How To Find Septic Tank Lid? (Perfect answer)

You can locate the lid of your septic tank by poking the ground every few feet with a metal probe. Lids can be buried up to a foot deep on average, so be sure to investigate any bumps that may indicate something is buried underneath.

How far down is a septic tank lid?

Often, septic tank lids are at ground level. In most cases, they have buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

Can a metal detector find a septic tank?

If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector. Based on your conclusions in Step 3, if your septic tank is likely made from concrete or steel, a metal detector can make the task of locating it much easier. But not just any metal detector will do.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

Do septic tanks have two lids?

Locate The Lid A septic tank installed before 1975 will have a single 24-inch concrete lid in the center of the rectangle. A two-compartment tank installed after 1975 will have two lids of either fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at opposite ends of the rectangle.

How do you hide a septic tank cover?

The Do’s For Hiding Your Septic Tank

  1. Plant tall native grasses with fibrous roots around the opening to conceal the tank lid from view.
  2. Place a light statue, bird bath or potted plant over the septic lid.
  3. Septic tank risers and covers are an alternative to concrete and blend into green grass.

Can I drive over my leach field?

Can You Drive on a Septic Drain Field? No, driving over your septic drain field is similarly never ever recommended. As much as you are able to help it, prevent cars or heavy equipment (such as oil delivery trucks, swimming pool water trucks, cement mixers, and also the like) to drive straight over the field.

Can you use a metal detector to find sewer lines?

Using a Plumbing Pipe Detector to Locate Underground Pipes. As a property owner there will be times when, for a variety of reasons, you will need to locate underground metal objects. For example, using a pipe locator metal detector you can easily pinpoint leaking underground pipes quickly.

Are septic tanks made of metal?

The majority of septic tanks are constructed out of concrete, fiberglass, polyethylene or coated steel. Typically, septic tanks with a capacity smaller than 6,000 gallons are pre-manufactured. Larger septic tanks are constructed in place or assembled on-site from pre-manufactured sections.

How do I know if my house has a septic tank?

A surefire way to confirm whether or not your home has a septic system is to check your property records. It is likely that the building permit and blueprints for your home and property will contain information about the presence (or lack) of a septic tank.

How do I get certified to install septic tank in GA?

Certified Lists:

  1. Review the certification requirements for individuals and companies.
  2. Study for the exam(s).
  3. Contact your County Environmental Health Office to schedule your exam.
  4. Complete the application(s) and bring them to your county.
  5. If starting a new company, pay your company certification fee.

Do homes in LA have septic tanks?

Thousands of houses throughout Southern California have septic systems.

How to Find a Septic Tank Lid

Having spent a few hours unsuccessfully digging around in your yard, it will be time to eat your hoagie and retire for the evening. Then it will be necessary to rent or borrow a metal detector to complete the investigation. If your next-door neighbor loves Star Wars action figures or has more than three unidentified antennae on his roof, there is a significant probability that he has a metal detector that you may use to search for treasure. If you’re lucky, the metal detector will actually assist you in discovering your septic tank, rather than just a bunch of old buried car parts.

As told in local legend, a well-known pumper known as “Zarzar The Incredible” can locate sewage tanks by using a 30′ metal measuring tape to trace their location.

Continue to press your commode (“commode” sounds sophisticated) tape deeper and farther down the pipes until he “feels” the bottom of the tank with his fingers.

Locating equipment that can be used to find septic tanks was just acquired by me.

  1. Call me at 574-533-1470 if you’d like to learn more.
  2. A video of the interior of your sewer pipes can then be created for you.
  3. Related: For more information, please see our Septic System Care page.
  4. A Brief Description of Services Provided by Meade Septic Design Inc Detailed information about Meade Septic Design, Inc.
  5. You can contact me via email!

Use the septic system plans if you have them.

The quickest and most straightforward method of locating a septic tank lid is to consult the original septic system drawings. The septic system drawings will include the position and dimensions of the tank in relation to the house. Simply measure the measurements of the septic tank lid using a measuring tape to determine where it is located. When it comes to septic system plans, it’s probable that your local board of health will have a copy if for some reason you don’t have access to them.

It is common for the lid to be buried beneath the grass, necessitating some probing and digging. However, if the previous owner placed an aseptic tank lid riser, the lid will be easy to locate and should be visible through the grass.

The sewer pipe can be your guide to finding the septic tank lid.

Sometimes it’s difficult to locate septic tanks when using these blueprints, or you may not have a copy of your septic plans on hand. The sewer pipe in your basement is your next best chance if you can’t locate it. This is the pipe that transports all of the waste water from your home to the sewer. Take note of the location of the pipe in relation to the ground level. this will give you an idea of how deep your tank will be buried under the earth. In addition, you will need to determine how many feet the pipe is away from the inner corner of your residence.

Make your way to the location where you believe the drain pipe is exiting the building.

Use caution when opening a septic tank lid.

Opening the septic cover is the first step in checking the levels of your septic tank on your own if you’ve managed to discover it. Sitting septic tank covers, particularly the older concrete ones, are extremely heavy and difficult to shift. The cover may feature hooks or grips that make it simpler to raise, or you may need to use a tool such as a shovel as a lever to open it. Older septic tanks should be handled with caution since the lids of older septic tanks can become unstable over time and prone to fracture.

A anyone falling into this tank, especially a child or a pet, would be in grave danger.

Never leave the open tank unattended, even for a brief moment, because the uncovered hole in the ground can be difficult to detect.

Measure the Levels of Your Septic Tank Yourself

While we provide a handy service to check the levels in your septic tank, you may also do so by yourself if you choose. To measure the amount of sludge, as we discussed in our previous piece, you can use a long stick or a two by four with an adhesive strip attached to one end, or you can acquire a special measuring equipment known as a “sludge judge.” Because the average septic tank contains 4-5 feet of water, it’s preferable to use a measuring stick that’s at least 7 feet long. If necessary, lower your handmade measuring stick or sludge judge down into the septic tank after you’ve opened the lid and maintained perfect verticality of the stick.

As soon as you feel the measuring stick make contact with the bottom of the tank, you may bring it back up and measure the amount of sludge by counting the number of inches of black material that is staining the stick.

As soon as you have an understanding of the levels in your septic tank, you can assess whether or not your septic tank requires pumping.

Make careful to cover the tank promptly and never leave the open tank alone, even for a minute, to avoid uninvited animals or humans from falling in to protect them from drowning.

Need help? Call Grant Septic Tech.

We are well aware that doing things oneself is not always simple or straightforward. But that is precisely why we are here! Our family has been in the septic system business for more than 60 years, and we’ve seen just about everything. Alternatively, if you’ve had difficulties with any of these processes (or simply want to avoid the mess), simply give us a call – we know where to look for a septic tank lid and can complete a comprehensive check for $127. There will be no fee for the inspection if we discover that your septic tank requires pumping while we are there; you will only be responsible for the cost of the septic tank pumping while we are there.

We provide service in a wide range of places around Massachusetts.

How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

DIY is not always simple or straightforward, as we all well aware! But that’s exactly what we’re here to help you with. Over the course of more than 60 years, our family has seen it all when it comes to septic system repair and maintenance. If you’ve had difficulties with any of these procedures (or just want to avoid the mess), just give us a call – we know where to look for a septic tank lid and can complete a full inspection for $127 if you’re having trouble. The examination is free of charge if we discover that your septic tank requires pumping at that time; you will only be charged for the septic tank pumping that takes place when we are on site.

A wide range of towns and cities in Massachusetts are served by our company.

Consult A Map

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank. If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your efforts.

Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land. After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if it is there. Locate the same spot outside and make a note of it. Insert a thin metal probe into the earth, identify the 4-inch sewage line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the property.

Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet apart from the home in all states except Alaska. The majority of them are between 10 and 25 feet distant. Whenever the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene it indicates that the tank has been located.

Locate The Lid

The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 5 feet by 8 feet. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its boundaries and outline the rectangle’s boundary using a pencil. A septic tank that was built before 1975 will have a single concrete lid that is 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. If the tank was built after 1975, it will have two covers made of fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at the ends of the rectangle and centered at the ends of the rectangle.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

Mark The Spot

Make a note on the ground near where the tank was pumped by a professional and the lid was buried to serve as a reference in the future. In order to keep track of where you are, you should choose a hefty circular patio tile that is embedded in the ground. Additionally, draw your own map of the area and store it with your other important papers.

How to Find Your Septic Tank

The location of the tank should be marked for future reference once it has been emptied by a professional and the lid has been hidden. In order to keep track of where you are, you might use a hefty circular patio tile that is placed in the ground. Also, draw your own map of the area and save it with your other important papers.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the municipal records. The most straightforward method of locating your septic tank is to review the building plans for your home that were approved by the local government. You should have received an application from the business that installed the septic tank, which should contain schematics and specifications that will help you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was installed. 2. Look for highs and lows in your data. The majority of septic tanks are constructed in such a way that they are barely noticeable.

  • 3.
  • Almost usually, your septic tank will be constructed near where the main sewage line exits your property.
  • Septic tanks are typically positioned between ten and twenty-five feet away from a home’s foundation.
  • When you do, that’s when your septic tank comes into play!
  • Look for the Lid.
  • You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and installed after 1975.
  • Those areas should be excavated in order to disclose the lids.
  • Get in touch with the pros.
  • Lifting concrete lids will necessitate the use of specialized equipment.
  • A fall into an unprotected septic tank has the potential to be lethal.
  • Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you may file away with your other important house paperwork.

That’s all there is to it! If you’ve been wondering where your septic tank is, you now have five alternatives to choose from, which should make finding it easier than ever. To book a plumbing service in Bastrop County, please contact us now!

How to Locate Your Septic Tank Lid

Despite the fact that septic tanks are vast, they can be difficult to identify, especially if they have not been properly maintained over time. It is critical to be aware of the location of your septic tank lid and septic tank, whether or not you are aware of it. You must be aware of the location of your dishwasher, toilet, and sewage line in order to properly care for these appliances. Despite the fact that septic tanks are vast, they can be difficult to identify, especially if they have not been properly maintained over time.

See also:  How Often Do You Have To Drain A Septic Tank? (Solution)

Continue reading to find out how to locate your septic tank lid.

Why It’s Important to Know Where Your Septic Tank Lid Is

Locating the location of your septic tank is a good first step in diagnosing septic tank problems as soon as they occur. Consider the following scenario: If you notice water near your septic tank lid, you’ll know right away that there might be an issue with your system being overloaded with waste. Aside from that, understanding the location of your septic tank allows you to prevent parking cars directly on top of it, which might cause the tank to collapse. You may also lead service experts to the appropriate location for septic tank services, saving them both time and money in the process.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank Opening

Knowing why it is so critical to know where your septic tank lid is located, you may begin the process of locating the lid. During your search, keep an eye out for a circular top that’s around two feet broad and roughly two feet in diameter. Septic tank lids are often constructed of green or black plastic, although they can also be built of concrete. It is not always simple to locate the septic tank lid, however, because grass, mud, and other debris might obscure the opening.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank as a New Homeowner

During the process of purchasing your house, you should have been provided with a schematic of your property that showed the location of your septic tank. Your home inspection will most likely include this service. Check the diagram against your home to see where your septic tank is located. You may need to dig around the tank to determine whether the lid has been hidden. Consider placing a large item, such as a boulder, on top of the septic lid to serve as a reminder of its location.

Septic Tank Maintenance

It is important to keep your septic tank lid in good condition in order to avoid damage and to make it easier to access for future cleaning and maintenance. Consider trimming the grass surrounding your tank lid on a regular basis, eliminating all dirt and trash, and marking the area so that you can easily identify where the tank lid is.

Get in Touch With B D Today!

Are you dealing with any plumbing issues that necessitate the intervention of a professional? Are you dealing with a plumbing problem that simply must be put off any longer? Inform B D Plumbing of the situation. Plumbing services are provided across the greater Washington, D.C. metropolitan region, including Maryland and Northern Virginia, by B D Plumbing Inc. Get in contact with us by dialing (301) 595-1141 or by following us on social media, which includes Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest (to name a few platforms).

As a small, family-owned business, we realize how important your house is to you—and we strive to provide great service that reflects that importance! This item was posted on Friday, April 17th, 2020 at and is filed under Uncategorized. Commenting and pinging are temporarily closed for this post.

How to Locate a Septic Tank

A surprising number of homeowners have had to figure out how to find the location of a septic tank on their premises. If you’re purchasing a home with a septic system or discover that your property’s tank hasn’t been maintained in years, you’ll want to know where the tank is located because all septic tanks must be pumped at some point in time. In the course of a real estate transaction, the property owners or real estate agent may be aware of the location of the tank. Inquire about the “as-built,” which is a schematic of the septic system and the specifics of its installation.

Unfortunately, locating the septic tank may not be as simple as it appears.

Because septic system permits have only been needed in Oregon since 1972, you may have to depend on visual indicators to determine whether your system is working properly.

1.Follow the Outgoing Sewer Pipe

Look for the four-inch sewage pipe that runs through the structure and the location where it exits the building in the basement or crawl space. Locate the location outside the building where the pipe exits the building or the location of an access cover over the pipe. It is required that septic tanks be at least five feet away from the structure, although they are usually between 10 and 25 feet away. You may follow the pipe all the way to the tank using a metal probe. It is important to note that sewage lines may curve and run around the corner of a building rather than following a straight path to the holding tank.

2.Search for Septic Tank Risers and Lids

Septic tanks are divided into one or two compartments, depending on their age. Each compartment has a lid, with two compartments for dual-compartment tanks that were erected later. If the tank includes an access point known as a riser, the lid may be readily visible from outside. Look for round, plastic discs that are about a foot or two in diameter. Due to the fact that the lids might be flush with the ground or just a few inches above it, they can get overrun with grass and other plants over time.

Tanks without risers are likewise equipped with lids, however they are located underground.

3.Find the Drain Field First

In the absence of a riser and lid, search for indicators of a drain field, such as an area of grass that grows more quickly or more slowly than the rest of the yard, grass that is a different color from the rest of the yard, or areas where snow melts more quickly than in other parts of the yard. Spots of high or low ground in the yard might possibly indicate the presence of a subterranean tank or drain field. You will be able to discover the tank if you probe these regions.

Reasons to Hire a Contractor for Help

In the absence of a riser and lid, search for indicators of a drain field, such as an area of grass that grows more rapidly or more slowly than the rest of the yard, grass that is a different color from the rest of the yard, or areas where snow melts more quickly than in other areas of the yard.

High or low patches in the yard might potentially be an indication of an underground tank or drain field in the vicinity. You will be able to locate the tank by probing these regions.

  • Soil that is sinking around the tank or drain field. Drainage backup into the home’s sewer system, or toilet backup
  • A foul odor in the area where you assume the tank and drain field are located
  • When there is no rain, pooling water, muddy soil, or spongy grass might occur. Septic tank covers that are rusted, cracked, or have been replaced with improvised lids are prohibited.

Even though you may be ashamed about forgetting where your septic tank is, it is a very frequent problem among homeowners. A contractor may assist you in locating it, and he or she may do it as part of the pumping service. If you need assistance locating your tank or if you have any other questions, please contact us at 503-630-7802. We are available to assist you!

How to find your Septic Tank Cover in 3 Steps

Home-Diy When dealing with something as enormous as a septic tank, it should be simple to keep track of things, but in reality, the reverse is frequently true. If your bird has been resting in your yard for several years without being disturbed, the dirt above it has settled and the ground cover successfully camouflages it, making identifying one a bit of detective work. When the length of the sources is equal to zero, this.parentNode.removeChild(sources); otherwise, this.onerror = null; this.src = fallback; )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace(), ‘, /public/images/logo-fallback.png’) ” loading=”lazy”> ” loading=”lazy”> It might be difficult to locate a septic tank, regardless of its size.

You should, however, be able to complete the task without exhausting yourself with a shovel if you follow the process of logical inference and use two useful instruments.

  • Design a floor plan for your property
  • Metal detector, shovel and a 6-foot piece of rebar are all necessary tools for this job.

Tip

It is common for septic tanks to have two covers, one for cleaning the tank and another for servicing and maintaining the pump. If you don’t find the one you’re looking for, use the metal detector to locate the other one you’re looking for. If you are unable to locate a site plan, locate the sewer clean out and excavate to determine which direction the sewer runs. Starting in that direction, begin probing with the re-bar until you come across the tank.

Warning

You should immediately cease pounding at the bar when you find resistance. If your tank is made of plastic, you run the risk of damaging it. A short distance away will reveal if you have merely discovered a rock or whether you have encountered anything more substantial.

  1. Consult a site plan for your property that indicates where the tank will be located before installing it. If you don’t have one on hand, you may check it up in the records of the county building department, where the contractor who installed it was obligated to submit a copy of the certificate. Take note of the relative orientations of the tank and your house, as well as the distance between the tank and the side of your house where the sewer leaves. The sewage clean-out on the side of your property should be located and measured in the direction that it is intended to flow into the tank. Start probing for the tank at that point by pushing a 6-foot piece of re-bar into the earth with a sledge hammer to determine its location. Immediately after hitting an impediment, stop hammering and start excavating a foot or two farther down the road. a) Continue doing this until you can drive the re-bar even farther into the tank, which indicates that you have reached the end of the tank. In this manner, locate and mark the ends of the tank on both sides. To locate the cover, run a metal detector over the area you marked out with a marker. It is often made of metal, or at the very least contains metal components. In addition, if the tank is equipped with an effluent pump, which is always positioned beneath the lid, the metal detector will detect this as well. Starting at the location where you receive a favourable reading, begin digging.

The Drip Cap

  • When dealing with something as enormous as a septic tank, it should be simple to keep track of everything, yet the contrary is frequently true
  • If your plant has been lying in your yard for several years without being disturbed, the dirt above it has settled and the ground cover successfully conceals it, making identifying it a detective’s task. In order to locate the cover, use a metal detector to search the area you laid out. It is often made of metal, or at the very least contains metal components.

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Many folks have contacted me through e-mail (typically from across the nation) to inquire about the location of their septic tank. “I have no idea,” I generally say as a helpful response to the question. I really want to add something like, “It’s just off your driveway, near that bushy thing,” or anything along those lines. But, truly, even for the most experienced searchers, septic tanks are difficult to come by. The following are some strategies you might employ to assist you in locating your tank.

  • Precaution should be exercised before you get started.
  • So, proceed with caution!
  • Please let me know if you have any queries or need assistance.
  • Get to know the beast!
  • tanks are normally buried 4 inches to 4 feet below the surface of the ground.
  • You might be astonished to hear that someone knows exactly where it is hidden in plain sight.
  • It is against the law to dig or probe in your own yard without first locating and marking the underground services.

You will receive the following tools to aid you in your search: Measurement tape, tile probe, and a shovel (if you are ambitious) The following tools are required: a metal detector (borrow or rent one since septic tanks often include iron steel rebar in the lids), and a hoagie sandwich (because locating sewage tanks makes you hungry.trust me on this).

  • Examine the basement wall to see where all of the pipes join together and exit through the basement ceiling.
  • If you don’t have a basement, walk outdoors and check for the roof vents on your house.
  • Ordinarily, the sewage line that leads to the septic tank will exit the home right below this ventilation opening.
  • On sometimes, the ancient proverb “The grass is always greener on the other side of the septic tank” is true.

Your tank may be located by probing or digging for it, and with luck, you will locate it. Keep in mind that not everything that seems to be a septic tank actually is! It’s possible that you came upon one of the following instead:

  • Most of the time, I receive emails from folks asking where their septic tank is situated (typically from all across the nation). “I have no idea,” I normally say in response to be helpful. “It’s right off your driveway near that bushy thing,” I want to add in my head, but I’m not sure how. On the other hand, even for professionals, finding septic tanks can be difficult. You can use the following strategies to assist you in finding your tank. The following information will almost certainly have you exclaiming, “How intelligent these guys at Meade Septic Design are!” when you have finished reading. The reality is that they are not proprietary or innovative strategies, but rather tried and true ways for locating your tank in the marketplace. Here’s a word of warning before you start: It is possible for an ancient septic tank and drywell lids to fail, sending you plummeting to the ground or worse, drowning. Take precautions, then. “How to locate your septic tank” and “When Should I Pump My Septic Tank” are two of the films I’ve created. Please let me know if you have any questions or need assistance. Thanks! Stuart A core sampler is a good place to start if you don’t have one already. Learn everything you can about the creature. Septic tanks are typically 4.5 feet wide, 8.0 feet long, and 6 feet tall, depending on their size. tanks are normally buried 4 inches to 4 feet below the surface of the earth. Make sure to check with previous homeowners, your local health agency, and area pumpers before starting your quest for your yard’s favorite hidden concrete block. The fact that someone is aware of its whereabouts may come as a surprise. It is also free to call 811 to get your utilities tagged. Excavating or probing in your own yard without first marking the underground utilities is against the law! Don’t probe or attempt to dig up a high-pressure gas line “just for fun,” and don’t intentionally break the fiber-optic cable that connects the White House to the NORAD silos in North Dakota once they have been identified! Get the following tools to aid you in your search: Measurement tape, tile probe, and a spade (if you are ambitious) The following tools: a metal detector (borrow or rent one since septic tanks often include iron steel rebar in the lids), and a hoagie sandwich (because locating septic tanks makes you hungry.trust me on this). In order to begin, ask yourself, “Where does the sewage come out of my house?” The good news is that you have an unfinished basement. Examine the basement wall to see where all of the pipes join together and exit through the basement floor. Most of the time, your tank will be 10′ – 20′ outside of your home, directly in front of this pipe. For those of you who don’t have a basement, walk outside and look for the roof vent. This is a pipe that protrudes from your roof and is used to vent sewage gases to the outside environment. Ordinarily, the sewage line that leads to the septic tank will exit the home right below this ventilation vent. We hope that from this point on you will be able to locate your septic tank without too much trouble! “The grass is always greener on the other side of the septic tank,” as they say, is true on sometimes. Yes, the position of your tank may be indicated by a green rectangle in your backyard (perhaps you should have figured that out yourself.). The best you can do is probe or dig for your tank in the hopes of stumbling across it. It is important to be cautious since not everything that seems to be a septic tank actually is! In its place, you could have come across one or more of the following:
See also:  How To Run Sewer Pipe To Septic Tank? (Solved)

After a few hours of hopelessly digging about in your yard, it will be time to eat your hoagie and take a little sleep. Following that, it will be necessary to rent or borrow a metal detector. In the event that your next-door neighbor loves Star Wars action figures or has more than three unidentified antennae on his roof, there is a significant probability that you can borrow his metal detector. If you’re lucky, the metal detector will really assist you in finding your septic tank, rather than simply a bunch of old buried automobile parts.

  1. According to local legend, a pumper known as “Zarzar The Incredible” can locate sewage tanks using a metal measuring tape spanning 30 feet in length.
  2. Continue to press your commode (“commode” sounds sophisticated) tape deeper and farther down the pipes until he “feels” the bottom of the tank with his tape.
  3. I recently acquired locate equipment that can be used to locate septic tanks, and I’m excited about it.
  4. For further information, please contact me at 574-533-1470.
  5. After that, you may have a movie of the inside of your sewer pipes created!
  6. Related: Visit our Septic System Maintenance page for more information.
  7. Services provided by Meade Septic Design Inc.
  8. Both Clients and Projects are included.
  9. Send me an email!

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Having spent a few hours unsuccessfully digging about in your yard, it will be time to eat your hoagie and retire for the evening. Then it will be necessary to rent or borrow a metal detector to complete the investigation. If your next-door neighbor loves Star Wars action figures or has more than three unidentified antennae on his roof, there is a significant probability that he has a metal detector that you may use to search for treasure. If you’re lucky, the metal detector will really assist you in discovering your septic tank, rather than simply a bunch of old buried auto parts.

  • As told in local legend, a well-known pumper known as “Zarzar The Incredible” can locate sewage tanks by using a 30′ metal measuring tape to trace their location.
  • Continue to press your commode (“commode” sounds sophisticated) tape deeper and farther down the pipes until he “feels” the bottom of the tank with his fingers.
  • Locating equipment that can be used to find septic tanks was just acquired by me.
  • Call me at 574-533-1470 if you’d like to learn more.
  • A video of the interior of your sewer pipes can then be created for you.
  • Related: For further information, please see our Septic System Care page.

Related: Well, Dosing Tank, and Distribution Box are all included. A Brief Description of Services Provided by Meade Septic Design Inc Detailed information about Meade Septic Design, Inc. Prospective clients, as well as specific projects Questions about a septic system? You may contact me via email!

How To Find A Septic Tank: Step By Step

It is critical to maintain the health of your septic tank since it is responsible for securely storing and handling the wastewater that drains from your house. It is necessary to pump your septic tank once every 1-3 years, depending on the number of people living in your household and the size of your tank, in order to avoid septic tank repairs or early failure, which means you must be familiar with the location of your tank. It’s not often simple to identify your septic tank, and many plumbers charge extra for this service, which is especially true if your tank’s lid is buried beneath.

1. Gather Some Helpful Tools

Septic tank location may be made much easier with the use of several simple instruments and techniques. To locate your septic tank, you only need to know the following information: A soil probe is one of the most useful instruments for locating a septic tank. It is a tiny piece of metal that is used to puncture through the earth and detect anything that could be buried underneath. Start at the point where your sewage line exits your home and work your way straight out, inserting your soil probe every two feet along the way.

Using this method, you may also locate the cover for your septic tank.

While we highly advise keeping your cover clean and exposed in the event that you require emergency septic service, we recognize that this is not always the case.

2. Use a Septic Tank Map

If you are a new homeowner who is trying to figure out where your septic tank is, a septic tank map should be included in your inspection documentation. You can use this information to assist you in pinpointing the exact position of your storage tank. If you don’t have access to this map, there are a few of additional strategies you might employ.

3. Start Ruling Areas Out

The location of a septic tank cannot be constructed in specific areas due to the risk of causing major damage to your property or tank, as specified by local rules. Your septic tank will not be affected by the following:

  • There are some restrictions that state exactly where a septic tank cannot be built in order to prevent major harm to your property or tank from taking place. The following will not be true of your septic tank:

4. Inspect Your Property

If you take a hard look around your land, there’s a high possibility you’ll be able to locate your septic tank without having to do any probing whatsoever. In many circumstances, a septic tank may be identified by a slight dip or slope on your land that cannot be explained by any other means. Due to the fact that the hole that your contractors excavated for your septic tank may not have been exactly the proper size, they proceeded to install the tank anyhow. This is a rather regular occurrence.

When there is a minor divot or depression, it indicates that the hole was too large and that your contractors simply did not fill the depression to level the hole.

The likelihood of your septic tank being discovered in a few specific locations is quite high. Because of code issues or just because it doesn’t make sense, it’s highly unlikely that your septic tank will be located near any of the following locations:

  • If you take a hard look around your land, there’s a high possibility you’ll be able to locate your septic tank without having to do any probing or excavation. Most of the time, a septic tank may be identified by a little dip or slope on your land that can’t be explained by anything else. Due to the fact that the hole that your builders excavated for your septic tank may not have been exactly the proper size, they proceeded to install the tank anyhow. Why? Something like this is not unheard of. If the hole was too small, the top of the tank will protrude above ground level, and the rest of the tank will be filled with extra dirt, resulting in a little mound on your land that is usually covered with grass, soil, or other natural vegetation. When there is a minor divot or depression, it indicates that the hole was too large and that your builders simply did not fill the depression to level the hole out. During rainstorms, this is often a location that becomes highly wet or even floods. The likelihood of your septic tank being discovered in a few specific locations is quite high. You will almost certainly not locate your septic tank in any of the following locations, either because of code issues or just because it doesn’t make sense:

5. Inspect Your Yard

A comprehensive investigation of your yard may be necessary to discover your septic tank considerably more quickly in some cases. The following are important items to check for in your yard:

  • If your septic tank is overfilled, sewage can leak out into the ground and function as fertilizer for your lawn, resulting in lush green grass. A area of grass that is very lush and green is a good sign that your septic tank is just beneath it
  • Puddles that don’t make sense: If your septic tank is seriously overfilled, it is possible that water will pool on your grass. Another telltale indicator that your septic tank is below ground level is an unexplainable pool of water. Ground that is uneven: When installing septic tanks, it is possible that the contractors will mistakenly create high or low patches on your grass. If you come across any uneven terrain, it’s possible that your septic tank is right there.

If your septic tank is overfilled, sewage can leak out into the ground and function as fertilizer for your lawn, resulting in lusher grass. It’s a good clue that your septic tank is directly below the surface of the ground if you see an unusually lush area of grass. Water puddles that aren’t supposed to be there: If your septic tank is severely overfilled, it may cause water to pool on your grass. Another telltale indicator that your septic tank is failing is an odd pool of water. Land with a lot of variation: Septic tank technicians may inadvertently produce high or low patches on your grass when installing the tanks.

6. Follow Your Sewer Main/Sewer Pipes

Following your sewage lines is one of the most straightforward methods of locating your septic tank. These pipes have a diameter of roughly 4 inches and are commonly found in the basement or crawlspace of your house. They are not dangerous. Following the pipes from your house out into your yard, using your metal soil probe every 2 feet or so until you reach the tank, is a simple process once they are located. Aside from that, every drain in your home is connected to your sewage main, which in turn is connected to your septic tank.

The likelihood that one of your major sewer lines is located in your basement or crawlspace is high if you have exposed plumbing lines in your basement or crawlspace.

If the line is labeled, it is usually made of plastic or rubber.

7. Check Your Property Records

Lastly, if all else fails, a search of your property’s public records will almost certainly reveal the location of the tank you’re looking for. Your builders most likely secured a permit for your property because septic systems are required to be installed by law in every state. In order to do so, they had to develop a thorough plan that depicted your property as well as the exact location where they intended to construct the tank. This is done to ensure that the local health department is aware of the tank and is prepared to deal with any issues that may arise as a result of its presence.

If you look hard enough, you may be able to locate the original building records for your home without ever having to get in your car or visit your local records center. Some localities make these records public on the internet, whereas others do not.

What to Do Once You Find Your Septic Tank

Upon discovering the position of your septic tank, you should mark its location on a map of your property. Use something to indicate the location of your lid, such as an attractive garden item that can’t be changed, to help you locate it. A birdbath, a rock, or a potted plant are just a few of the possibilities. You are now ready to arrange your septic tank inspection and pumping service. Contact us now! If you have any more concerns regarding how to locate your septic tank, or if you want septic tank servicing, please contact The Plumbing Experts at (864) 210-3127 right now!

How to Find a Septic Tank and Manhole Cover

People frequently contact me through e-mail to inquire where they can find the septic tank cover for a septic tank, the manhole, or how to locate a septic tank in its natural state. Which is invariably met with the response “I don’t know.” Our plumbing how to will demonstrate that septic tanks and covers are never found in the same location, making it difficult for even the most experienced homeowners to make their way to the septic tank lid.

Check your building plans they often show you how to locate a septic tank.

It might be difficult to locate an aseptic tank, distribution box, or septic covers. The first thing you should do is double-check your original construction blueprints. Because these construction plans will frequently show you the exact placement of the septic tank or manhole covers for septic tanks, it is important that you keep them on hand. If you do not have your building plans, check with your local office of zoning to see if they already have a copy of your plan. Even if the septic system is still relatively new, there is a strong possibility they will, although many states do not save any of the earlier documentation.

It’s also possible to locate whichseptic tank service installed the system, and that company should be able to tell you exactly where the septic tank and/or septic tank lid are located.

How to find out where a sewer main exits the house.

If none of these options work, you will need to locate the point at which your sewage main exits your home. Whether you have a basement or crawl space, you should examine inside to see if there is a 4 inch black pipe coming out of the foundation and where it goes. It is necessary to locate the lowest drain in your home if you do not have a basement or crawl space, or if your sewage main is located beneath your home’s foundation, in order to complete this task. This is normally where a floor drain is located, and it is also most likely where the sewage line will exit your house.

See also:  How Do I Know If My Septic Tank Is Full? (Best solution)

Use a tile probe to find the pipes leading to the septic tank.

Having located your sewage main and having a general notion of where the sewer pipe exits the home, you will need to step outside and probe the ground directly next to your foundation with a tile probe or a 12-inch or 14-inch stainless steel rod until you locate the sewer pipe. However, if you push too hard, you may wind up poking a hole in the drainpipe, which is particularly dangerous if the drainpipe is an older type of cast iron pipe. Once you’ve located the main line, you’ll want to go on to the next step: locating the septic tank.

The majority of septic tank systems are located between ten and twenty feet away from your home.

Septic tanks and septic tank lids are two types of septic tanks.

The manhole cover for the septic tank may be found here. can be located in the exact center of the septic tank, a septic tank lid can also be located on the side of the septic tank inlet or outlet, there can even be two or three septic tank covers, or there can be none at all.

How to locate a distribution box.

At the very least, it should be a little easier to locate the distribution box. It is normally around ten to twenty feet away from the septic tank, and you can sometimes tell it is there just by looking at the way your grass grows in the spring and summer. A common occurrence is that the grass will be greener above the drain lines, and you will be able to observe a pattern on the lawn where the lines meet together, which indicates the location of your distribution box. Other than that, you’ll have to place the distribution box in the same manner as you did with the septic tank.

Some of the things you can find while locating your septic tank are:

  • Soils with a lot of clay. Clay soils can be difficult to penetrate, and once a probe is inserted, it can be very difficult to extract it
  • Rocky soils can also be difficult to penetrate. You believe you’ve found the tank, so you begin excavating, only to discover a rock. And this is something that may happen over and over. Deep-level systems. Tracking and digging in a hole that is more than 2 or 3 feet deep may be a genuine pleasure. Pipes that appear to twist and twirl before disappearing into nothingness are common in older systems.

It is recommended that specialists like Septic Tank Service do this type of work (some pumpers merely pump tanks; they do not find the tank). Often, simply by glancing at your house, a professional plumbing expert will be able to figure out exactly where everything is. In addition, if they are unable to locate it immediately, they still have all of the necessary equipment and plumbing tools to locate the septic tank’s lid much more quickly than you can.

External References

  • It is recommended that specialists like Septic Tank Service do this type of work (some pumpers merely pump tanks
  • They will not find the tank, for instance). Often, simply by glancing at your home, a professional plumbing expert will be able to tell exactly where everything is. In addition, if they are unable to locate it immediately, they still possess all of the necessary equipment and plumbing tools to locate the septic tank’s lid much more quickly than you can.

LOCATING YOUR TANK — JT’s SEPTIC

Septic tank location can be difficult, and it is best left to the expertise of a trained specialist. We have the experience and equipment necessary to locate and remove your tank lids as fast and effectively as possible while causing the least amount of damage to your property as possible. Attempting to save a few bucks time and time again, the homeowner (rightfully) digs trenches in the yard, sometimes for hours or even days, in an attempt to locate the tank; in the process, many well-meaning people have damaged utility lines and even the sewer pipes themselves.

For those of you who insist on trying to locate your own septic tank, the following are some pointers that will assist you in estimating its location:

  1. Locate your sewer cleanouts – the tank should be in close proximity to the cleanouts
  2. And If you have a small tank, you may notice dead areas in your yard
  3. However, this is rare. Some depressions in the ground, roughly 8′ x 5′ in size, may be present. Check with the county to see whether you have a plot plan of utilities in your yard. Depending on how deep the tank is, you may want to consider building risers, which will bring the tank access up to the surface. JT’s would be pleased to install risers for you, or you may purchaseTuf-Titebrand risers from JT’s and have them installed yourself.

obtain A COPY OF YOUR PLOT PLAN

Owners of septic systems can acquire a copy of their septic permit and plot plan by contacting Yavapai County Environmental Services. These can be sent, faxed, or emailed, or they can be picked up at the County building. When it comes to supplying information on the size and placement of your system, these documents are really useful. Call (928) 771-3562 to schedule a septic inspection. The Permit Research phone number is (928) 771-3465 and the Fax number is (928) 771-3443. Send an email to: [email protected] (this includes Permit Research Requests).

Locating & Digging

Information can be obtained by calling (425) 432-3084 or (253) 639-3606 or (360) 825-4809, or by emailing [email protected] If you are unable to locate and uncover your septic tank lids on your own, Lilly’s Septic Service Experts can assist you with this task. The illustrations and diagrams that follow will assist you in determining how your septic tank lids are constructed and installed. (If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us for assistance.) Most of the time, the septic tank is positioned roughly 5 feet away from the home, just above the lowest bathroom or kitchen.

Owner Darren McCullough has 20 years of expertise locating and digging septic tank lids, and it is as if he had X-Ray Vision to see exactly where the lid is located!

1975 and earlier (Single Compartment)

It is anticipated that this tank will have one main lid and two smaller baffle lids on either end of the tank, as illustrated in the picture below).

1975 – 1980 to Present (Two Compartment)

(As seen in the picture below, this tank will have one main lid and two smaller baffle lids on either end of the tank.)

1990 to Present (Two Compartment with Pump Tank)

(If a Pressure Distribution System is installed, this tank will have only one main lid located in the center of the tank.) Give us a call today to learn more.

(425) 432-3084 * (253) 253-3606 * (360) 825-4809

For further information, please contact us. (When built with a Pressure Distribution System, there will be only one main lid in the center of the tank.)

Septic Tank Repair Atlanta GA – Septic System Repair Near Me

Septic tank or system failure is the last thing that any homeowner or business owner wants to deal with on a daily basis. It does, however, happen from time to time, which is regrettable. It is important to know that the crew you call will be prepared to give you with the highest quality septic tank repair Atlanta has to offer when the time comes. This necessitates contacting Septic Masters. We service and repair septic systems across the Metro region, and you will not find a more dedicated or better-informed customer care team anywhere else in town.

Septic Tank Repair Atlanta GA

All aspects of your septic system, including the pump and drain field, may be repaired by our team of experts at Septic Masters. We recognize that the health of your entire home is dependent on the operation of your septic system. As a matter of fact, we believe it is the very last thing you need be concerned about. Nonetheless, if you are experiencing difficulties, we want to make certain that the situation is rectified as quickly as possible. Some of the warning indications that your septic system is malfunctioning are as follows:

  • If you have sewage backing up inside your home, call an emergency plumber. In your yard, there is a pool of water, particularly near where the septic tank is located
  • A rotten egg stench, whether inside or outside your home
  • There is more sponginess in the grass surrounding the tank compared to the rest of the yard. drainage that is slow or sluggish

In the event that you detect any of these problems, there is no need to be alarmed. Septic Masters provides excellent septic servicing, pumping, and repair, and we are always here to assist you with your needs.

Septic Tank Repair Near Me

Do not put off septic system repairs any longer than absolutely necessary. Emergency service is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week throughout Atlanta and the surrounding metro region. This includes Gwinnett and Hall counties, Barrow and Forsyth counties, and other nearby counties. Contact our professionals immediately to benefit from a first-class client experience as well as the septic system repairs that you require.

Dig the Correct Cover

Here are a few pointers to assist you in locating and digging the proper cover for your septic tank:

  • Locate the 4′′ sewage pipe that runs from your toilet and shower to the exterior wall of your home. It should be visible. Most of the time, your tank is 8 to 15 feet from the place where the sewer pipe exits
  • Perhaps you have seen an area outdoors where snow melts each winter
  • Most of the time, this location is within the 8 to 15-foot range. This is an excellent place to begin. To identify the four corners of the tank, probe the ground with an abar and mark the locations. A septic tank measures roughly 8 feet long by 5 feet broad and is covered with three different types of coverings. Some tanks, on the other hand, are longer and made of plastic, making them more difficult to spot. Our company, Maine SepticPumping, requests that you find and excavate the center cover in order for us to thoroughly clean and remove any sediments from your tank. If you have a septic system that includes a pump, you should exercise caution. Unground electrical wire will be present, and it is possible that it could pose a hazard. You should also find and dig the cover for your pump chamber so that it can be pumped at the time of our service
  • If you are experiencing sluggish drains and the digging is relatively simple, you can try excavating all of the tank covers. All of the covers being removed would allow us to inspect your input region and eliminate any sediments that may be blocking the passage of the water. This also allows us to view your outlet baffle clearly, allowing us to ensure that it is secure. If you have any questions when trying to locate your tank, please contact our office. MaineSepticPumping can also assist you in locating and digging your cover.

How to find your Septic Tank at Home

Look locate the 4′′ sewage pipe that runs from your toilet and shower to the exterior wall of your home. It should be easy to find. When your tank is 8 to 15 feet away from the sewer pipe’s departure point, you may have observed a region outdoors where snow melts throughout the winter; this area is normally between 8 and 15 feet away from the sewer pipe’s exit point. A excellent place to begin is with the following. To locate the four corners of the tank, use an abar to probe the earth. There are three alternative coverings for a septic tank that is roughly 8′ long by 5′ broad.

If your septic system has a pump, you should use caution when using it.

You should also find and dig the cover for your pump chamber so that it may be pumped at the time of our service; if you are experiencing sluggish drains and the digging is relatively simple, you can try excavating all of the tank covers at one time.

This also allows us to view your outlet baffle clearly, allowing us to ensure that it is safe.

We can also help you find and excavate your cover; MaineSepticPumping can do both.

Many septic tank installers will attempt to blend these access risers into the surrounding landscaping so they don’t create an ugly eyesore.

So the next step is to mentally go about your yard, looking for any circular, plastic lids that could be lying around. These can range in size from 10 inches to 24 inches in diameter and can be either black or green. Second, if the answer is no, consider any round, square, or rectangular concrete lids that may be present in your yard or landscaping as a possible source of contamination. Often, they will be practically flat with the surface of the ground, allowing a lawnmower or rake to pass directly over the top of them without causing damage.

  1. Typically, the septic tank access will be no more than 10 feet away from your home, but in the event of an older home or a subsequent addition to the property, they may be closer than that.
  2. Hopefully, you have a basement to store your belongings.
  3. If your home does not have a basement or crawlspace, we will rely on other indications to locate your home.
  4. All of these pipes should converge into a single bigger pipe (usually 4 inches in diameter) that exits the house via one of the home’s walls.
  5. Now it’s time to go outdoors.

Check the area where the pipe comes out of the house. There may be a PVC pipe extending to the surface, with a threaded cleanout cap on it. If you find this, you’re well on the way to victory.

Take a check at the roof if your property is constructed on a slab with no basement or crawlspace beneath it. Check the roof for a vent pipe that is coming out of it. An internal vent that travels straight up, through the roof, and out the top of your home is common. If you can identify that vent, it might be possible to figure out where the pipe is departing the house. Continue walking outside from the house for a few steps, keeping an eye out for that round, square, or rectangular cover. If you can’t discover it, check for a little sunken place in the yard that could be hiding anything.

If you notice one of those, you might want to look underneath it to see if there is an entry point hidden there.

It’s possible that here is where your tank is lurking. If none of these suggestions have resulted in victory, and you begin to observe your neighbors peering through their blinds with those anxious glances that neighbors are so prone to giving.give us a call!

We have foundseptic tanksin many strange and unpredictable places. Here’s hoping you win the game on how to find your septic tank. Here tanky, tanky, tanky! If you need to schedule aseptic tank cleaning, pumping, or inspection, don’t hesitate to call Shankster Bros at(260)-982-7111. any time.

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