How To Open A Septic Tank Lid? (Question)

How to Open a Septic Tank Lid

  1. Locate the septic tank. Most codes call for the tank to be a minimum of 10 feet from the house foundation.
  2. Excavate the dirt from the top of the tank.
  3. Push the screwdriver into the seam around the lid.
  • Push the screwdriver into the seam around the lid. When it opens slightly, push the edge of the pry-bar into the seem and pry it upwards. The lid can be quite heavy so have a partner available to help you lift it free of the hole. Be careful during this process not to crack or chip the edges of the tank or the lid itself.

How do you remove a stuck lid from a concrete septic tank?

Answers: We usually pry them up and lay them against the dirt on top of the tank (imagine that the lid is on a hinge to the middle part of the top of the tank). Take a long breaker bar (we call them rock bars) and pry up the lid, then use a hook from the other side to pull the lid up and set it basically straight up.

Do septic tanks have two lids?

Locate The Lid A septic tank installed before 1975 will have a single 24-inch concrete lid in the center of the rectangle. A two-compartment tank installed after 1975 will have two lids of either fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at opposite ends of the rectangle.

Where is the lid on a septic tank?

You can locate the lid of your septic tank by poking the ground every few feet with a metal probe. Lids can be buried up to a foot deep on average, so be sure to investigate any bumps that may indicate something is buried underneath.

Should septic tank lid be sealed?

Like wells, septic systems have problems if they are not sealed from outside surface water. Most septic systems rely on buried pipes to get rid of the fluids. The lid covers should fit tightly — if they don’t, a company that specializes in septic repairs should be called to fix them.

Can a septic tank have only one lid?

Septic tanks should have one lid per compartment. Most tanks have (2) compartments. So, most residential tanks should have (2) lids about 5′ away from each other.

Why does my septic tank have 1 lid?

But seeing one lid on the ground doesn’t necessarily mean that you have one lid – the other might be buried few feet away from the one you saw and so you will have to dig to access it. Most septic tank lids are made of concrete. Fiberglass and polyethylene lids are not very popular because they break easily.

How far down is a septic tank lid?

Often, septic tank lids are at ground level. In most cases, they have buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

What is used to seal a septic tank lid?

You need to purchase butyl rubber rope about 3/4″ to 1″ used to seal concrete pipe rings for proper seal. I got this product to use for a seal for our manhole extension to a small septic tank.

Why is my septic tank always full?

An overfilled septic tank is often a signal that your drain field is malfunctioning. The drain field is the final fixture in the septic system and serves the purpose of returning treated effluent back into the soil.

How do I stop my septic tank from smelling?

Avoid pouring fats, oils, coffee grounds, cleaning products, paints, or other chemicals down your sink or tub drains. These can disrupt sewage breakdown inside the tank and cause a foul odor. Adding a cup of baking soda to a sink drain or toilet once a week will help maintain the correct pH level in the septic tank.

How to Open a Septic Tank Lid

Find the location of the septic tank. The tank must be at least 10 feet away from the house foundation, according to most building rules. The location and direction of the drain as it exits the house should offer a good indication of the tank’s location and direction. For the purpose of locating the tank, it may be required to drill a number of test holes.

Step 2

Remove the dirt off the top of the tank using a shovel. The lid of the septic tank will be a square piece of concrete that will be installed at the center of the tank’s interior. Depending on the kind of tank you have, it will be around 18 inches square at the most. Remove the dirt from the lid’s edges as much as possible, and try to slant the sides of the hole to assist prevent dirt from moving and sliding down the sides of the hole. After you have removed all of the loose dirt, whisk away any leftover dirt.

Step 3

Make a small indentation with the screwdriver in the seam surrounding the lid. As soon as the seam begins to open slightly, insert one edge of the pry-bar into it and pry it upwards. Because the lid may be fairly heavy, you should have a companion nearby to assist you in removing it from the hole. Keep an eye out for any cracks or chips in the tank’s borders or the lid itself when doing this procedure. It is critical to have a tight, smooth seal between the lid and the tank when using this method.

Tip

In order to avoid accidentally back-filling the hole when the repairs are finished, make a note on it. It is best to indicate the placement of the tank lid with a tiny stepping stone that is flush with the surface of the ground. If you need to re-open the tank in the future, you will save time and effort by doing so now.

Warning

Never go into a septic tank or allow anybody else to get into one. Suffocation and death can occur quickly as a result of the gases and lack of oxygen.

Procedure for Opening Septic Tanks

  • A septic tank should never be entered, nor should anyone else be allowed to enter one! It is possible to die from asphyxia due to the gases and lack of oxygen.

Never enter a septic tank or allow anybody else to enter one. Suffocation and even death can occur as a result of the fumes and lack of oxygen.

Procedures for Safe Opening of a Septic Tank, Cesspool, or Drywall for Inspection or Cleaning

The following are the contents of the article:

  • How to remove the lid from a septic tank
  • When it comes to pumping out the septic tank, which septic tank entrance should be used? Why

In this septic tank pumpout article series, you’ll learn how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks, as well as how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks using photos. In addition to septic pumping tank truck operators, this guideline is meant to provide basic information to homeowners and septic service providers that are concerned about septic system maintenance.

  • There is a risk of dangerous, perhaps deadly collapse due to subsidence (depressions or low regions in the earth) near the location of the septic tank. Evidence of recent construction activity that may necessitate further investigation in order to determine the status of the septic system
  • Backup or effluent breakout at the surface of the ground in the septic tank region.
  • There is a risk of hazardous, perhaps fatal collapse due to subsidence (depressions or low regions in the earth) at the site of the septic tank. It may be necessary to do more investigation to determine the status of the septic system in order to determine its condition. The presence of backlog or effluent breakout at the surface of the septic tank area.

Procedure for Opening the Septic Tank Pumping Access Port

It is necessary to clean the septic tank using a cleanout port, which is normally positioned in the center of the tank. A small access opening, such as one over an intake or outlet baffle, does not provide enough space for adequate sludge removal from the septic tank bottom, and it increases the likelihood of future clogging of the tank’s inlet or outlet due to partially removed floating scum that has not been completely removed from the tank bottom. In this particular scenario, we already had the measurements to the exact placement of the septic tank cleanout cover due to previous work.

A wrecking bar is set to be used to remove the cover from the vehicle. It is important to note that we excavated far enough away from the tank entrance so that when we remove the lid, we will not have a large amount of dirt falling into the septic tank.

Reader CommentsQ A

@Ron, In order for a concrete septic tank lid to be correctly erected, it must feature both access openings and cast in iron loops to which a hoist may be attached. Alternatively, if your septic tank cover does not have those points of purchase for lifting, you will require a flat bar and a larger wrecking bar to pry up the excavated lid from the septic tank sufficiently to allow you to put a chain around the lid, most likely two Chainz, and lift the lid with a hoist and tripod mechanism or you will use an on-site motorized hoist.

  1. 1/2 x 27/4 removing the top of a septic tank @Phil, Although what you describe is theoretically doable, it may be less expensive and more rational to do so in a different way.
  2. This is due to the fact that just stitching a circular hole does not ensure that I am creating a hole through which the lid will not be dropped.
  3. Edge My concrete septic tank, which was constructed when the home was built in 1979 and does not have any manholes or openings for pumping out, is in poor condition.
  4. Is it feasible to cut two manholes using a concrete saw that are 20″/24″ in diameter and then build risers and a cover on top of them?
  5. Could you please share a picture of the tank top?
  6. It is common for the concrete top to be tapered; nevertheless, it may just be trapped by effloresent salts and filth.
  7. I have a feeling that simply tugging will not be effective.

This would have stopped leaks but would have made it extremely difficult to open the tank for the next person who needed to open the tank.

Repeat this process many times all around the cover’s perimeter.

For me, this has worked almost every time in the past.

It is recommended that you build a septic tank riser that is sealed to the tank top, as well as a new secure cover on top of the riser if your septic tank lid is not near to the ground level.

Never work on your own.

I’ve erected two wood 4x4s on top of the lifting ring to provide additional support.

All I’ve done three times is shattered those 4x4s.

Do you have any recommendations?

A septic tank pumping provider can remove plastic bags, tiny pebbles, and other debris from your tank, as well as the sediments, scum, and sludge that has accumulated there.

What is the best way to get them out?

When the septic tank is drained out, would it make sense to place a plastic bag over the top hole of the tank to keep the odors contained?

Gerard A plastic bag as a sewer line cap doesn’t seem right to me – it’s not durable, it’s the incorrect material if a cover is required, and if it’s a vent rather than an access pipe, the vent must be open to the atmosphere and protected from animal intrusion.

What is the function of this item?

A typical septic tank is equipped with clean out access covers that are strategically placed.

Maybe something as basic as a flat piece of concrete or stone will be sufficient, or maybe something more complex.

To be quite honest, I would have expected the contractor who dug the hole to be accountable for ensuring that the system was repaired and safe.

What should I do to solve it?

What store would I go to in order to acquire septic tank covers?

A few years ago, I had a beautiful new house built for me.

I have three plastic polylok lids, one of which is above ground and is for the pump.

I’d like to purchase risers so that I may build all three at a depth of around 6 inches below ground level.

What are the advantages and disadvantages.

Do you have any other suggestions?

I apologize for the lengthy post.

Sorry, but “True Bolt” isn’t a phrase I’m familiar with or associate with septic tank lids in any way.

Although this is not always the case, Mary, as the pumper may be able to access the entire tank bottom from a single opening depending on the tank’s size and shape; however, if your pumper is unable to do so from a single opening, you may want both openings opened to inspect the condition of the tank baffles.

There are two holes in my septic tank. Is it necessary to open both doors for a pump out?

Question:cannot find the manhole cover of the septic tank

(8th of August, 2014) “We’ve located the cesspool concrete lid (about 12 foot diameter), but after digging a 2 foot perimeter, we were unable to locate the manhole cover, which was required for an inspection.” vicki levin stated Help? My husband is becoming increasingly upset with the digging!

See also:  Where To Buy A Septic Tank? (Solution found)

Reply:

If it’s a cesspool, rather than a septic tank, and it’s spherical, the access lid is normally located in the center of the container.

Question: how do i remove septic tank lid that is stuck

The entrance lid would normally be in the center of the cesspool, if it is in fact a cesspool rather than a septic tank, and it is spherical.

Reply:

Anon:WARNING: If the septic tank cover, lid, or access aperture has partially caved in or sank into the tank, the condition is extremely dangerous – an unsecure cover implies that someone might fall into the tank, which is generally lethal very quickly. Please keep everyone away from the septic tank area until such time as you have had the tank inspected and opened for additional inspection by a professional. Depending on the tank type and condition, lifting the lid may necessitate the use of a pry bar or wrecking bar, as well as a small portable winch (which is unusual).

Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Pumping ProcedurePumper Truck Operation Articles

  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION
  • MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • HOW TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN NOT TO PUMP A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO FIND A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK
  • INSPECT THE SEPTIC TANK BEFORE PUMPING
  • SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION PROCEDURE
  • SEPTIC TANK LEVELS OF SEWAGE
  • PUMPER TRU

Suggested citation for this web page

HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK at Inspect a Tank An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

KIT INSPECTION: OPENING A SEPTIC TANK An online encyclopedia of building and environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue avoidance guidance is available at pedia.com/building. Alternatively, take a look at the following:

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How to Remove Septic Tank Lid: The Ultimate Step-by-Step Guide!

Sewage tank maintenance is made easier by understanding how to remove a septic tank lid properly. Fortunately, the removal process is pretty basic and, in the majority of cases, does not necessitate the use of a professional’s assistance. This tutorial is meant to assist homeowners with removing the lid from their septic tank in a correct and safe manner. Let’s get this party started!

How to Remove Septic Tank Lid

Removing the cover of a septic tank is a pretty simple procedure.

Because most septic tank lids do not come with a lock, they may be opened at any time with the proper tools and materials.

You’ll Need:

  • Screwdriver, shovel, pry bar, metal detector (optional), broom, and other tools

Step 1: Locate the Septic Tank

In most areas, septic tanks must be located at least 10 feet away from the house’s foundation in order to function properly. It is possible to monitor their whereabouts by tracing the path of the drain as it leaves the residence. It’s possible that you’ll need to call your local health department instead if you can’t follow it down through the drainage system. If they’ve given permits for the system, it’s probable that they have a record of the location of the septic tank. If they don’t, get in touch with a reputable septic system company and inquire as to where it could be hidden or hidden from view.

It is possible to locate the approximate position of the septic tank using a metal detector if the tank is buried underground.

As a result, a metal detector will undoubtedly assist you in your hunt.

If it makes contact with something substantial, you’ve discovered your container.

Step 2: Dig Up the Lid

Septic tanks are often located beneath ground level. A covering of dirt or grass is frequently placed on top of them to prevent mishaps and odors from escaping because they require little care aside from the biannual or triennial pumping. Bring a shovel or other digging instrument with you to assist you in excavating the earth once you’ve discovered the tank. The lid should be perfectly flat on the tank, with the exception of a little seam around the edge. Prevent dirt from dropping and sliding down onto the lid by digging out at least 16 inches of earth on all sides and around the top of it.

Most tanks feature two or three lids, depending on their size.

Step 3: Remove the Lid

Due to the fact that septic tank lids are often built of concrete or steel, they are extremely tough to force apart and remove. The handles on some tank lids are built in, whilst others need the use of a pry bar to raise them open completely. If the lid has handles, enlist the help of a friend or family member to assist you in removing the lid from the container. If it doesn’t, put a screwdriver into the seam surrounding the lid and the pry bar into the space created by the screwdriver. Then press the button all the way down.

  • Use caution when doing so to avoid damaging the lid.
  • Keep in mind that septic tanks with concrete lids weigh significantly more than those with steel covers.
  • In such instances, it is preferable to employ a contractor to remove the lid on your behalf in order to avoid injuring the lid itself.
  • That’s all there is to it!
  • When the pumping or repairs are finished, replace the cover on the hole in the right manner.
  • Then you can either cover the lid with dirt or plant grass on top of it to finish it off.

The position of the tank should also be marked with a sign or a beautiful stepping stone to make it easier to find afterwards. You will avoid having to deal with the trouble of moving the tank’s cover in the future if you do this.

Septic Tank Lid Safety and Precautions

Concrete and steel are commonly used to construct septic tank lids, making it extremely difficult to force them off on their hinges. A pry bar is required to open some tank lids since they do not have built-in handles to pull on. If the lid has handles, enlist the help of a friend or family member to assist you in removing it from the container. If it doesn’t, put the pry bar into the space created by the screwdriver in the seam surrounding the lid. Press down after that. Remember to use caution when doing so since if you forcibly pry up a lid, the edges may shatter or chip.

  1. Please keep in mind that concrete lids on septic tanks weigh significantly more than steel lids.
  2. In such instances, it is preferable to engage a contractor to remove the lid on your behalf in order to avoid harming the lid.
  3. Then you’re done!
  4. When the pumping or repairs are finished, replace the cover on the hole in the right manner to seal it.
  5. After that, you may either cover the lid with dirt or plant grass on top of it to finish it off.
  6. You will avoid having to deal with the bother of shifting the tank’s cover in the future if you do it now.
  • Check the condition of the tank’s lids on a regular basis. Bolts, screws, and other locks should be used to secure the lids to prevent unauthorized entry. It is never safe to leave an open lid alone, even while it is being pumped or fixed. After working on the septic system, always double-check that the tank lids are properly closed and secure. Educate young children on the importance of not opening or playing with septic tank covers. Understand the exact location of the septic tank lids on your property
  • Vehicles and heavy gear should never be driven or parked on top of septic systems, since this may cause the lid to become dislodged or damaged. Stay away from the septic tank’s entry since the gases might knock you out. If you’re near a septic tank, don’t burn a cigarette or do anything else that may cause a fire. Septic tanks emit methane gas, which is very flammable and explosive. Whenever you are excavating outside, keep an eye out for hidden mechanical or electrical wires. No matter how precious something may appear to be, it is never safe to remove anything from a tank. Instead, you should hire an expert to collect it on your behalf. If someone falls into the tank, do not go in after them unless you are equipped to do so safely and effectively. Please dial 911 as soon as possible, and make sure the individual does not drown by placing a floating device in the tank.

Final Thoughts

We hope this tutorial was useful in assisting you with the procedure of lifting the lid of your septic tank! Allow us to conclude this piece with a final word of caution: until absolutely essential, leave the maintenance of your septic system to the experts. Open the lid only when you need to monitor the level of the tank’s liquids or gases. Wishing you the best of luck!

How to Remove a Septic Tank Lid

A septic tank lid is the section of the sewage tank that is located at the top of the tank. This lid must be removed at least once every several years in order to completely empty the tank. Every three to five years, depending on the size of the tank, a homeowner will need to have the septic tank pumped out and cleaned. Avoid allowing the tank to become overflowing, causing it to begin backing up into the home or overflowing out of the opening. The tank suffers serious damage as a result of this.

Step 1 – Locate Septic Tank

A septic tank lid is the section of the sewage tank that is located at the top of the tank. This lid must be removed at least once every several years in order to completely empty the tank. Every three to five years, depending on the size of the tank, a homeowner will need to have the septic tank pumped out and cleaned. Avoid allowing the tank to become overflowing, causing it to begin backing up into the home or overflowing out of the opening.

The tank suffers serious damage as a result of this. Removing the lid is a simple procedure that may be completed before the pumping service arrives or whenever you wish to examine the contents of the container.

Step 2 – Dig Up Septic Tank Lid

A septic tank lid is the section of the sewage tank that is located at the top of the tank. This lid must be removed at least once every several years in order to completely empty the tank. Every three to five years, depending on the size of the tank, a homeowner will need to have the septic tank pumped out and cleaned. Avoid allowing the tank to become overflowing, causing it to begin backing up into the home or overflowing out of the opening. The tank suffers serious damage as a result of this.

Step 3 – Pry Off Septic Tank Lid

The lid of the septic tank might be rather hefty, depending on the size of the tank. On all sides, it is a solid block of concrete that is perfectly flat. It could have a handle that you can pull on. Pry bars are required to remove the majority of septic tank lids from their resting positions. Set the prybar in the seam and push it down until it is secure. As the lid begins to rise out of the hole, have someone assist you in moving it to the side. Place the lid on the ground’s surface so that it is not in the path of the pumping vehicle.

How do you open a septic tank lid?

  1. Find the location of the septic tank. Most building rules require that the tank be located at least 10 feet away from the house foundation
  2. Remove the soil off the top of the tank. The septic tank lid will be a square piece of concrete that will be installed at the center of the tank. Insert the screwdriver into the seam along the lid’s perimeter
See also:  Why Is My Septic Tank Overflowing? (Best solution)

The location of the septic tank should be determined first. According to most building requirements, the tank must be at least 10 feet away from the house foundation. Remove any soil that has accumulated around the tank’s top; This will be a square piece of concrete that will be placed at the center of the tank as the lid. Screwdriver into seam around lid with a slanting motion

How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

All septic tanks eventually fill with sediments and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain in excellent functioning order. If the tank’s lid is not on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located. A typical septic tank is 4 inches to 4 feet underground, with all of its components, including the cover, buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underneath. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the surface of the ground.

Consult A Map

All septic tanks eventually become clogged with particles and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain operational. Unless the tank’s lid is mounted on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located. In the majority of situations, the whole septic tank, including the cover, is buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the ground.

Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land.

After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if it is there. Locate the same spot outside and make a note of it. Insert a thin metal probe into the earth, identify the 4-inch sewage line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the property. Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet apart from the home in all states except Alaska.

Whenever the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene it indicates that the tank has been located.

Locate The Lid

The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 5 feet by 8 feet. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its boundaries and outline the rectangle’s boundary using a pencil. A septic tank that was built before 1975 will have a single concrete lid that is 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. If the tank was built after 1975, it will have two covers made of fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at the ends of the rectangle and centered at the ends of the rectangle.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

Mark The Spot

Make a note on the ground near where the tank was pumped by a professional and the lid was buried to serve as a reference in the future. In order to keep track of where you are, you should choose a hefty circular patio tile that is embedded in the ground. Additionally, draw your own map of the area and store it with your other important papers.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank Lid

Despite the fact that septic tanks are vast, they can be difficult to identify, especially if they have not been properly maintained over time. It is critical to be aware of the location of your septic tank lid and septic tank, whether or not you are aware of it. You must be aware of the location of your dishwasher, toilet, and sewage line in order to properly care for these appliances. Despite the fact that septic tanks are vast, they can be difficult to identify, especially if they have not been properly maintained over time.

Continue reading to find out how to locate your septic tank lid. If you have any difficulty locating it, please do not hesitate to contact B D Plumbing for assistance.

Why It’s Important to Know Where Your Septic Tank Lid Is

Locating the location of your septic tank is a good first step in diagnosing septic tank problems as soon as they occur. Consider the following scenario: If you notice water near your septic tank lid, you’ll know right away that there might be an issue with your system being overloaded with waste. Aside from that, understanding the location of your septic tank allows you to prevent parking cars directly on top of it, which might cause the tank to collapse. You may also lead service experts to the appropriate location for septic tank services, saving them both time and money in the process.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank Opening

Knowing why it is so critical to know where your septic tank lid is located, you may begin the process of locating the lid. During your search, keep an eye out for a circular top that’s around two feet broad and roughly two feet in diameter. Septic tank lids are often constructed of green or black plastic, although they can also be built of concrete. It is not always simple to locate the septic tank lid, however, because grass, mud, and other debris might obscure the opening.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank as a New Homeowner

During the process of purchasing your house, you should have been provided with a schematic of your property that showed the location of your septic tank. Your home inspection will most likely include this service. Check the diagram against your home to see where your septic tank is located. You may need to dig around the tank to determine whether the lid has been hidden. Consider placing a large item, such as a boulder, on top of the septic lid to serve as a reminder of its location.

Septic Tank Maintenance

At the time of your purchase, you should have been provided with an architectural plan detailing the location of your septic tank. This is often included as part of your home inspection. Check the diagram against your home to see where your septic tank is located. You may need to dig around the tank to see whether the lid has been hidden by ground debris. You may consider placing a large object on top of the septic lid so that you will remember where it is.

Get in Touch With B D Today!

Are you dealing with any plumbing issues that necessitate the intervention of a professional? Are you dealing with a plumbing problem that simply must be put off any longer? Inform B D Plumbing of the situation. Plumbing services are provided across the greater Washington, D.C. metropolitan region, including Maryland and Northern Virginia, by B D Plumbing Inc. Get in contact with us by dialing (301) 595-1141 or by following us on social media, which includes Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest (to name a few platforms).

This item was posted on Friday, April 17th, 2020 at and is filed under Uncategorized.

Can’t remove septic tank lid

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Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:FrontRanger (CO)Hi, first post here. This issue may have come up before but I wasn’t able to find it using the Search feature.I’ve got a two-chamber concrete septic tank. The previous owners used to pump out the tank by removing only the lid on the inlet-side chamber. Now the concrete lid on the outlet-side chamber can’t be removed. The septic serviceman said that it hadn’t been removed in so long, the concrete had “re-set”. The way he explained it, irrigation and rain water soak through the soil, then get into the concrete, and over time form a bond. He also said that you can’t pump/clean/inspect the tank properly without removing that lid. Naturally, I called up the previous owner, but he had a different story. I wanted to get some impartial advice to find out who was right, so here goes:1. The previous owner didn’t think it was necessary to remove the outlet-side cover. He said the septic pumping company was able to put their hose in over the baffle and pump out the outlet-side chamber. I’m no expert but I don’t see how that’s possible, given the size and flexibility of the hose, and the extremely limited visibility with the hose in the hole. Is it possible to properly pump out the tank removing only the inlet-side lid? If so, how?2. If the answer to the first question is that you truly need to remove the outlet-side lid, what is the best way to solve the problem of the “re-set” concrete in the lid? The tank is located close to my house, beneath a lawn with sprinkler lines (both water and electrical) cleverly running right over the tank. Not the best choice on the part of the installer but naturally I want to minimize the excavation in that area.In case the options are specific to location, I’m located in Northern Colorado.Thanks!
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:hj (AZ)what are you using to lift the lid? I have never had a problem even when the lid was set with mortar.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:FrontRanger (CO)The lid has what looks like a curved piece of re-bar set into it. The septic service guy was prying up on that with something, I didn’t see exactly what he was doing. Then he took a digging bar and started chipping away little pieces at the seam between the tank top and the lid, then tried prying up in that little space. After doing that unsuccessfully he said the concrete had “re-set”.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:mm (MD)Fasten a chain to the lid handle and then wrap and tie it off around a digging bar that is held horizontally 2-3 feet above the tank.Have someone (a helper?) apply upward leverage on the bar against the ground while you take a second digging bar and, using the hammer end, gently but firmly pound on the outer edge of the concrete lid.It will come up.The lids are often set in tar to seal them against water seepage into the tank so they are tight, but it will release.Edited 1 times.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:FrontRanger (CO)Thanks, m m. Now that you mention that, I remember the septic service guy talking about that briefly, and also a variation using a jack to apply the force. He said he thought since it had been so long since it was last removed, the re-bar would break out of the concrete before the lid came up. I know that the previous owner had not removed it since 1995. Don’t know about the owner before that, but he might not have taken it off since it was installed in 1978!There was no tar or tar paper visible in the chipped-away sections. some sort of barrier seems like an obvious step for anyone who installs these things for a living, but it looks like it was omitted in this case.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:hj (AZ)I usually call a tow truck and use his hook in that rebar.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:hj (AZ)A couple of log splitting wedges between the lid and the tank will also help.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:mm (MD)”A couple of log splitting wedges between the lid and the tank will also help”.About all they’ll help in doing is to obliterate the lid.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:hj (AZ)The lid is about 8″ thick, it is not going to be “obliterated” unless it is completely deteriorated.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:FrontRanger (CO)Thanks for all the replies so far, about how to free up the stuck lid.Anyone for the first question? Is it possible to properly pump out the tank removing only the inlet-side lid? If so, how?Thank you.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:Paul48 (CT)Logically.Why would they put 2 access holes if one was enough?
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:hj (AZ)It appears that there are NO access holes just two halves of the lid. The center baffle doesn’t comeup the bottom of the lid so they just stick the hose into the other side.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:FrontRanger (CO)Re: It appears that there are NO access holes just two halves of the lid. The center baffle doesn’t come up the bottom of the lid so they just stick the hose into the other side.-Perhaps I’ve been using the wrong terminology. What I meant by “lid” was a roughly 18″x18″ opening in the top of the tank, i.e., the covering for the access hole.Re: Why would they put 2 access holes if one was enough?-The same track that my mind took. The question arose from the claim of the previous owner that one was sufficient, and that the hose could be put over the baffle into the outlet-side chamber. My skepticism comes from imagining a stiff 4″ hose maneuvering down a hole, over the baffle, and then into the other chamber. Two access holes would certainly make it more convenient. My question is, can it be done properly using only the one on the inlet-side?Thanks again for your time.
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Re: Can’t remove septic tank lid
Author:hj (AZ)18 x 18 ports are NOT the same as two tank halves. It would be difficult to put the hose across, IF you have a center baffle. In this case there may not be one and everything can be done from a single port.
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Dig the Correct Cover

Here are a few pointers to assist you in locating and digging the proper cover for your septic tank:

  • Locate the 4′′ sewer pipe that runs from your toilet and shower to the outside wall of your home. It should be visible. Most of the time, your tank is 8 to 15 feet from the point where the sewer pipe exits
  • Perhaps you have noticed an area outside where snow melts each winter
  • Most of the time, this area is within the 8 to 15-foot range. This is an excellent place to begin. To locate the four corners of the tank, probe the ground with an abar and mark the locations. A septic tank measures approximately 8 feet long by 5 feet wide and is covered with three different types of covers. Some tanks, on the other hand, are longer and made of plastic, making them more difficult to locate. Our company, Maine SepticPumping, requests that you locate and dig the center cover in order for us to properly clean and remove any solids from your tank. If you have a septic system that includes a pump, you should exercise caution. Unground electrical wiring will be present, and it is possible that it will pose a hazard. You should also locate and dig the cover for your pump chamber so that it can be pumped at the time of our service
  • If you are experiencing slow drains and the digging is relatively simple, you might consider digging all of the tank covers. All of the covers being removed would allow us to inspect your inlet area and clear any solids that may be blocking the flow of the water. This also allows us to see your outlet baffle clearly, allowing us to ensure that it is secure. If you have any questions when trying to locate your tank, please contact our office. MaineSepticPumping can also assist you in locating and digging your cover.

How to Find a Septic Tank Lid

Septic tanks are installed on certain properties, and it is a good idea to be aware of where your tank is located. The first stage will be to locate the septic tank lid, whether it is to prevent damage to the tank and drain field from heavy equipment, to locate the tank for excavating reasons, or to conduct a self-inspection of the septic tank.

We generally give this service to our customers while doing inspections or septic tank pumping, however we understand that some homeowners may prefer to discover it on their own. How to locate a septic tank lid on your own is outlined below.

Use the septic system plans if you have them.

The quickest and most straightforward method of locating a septic tank lid is to consult the original septic system drawings. The septic system drawings will include the position and dimensions of the tank in relation to the house. Simply measure the measurements of the septic tank lid using a measuring tape to determine where it is located. When it comes to septic system plans, it’s probable that your local board of health will have a copy if for some reason you don’t have access to them. It is common for the lid to be buried beneath the grass, necessitating some probing and digging.

The sewer pipe can be your guide to finding the septic tank lid.

Sometimes it’s difficult to locate septic tanks when using these blueprints, or you may not have a copy of your septic plans on hand. The sewer pipe in your basement is your next best chance if you can’t locate it. This is the pipe that transports all of the waste water from your home to the sewer. Take note of the location of the pipe in relation to the ground level. this will give you an idea of how deep your tank will be buried under the earth. In addition, you will need to determine how many feet the pipe is away from the inner corner of your residence.

Make your way to the location where you believe the drain pipe is exiting the building.

Use caution when opening a septic tank lid.

Opening the septic cover is the first step in checking the levels of your septic tank on your own if you’ve managed to discover it. Sitting septic tank covers, particularly the older concrete ones, are extremely heavy and difficult to shift. The cover may feature hooks or grips that make it simpler to raise, or you may need to use a tool such as a shovel as a lever to open it. Older septic tanks should be handled with caution since the lids of older septic tanks can grow unstable over time and are more prone to breaking.

A anyone falling into this tank, especially a child or a pet, would be in grave danger.

Because the exposed hole in the ground might be easily missed, never leave the open tank alone, even for a little moment of reflection.

Measure the Levels of Your Septic Tank Yourself

While we provide a handy service to check the levels in your septic tank, you may also do so by yourself if you choose. To measure the amount of sludge, as we discussed in our previous piece, you can use a long stick or a two by four with an adhesive strip attached to one end, or you can acquire a special measuring equipment known as a “sludge judge.” Because the average septic tank contains 4-5 feet of water, it’s preferable to use a measuring stick that’s at least 7 feet long. If necessary, lower your handmade measuring stick or sludge judge down into the septic tank after you’ve opened the lid and maintained perfect verticality of the stick.

As soon as you feel the measuring stick make contact with the bottom of the tank, you may bring it back up and measure the amount of sludge by counting the number of inches of black material that is staining the stick.

As soon as you have an understanding of the levels in your septic tank, you can assess whether or not your septic tank requires pumping.

Make careful to cover the tank promptly and never leave the open tank alone, even for a minute, to avoid uninvited animals or humans from falling in to protect them from drowning.

Need help? Call Grant Septic Tech.

We are well aware that doing things oneself is not always simple or straightforward. But that is precisely why we are here! Our family has been in the septic system business for more than 60 years, and we’ve seen just about everything. Alternatively, if you’ve had difficulties with any of these processes (or simply want to avoid the mess), simply give us a call – we know where to look for a septic tank lid and can complete a comprehensive check for $127. There will be no fee for the inspection if we discover that your septic tank requires pumping while we are there; you will only be responsible for the cost of the septic tank pumping while we are there.

We provide service in a wide range of places around Massachusetts.

3 Safety Guidelines To Prevent Septic System – Related Injuries And Illness

The following are three safety guidelines to follow in order to avoid septic system-related injuries and illnesses. Because of their widespread use and the fact that they are frequently out of sight, out of mind, septic systems are sometimes taken for granted. Septic systems, on the other hand, can bring death, damage, and sickness in individuals who are not careful and do not follow safety procedures. Three particular principles for safeguarding yourself and anyone who may have access to your land and septic system are outlined in the following sections.

Ensure that the septic tank is accessible.

The drowning of children and some adults in sewage tanks has been reported in the past.

Even though septic tanks are buried beneath the earth, a vertical extension of the tank, known as a riser, is visible above ground, allowing for pumping and maintenance.

Homes without sufficient septic tank protection are frequently abandoned in favor of unsecured lids and coverings, which are readily moved by children and animals.

Locking lids are the most secure since they need the use of a key or a combination to open.

They provide obvious access to the tank while also preventing someone from falling into the tank if the lid is removed accidentally.

Keep maintenance and repair to a minimum by using professionals.

Septic tanks are home to a variety of hidden dangers and lethal traps that must be avoided at all costs.

For example, the natural decaying process of biological waste releases combustible methane, which is dangerous to the environment.

Suffocation is another hazard posed by septic tank failures.

Because none of these gases are oxygenating, a human who is exposed to them may become quickly exhausted and pass out.

Aside from that, avoid leaning over an open septic tank since the gases rising from the tank might lead you to lose consciousness and fall into the tank opening.

Stay away from biological hazards.

While not every germ found in a septic system poses a threat to human health, a large number of disease-causing bacteria, viruses, and protozoa can be found in and near septic systems and should be avoided.

The above-mentioned precaution of staying out of the tank can protect you from being exposed to these microorganisms.

If it is operating properly, the drain field allows liquid effluent from the tank to trickle downhill into the soil, where it is filtered and sterilized before returning to the tank for disposal.

That is why you should avoid walking across a flooded drain field and calling a certified septic service provider, such as Walters Environmental Services, for assistance as soon as possible.

You should not attempt to repair a drain field problem on your own, however you can limit your water use to lower water levels and aid in the drying out of the drainage field.

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