usage of the ground above the tank, are factors in determining where the tank should be disposed of.

Steel tanks are typically crushed and the resulting hole is filled with a filler material such as earth or gravel.

Following that, the tanks are filled with soil and gravel.

Inspect the earth under the surface to make sure there are no air pockets left that might cause the ground to sink.

As soon as you realize you need to dispose of a septic tank, call an experienced business that will guide you through the procedure step-by-step. The correct disposal of your septic tank helps keep you and others who live on your land safe.

Can’t remove septic tank lid

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Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:FrontRanger (CO)Hi, first post here. This issue may have come up before but I wasn’t able to find it using the Search feature.I’ve got a two-chamber concrete septic tank. The previous owners used to pump out the tank by removing only the lid on the inlet-side chamber. Now the concrete lid on the outlet-side chamber can’t be removed. The septic serviceman said that it hadn’t been removed in so long, the concrete had “re-set”. The way he explained it, irrigation and rain water soak through the soil, then get into the concrete, and over time form a bond. He also said that you can’t pump/clean/inspect the tank properly without removing that lid. Naturally, I called up the previous owner, but he had a different story. I wanted to get some impartial advice to find out who was right, so here goes:1. The previous owner didn’t think it was necessary to remove the outlet-side cover. He said the septic pumping company was able to put their hose in over the baffle and pump out the outlet-side chamber. I’m no expert but I don’t see how that’s possible, given the size and flexibility of the hose, and the extremely limited visibility with the hose in the hole. Is it possible to properly pump out the tank removing only the inlet-side lid? If so, how?2. If the answer to the first question is that you truly need to remove the outlet-side lid, what is the best way to solve the problem of the “re-set” concrete in the lid? The tank is located close to my house, beneath a lawn with sprinkler lines (both water and electrical) cleverly running right over the tank. Not the best choice on the part of the installer but naturally I want to minimize the excavation in that area.In case the options are specific to location, I’m located in Northern Colorado.Thanks!
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:hj (AZ)what are you using to lift the lid? I have never had a problem even when the lid was set with mortar.
Post Reply
Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:FrontRanger (CO)The lid has what looks like a curved piece of re-bar set into it. The septic service guy was prying up on that with something, I didn’t see exactly what he was doing. Then he took a digging bar and started chipping away little pieces at the seam between the tank top and the lid, then tried prying up in that little space. After doing that unsuccessfully he said the concrete had “re-set”.
Post Reply
Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:mm (MD)Fasten a chain to the lid handle and then wrap and tie it off around a digging bar that is held horizontally 2-3 feet above the tank.Have someone (a helper?) apply upward leverage on the bar against the ground while you take a second digging bar and, using the hammer end, gently but firmly pound on the outer edge of the concrete lid.It will come up.The lids are often set in tar to seal them against water seepage into the tank so they are tight, but it will release.Edited 1 times.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:FrontRanger (CO)Thanks, m m. Now that you mention that, I remember the septic service guy talking about that briefly, and also a variation using a jack to apply the force. He said he thought since it had been so long since it was last removed, the re-bar would break out of the concrete before the lid came up. I know that the previous owner had not removed it since 1995. Don’t know about the owner before that, but he might not have taken it off since it was installed in 1978!There was no tar or tar paper visible in the chipped-away sections. some sort of barrier seems like an obvious step for anyone who installs these things for a living, but it looks like it was omitted in this case.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:hj (AZ)I usually call a tow truck and use his hook in that rebar.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:hj (AZ)A couple of log splitting wedges between the lid and the tank will also help.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:mm (MD)”A couple of log splitting wedges between the lid and the tank will also help”.About all they’ll help in doing is to obliterate the lid.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:hj (AZ)The lid is about 8″ thick, it is not going to be “obliterated” unless it is completely deteriorated.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:FrontRanger (CO)Thanks for all the replies so far, about how to free up the stuck lid.Anyone for the first question? Is it possible to properly pump out the tank removing only the inlet-side lid? If so, how?Thank you.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:Paul48 (CT)Logically.Why would they put 2 access holes if one was enough?
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:hj (AZ)It appears that there are NO access holes just two halves of the lid. The center baffle doesn’t comeup the bottom of the lid so they just stick the hose into the other side.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:FrontRanger (CO)Re: It appears that there are NO access holes just two halves of the lid. The center baffle doesn’t come up the bottom of the lid so they just stick the hose into the other side.-Perhaps I’ve been using the wrong terminology. What I meant by “lid” was a roughly 18″x18″ opening in the top of the tank, i.e., the covering for the access hole.Re: Why would they put 2 access holes if one was enough?-The same track that my mind took. The question arose from the claim of the previous owner that one was sufficient, and that the hose could be put over the baffle into the outlet-side chamber. My skepticism comes from imagining a stiff 4″ hose maneuvering down a hole, over the baffle, and then into the other chamber. Two access holes would certainly make it more convenient. My question is, can it be done properly using only the one on the inlet-side?Thanks again for your time.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:hj (AZ)18 x 18 ports are NOT the same as two tank halves. It would be difficult to put the hose across, IF you have a center baffle. In this case there may not be one and everything can be done from a single port.
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