How To Find Septic Tank In Old House? (Solution found)

Go to your basement or crawl space, and then look for the main sewer line that leads to your septic tank. Look for a pipe that’s roughly four inches in diameter that leads away from your house. Remember the location of the sewer pipe and where the pipe leaves your home so you can find it outside.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

Where are most septic tanks located?

Toe the Line. Your septic tank will most certainly be installed along the main sewer line that runs out of your home. Look for the 4-inch sewer that exits the crawl space or basement, and locate the same spot outside the home. Septic tanks are usually located between ten to 25 feet away from the home.

How do I know if my house has a septic tank?

Some of the signs that your property has a septic tank are:

  1. The tank needing to be emptied each year.
  2. 2, 3 or 4 manholes in close proximity to each other above ground.
  3. Possible vent pipes above ground – these take unpleasant smells and gasses from the tank and distribute them into the air.

Can a metal detector find a septic tank?

If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector. Based on your conclusions in Step 3, if your septic tank is likely made from concrete or steel, a metal detector can make the task of locating it much easier. But not just any metal detector will do.

How do I find the layout of my septic system?

Go to your basement or crawl space, and then look for the main sewer line that leads to your septic tank. Look for a pipe that’s roughly four inches in diameter that leads away from your house. Remember the location of the sewer pipe and where the pipe leaves your home so you can find it outside.

How do I find where my septic tank is buried?

In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter. If you do not find the lid by probing, shallow excavation with a shovel along the tank’s perimeter should reveal the lid.

How were old septic tanks built?

Many of the first septic tanks were concrete tanks that were formed out of wood and poured in place in the ground and covered with a concrete lid or often some type of lumber. In the 1960s, precast concrete tanks became more prevalent as the standard of practice improved.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

What is the difference between a septic tank and a cesspit?

A cesspit is a sealed underground tank that simply collects wastewater and sewage. In contrast, septic tanks use a simple treatment process which allows the treated wastewater to drain away to a soakaway or stream.

Is septic tank better than sewer?

Although septic systems require a bit more maintenance and attention, they have a number of advantages over sewer lines. Since they don’t pump wastewater long distances to be processed at a water treatment facility, they use less energy overall and have a smaller environmental impact.

How do you find out if a property is on mains drainage?

One way to find out if your property has surface water drainage is checking your property’s Title Deeds (you can do this through Gov), or looking at your original Planning Application.

Can I drive over my leach field?

Can You Drive on a Septic Drain Field? No, driving over your septic drain field is similarly never ever recommended. As much as you are able to help it, prevent cars or heavy equipment (such as oil delivery trucks, swimming pool water trucks, cement mixers, and also the like) to drive straight over the field.

How much does a pump for a septic tank cost?

Average Cost To Pump A Septic Tank The national average cost to clean and pump a septic tank is between $295 and $610 with most people spending around $375. Depending on the size of your septic tank, pumping could cost as low as $250 for a 750-gallon tank, or as high as $895 for a 1,250-gallon tank.

Can you use a metal detector to find sewer lines?

Using a Plumbing Pipe Detector to Locate Underground Pipes. As a property owner there will be times when, for a variety of reasons, you will need to locate underground metal objects. For example, using a pipe locator metal detector you can easily pinpoint leaking underground pipes quickly.

How To Find a Septic Tank Location in an Old House (Tips and Techniques)

It is important for every homeowner to be aware of the location of their septic tank. It is quite beneficial for dealing with a variety of septic system difficulties. The septic tank can be difficult to identify in some older homes, which can be a major hassle if you are moving into one. In this post, we’ll discuss the significance of your septic tank, as well as how to determine whether or not you actually have one. Following that, we’ll go through some of the measures you may take to locate a septic tank in an old house or property.

Importance of Locating Your Septic Tank

There are a variety of reasons why it is important for you to be aware of the location of your septic tank. For starters, it makes it easier to inspect and fix your septic system. Being aware of the location of your septic tank can also assist you with any future maintenance you conduct around the property. It is impossible to avoid damage to the tank and its associated lines unless you are aware of their location. If you hire a professional, they will be able to spend more time searching for your tank.

More information may be found at:

  • How To Locate Your Septic Drain Field Lines
  • Different Types Of Septic Systems (Which Is The Best For You? )
  • How To Find Your Septic Drain Field Lines

How to Know if You Have a Septic Tank

If you have recently purchased a home, it is possible that you are unaware of the presence of a septic tank. The simplest method to find out is to look at your monthly water bill. Sewer services will not be charged if you have a septic tank, which will save you money. Additionally, the location of your home is an important factor to consider. If you live in a rural region, the likelihood that your home is equipped with a septic tank is rather high.

Where Can’t Your Septic Tank Be?

In the next part, we’ll have a look at the various strategies for locating your tank. But first and foremost, it’s crucial to note that there are several sites where your tank is not permitted. This will assist you in narrowing down your search.

Under Paved Surfaces

Onward to the following part, where we’ll examine the various methods of tracking down your tank. To begin, it’s crucial to note that there are several situations where your tank will not be permitted to be present. In order to refine your search, you need perform the following:

In the House

Most individuals would probably consider this to be self-evident. Septic tanks are not permitted to be installed anyplace in your home. However, the tank is usually buried someplace outdoors, despite the fact that there are hints in your home that would lead you in the appropriate location. Can you image how bad that would smell?

Immediately Next to Your House

Tanks are not only not permitted in your home, but they are also not permitted in close proximity to your home. In accordance with the building regulations, any tank that is located within five feet of the home must be decommissioned.

Under the Patio

The same line of reasoning holds true for installing a septic tank beneath your deck, patio, addition, shed or other structure. If you notice a building in your backyard, don’t even bother looking for your tank there.

Next to Your Well

It’s safe to assume that if you have a well, there is no tank in the vicinity.

Under Trees

Anyone who wants to plant trees should avoid doing so above or near to their sewage tank. Due to the age of your home, there is a possibility that this regulation will not be effective. After the tank was initially erected, it’s possible that someone came by and planted a tree decades later. The presence of a tree near your septic tank increases the likelihood of frequent blockages and other difficulties with your system. It is usually recommended to remove any trees that are in close proximity to your septic system.

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Because your home is older, it’s possible that you don’t know who lived there before you. That implies you won’t be able to just ask around for directions. The good news for you is that no matter how old your house is, there are a variety of methods for locating your septic tank. Before continuing, keep in mind the locations where your tank is not permitted to operate.

Look at the Drawings

Every septic system that has been installed with a permit has been documented with a drawing. These drawings are public documents, and you may obtain a copy of them by contacting the health department in your county. It may be more difficult to obtain the blueprints for certain older homes because of their age. However, it is still a smart initial step because it will provide you with the most precise information on where your tank is. These drawings show the location of your septic system, as well as a flow diagram and the components that make up your system.

Visually Inspect Your Yard

For the majority of folks, visual inspection of their yard is the most straightforward method of locating their tank. There are some clues to hunt for, so you get to pretend for a little while that you’re a detective on the case! You may expect the tank to be buried in your yard at some point. In older homes, the earth around the tank has had more opportunity to settle as a result of the passage of time. Here are several visible cues that indicate that you have located your septic tank: Grass that is more lush than usual Septic systems are responsible for releasing liquid waste and fertilizer into the surrounding soil.

  1. Some individuals opt to spend a few days without watering their lawn in order to see a more visible improvement in the quality of their grass.
  2. Grass that has died If you have a large patch of dead grass, this might be an indication that something is wrong with your tank.
  3. It might also be a sign of a problem with your computer system.
  4. See which area of grass thaws the fastest compared to the others.

Spots of high or low pressure It is impossible to miss a little slope or pit in an otherwise level backyard. It is likely that many individuals will interpret this as a hint that their tank is buried nearby.

Look at the Pipes

If you are unable to locate some hints outdoors, let us look inside. You are already aware that your plumbing drains into your septic tank, which implies that there is a line that runs from your home to the tank and back again. A pipe might be found in the crawlspace or basement of your home (typically 3-6 inches in diameter). It should be one of the only pipes that exits your home, and it has the strength to punch through a wall. This is the conduit that connects your tank to the rest of the house.

  1. Exit your home and get to the area of your yard where the pipe is located immediately.
  2. Because the pipe will be in a straight line, it will be simple to follow along with it.
  3. Take a soil probe and follow the line to the end.
  4. Concrete, polyethylene, or fiberglass are the most common types of hard, flat materials you’ll come across when looking.
  5. The location of your septic tank indicates that you’ve struck gold.

Use a Pipe Camera

The usage of a pipe camera is a more high-tech alternative. This is a snake with a camera attached to the end of its tail. In order to see what’s going on, you may input the line into the machine. You’ll eventually reach your septic tank, at which point you’ll be able to exit the house and continue down the route. This also helps you to check whether there are any clogs or blockages in your line. The pipe camera also allows you to physically check the intake of your septic tank, which is an added bonus.

This product’s price and availability information will be presented on the product’s purchase page at the time of purchase.

Call a Pro

If all else fails, you may always hire an expert to assist you. They will be well aware of what to do and where to look. You could even witness them use some of the techniques described above, but these professionals will have access to equipment and expertise that is well beyond that of a typical DIYer.

Safety Tips While Searching for an Old Septic Tank

You should be on the lookout for a few additional safety dangers in your home because it is an older structure. If you see sinking dirt in locations that might potentially contain your septic tank throughout this operation, proceed with caution. Avoid going near these locations since it might be an indicator that your tank or system has collapsed, so stay away from them. Walking across these spots has the potential to cause you to fall through and into your tank, which is extremely dangerous and might be fatal.

It is also necessary to avoid using tank covers that are made of wood or that are flimsy. Lastly, keep an eye out for any signs of rust on any portion of your septic system that you may come across.

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You should be on the alert for a few additional safety dangers in your home since it is older. If you see sinking dirt in locations where your septic tank might be located throughout this operation, proceed with caution. It is not safe to approach these locations since they might be signs that your tank or system has collapsed. While walking through these locations, you run the risk of falling into your tank, which is almost always fatal. Tank covers made of wood or that are improvised should be avoided at all costs, as well.

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Follow the Main Sewer Line

Purchase a soil probe that you may use to probe into the earth in order to locate the underground sewage line and septic tank in your property. Find the main sewage line that leads to your septic tank by going to your basement or crawl space and digging about down there. Look for a pipe with a diameter of around four inches that is leading away from your home or building. Keep a note of the position of the sewer pipe and the point at which the line exits your home so that you can locate it outdoors.

If you have a drain snake, you may use it to try to follow the approximate course of the pipes in your home.

Since the majority of states require at least five feet between a home’s septic tank and its foundation, with many tanks located between 10 and 25 feet away, you may have to probe a bit further out before striking the tank.

Inspect Your Property

Purchase a soil probe that you may use to probe into the earth in order to locate the underground sewage line and septic tank in your yard. Find the main sewage line that leads to your septic tank by going to your basement or crawl space and digging about in it. Look for a pipe with a diameter of around four inches that is leading away from your home or business. Recall where your sewer pipe is located, as well as where it exits your home, in order to locate it while you are out in the field.

If you have a drain snake, you may use it to try to follow the approximate course of the pipes in your house.

Since the majority of states require at least five feet between a home’s septic tank and its foundation, with many tanks located between 10 and 25 feet away, you may need to probe a bit further out before striking the tank.

  • Paved surfaces
  • Unique landscaping
  • Your water well, if you have one
  • And other features.

If you are still having trouble locating your septic system, you might inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tank on their land. Finding out how far away their septic systems are will help you figure out where yours might be hidden in your yard or garden.

Check the Property Records

Are you unsure about how to obtain this? Simply contact your county’s health department for further information. Check with your local health agency to see if they have a property survey map and a septic tank map that you can borrow. Perhaps you will be shocked to learn that there are a variety of options to obtain information about your property without ever leaving the comfort of your own residence. Building permits, for example, are frequently found in county records, and they may provide schematics with specifications on how far away from a septic tank a home should be, as well as other important information such as the size of the tank.

Most counties, on the other hand, keep records of septic tank installations for every address. For further information on the placement of your septic tank, you can consult your home inspection documents or the deed to the property.

Don’t Try to Fix Septic Tank Issues Yourself

Septic tank problems should be left to the specialists. The Original Plumber can do routine maintenance on your septic tank and examine any problems you may have once you’ve located the tank. It is not recommended to open the septic tank lid since poisonous vapors might cause major health problems. Getting trapped in an open septic tank might result in serious injury or death. While it is beneficial to know where your septic tank is located, it is also beneficial to be aware of the potential health dangers associated with opening the tank.

Schedule Septic Tank Maintenance

The maintenance of your septic tank on a regular basis helps to avoid sewer backups and costly repairs to your sewer system. You should plan to have your septic tank pumped out every three to five years, depending on the size of your tank and the number of people that reside in your home. The Original Plumber offers skilled septic tank and drain field maintenance and repair services at competitive prices. While it is useful to know where the septic tank is located, it is not required. Our team of skilled plumbers is equipped with all of the tools and equipment necessary to locate your tank, even if you have a vast property.

We are open seven days a week, twenty-four hours a day.

Frequently Asked Questions

A septic system is a system for the management of wastewater. Simply said, wastewater will exit your home through pipes until it reaches your septic tank, which is located outside your home. Septic tanks are normally located beneath the surface of the earth. Solids and liquids will separate in the septic tank as a result of the separation process. Solids will settle to the bottom, and liquids will finally run out into your leach field.

How do I know if I have a septic tank?

A septic system is a system for the management of sewage and wastewater. Water will flow out of your home through pipes until it reaches your septic tank outside your home, to put it another way. Septic tanks are normally located beneath the surface of the earth. Solids and liquids will separate in the septic tank as they decompose. Eventually, the solids will fall to the bottom of the tank and the liquids will run out onto your leach field.

What do I do once I locate my septic tank?

Once you’ve discovered where your septic tank is, there are a few things you should do. It is critical to clearly mark the position of your septic tank. With our inspection, pumping, and repair services, you can save time whether you need a sewer line cleanout or a septic tank maintenance job completed quickly. Make a note of the location of your tank so that you can find it again if necessary. It should be heavy enough so that it does not fly away in windy conditions. A creative approach to accomplish this without having an unattractive flag or marking in your yard is to use garden décor or a potted plant.

This way, you’ll have it for future reference and will be able to quickly locate the exact position if necessary.

Then contact The Original Plumber to have your septic system maintained on a regular basis. Preventing worse problems and the need for costly repairs down the line may be accomplished via proper septic system maintenance. All of the heavy lifting has been delegated to our team of professionals.

How To Find My Septic Tank

  1. What is a septic tank
  2. How do I know if I have a septic tank
  3. And how do I know if I have a septic tank Identifying the location of your septic tank is critical for several reasons. The Best Way to Find a Septic Tank
  4. What to Do Once You’ve Discovered Your Septic Tank

You may have fallen in love with your new house because of its appealing good looks and characteristics, but there is almost certainly more to your new home than meets the eye. In many cases, the characteristics that make your house run more effectively and allow you to live a pleasant, contemporary life are not readily apparent. Septic tanks, for example, are an important part of your home’s infrastructure. A septic system is responsible for regulating and managing the wastewater generated by your home.

  1. “How can I locate my septic tank?” is one of the most often requested inquiries we receive.
  2. When your tank’s lid is difficult to locate – especially if you are not the original homeowner – you may be at a loss for what to do or where to look for the lid when you need it.
  3. The majority of the time, all of the components of the septic tank are buried between four inches and four feet below ground level.
  4. In order to do so, it is necessary to first comprehend the functions of septic tanks and septic systems and why it is important to know where yours is located.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Your septic tank’s location is not a closely guarded secret. There will be a method for you to locate it and make a note of its position for future reference, and below are a few examples of such methods.

What Is a Septic Tank?

Nobody has any idea where your septic tank is located. For your convenience, we’ve included a list of some of the methods you may use to locate it and record its position for future reference.

How Do I Know If I Have a Septic Tank?

What is the best way to tell if your home has a septic tank? There are generally a few of different methods to tell. Examining your water bill might help you identify whether or not your house is served by a septic system or is part of the public sewage system in your neighborhood. If you have a septic system for wastewater management, you are likely to receive a charge from the utility provider for wastewater or sewer services of zero dollars. In the case of those who are fortunate enough to have a septic system, it is likely that they may not receive any water bills at all.

  • A lack of a meter on the water line that enters your property is typically indicative of the fact that you are utilizing well water rather than public utility water, according to the National Association of Realtors.
  • A septic system is likely to be installed in your home if you reside in a rather rural location.
  • Septic systems are likely to be installed in all of these buildings, which means your home is likely to be as well.
  • When a septic tank is present, it is common to find a mound or tiny hill on the property that is not a natural structure.

Checking your property records is a foolproof method of determining whether or not your home is equipped with a septic system. Your home’s building permit and drawings will almost certainly include details concerning the existence (or absence) of a septic tank on your site.

Why It’s Important to Know the Location of Your Septic Tank

You might wonder why you should bother trying to discover out where your septic tank is. There are several important reasons for this:

1. To Be Able to Care for It Properly

You might wonder why you should bother figuring out where your septic tank is located. A few important causes for this include the following:

2. If You Want to Landscape or Remodel Your Property

If you want to build an addition to your home or perform some landscaping around your property, you will need to know where your septic tank is located. Nothing with deep or lengthy roots should be planted on top of or in the area of your tank, since this can cause problems. If roots are allowed to grow into the pipes of your septic system, it is conceivable that your system will get clogged. When you know where the tank is going to be, you may arrange your landscaping such that only shallow-rooted plants, such as grass, are in close proximity to the tank.

For starters, the tank’s weight might lead it to collapse due to the weight of the construction.

3. If a Problem With Your Tank Occurs

Knowing where your tank is buried might also assist you in identifying problems as soon as they arise. Consider the following scenario: you wake up one morning and see that there is flooding or ponding water in the region surrounding your septic tank – a sign that your system is overwhelmed and that an excessive amount of water is being utilized all at once.

4. Ease of Getting It Fixed

Once you have determined the location of your sewer system, you can quickly send a plumber to it in the event that something goes wrong with the system, saving everyone both time and money. Get in Touch With A Plumber Right Away

1. Use a Septic Tank Map

Once you have determined the location of your sewer system, you can quickly direct a plumber to the tank if an issue arises, saving both time and money for everyone involved. Immediately Contact a Plumber

2. Follow the Pipes to Find Your Septic Tank

Whether or not there is an existing map of your septic tank on file, or whether or not you choose to develop one for future reference or for future homeowners, you will still need to track down and find the tank. One method of accomplishing this is to follow the sewer lines that lead away from your residence. The septic tank is situated along the sewage line that goes from your home and into the yard, as we’re sure you’re aware. Find a four-inch sewer pipe in your basement or crawl space. This is the line that will lead to your septic system and should be accessible from the ground level.

  • In general, though, you’re searching for a pipe with a diameter of four inches or more that leaves your home via a basement wall or ceiling.
  • By inserting a thin metal probe (also known as a soil probe) into the earth near the sewage line, you can track the pipe’s location.
  • The majority of septic tanks are located between 10 and 25 feet away from your home, and they cannot be any closer than five feet.
  • Going via the sewage line itself is another method of locating the septic tank utilizing it.
  • Drain snakes are typically used to unclog clogs in toilets and drains, and they may be used to do the same thing.
  • When the snake comes to a complete halt, it has almost certainly reached the tank.
  • While drawing the snake back, make a note of how far it has been extended and whether it has made any bends or turns.
  • When looking for your septic tank, you may use a transmitter that you flush down the toilet and it will direct you straight to the tank.

If you only want to keep an eye on the condition of your tank and don’t need to dig it up and inspect it, you may thread a pipe camera into the sewer pipe to see what’s happening.

3. Inspect Your Yard

Septic tanks are designed to be as unobtrusive as possible when they are erected. With the passage of time, and the growth of the grass, it might be difficult to discern the visual indications that indicated the exact location of your septic tank’s installation. However, this does not rule out the possibility of finding evidence that will take you to the location of your septic tank in the future. First and foremost, you want to rule out any potential locations for your septic tank, such as:

  • Under a road or similar paved surface, for example. Right up against the house (the tank must be at least five feet away)
  • Directly in front of the home Immediately adjacent to your well (if you have one)
  • In close proximity to trees or densely planted regions
  • In the shadow of a patio, deck, or other building
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Once you’ve ruled out any potential locations for your tank, it’s time to start hunting for indications as to where it may be hiding in plain sight. Keep your eyes peeled as you go about your property, looking for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground tank. When looking at your property, you could see a hill or mound on the ground, which is frequently an indication that there is a septic tank nearby. One further item to consider while searching for the right septic tank for your home is the amount of grass or other foliage in your yard.

Alternatively, if the tank was not adequately buried, you may observe a “bald patch,” which is an area where the grass is struggling to grow in the vicinity.

4. Talk to Your Neighbors

If your neighbors have septic systems as well, they may be able to assist you in locating your tank. Inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tanks in relation to their residences. Having a polite conversation with your neighbors regarding septic systems not only provides you with a means to figure out where yours is, but it may also serve as a friendly introduction to the other residents of your community.

5. Look for Your Septic Tank Lid

It is only the first step in the process to discover where your septic tank is located. After you’ve located your tank, the following step is to locate the lid. You can locate it with the help of your soil probe. The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around five feet by eight feet. The perimeter of the tank should be marked with a probe once it has been probed around. A shallow excavation with a shovel within the tank’s perimeter and near the center (or broken into halves for a two compartment tank) should show the position of the lid or lids if you are unable to feel them by probing.

The tank itself is likely to be filled with foul-smelling vapors, if not potentially hazardous ones.

What to Do After You Find Your Septic Tank

Once you’ve determined where your tank is, it’s time to bring in the specialists. Trust us when we say that opening a septic tank is not something that just anybody wants to undertake. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy and must be lifted using special lifting gear in order to be removed. Since the vapors are potentially dangerous due to the contents of the tank, please respect our advice and refrain from attempting to open the tank yourself. An exposed septic tank can be hazardous to anybody wandering around your property’s perimeter, and if someone were to fall into it, it might be lethal owing to the toxicity of the sewage in the tank.

However, before you send in a team of experienced plumbers, there are a few things you can do to ensure that others do not experience the same difficulty locating the tank and to make locating the tank in the future easier.

1. Mark Its Location

The pros should be contacted as soon as you’ve discovered your tank. a. Don’t kid yourself, draining and cleaning a septic tank is not something that just anybody wants to undertake. A special lifting equipment is required to remove concrete septic tank lids since they are quite heavy. Because of the contents, the gases can be poisonous; thus, please respect our warning and do not attempt to open the tank on your own own. An exposed septic tank can be hazardous to anybody wandering around your property’s perimeter, and if someone were to fall into it, the toxicity of the waste might be lethal.

2. Take Care of Your Septic Tank

Taking proper care of your tank may save you hundreds of dollars over the course of its lifetime. The expense of maintaining your system could be a few hundred dollars every few years, but that’s a lot less than the thousands of dollars it might cost to repair or replace a damaged tank or a malfunctioning septic system. Two strategies to take better care of your septic tank and system are to avoid utilizing your drain pipes or toilets as garbage cans and to use less water overall. Things like paper towels, face wipes, and cat litter should not be flushed down the toilet since they are not designed to be flushed.

In addition, installing low-flow faucets and high-efficiency toilets can help you reduce the amount of water used in your home.

For example, you don’t want to be washing load after load of laundry or running your clothes washer at the same time as your dishwasher all at the same time.

Call a Professional Plumber

Maintenance of a septic system is not normally considered a do-it-yourself activity. In the Greater Syracuse region, whether your septic tank requires pumping out or cleaning, or if you want to replace your tank, you should use the services of a reputable plumbing firm to do the job right. If you’ve attempted to locate your septic tank on your own and are still unsure of its position, it may be necessary to enlist the assistance of a professional local plumber. Our team at Mr. Rooter Plumbing of Greater Syracuse can assist you with locating, maintaining, or replacing your home’s sewage tank.

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How Do I Find My Septic Tank

What is the location of my septic tank? Natalie Cooper is a model and actress who has appeared in a number of films and television shows. 2019-10-24T 02:52:07+10:00

How Do I Find My Septic Tank

Whether or not my property has a septic tank is up in the air. If you live on an acreage or in a rural region, it is highly probable that you have a septic tank or a waste water treatment system in your home. What Is the Appearance of a Septic Tank? The great majority of septic tanks are 1600L concrete tanks, which are common in the industry. They feature a spherical concrete top with a huge lid in the center and two little lids on the sides. They are made out of concrete. Although the lids of these tanks may have been removed or modified on occasion, this is a rare occurrence.

A tiny proportion of septic tanks have a capacity of 3000L or more.

Our expert lifts the hefty lid of a 3000L septic tank and inspects the contents.

If you have discovered a tank or tanks that do not appear to be part of a waste water treatment plant system, it is possible that you have discovered a septic tank system. To learn more about our wastewater treatment plant, please visit our Waste Water Treatment Plant website.

How Can I Find My Septic Tank?

According to standard guidelines, the septic tank should be positioned close to the home, preferably on the same side of the house as the toilet. It can be found on the grass or within a garden bed, depending on its location. Going outdoors to the same side of the home as the toilet and performing a visual check of the septic tank is a smart first step to taking in order to discover where your septic tank is. The location of the toilets from outside can be determined if you are unfamiliar with the location of the toilets (for example, if you are looking to purchase a property).

Unfortunately, the position of septic tanks can vary widely and is not always easily discernible from the surrounding landscape.

In cases where the septic tank is no longer visible, it is likely that it has become overgrown with grass, has been buried in a garden or has had a garden built over it, that an outdoor area has been added and the septic tank has been paved over, or that a deck has been constructed on top of the tank.

  • They should indicate the position of your septic tank, as well as the location of your grease trap and greywater tank, if any.
  • Alternatively, if we have previously serviced the property for a different owner, our helpful office staff can examine our records to see if there are any notes pertaining to the site.
  • A specific gadget is used to locate the location of the septic tank, and our professional will mark the location of the tank so that it may be exposed and cleaned out.
  • Using an electronic service locator, you may locate a septic tank.
  • In the event that you’re not experiencing any problems, the toilets are flushing normally, and there are no foul odors, you may ponder whether it’s best to leave things alone rather than attempting to locate and unburden a hidden septic tank.
  • Although you could wait until there is a problem, this would almost certainly result in a significant amount of additional charges.
  • Does it make sense for me to have many toilets and also multiple septic tanks?

It is decided by the number of bedrooms, which in turn determines the number of people who are anticipated to reside in the house, that the size of the septic tank should be. The following is the relationship between septic tank volumes and the number of bedrooms:

  • There are three sizes of sewer tanks available: 3000L for three bedrooms, 3500L for four bedrooms, and 4000L for five bedrooms.

The most typical septic tank size is 1600L, although there are also some 3000L septic tanks available on the market. It is possible to have septic tanks with capacities as large as 3500L or 4000L, although they are not as popular, and most residences that require these capacities have numerous septic tanks in order to meet the septic litre requirements for each bedroom. Using the septic tank lid as a test, you may quickly determine whether all of the toilets in your home are linked to the same septic tank.

Check the rest of the toilets in the home by repeating the procedure.

Please call us immediately to have your septic tank pumped out or to schedule a free septic tank test when we are next in your area.

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How to Find Your Septic Tank

Over time, all septic tanks become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to continue functioning properly. Septic tank lids are frequently located at ground level. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. In the event that you have recently purchased a property and are unsure as to where your septic tank is located, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank. Noteworthy: While every property is unique, septic tanks are usually typically huge and difficult to build.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the municipal records. The most straightforward method of locating your septic tank is to review the building plans for your home that were approved by the local government. You should have received an application from the business that installed the septic tank, which should contain schematics and specifications that will help you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was installed. 2. Look for highs and lows in your data. The majority of septic tanks are constructed in such a way that they are barely noticeable.

  1. 3.
  2. Almost usually, your septic tank will be constructed near where the main sewage line exits your property.
  3. Septic tanks are typically positioned between ten and twenty-five feet away from a home’s foundation.
  4. When you do, that’s when your septic tank comes into play!
  5. Look for the Lid.
  6. You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and installed after 1975.
  7. Those areas should be excavated in order to disclose the lids.
  8. Get in touch with the pros.
  9. Lifting concrete lids will necessitate the use of specialized equipment.
  10. A fall into an unprotected septic tank has the potential to be lethal.
  11. Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you may file away with your other important house paperwork.

That’s all there is to it! If you’ve been wondering where your septic tank is, you now have five alternatives to choose from, which should make finding it easier than ever. To book a plumbing service in Bastrop County, please contact us now!

Locating Septic Tanks the Old-Fashioned Way

When it comes to locating septic tanks, Ray Harrison prefers to utilize an old-fashioned listening rod.

See also:  How Much Bleach Will Kill A Septic Tank? (Solution)

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Receive articles, news, and videos about Systems/ATUs sent directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Systems/ATUs+ Receive Notifications The chances are good that when Ray Harrison is out on a job site, he will at some time unload a long steel rod from his truck. His response: “That’s something that we utilize very much on a regular basis.” “It’s a little out of the way. “A large number of individuals have converted to cameras.” In Chestertown, Maryland, on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay, he owns and operates Raymond Harrison Septic Services, and the instrument that he cherishes the most is a sounding rod.

  1. You can tell the difference between a concrete tank and a plastic tank.
  2. With a little practice, you can tell the difference between PVC and cast iron.
  3. Everything is dependent on how the earth or a subterranean structure reacts to the rod.
  4. PVC has a bounce to it, and it has a deeper sound than other materials.
  5. It’s impossible to move something after you strike it,” Harrison explains.
  6. Commercial sounding rods are available for purchase, but Harrison chooses to do the more inexpensive method.
  7. It performs exactly what its name indicates for electricians: it does what it says it will do.

These rods are composed of galvanized steel, which ensures that they will survive for a long time, and they are available in a variety of lengths.

That’s the most manageable length.

It takes time and effort to become proficient with a sounding rod.

His father had taught him how to use the sounding rod, and he owed his success to him.

Maryland has a large number of septic systems, many of which are ancient, and Harrison receives calls from people who are unsure about the location of their septic system roughly every other week.

When utilizing any instrument to probe the earth, extreme caution should be exercised.

A “digger’s hotline” service should be installed on the electric, gas, and cable utilities prior to the arrival of workers on the job site. In the April edition of Onsite Installer, you can read a comprehensive profile of Raymond Harrison Septic Services.

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Get articles, stories, and videos about Systems/ATUs delivered directly to your email. Make your registration right now. Systems/ATUs+ Receive Notifications. The chances are good that when Ray Harrison is out on a job site, he will at some time unload a large steel rod from his truck. The phrase “very much on a regular basis” comes to mind, he claims. In a way, it’s antiquated.” People began to use cameras in large numbers. In Chestertown, Maryland, on the eastern side of the Chesapeake Bay, he owns and operates Raymond Harrison Septic Services, and the instrument that he cherishes the most is a sounding rod.

  1. When comparing concrete and plastic tanks, it is possible to tell the difference between them.
  2. The distinction between PVC and cast iron may be made with practice.
  3. Everything is dependent on how the earth or a subterranean structure responds to the rod.
  4. There is a bounce to the sound of PVC, and it has a deeper tone to it.
  5. It’s impossible to move it once you get your hands on it, adds Harrison.
  6. Commercial sounding rods are available for purchase, but Harrison chooses to use the more inexpensive approach rather than purchasing one.
  7. It accomplishes exactly what its name says for electricians: it conducts electricity.

Designed to survive for a long time, these rods are composed of galvanized steel and are available in a variety of lengths to meet your needs.

That’s the most convenient length for holding anything in your hand.

It takes time and effort to become proficient at using a sounding rod.

He is 34 years old.

He also has lots of opportunities to practice in his area of the country.

He investigates by removing his sounding bar from his vehicle.

Before beginning, make sure you are aware of any hidden utilities.

It is usually a good idea to have the electric, gas, and cable utilities designated with a “digger’s hotline” service before to arriving on the job site. In the April edition of Onsite Installer, you’ll find a detailed profile of Raymond Harrison Septic Services.

  • Get articles, stories, and videos about Systems/ATUs delivered directly to your email! Sign up right away. Systems/ATUs+ Get Notifications When Ray Harrison goes out on a project, it’s likely that he’ll unload a long steel rod from his truck at some point throughout the day. “That’s something we very much utilize on a daily basis,” he explains. “It’s a little out of date.” A large number of individuals have converted to cameras.” He owns and operates Raymond Harrison Septic Services in Chestertown, Maryland, on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay, and the equipment he relies on the most is a sounding rod, which he uses to inspect septic systems. He claims that if you drive the sounding bar into the earth, you will be able to identify a septic tank. A concrete tank can be distinguished from a plastic tank. You should be able to detect a pipe. With practice, you can tell the difference between PVC and cast iron. Drainfields provide information on how deeply tiles are sunk as well as whether the ground is dry or saturated. It all relies on how the earth or a subterranean structure reacts to the rod. “It’s all about the sensation and the sound. I’ve been using one since I was a youngster, and you become used to the many noises you can make by tapping on it with the rod and hammer. PVC has a distinct bounce to it, as well as a richer tone. Concrete is solid, has a higher pitch, and does not vibrate, but steel does. It’s impossible to move it after you strike it,” Harrison explains. It’s similar to telling the difference between glass and plastic by tapping it with your fingertip on the surface of the glass. Commercial sounding rods are available for purchase, but Harrison chooses a less costly alternative. He goes to a nearby electrical supply business and inquires about purchasing a grounding rod. It performs exactly what its name indicates for electricians: it does what it says it will. It serves as a grounding device in electrical circuits. These rods are composed of galvanized steel, which ensures that they will survive for a long time, and are available in a variety of lengths. Harrison’s customary stopping point is 5 feet. That is the most manageable length. There is also an 8-foot-long variant of the truck available for larger constructions. Using a sounding rod is something that takes time to master. Harrison is 34 years old and grew up in the family company that his grandpa Raymond Harrison created and that his father Harry Harrison controlled. It was his father who first introduced him to the sounding rod. And he gets plenty of practice in his area of the nation. Maryland has a large number of septic systems, many of which are ancient, and Harrison receives calls from people who are unsure about the location of their septic system approximately once a week. He investigates by removing his sounding bar from the vehicle. When utilizing any tool to probe the earth, exercise care. Before you start digging, make sure you are aware of any hidden utilities. Having the power, gas, and cable utilities marked with a “digger’s hotline” service before arriving on the job site is always a smart idea. In the April edition of Onsite Installer, you can read a detailed profile of Raymond Harrison Septic Services.

After a few hours of hopelessly digging about in your yard, it will be time to eat your hoagie and take a little sleep. Following that, it will be necessary to rent or borrow a metal detector. In the event that your next-door neighbor loves Star Wars action figures or has more than three unidentified antennae on his roof, there is a significant probability that you can borrow his metal detector. If you’re lucky, the metal detector will really assist you in finding your septic tank, rather than simply a bunch of old buried automobile parts.

  • According to local legend, a pumper known as “Zarzar The Incredible” can locate sewage tanks using a metal measuring tape spanning 30 feet in length.
  • Continue to press your commode (“commode” sounds sophisticated) tape deeper and farther down the pipes until he “feels” the bottom of the tank with his tape.
  • I recently acquired locate equipment that can be used to locate septic tanks, and I’m excited about it.
  • For further information, please contact me at 574-533-1470.
  • After that, you may have a movie of the inside of your sewer pipes created!
  • Related: Visit our Septic System Maintenance page for more information.
  • Services provided by Meade Septic Design Inc.
  • Both Clients and Projects are included.
  • Send me an email!

How to Locate a Septic Tank

A surprising number of homeowners have had to figure out how to find the location of a septic tank on their premises. If you’re purchasing a home with a septic system or discover that your property’s tank hasn’t been maintained in years, you’ll want to know where the tank is located because all septic tanks must be pumped at some point in time. In the course of a real estate transaction, the property owners or real estate agent may be aware of the location of the tank. Inquire about the “as-built,” which is a schematic of the septic system and the specifics of its installation.

Unfortunately, locating the septic tank may not be as simple as it appears.

In other cases, not filing the as-built with the local health department was not required. Because septic system permits have only been needed in Oregon since 1972, you may have to depend on visual indicators to determine whether your system is working properly.

1.Follow the Outgoing Sewer Pipe

Look for the four-inch sewage pipe that runs through the structure and the location where it exits the building in the basement or crawl space. Locate the location outside the building where the pipe exits the building or the location of an access cover over the pipe. It is required that septic tanks be at least five feet away from the structure, although they are usually between 10 and 25 feet away. You may follow the pipe all the way to the tank using a metal probe. It is important to note that sewage lines may curve and run around the corner of a building rather than following a straight path to the holding tank.

2.Search for Septic Tank Risers and Lids

Depending on their age, septic tanks are either one- or two-compartment structures. Each compartment has a cover, with two additional lids for dual-compartment tanks that were added later. If the tank includes an access point known as a riser, the lid may be readily visible from outside. Look for round, plastic discs that are about a foot or two in diameter. Due to the fact that the lids might be flush with the ground or just a few inches above it, they can get overrun with grass and other plants over time.

Tanks without risers are likewise equipped with lids, however they are located underground.

3.Find the Drain Field First

Depending on their age, septic tanks can be divided into one or two compartments. For dual-compartment tanks that were installed later, each compartment has two lids. For tanks with an access point called a riser, the lid may be readily visible from the outside. Try to find a foot- or two-wide round plastic disc. Due to the fact that the lids can be level with the ground or just a few inches above it, they can get overrun with grass and other plant life. Additionally, you could come upon a hefty concrete container lid.

Reasons to Hire a Contractor for Help

Attempting to locate a septic tank on your own can be risky, and in some cases, lethal, if the septic system is old and in danger of collapse. In the event that you fall into a cesspool, dry well, or septic tank, you will die. Removing septic tank lids on your own might potentially put you at risk of contracting bacterial or virus diseases. If you detect any of the following issues, please contact a contractor to assist you in locating or inspecting your septic tank:

  • Soil that is sinking around the tank or drain field. Drainage backup into the home’s sewer system, or toilet backup
  • A foul odor in the area where you assume the tank and drain field are located
  • When there is no rain, pooling water, muddy soil, or spongy grass might occur. Septic tank covers that are rusted, cracked, or have been replaced with improvised lids are prohibited.

Even though you may be ashamed about forgetting where your septic tank is, it is a very frequent problem among homeowners. A contractor may assist you in locating it, and he or she may do it as part of the pumping service. If you need assistance locating your tank or if you have any other questions, please contact us at 503-630-7802. We are available to assist you!

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